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  • richardmitnick 10:14 am on March 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ANU-Australian National University, Francesca Maclean,   

    From ANU: Women in STEM – “Engineering student named 2017 Young ACT Woman of the Year” Francesca Maclean 

    ANU Australian National University Bloc

    Australian National University

    8 March 2017

    1
    ANU PhD student Francesca Maclean. Image: Stuart Hay, ANU.

    ANU engineering PhD student Francesca Maclean has been awarded the 2017 Young ACT Woman of the Year for her work to promote gender equity in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) at the University.

    The award was announced as part of celebrations for International Women’s Day, and was one of three ACT Women’s Awards presented by the ACT Minister for Women, Yvette Berry MLA.

    Francesca and fellow student Emily Campbell founded a student-run volunteer organisation called Fifty50, which aims to develop an equitable and inclusive study and work environment, particularly for women.

    Francesca was surprised and delighted to have received the award.

    “It was a really big surprise. It’s great to know that the wider community value the work we’re doing to promote gender equity with Fifty50, and fostering a more inclusive STEM culture generally,” she said.

    Francesca has played a vital role in leading the group to run mentoring programs, workshops and public events, as well as mentoring many undergraduate female students herself.

    The ACT Women’s Awards recognise the achievements of women who have made an outstanding contribution to the lives of women and girls in the Canberra community.

    See the full article here .

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    ANU Campus

    ANU is a world-leading university in Australia’s capital city, Canberra. Our location points to our unique history, ties to the Australian Government and special standing as a resource for the Australian people.

    Our focus on research as an asset, and an approach to education, ensures our graduates are in demand the world-over for their abilities to understand, and apply vision and creativity to addressing complex contemporary challenges.

     
  • richardmitnick 9:35 am on March 1, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ANU-Australian National University, , , Far-away planet systems are shaped like the Solar System   

    From ANU: “Far-away planet systems are shaped like the Solar System” 

    ANU Australian National University Bloc

    Australian National University

    March 1, 2017
    No writer credit

    1
    Caltech

    Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have found that far-away planet systems are shaped like the Solar System, with multiple planets aligning with the host star on a flat plain, in a discovery that could increase the chance of finding alien life.

    Co-researcher Associate Professor Charley Lineweaver said NASA’s discovery of the seven-planet system being on a flat plain supported this research, which challenges the usual assumption that planet systems are flared like bellbottoms.

    “Other planet systems in the Universe seem to be much like our Solar System,” said Dr Lineweaver from the ANU Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA).

    “The more we find out about these planet systems the more it seems the Solar System is unexceptional.”

    The Kepler space telescope has detected more than 4,000 planets orbiting 3,200 stars. The majority of these host stars have only one detected planet, while 656 have multiple planets.

    The lead author of the research paper, being published in The Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society, is RSAA PhD student Tim Bovaird: arxiv.org/abs/1702.08126

    “The wealth of the Kepler planet data allows for the first time detailed studies of planet systems outside the Solar System. We are now able to ask and answer questions like, how common are planet systems like our own?” Mr Bovaird said.

    “But this is an odd assumption because the inner part of our Solar System is flat, not flared. When we dropped the assumption that planet systems are flared, simulations naturally matched the observed data without using the Kepler Dichotomy.”

    Dr Lineweaver said the team’s result should demote the Kepler Dichotomy and allow more realistic interpretations of new planet systems.

    See the full article here .

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    ANU Campus

    ANU is a world-leading university in Australia’s capital city, Canberra. Our location points to our unique history, ties to the Australian Government and special standing as a resource for the Australian people.

    Our focus on research as an asset, and an approach to education, ensures our graduates are in demand the world-over for their abilities to understand, and apply vision and creativity to addressing complex contemporary challenges.

     
  • richardmitnick 4:52 am on December 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ANU-Australian National University, , , , , The Biggest Solar System Ever Found Is Very Very Big   

    From popsci.com: “The Biggest Solar System Ever Found Is Very, Very Big” from January 2016, but worth it 

    popsci-bloc

    Popular Science

    January 25, 2016
    Sarah Fecht

    1
    2MASS J2126-8140
    Artist’s depiction of the gas giant planet in orbit around the red dwarf star TYC 9486-927-1, faintly visible in the background.
    University of Hertfordshire/Neil James Cook

    Scientists used to suspect a giant planet named “2MASS J2126-8140” was a rogue world, wandering the galaxy without a star to orbit. But it turns out the planet isn’t homeless after all: its star is just very, very far away. Like, a trillion kilometers away (or about 621,000,000,000 miles).

