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  • richardmitnick 4:12 pm on July 28, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "On the hunt for 'hierarchical' black holes", Black holes-detected by their gravitational wave signal as they collide with other black holes-could be the product of much earlier parent collisions., , , , , , VIRGO Gravitational Wave interferometer(IT)   

    From University of Birmingham (UK) : “On the hunt for ‘hierarchical’ black holes” 

    From University of Birmingham (UK)

    27 July 2021

    Beck Lockwood,
    Press Office, University of Birmingham,
    Tel: +44 (0)781 3343348.
    r.lockwood@bham.ac.uk

    Black holes-detected by their gravitational wave signal as they collide with other black holes-could be the product of much earlier parent collisions.

    1
    Credit: Riccardo Buscicchio.

    1
    Credit: CC0 Public Domain.

    Such an event has only been hinted at so far, but scientists at the University of Birmingham in the UK, and Northwestern University (US), believe we are getting close to tracking down the first of these so-called ‘hierarchical’ black holes.

    In a review paper, published in Nature Astronomy, Dr Davide Gerosa, of the University of Birmingham, and Dr Maya Fishbach of Northwestern University (US), suggest that recent theoretical findings together with astrophysical modelling and recorded gravitational wave data will enable scientists to accurately interpret gravitational wave signals from these events.

    Since the first gravitational wave was detected by the LIGO and Virgo detectors in September 2015, scientists have produced increasingly nuanced and sophisticated interpretations of these signals.

    There is now fervent activity to prove the existence of so-called ‘hierarchical mergers’ although the detection of GW190521 in 2019 – the most massive black hole merger yet detected – is thought to be the most promising candidate so far.

    “We believe that most of the gravitational waves so far detected are the result of first generation black holes colliding,” says Dr Gerosa. “But we think there’s a good chance that others will contain the remnants of previous mergers. These events will have distinctive gravitational wave signatures suggesting higher masses, and an unusual spin caused by the parent collision.”

    Understanding the characteristics of the environment in which such objects might be produced will also help narrow the search. This must be an environment with a large number of black holes, and one that is sufficiently dense to retain the black holes after they have merged, so they can go on and merge again.

    These could be, for example, nuclear star clusters, or accretion disks – containing a flow of gas, plasma and other particles – surrounding the compact regions at the centre of galaxies.

    “The LIGO and Virgo collaboration has already discovered more than 50 gravitational wave events,” says Dr Fishbach. “This will expand to thousands over the next few years, giving us so many more opportunities to discover and confirm unusual objects like hierarchical black holes in the universe.”

    See the full article here .

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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    University of Birmingham (UK) has been challenging and developing great minds for more than a century. Characterised by a tradition of innovation, research at the University has broken new ground, pushed forward the boundaries of knowledge and made an impact on people’s lives. We continue this tradition today and have ambitions for a future that will embed our work and recognition of the Birmingham name on the international stage.

    The University of Birmingham is a public research university located in Edgbaston, Birmingham, United Kingdom. It received its royal charter in 1900 as a successor to Queen’s College, Birmingham (founded in 1825 as the Birmingham School of Medicine and Surgery), and Mason Science College (established in 1875 by Sir Josiah Mason), making it the first English civic or ‘red brick’ university to receive its own royal charter. It is a founding member of both the Russell Group (UK) of British research universities and the international network of research universities, Universitas 21.

    The student population includes 23,155 undergraduate and 12,605 postgraduate students, which is the 7th largest in the UK (out of 169). The annual income of the institution for 2019–20 was £737.3 million of which £140.4 million was from research grants and contracts, with an expenditure of £667.4 million.

    The university is home to the Barber Institute of Fine Arts, housing works by Van Gogh, Picasso and Monet; the Shakespeare Institute; the Cadbury Research Library, home to the Mingana Collection of Middle Eastern manuscripts; the Lapworth Museum of Geology; and the 100-metre Joseph Chamberlain Memorial Clock Tower, which is a prominent landmark visible from many parts of the city. Academics and alumni of the university include former British Prime Ministers Neville Chamberlain and Stanley Baldwin, the British composer Sir Edward Elgar and eleven Nobel laureates.

    Scientific discoveries and inventions

    The university has been involved in many scientific breakthroughs and inventions. From 1925 until 1948, Sir Norman Haworth was Professor and Director of the Department of Chemistry. He was appointed Dean of the Faculty of Science and acted as Vice-Principal from 1947 until 1948. His research focused predominantly on carbohydrate chemistry in which he confirmed a number of structures of optically active sugars. By 1928, he had deduced and confirmed the structures of maltose, cellobiose, lactose, gentiobiose, melibiose, gentianose, raffinose, as well as the glucoside ring tautomeric structure of aldose sugars. His research helped to define the basic features of the starch, cellulose, glycogen, inulin and xylan molecules. He also contributed towards solving the problems with bacterial polysaccharides. He was a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1937.

