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  • richardmitnick 10:34 am on January 8, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Quantum scientists demonstrate world-first 3D atomic-scale quantum chip architecture, Single atom technology can be adapted to building 3D silicon quantum chips, UNSW   

    From University of New South Wales: “Quantum scientists demonstrate world-first 3D atomic-scale quantum chip architecture” 

    U NSW bloc

    From University of New South Wales

    08 Jan 2019
    Isabelle Dubach

    UNSW scientists have shown that their pioneering single atom technology can be adapted to building 3D silicon quantum chips – with precise interlayer alignment and highly accurate measurement of spin states. The 3D architecture is considered a major step in the development of a blueprint to build a large-scale quantum computer.

    1
    Study authors Dr Joris Keizer and Professor Michelle Simmons

    UNSW researchers at the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) have shown for the first time that they can build atomic precision qubits in a 3D device – another major step towards a universal quantum computer.

    The researchers, led by 2018 Australian of the Year and Director of CQC2T Professor Michelle Simmons, have demonstrated that they can extend their atomic qubit fabrication technique to multiple layers of a silicon crystal – achieving a critical component of the 3D chip architecture that they introduced to the world in 2015. This new research is published today in Nature Nanotechnology.

    The group is the first to demonstrate the feasibility of an architecture that uses atomic-scale qubits aligned to control lines – which are essentially very narrow wires – inside a 3D design.

    What’s more, team members were able to align the different layers in their 3D device with nanometer precision – and showed they could read out qubit states with what’s called ‘single shot’, i.e. within one single measurement, with very high fidelity.

    “This 3D device architecture is a significant advancement for atomic qubits in silicon,” says Professor Simmons.

    “To be able to constantly correct for errors in quantum calculations – an important milestone in our field – you have to be able to control many qubits in parallel.

    “The only way to do this is to use a 3D architecture, so in 2015 we developed and patented a vertical crisscross architecture. However, there were still a series of challenges related to the fabrication of this multi-layered device. With this result we have now shown that engineering our approach in 3D is possible in the way we envisioned it a few years ago.”

    In this paper, the team has demonstrated how to build a second control plane or layer on top of the first layer of qubits.

    “It’s a highly complicated process, but in very simple terms, we built the first plane, and then optimised a technique to grow the second layer without impacting the structures in first layer,” explains CQC2T researcher and co-author, Dr Joris Keizer.

    “In the past, critics would say that that’s not possible because the surface of the second layer gets very rough, and you wouldn’t be able to use our precision technique anymore – however, in this paper, we have shown that we can do it, contrary to expectations.”

    The team members also demonstrated that they can then align these multiple layers with nanometer precision.

    “If you write something on the first silicon layer and then put a silicon layer on top, you still need to identify your location to align components on both layers. We have shown a technique that can achieve alignment within under five nanometers, which is quite extraordinary,” Dr Keizer says.

    Lastly, the researchers were able to measure the qubit output of the 3D device single shot – i.e. with a single, accurate measurement, rather than having to rely on averaging out millions of experiments.

    “This will further help us scale up faster,” Dr Keizer explains.

    Towards commercialisation

    Professor Simmons says that this research is a milestone in the field.

    “We are working systematically towards a large-scale architecture that will lead us to the eventual commercialisation of the technology.

    “This is an important development in the field of quantum computing, but it’s also quite exciting for SQC,” says Professor Simmons, who is also the founder and a director of SQC.

    Since May 2017, Australia’s first quantum computing company, Silicon Quantum Computing Pty Limited (SQC), has been working to create and commercialise a quantum computer based on a suite of intellectual property developed at CQC2T and its own proprietary intellectual property.

    “While we are still at least a decade away from a large-scale quantum computer, the work of CQC2T remains at the forefront of innovation in this space. Concrete results such as these reaffirm our strong position internationally,” she concludes.

    See the full article here .


