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  • richardmitnick 1:31 pm on April 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , CSAIL, Tim Berners-Lee wins $1 million Turing Award, World Wide Web   

    From MIT: “Tim Berners-Lee wins $1 million Turing Award” 

    MIT News

    MIT Widget

    MIT News

    April 4, 2017
    Adam Conner-Simons

    1
    Tim Berners-Lee was honored with the Turing Award for his work inventing the World Wide Web, the first web browser, and “the fundamental protocols and algorithms [that allowed] the web to scale.” Photo: Henry Thomas

    CSAIL researcher honored for inventing the web and developing the protocols that spurred its global use.

    MIT Professor Tim Berners-Lee, the researcher who invented the World Wide Web and is one of the world’s most influential voices for online privacy and government transparency, has won the most prestigious honor in computer science, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) A.M. Turing Award. Often referred to as “the Nobel Prize of computing,” the award comes with a $1 million prize provided by Google.

    In its announcement today, ACM cited Berners-Lee for “inventing the World Wide Web, the first web browser, and the fundamental protocols and algorithms allowing the web to scale.” This year marks the 50th anniversary of the award.

    A principal investigator at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) with a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Berners-Lee conceived of the web in 1989 at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) as a way to allow scientists around the world to share information with each other on the internet. He introduced a naming scheme (URIs), a communications protocol (HTTP), and a language for creating webpages (HTML). His open-source approach to coding the first browser and server is often credited with helping catalyzing the web’s rapid growth.

    “I’m humbled to receive the namesake award of a computing pioneer who showed that what a programmer could do with a computer is limited only by the programmer themselves,” says Berners-Lee, the 3COM Founders Professor of Engineering at MIT. “It is an honor to receive an award like the Turing that has been bestowed to some of the most brilliant minds in the world.”

    Berners-Lee is founder and director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), which sets technical standards for web development, as well as the World Wide Web Foundation, which aims to establish the open web as a public good and a basic right. He also holds a professorship at Oxford University.

    As director of CSAIL’s Decentralized Information Group, Berners-Lee has developed data systems and privacy-minded protocols such as “HTTP with Accountability” (HTTPA), which monitors the transmission of private data and enables people to examine how their information is being used. He also leads Solid (“social linked data”), a project to re-decentralize the web that allows people to control their own data and make it available only to desired applications.

    “Tim Berners-Lee’s career — as brilliant and bold as they come — exemplifies MIT’s passion for using technology to make a better world,” says MIT President L. Rafael Reif. “Today we celebrate the transcendent impact Tim has had on all of our lives, and congratulate him on this wonderful and richly deserved award.”

    While Berners-Lee was initially drawn to programming through his interest in math, there was also a familial connection: His parents met while working on the Ferranti Mark 1, the world’s first commercial general-purpose computer. Years later, he wrote a program called Enquire to track connections between different ideas and projects, indirectly inspiring what later became the web.

    “Tim’s innovative and visionary work has transformed virtually every aspect our lives, from communications and entertainment to shopping and business,” says CSAIL Director Daniela Rus. “His work has had a profound impact on people across the world, and all of us at CSAIL are so very proud of him for being recognized with the highest honor in computer science.”

    Berners-Lee has received multiple accolades for his technical contributions, from being knighted by Queen Elizabeth to being named one of TIME magazine’s “100 Most Important People of the 20th Century.” He will formally receive the Turing Award during the ACM’s annual banquet June 24 in San Francisco.

    Past Turing Award recipients who have taught at MIT include Michael Stonebraker (2014), Shafi Goldwasser and Silvio Micali (2013), Barbara Liskov (2008), Ronald Rivest (2002), Butler Lampson (1992), Fernando Corbato (1990), John McCarthy (1971) and Marvin Minsky (1969).

    See the full article here .