    The cavity magnetron was developed in the Department of Physics by Sir John Randall, Harry Boot and James Sayers. This was vital to the Allied victory in World War II. In 1940, the Frisch–Peierls memorandum, a document which demonstrated that the atomic bomb was more than simply theoretically possible, was written in the Physics Department by Sir Rudolf Peierls and Otto Frisch. The university also hosted early work on gaseous diffusion in the Chemistry department when it was located in the Hills building.

    Physicist Sir Mark Oliphant made a proposal for the construction of a proton-synchrotron in 1943, however he made no assertion that the machine would work. In 1945, phase stability was discovered; consequently, the proposal was revived, and construction of a machine that could surpass proton energies of 1 GeV began at the university. However, because of lack of funds, the machine did not start until 1953. The DOE’s Brookhaven National Laboratory (US) managed to beat them; they started their Cosmotron in 1952, and had it entirely working in 1953, before the University of Birmingham.

    In 1947, Sir Peter Medawar was appointed Mason Professor of Zoology at the university. His work involved investigating the phenomenon of tolerance and transplantation immunity. He collaborated with Rupert E. Billingham and they did research on problems of pigmentation and skin grafting in cattle. They used skin grafting to differentiate between monozygotic and dizygotic twins in cattle. Taking the earlier research of R. D. Owen into consideration, they concluded that actively acquired tolerance of homografts could be artificially reproduced. For this research, Medawar was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society. He left Birmingham in 1951 and joined the faculty at University College London (UK), where he continued his research on transplantation immunity. He was a recipient of the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1960.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:52 pm on March 12, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Giant gravitational wave detectors could hear murmurs from across universe", , , , European Space Agency(EU)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (US) eLISA space based- the future of gravitational wave research., , KAGRA Large-scale Cryogenic Graviationai wave Telescope Project(JP), , , VIRGO Gravitational Wave interferometer(IT)   

    From Science Magazine: “Giant gravitational wave detectors could hear murmurs from across universe” 

    From Science Magazine

    Mar. 10, 2021
    Adrian Cho

    Just 5 years ago, physicists opened a new window on the universe when they first detected gravitational waves, ripples in space itself set off when massive black holes or neutron stars collide. Even as discoveries pour in, researchers are already planning bigger, more sensitive detectors. And a Ford versus Ferrari kind of rivalry has emerged, with scientists in the United States simply proposing bigger detectors, and researchers in Europe pursuing a more radical design.

    “Right now, we’re only catching the rarest, loudest events, but there’s a whole lot more, murmuring through the universe,” says Jocelyn Read, an astrophysicist at California State University, Fullerton(US), who’s working on the U.S. effort. Physicists hope to have the new detectors running in the 2030s, which means they have to start planning now, says David Reitze, a physicist at the California Institute of Technology(US). “Gravitational wave discoveries have captivated the world, so now is a great time to be thinking about what comes next.”

    Current detectors are all L-shaped instruments called interferometers. Laser light bounces between mirrors suspended at either end of each arm, and some of it leaks through to meet at the crook of the L. There, the light interferes in a way that depends on the arms’ relative lengths. By monitoring that interference, physicists can spot a passing gravitational wave, which will generally make the lengths of the arms waver by different amounts.

    Caltech/MIT Advanced aLigo


    Caltech/MIT Advanced aLigo Hanford, WA, USA installation


    Caltech/MIT Advanced aLigo detector installation Livingston, LA, USA

    Cornell SXS, the Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes (SXS) project


    European Space Agency(EU)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (US) eLISA space based, the future of gravitational wave research.

    To tamp down other vibrations, the interferometer must be housed in a vacuum chamber and the weighty mirrors hung from sophisticated suspension systems. And to detect the tiny stretching of space, the interferometer arms must be long. In the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), twin instruments in Louisiana and Washington state that spotted the first gravitational wave from two black holes whirling into each other, the arms are 4 kilometers long. Europe’s Virgo detector in Italy has 3-kilometer-long arms.

    In spite of the detectors’ sizes, a gravitational wave changes the relative lengths of their arms by less than the width of a proton.

    The dozens of black hole mergers that LIGO and Virgo have spotted have shown that stellar-mass black holes, created when massive stars collapse to points, are more varied in mass than theorists expected.