    To put that number into context, that’s around 6,900 times the distance between the Sun and Earth. Its orbit is 140 times wider than Pluto’s. At that distance, the dim red dwarf star would look like just another moderately bright star in the sky.

    Astronomer Simon Murphy from the Australian National University and his colleagues uncovered the secret relationship between the planet and star after noticing that they were both located 100 light-years from Earth.

    ANU Australian National University Bloc

    Further analysis showed they were moving together as well.

    The planet is believed to be a gas giant 12 to 15 times the size of Jupiter, and takes nearly a million Earth years to circle its star.

    Scientists aren’t sure how such a far-flung solar system could have formed. “There is no way it formed in the same way as our solar system did, from a large disc of dust and gas,” Murphy said in a press statement.

    Instead, the team suspects the star-planet duo were born relatively recently (10 to 45 million years ago, compared to our solar system’s birth 4.5 billion years ago), and that they formed from “a filament of gas that pushed them together in the same direction,” says Murphy.

    “They must not have lived their lives in a very dense environment. They are so tenuously bound together that any nearby star would have disrupted their orbit completely.”

    See the full article here .

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  • richardmitnick 10:02 am on December 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ANU-Australian National University, , , New telescope chip offers clear view of alien planets   

    From ANU: “New telescope chip offers clear view of alien planets” 

    ANU Australian National University Bloc

    Australian National University

    6 December 2016
    Will Wright
    +61 2 6125 7979
    media@anu.edu.au

    1
    2
    3

    Scientists have developed a new optical chip for a telescope that enables astronomers to have a clear view of alien planets that may support life.

    Seeing a planet outside the solar system which is close to its host sun, similar to Earth, is very difficult with today’s standard astronomical instruments due to the brightness of the sun.

    Associate Professor Steve Madden from The Australian National University (ANU) said the new chip removes light from the host sun, allowing astronomers for the first time to take a clear image of the planet.

    “The ultimate aim of our work with astronomers is to be able to find a planet like Earth that could support life,” said Dr Madden from the ANU Research School of Physics and Engineering.

    “To do this we need to understand how and where planets form inside dust clouds, and then use this experience to search for planets with an atmosphere containing ozone, which is a strong indicator of life.”

    Physicists and astronomers at ANU worked on the optical chip with researchers at the University of Sydney and the Australian Astronomical Observatory.

    Dr Madden said the optical chip worked in a similar way to noise cancelling headphones.

    “This chip is an interferometer that adds equal but opposite light waves from a host sun which cancels out the light from the sun, allowing the much weaker planet light to be seen,” he said.

    PhD student Harry-Dean Kenchington Goldsmith, who built the chip at the ANU Laser Physics Centre, said the technology works like thermal imaging that fire fighters rely on to see through smoke.

    “The chip uses the heat emitted from the planet to peer through dust clouds and see planets forming. Ultimately the same technology will allow us to detect ozone on alien planets that could support life,” said Mr Kenchington Goldsmith from the ANU Research School of Physics and Engineering.

    The innovation builds on over 10 years of research on specialised optical materials and devices that has been supported through CUDOS, a centre of excellence funded by the Australian Research Council.

    The research is being presented at the Australian Institute of Physics Congress in Brisbane this week.

    See the full article here .

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    ANU Campus

    ANU is a world-leading university in Australia’s capital city, Canberra. Our location points to our unique history, ties to the Australian Government and special standing as a resource for the Australian people.

    Our focus on research as an asset, and an approach to education, ensures our graduates are in demand the world-over for their abilities to understand, and apply vision and creativity to addressing complex contemporary challenges.