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  • richardmitnick 12:49 pm on March 18, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , World Wide Web   

    From CERN: “£1 million Engineering prize honours web pioneers” 

    CERN New Masthead

    March 18, 2013
    Cian O’Luanaigh

    Five engineers whose work, beginning in the 1970s, led to the internet and the World Wide Web have together won the inaugural £1 million Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering.

    tb
    Tim Berners-Lee, pictured at CERN with the NeXT computer that he used to invent the World Wide Web. Berners-Lee shares the £1 million Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering with four other engineers (Image: CERN)

    Sharing the prize are Robert Kahn, Vinton Cerf and Louis Pouzin for their contributions to the protocols that make up the fundamental architecture of the internet, Tim Berners-Lee who created the World Wide Web at CERN in 1989, and Marc Andreessen who wrote the Mosaic browser that is credited with popularising the World Wide Web.

    See the full article here.

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Cern Courier

    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New

    LHC

    CERN LHC New

    LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries


    ScienceSprings is powered by MAINGEAR computers

     
  • richardmitnick 6:01 pm on January 27, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , World Wide Web   

    CERN and the Birth of the World Wide Web 

    CERN New Masthead

    CERN

    THIS IS THE THIRD IN A SERIES OF POSTS ABOUT SPECIFIC ASPECTS OF CERN.

    The birth of the web

    The World Wide Web, invented at CERN in 1989 by British scientist Tim Berners-Lee, has grown to revolutionize communications worldwide.
    TB

    Tim Berners-Lee, a British scientist at CERN, invented the World Wide Web (WWW) in 1989. The web was originally conceived and developed to meet the demand for automatic information-sharing between scientists in universities and institutes around the world.

    CERN is not an isolated laboratory, but rather a focus for an extensive community that includes more than 10,000 scientists from over 100 countries. Although they typically spend some time on the CERN site, the scientists usually work at universities and national laboratories in their home countries. Good contact is therefore essential.

    The basic idea of the WWW was to merge the technologies of personal computers, computer networking and hypertext into a powerful and easy to use global information system.

    How the web began

    Berners-Lee wrote the first proposal for the World Wide Web at CERN in 1989, further refining the proposal with Belgian systems engineer Robert Cailliau the following year. On 12 November 1990 the pair published a formal proposal outlining principal concepts and defining important terms behind the web. The document described a “hypertext project” called “WorldWideWeb” in which a “web” of “hypertext documents” could be viewed by “browsers”.

    By the end of 1990, prototype software for a basic web system was already being demonstrated. An interface was provided to encourage its adoption, and applied to the CERN computer centre’s documentation, its help service and Usenet newsgroups; concepts already familiar to people at CERN. The first examples of this interface were developed on NeXT computers.

    Info.cern.ch was the address of the world’s first website and web server, running on a NeXT computer at CERN. The first web page address was

    Info.cern.ch was the address of the world’s first website and web server, running on a NeXT computer at CERN. The first web page address was

    http://info.cern.ch/hypertext/WWW/TheProject.html

    The first web server in the US came online in December 1991, once again in a particle physics laboratory: the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) in California.”

    Please visit the full page and follow the links to read much more of the story.

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Cern Courier

    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New

    LHC

    CERN LHC New

    LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries


    ScienceSprings is powered by MAINGEAR computers

     
  • richardmitnick 11:45 am on April 15, 2011 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: World Wide Web   

    From Fermilab Today and Symmetry Breaking: “The future of the Web: from physics to fundamental right’ 

    “Countless scientific tools have made their way from the lab bench to everyday life. But perhaps none have been more pervasive than the World Wide Web. Developed by Tim Berners-Lee at CERN in 1989 as a way to manage project information at the laboratory, the Web has since infiltrated the globe and affected the way we communicate, educate, entertain, inform and govern.

    i1
    Tim Berners-Lee (left) and Gordon Brown discuss the future of the Web in front of an audience at the University of Geneva. Photo by Felipe Fink Grael.

    Twenty years after the technology became a publicly available service, the future of the Web remains a widely debated topic. ”

    See the full article here or here .

     
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