    Masses in the Stellar Graveyard GWTC-2 plot v1.0 BY LIGO-Virgo. Credit: Frank Elavsky and Aaron Geller at Northwestern University(US).

    In 2017, LIGO and Virgo delivered another revelation, detecting two neutron stars spiraling together and alerting astronomers to the merger’s location on the sky. Within hours telescopes of all types had studied the aftermath of the resulting “kilonova,” observing how the explosion forged copious heavy elements.

    Researchers now want a detector 10 times more sensitive, which they say would have mind-boggling potential. It could spot all black hole mergers within the observable universe and even peer back to the time before the first stars to search for primordial black holes that formed in the big bang. It should also spot hundreds of kilonovae, laying bare the nature of the ultradense matter in neutron stars.

    The U.S. vision for such a dream machine is simple. “We’re just going to make it really, really big,” says Read, who is helping design Cosmic Explorer, an interferometer with arms 40 kilometers long—essentially, a LIGO detector scaled up 10-fold.

    The “cookie cutter design” might enable the United States to afford multiple, widely separated detectors, which would help pinpoint sources on the sky as LIGO and Virgo do now, says Barry Barish, a physicist at Caltech who directed the construction of LIGO.

    Siting such mammoth wave catchers may be tricky. The 40-kilometer arms have to be straight, but Earth is round. If the crook of the L sits on the ground, then the ends of the interferometers might have to rest on berms 30 meters high. So U.S. researchers hope to find bowl-like areas that might accommodate the structure more naturally.

    In contrast, European physicists envision a single subterranean gravitational wave observatory, called the Einstein Telescope [above], that would do it all. “We want to realize an infrastructure that is able to host all the evolutions [of detectors] for 50 years,” says Michele Punturo, a physicist with Italy’s National Institute for Nuclear Physics(IT) in Perugia and co-chair of the ET steering committee.

    The ET would comprise multiple V-shaped interferometers with arms 10 kilometers long, arranged in an equilateral triangle deep underground to help shield out vibrations. With interferometers pointed in three directions, the ET could determine the polarization of gravitational waves—the direction in which they stretch space—to help locate sources on the sky and probe the fundamental nature of the waves.

    The tunnels would actually house two sets of interferometers. The signals detected by LIGO and Virgo hum at frequencies that range from about 10 to 2000 cycles per second and rise as a pair of objects spirals together. But picking up lower frequencies of just a few cycles per second would open new realms. To detect them, a second interferometer that uses a lower power laser and mirrors cooled to near absolute zero would nestle in each corner of the ET. (Such mirrors are already in use at Japan’s KAGRA Large-scale Cryogenic Graviationai wave Telescope Project(JP) which has 3-kilometer arms and is striving to catch up with LIGO and Virgo.)

    By going to lower frequencies, the ET could detect the merger of black holes hundreds of times as massive as the Sun. It could also catch neutron-star pairs hours before they actually merge, giving astronomers advance warning of kilonova explosions, says Marica Branchesi, an astronomer at Italy’s Gran Sasso Science Institute. “The early emission [of light] is extremely important, because there is a lot of physics there,” she says.

    The ET should cost €1.7 billion, including €900 million for the tunneling and basic infrastructure, Punturo says. Researchers are considering two sites, one near where Belgium, Germany, and the Netherlands meet and another on the island of Sardinia. The plan is under review by the European Strategy Forum on Research Infrastructures, which could put the ET on its to-do list this summer. “This is an important political step,” Punturo says, but not final approval for construction.

    The U.S. proposal is less mature. Researchers want the National Science Foundation(US) to provide $65 million for design work so a decision on the billion-dollar machine can be made in the mid-2020s, Barish says. Physicists hope to have both Cosmic Explorer and the ET running in the mid-2030s, at the same time as the planned Laser Interferometer Space Antenna, a constellation of three spacecraft millions of kilometers apart that will sense gravitational waves of far lower frequencies from supermassive black holes in the centers of galaxies.

    Gravity is talking. Lisa will listen. Dialogos of Eide.

    European Space Agency(EU)/National Aeronautics and Space Administration (US) eLISA space based, the future of gravitational wave research.

    The push for new gravitational wave detectors isn’t necessarily a competition. “What we really want is to have ET and Cosmic Explorer and, ideally, even a third detector of similar sensitivity,” says Stefan Hild, a physicist at Maastricht University [Universiteit Maastricht](NL) who works on the ET. Reitze notes, however, that timing and cost could “push towards convergence and simplicity in designs.” Instead of a Ford and a Ferrari, perhaps physicists will end up building a few Audis.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

     
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