     
  • richardmitnick 8:16 am on September 27, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ANU-Australian National University, , , Stopped light   

    From COSMOS: “Stopped light means go for quantum computers (eventually)” 

    Cosmos Magazine bloc

    COSMOS

    27 September 2016
    Cathal O’Connell

    1
    A cold cloud of atoms (red smear in the centre) holds light in place. Ben Buchler / ANU

    Australian physicists have brought quantum computing a step closer by bringing light to a standstill. This kind of system, reported in Nature Physics, could be used to store light in a quantum memory or build optical gates – two vital components in the futuristic goal of assembling a light-based quantum computer.

    The researchers from the Australian National University in Canberra liken the experiment to a scene from the 2015 film Star Wars: The Force Awakens when the character Kylo Ren used the Force to stop a laser blast mid-air.

    “Of course, we’re not using the Force, we’re using a light-matter interaction,” says study co-author Geoff Campbell, adding that the movie scene does give an intuitive idea about what the experiment was about.

    The work follows 20 years of research into slowing or stopping the fastest phenomenon in the universe. Light barrels along through a vacuum at three hundred billion metres per second.

    In 1999 physicists managed to slow it to 17 metres per second in a cloud of cold gas.

    And by 2013, scientists at the University of Darmstadt in Germany stopped it entirely, for a full minute, inside an opaque crystal.

    But what physicists call ‘stopped light’ is not quite what you might imagine from that Star Wars scene.

    When physicists stop light, it’s actually only the light’s information that’s held in place – imprinted on surrounding atoms as light is absorbed. They can then retrieve this information by setting it in motion again as another light wave, for instance.

    This storage and retrieval of light information could be vital for building light-based quantum computers.

    The new experiment is a new variation on the stopped light technique, called ‘stationary light’. To pull it off, the Australian team shone infrared lasers into an ultra-cold cloud of rubidium atoms which excited atoms in two locations.

    The two excited groups of atoms then exchanged photons in a self-sustaining interaction – a bit like two groups of excited supporters exchanging chants at a football game.

    This optical chanting is called stationary light, because it preserves the information of the original light sent into the cloud – although only for a fraction of a second.

    While light has ground to a halt before, the Australian team managed to create a self-correcting arrangement – something which has never been done but makes preparation a lot easier. They were also able to image the cloud of atoms side-on and show the light exchange in action.

    The physicists see the experiment as an important step towards building a quantum logic gate, a critical element of optical quantum computers.

    Although some quantum logic gates have been built, they have been probabilistic, meaning they only work some of the time and can’t be scaled up. Building more reliable quantum gates hinges on finding a way to get two particles of light to interact.

    “The problem is photons tend not to talk to one another,” says Ben Buchler, who led the research.

    Using this technique, holding the light in place could give it more of a chance to interact, he adds: “That’s the building block for a quantum gate which is essential to a quantum computer.”

    See the full article here .

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  • richardmitnick 12:53 pm on August 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ANU-Australian National University, , Dr Ceridwen Fraser,   

    From Australian National University: Women in Science – “Ceridwen Fraser named ACT Scientist of the Year” 

    ANU Australian National University Bloc

    Australian National University

    1
    Dr Ceridwen Fraser. Image: Stuart Hay, ANU.

    ANU Fenner School of Environment and Society’s Dr Ceridwen Fraser has been named the ACT Scientist of the Year.

    ACT Chief Minister Andrew Barr presented Dr Fraser with the award today at Lyneham Primary, where she went to school, in recognition of her work on the influence of environmental conditions, including past and future climate change, on global biodiversity.

    Vice-Chancellor Professor Brian Schmidt AC congratulated Dr Fraser on her award.

    “To be recognised as the ACT Scientist of the Year is a great honour and wonderful recognition of Ceridwen’s excellent contribution to the ACT, Australia and the world,” Professor Schmidt said.

    Dr Fraser’s research has informed our understanding of past climate change in Antarctica, in particular, and associated impacts on life there.

    “How plants and animals have responded to climate change in the past can tell us a lot about how they might respond in the future, with the very fast climate change that we’re starting to see now,” she said.

    “I’m really motivated by the excitement of new discoveries. Sometimes they’re not at all what you were expecting, so they can make you change the way you see the world and that keeps you wanting to go on and find the next big thing.”

    As part of the ACT Scientist of the Year award, Dr Fraser will be a science ambassador for the ACT.

    The biogeographer said she was honoured by the recognition.