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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

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  • richardmitnick 1:26 pm on December 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Australian scientists have investigated new directions to scale up qubits utilising their spin-orbit coupling adding a new suite of tools to the armory, Latest results revealed a previously unknown coupling of the electron spin to the electric fields typically found in device architectures created by control electrodes, , , UNSW   

    From University of New South Wales: “Harnessing the power of ‘spin-orbit’ coupling: scaling up spin-based quantum computation” 

    U NSW bloc

    From University of New South Wales

    10 Dec 2018
    Karen Viner-Smith

    Research teams from UNSW are investigating multiple pathways to scale up atom-based computing architectures using spin-orbit coupling – advancing towards their goal of building a silicon-based quantum computer in Australia.

    1
    Artist’s impression of spin-orbit coupling of atom qubits. Illustration: Tony Melov. Credit: CQC2T

    Australian scientists have investigated new directions to scale up qubits utilising their spin-orbit coupling, adding a new suite of tools to the armory.

    Spin-orbit coupling, the coupling of the qubits’ orbital and spin degree of freedom, allows the manipulation of the qubit via electric, rather than magnetic fields. Using the electric dipole coupling between qubits means they can be placed further apart, thereby providing flexibility in the chip fabrication process.

    In one of these approaches, published in Science Advances, a team of scientists led by UNSW Professor Sven Rogge investigated the spin-orbit coupling of a boron atom in silicon.

    “Single boron atoms in silicon are a relatively unexplored quantum system, but our research has shown that spin-orbit coupling provides many advantages for scaling up to a large number of qubits in quantum computing,” says Professor Rogge, Program Manager at the Centre for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T).

    Following on from earlier results from the UNSW team, published last month in Physical Review X, Rogge’s group has now focused on applying fast read-out of the spin state (1 or 0) of just two boron atoms in an extremely compact circuit all hosted in a commercial transistor.

    “Boron atoms in silicon couple efficiently to electric fields, enabling rapid qubit manipulation and qubit coupling over large distances. The electrical interaction also allows coupling to other quantum systems, opening up the prospects of hybrid quantum systems,” says Rogge.

    Phosphorus atom qubits

    Another piece of recent research by Prof Michelle Simmons’ team at UNSW has also highlighted the role of spin orbit coupling in atom-based qubits in silicon, this time with phosphorus atom qubits. The research was recently published in npj Quantum Information.

    The research revealed surprising results. For electrons in silicon — and in particular those bound to phosphorus donor qubits — spin orbit control was commonly regarded as weak, giving rise to seconds long spin lifetimes. However, the latest results revealed a previously unknown coupling of the electron spin to the electric fields typically found in device architectures created by control electrodes.

    “By careful alignment of the external magnetic field with the electric fields in an atomically engineered device, we found a means to extend these spin lifetimes to minutes,” says Professor Michelle Simmons, Director, CQC2T.

    “Given the long spin coherence times and the technological benefits of silicon, this newly discovered coupling of the donor spin with electric fields provides a pathway for electrically-driven spin resonance techniques, promising high qubit selectivity,” says Simmons.

    Both results highlight the benefits of understanding and controlling spin orbit coupling for large-scale quantum computing architectures.

    Commercialising silicon quantum computing IP in Australia

    Since May 2017, Australia’s first quantum computing company, Silicon Quantum Computing Pty Limited (SQC), has been working to create and commercialise a quantum computer based on a suite of intellectual property developed at the Australian Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T). Its goal is to produce a 10-qubit prototype device in silicon by 2022 as the forerunner to a commercial scale silicon-based quantum computer.

    As well as developing its own proprietary technology and intellectual property, SQC will continue to work with CQC2T and other participants in the Australian and International Quantum Computing ecosystems, to build and develop a silicon quantum computing industry in Australia and, ultimately, to bring its products and services to global markets.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:39 pm on August 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Ali Observatory on the Tibetan Plateau over 5100 metres above sea level, , , , , Possible site for new 12 metre optical telescope, SODAR testing with Fulcrum 3D’s sonar radar, UNSW   

    From University of New South Wales: ” In search of the best telescope location, UNSW astronomer and alumnus head to high places” 

    U NSW bloc

    From University of New South Wales

    21 Aug 2018
    Ivy Shih

    An international effort to pinpoint the site for a new telescope is relying on technology developed by a UNSW alumnus during his PhD.

    1
    Dr Colin Bonner (left) and Professor Michael Ashley on location at Ali Observatory. Photo: Colin Bonner

    It is a tale of North and South with an astronomical twist, with a UNSW astronomer and a UNSW PhD alumnus heading from Antarctica to the Tibetan Plateau to help find the best site for a new, 12-metre optical telescope.

    This year, Professor Michael Ashley from the School of Physics and alumnus Dr Colin Bonner travelled to Ali Observatory in western Tibet to lead the testing and installation of SODAR (Sound Detection and Ranging), a device the astronomers will use to decide where a new telescope is best located.

    Ali Observatory on the Tibetan Plateau over 5100 metres above sea level

    The road to Tibet was a journey from one extreme to another. Before Tibet, Professor Ashley and Dr Bonner had been on scientific expeditions deploying telescopes in some of the most remote locations of Antartica, including the South Pole itself at latitude 90S. To reach Ali Observatory, the pair had to travel from Tibet’s capital Lhasa to Nagari Gunsa airport, the fourth highest altitude airport in the world.

    Ali Observatory is situated on the Tibetan Plateau, at more than 5100 metres above sea level. It’s a good location for studying the night sky, due to the combination of its high altitude and predominantly dry seasonal conditions in the region.

    “In astronomy you want to be as high as you can be because it gets you above some of the atmosphere, where it is nice and cold and there is not much water vapour,” says Professor Ashley.

    “It’s an amazing location. Antarctica is amazing in more ways than one, but the Tibetan Plateau is like the surface of the moon, albeit with some tufts of hardy grass and a few yaks.”

    The pair limited their time at Ali Observatory to a few hours at a time, however, to reduce the risk of altitude sickness.

    “The photos don’t capture the feeling of being there – you really notice the difficulty of breathing,” says Professor Ashley.

    Ashley and Bonner travelled to Tibet to install a SODAR to help evaluate the stability of the atmosphere at the location.

    2
    Fulcrum 3D’s sonar radar (cone-shaped object in the centre) installed onsite at Ali Observatory. Photo: Colin Bonner

    Atmosphere stability is critical for astronomers: tens of metres difference between where a telescope is placed can make the difference between a blurry image of a star and a clear high-resolution one.

    Original versions of the SODAR were put through their paces in Antarctica, where Professor Ashley and Dr Bonner previously worked at an international observatory.

    Chinese astronomer collaborators onsite in Antarctica saw the SODAR’s effectiveness and called on the combined expertise of Professor Ashley and Dr Bonner to apply it at Ali Observatory.

    There are now plans to construct a 12-metre optical telescope in Tibet. This will be the latest addition to an international cluster of smaller telescopes from the United States and Japan.

    “A big part of the visit was assessing locations – there is no point in having a Ferrari-style telescope put on a site that would not produce optimal conditions for astronomers,” says Dr Bonner.

    “If you are going to put in money to build a telescope, you need to be absolutely sure it is the best location.”

    The device will remain at Ali Observatory for at least a couple of years to collect seasonal atmospheric data. The information will then be analysed by Fulcrum3D and astronomers at the National Astronomical Observatory of China and UNSW to determine the best location for the new telescope.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 4:14 pm on March 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , UNSW   

    From University of New South Wales: “Seeing is believing – precision atom qubits achieve major milestone” 

    U NSW bloc

    University of New South Wales

    07 Mar 2018
    Deborah Smith

    The unique Australian approach of creating quantum bits from precisely positioned individual atoms in silicon is reaping major rewards, with two of these atom qubits made to “talk” to each other for the first time.

    1
    Scientia Professor Michelle Simmons with a scanning tunnelling microscope. Credit: UNSW

    The unique Australian approach of creating quantum bits from precisely positioned individual atoms in silicon is reaping major rewards, with UNSW Sydney-led scientists showing for the first time that they can make two of these atom qubits “talk” to each other.