    “I’m thrilled to have been chosen to represent the ACT’s many excellent scientists this year, and I look forward to visiting lots of ACT schools to speak to students about my research and careers in science,” she said.

    “I hope that my research will help the world to see the ACT as a dynamic research hub, and a mover and a shaker beyond politics.”

    Dr Fraser is passionate about helping to discover the next generation of scientists.

    “I really enjoy engaging with primary and secondary school students, who are full of enthusiasm and fantastic ideas,” she said.

    A video interview with Dr Ceridwen Fraser is on ANU YouTube channel.

    See the full article here .

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    ANU Campus

    ANU is a world-leading university in Australia’s capital city, Canberra. Our location points to our unique history, ties to the Australian Government and special standing as a resource for the Australian people.

    Our focus on research as an asset, and an approach to education, ensures our graduates are in demand the world-over for their abilities to understand, and apply vision and creativity to addressing complex contemporary challenges.

     
  • richardmitnick 6:17 am on July 26, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ANU-Australian National University, , ,   

    From ANU: “ANU scientists exploit malaria’s Achilles’ heel” 

    ANU Australian National University Bloc

    Australian National University

    25 July 2016
    Will Wright
    +61 2 6125 7979
    media@anu.edu.au

    1
    Malaria is transmitted via mosquitoes.

    Malaria researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have found one of the malaria parasite’s best weapons against drug treatments turns out to be an Achilles’ heel, which could be exploited to cure the deadly disease.

    The findings could prolong the use of several anti-malarial drugs, including the former wonder drug chloroquine, to treat the mosquito-borne disease which kills 600,000 people around the world each year.

    Lead researchers Dr Rowena Martin and PhD student Sashika Richards, from the ANU Research School of Biology, said changes in the protein that enable the parasite to evade several anti-malarial drugs – including chloroquine – make the parasite super-sensitive to other therapies.

    “Malaria is one of the biggest killers in the world, particularly for young children and pregnant women in Africa and the Pacific, and our research could help save countless lives in some of the world’s poorest countries,” Dr Martin said.

    Dr Martin said the interactions of the modified protein with certain drugs were so intense that it was unable to effectively perform its normal role, which was essential to the parasite’s survival.

    “We also found that the changes that allow the protein to move chloroquine away from its anti-malarial target simultaneously enable the protein to deliver other drugs to their anti-malarial targets,” she said.

    “The other important phenomenon we found is when the protein adapts itself to fend off one of these drugs, it is no longer able to deal with chloroquine and hence the parasite is re-sensitised to chloroquine.

    “Essentially, the parasite can’t have its cake and eat it too. So if chloroquine or a related drug is paired with a drug that is super-active against the modified protein, no matter what the parasite tries to do it’s checkmate for malaria.”

    Dr Martin said the super-sensitivity phenomenon also occurred in other drug-resistant pathogens, such as bacteria, and in cancer cells.

    Ms Richards said the findings would improve the cure rates for people with malaria, and could help stop the emergence and spread of drug-resistant malaria.

    “Health authorities could use our research to find ways to prolong the lifespan of anti-malarial drugs,” Ms Richards said.

    She said prolonging the use of existing drugs was crucial, as it would give scientists time to find the next anti-malarial drug.

    “The current frontline anti-malarial drug, artemisinin, is already failing in Asia and we don’t have anything to replace it,” she said.

    “It will be at least five years before the next new drug makes it to market. The low-hanging fruit is gone, and it’s now very costly and time consuming to develop new treatments for malaria.”

    The study was supported by National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) funding.

    It was published in the latest PLOS Pathogens journal.

    See the full article here .

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    ANU Campus

    ANU is a world-leading university in Australia’s capital city, Canberra. Our location points to our unique history, ties to the Australian Government and special standing as a resource for the Australian people.

    Our focus on research as an asset, and an approach to education, ensures our graduates are in demand the world-over for their abilities to understand, and apply vision and creativity to addressing complex contemporary challenges.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:00 pm on June 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ANU-Australian National University, , ,   

    From ANU: Women in Science “See physics in a new light with a Flexible Double Degree” 

    ANU Australian National University Bloc

    Australian National University

    6.8.16
    No writer credit found

    1
    Juliet Kirby wants more girls to share in the glow of pride—and plasma—she experiences as a physics student at ANU.

    Juliet Kirby can talk about physics until she’s purple in the face.

    And we’re not speaking figuratively here.

    Her face literally turns purple as a plasma device is turned on and begins glowing bright purple.

    “The MAGPIE machine actually generates real plasma. When they run it through with hydrogen it goes purple, and with nitrogen it goes orange,” says Juliet.

    The MAGPIE is just one of the many devices that Juliet can access as an undergraduate physics student at ANU.

    “We have these amazing machines that are worth thousands of dollars, and my lecturers trust me to turn them on, even as an undergraduate,” she says.

    “I even got to see the University’s Tokamak, which is one of the biggest and most powerful plasma fusion generators in the world.

    “I’m so lucky to get access to it.”

    Lucky too is Juliet, for going against the tide of girls at her high school who chose not to capitalise on their natural talent and passion for physics.

    “There were some really bright girls in my physics class at school, but no-one other than me pursued physics to university,” she says.

    “I definitely think it’s important for young women to study physics,” she says. “Girls are really good at it, and interested in it too.”

    Alongside her Bachelor of Science, Juliet is also studying her other true love, law, through a Flexible Double Degree.

    And while these two disciplines seem like they couldn’t be further from each other, they are actually quite complementary.

    “I love the contrast between the two,” she says.

    “My physics cohort is small, which is really nice because in my law courses there is a whole lecture theatre full of 200 people.

    “And if I’m struggling with a law essay where I don’t know if I’m right or wrong, I can just turn to some physics problems so I can get a straight answer,” she says.

    Juliet hopes her career will encompass her passion for both physics and the law.

    “Studying physics and law has really opened up doors for me, especially in law involving technology,” she says.

    “I wrote an essay on space law last semester and I just fell in love with it.

    “If I was an in-house lawyer for a space or tech start-up, that would be my ideal job.”

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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    ANU Campus

    ANU is a world-leading university in Australia’s capital city, Canberra. Our location points to our unique history, ties to the Australian Government and special standing as a resource for the Australian people.

    Our focus on research as an asset, and an approach to education, ensures our graduates are in demand the world-over for their abilities to understand, and apply vision and creativity to addressing complex contemporary challenges.

     
  • richardmitnick 6:58 am on May 19, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ANU-Australian National University, , ,   

    From ANU: “Supernova reserve fuel tank clue to big parents” 

    ANU Australian National University Bloc

    Australian National University

    19 May 2016
    Dr Phil Dooley
    +61 2 6125 7979
    media@anu.edu.au

    1
    No image capton. No image credit.

    Some supernovae have a reserve tank of radioactive fuel that cuts in and powers their explosions for three times longer than astronomers had previously thought.

    A team of astronomers jointly led by Dr Ivo Seitenzahl from ANU Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics detected the faint afterglow of a supernova, and found it was powered by radioactive cobalt-57.

    The discovery gives important new clues about the causes of Type Ia supernovae, which astronomers use to measure vast distances across the Universe.

    Dr Seitenzahl said the discovery of cobalt-57 fingerprints in a Type Ia supernova gave insights into the star that exploded and suggested it was at the top of its weight range.

    “This explosion suggested that it was a star stealing matter from an orbiting partner until it got so massive that its core of carbon ignited and set off the explosion,” said Dr Seitenzahl.

    “It’s exciting to work this out because there are conflicting theories about what causes Type Ia supernovae.

    “It’s curious to me that we still don’t know exactly what these things are, even though they are so important for cosmology.”

    Type Ia supernovae are explosions that can be seen even in far-away galaxies and help astronomers study the large-scale structure of the Universe. For a period of weeks after they explode they can outshine the billions of other stars in their galaxy, and do so in a predictable fashion that makes them a reliable cosmic beacon [“standard candle”].

    Astronomers believe that Type Ia supernovae occur when matter falls into an old white-dwarf star and pushes its mass over a threshold at which the carbon core ignites and triggers the star to explode.

    However, it was unclear whether the star sucked in matter slowly from a companion star, or a collision between two smaller stars pushed the system over the edge.

    In the case of a collision, theories suggest a white dwarf can be as small as 1.1 times the mass of the Sun when it explodes, but this finding pointed towards a heavier star, around 1.4 solar masses, supporting the slow suck model.

    The team, from Australia and the US, calculated the star’s mass from the abundance of the cobalt isotopes created by nuclear fusion in the supernova.

    When the core ignites, carbon and oxygen fuse to form lots of radioactive cobalt-56, whose radioactive decay into iron-56 with a half-life of 77 days powers the peak brightness of a supernova.

    However, Dr Seitenzahl had believed traces of cobalt-57 must be created too, and the exact amount would distinguish between a 1.1 and 1.4 solar mass explosion.

    “It doesn’t seem like a big difference, but it amounts to 100 times higher density in the core of the star, which means a lot more cobalt-57 is created.”

    Even so, the amount of cobalt-57 is tiny, so the team needed patience to see it against the glare of the cobalt-56. Cobalt-57’s longer half life, 270 days, means it keeps glowing after the cobalt-56 has died out after a couple of years.

    The international team watched the supernova for 1,055 days after the explosion with the Hubble Space Telescope, and found a persistent glow after the cobalt-56 had faded that matched Dr Seitenzahl’s predictions, from 2009.

    NASA/ESA Hubble Telescope
    NASA/ESA Hubble Telescope

    “I was skeptical whether clues for the presence of cobalt-57 in Type Ia supernovae would be observed in my lifetime,” Seitenzahl said.

    “I am absolutely thrilled that now, only seven years after our predictions, the Hubble Space Telescope has enabled us to make these incredibly faint observations and proved the theory right,” he said.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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    ANU Campus

    ANU is a world-leading university in Australia’s capital city, Canberra. Our location points to our unique history, ties to the Australian Government and special standing as a resource for the Australian people.

    Our focus on research as an asset, and an approach to education, ensures our graduates are in demand the world-over for their abilities to understand, and apply vision and creativity to addressing complex contemporary challenges.

     
  • richardmitnick 7:31 am on April 21, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ANU-Australian National University, ,   

    From ANU: “Stories in the stone: Geology students venture into the field” 

    ANU Australian National University Bloc

    Australian National University

    1

    If rocks could speak, they would have a lot to say. Even without a voice, they’re great story-tellers. So long as you know how to listen.

    “I didn’t really get interested in geology until the later years of high school, when I realised that you can tell a story from rocks,” says Eleni Ravanis, an ANU student who has just completed a nine-day geology field trip at Wee Jasper in NSW.

    2

    As part of the field trip students are learning how to map the type and structure of rocks to understand what has happened in past environments.

    In a limestone structure, students see a story that begins under the sea. In a fold or a fault, they understand the shifting of the Earth’s tectonic plates.

    “It’s pretty cool to infer that just from looking at a rock,” says Eleni.

    2

    3

    The field trip was also the ultimate Aussie experience for Dutch exchange student, Jesse Zondervan.

    “We’re staying in Wee Jasper at a homestead in the bush with little sheep running around,” he says.

    Each morning the students leave the property and four-wheel drive across steep terrain to the upper reaches of Lake Burrinjuck. They drive past impressive folds and ripples in the Earth before arriving at a geological formation called the “Shark’s Mouth”.

    4

    The students learn a range of techniques in mapping and structural geology and they admit the course can be demanding.

    “It’s a steep learning curve but I’ve definitely improved my skills in the field,” says Jack Dennison, a former Sydney-sider who moved to Canberra for the well-regarded Earth sciences program.

    5

    But the best part about the course is the chance to interact with other students and make new friends.

    “It’s been a very intense few days but we’re all in it together,” says Eleni.

    “I’ve made better friends with people I didn’t really know before this course. We all help each other out.”

    And as the students retreat to their homestead to share the stories of the rocks, they have the chance to share some of their own.

    6

    f you would like to hone your geology skills you might like to try the Introduction to Structural and Field Geology course.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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    ANU Campus

    ANU is a world-leading university in Australia’s capital city, Canberra. Our location points to our unique history, ties to the Australian Government and special standing as a resource for the Australian people.

    Our focus on research as an asset, and an approach to education, ensures our graduates are in demand the world-over for their abilities to understand, and apply vision and creativity to addressing complex contemporary challenges.

     
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