    The team – led by UNSW Scientia Professor Michelle Simmons, Director of the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology, or CQC2T – is the only group in the world that has the ability to see the exact position of their qubits in the solid state.

    Simmons’ team create the atom qubits by precisely positioning and encapsulating individual phosphorus atoms within a silicon chip. Information is stored on the quantum spin of a single phosphorus electron.

    The team’s latest advance – the first observation of controllable interactions between two of these qubits – is published in the journal Nature Communications. It follows two other recent breakthroughs using this unique approach to building a quantum computer.

    By optimising their nano-manufacturing process, Simmons’ team has also recently created quantum circuitry with the lowest recorded electrical noise of any semiconductor device.

    And they have created an electron spin qubit with the longest lifetime ever reported in a nano-electric device – 30 seconds.

    “The combined results from these three research papers confirm the extremely promising prospects for building multi-qubit systems using our atom qubits,” says Simmons.

    2018 Australian of the Year inspired by Richard Feynman

    Simmons, who was named 2018 Australian of the Year in January for her pioneering quantum computing research, says her team’s ground-breaking work is inspired by the late physicist Richard Feynman.

    “Feynman said: ‘What I cannot create, I do not understand’. We are enacting that strategy systematically, from the ground up, atom by atom,” says Simmons.

    “In placing our phosphorus atoms in the silicon to make a qubit, we have demonstrated that we can use a scanning probe to directly measure the atom’s wave function, which tells us its exact physical location in the chip. We are the only group in the world who can actually see where our qubits are.

    “Our competitive advantage is that we can put our high-quality qubit where we want it in the chip, see what we’ve made, and then measure how it behaves. We can add another qubit nearby and see how the two wave functions interact. And then we can start to generate replicas of the devices we have created,” she says.

    2
    A scanning tunnelling microscope image showing the electron wave function of a qubit made from a phosphorus atom precisely positioned in silicon. Credit: UNSW

    For the new study, the team placed two qubits – one made of two phosphorus atoms and one made of a single phosphorus atom – 16 nanometres apart in a silicon chip.

    “Using electrodes that were patterned onto the chip with similar precision techniques, we were able to control the interactions between these two neighbouring qubits, so the quantum spins of their electrons became correlated,” says study lead co-author, Dr Matthew Broome, formerly of UNSW and now at the University of Copenhagen.

    “It was fascinating to watch. When the spin of one electron is pointing up, the other points down, and vice versa.

    “This is a major milestone for the technology. These type of spin correlations are the precursor to the entangled states that are necessary for a quantum computer to function and carry out complex calculations,” he says.

    Study lead co-author, UNSW’s Sam Gorman, says: “Theory had predicted the two qubits would need to be placed 20 nanometres apart to see this correlation effect. But we found it occurs at only 16 nanometres apart.

    “In our quantum world, this is a very big difference,” he says. “It is also brilliant, as an experimentalist, to be challenging the theory.”


    UNSW Sydney-led scientists have shown for the first time that they can make two precisely placed phosphorous atom qubits “talk” to each other.

    Leading the race to build a quantum computer in silicon

    UNSW scientists and engineers at CQC2T are leading the world in the race to build a quantum computer in silicon. They are developing parallel patented approaches using single atom and quantum dot qubits.

    “Our hope is that both approaches will work well. That would be terrific for Australia,” says Simmons.

    The UNSW team have chosen to work in silicon because it is among the most stable and easily manufactured environments in which to host qubits, and its long history of use in the conventional computer industry means there is a vast body of knowledge about this material.

    In 2012, Simmons’ team, who use scanning tunnelling microscopes to position the individual phosphorus atoms in silicon and then molecular beam epitaxy to encapsulate them, created the world’s narrowest conducting wires, just four phosphorus atoms across and one atom high.

    In a recent paper published in the journal Nano Letters, they used similar atomic scale control techniques to produce circuitry about 2-10 nanometres wide and showed it had the lowest recorded electrical noise of any semiconductor circuitry. This work was undertaken jointly with Saquib Shamim and Arindam Ghosh of the Indian Institute of Science.

    “It’s widely accepted that electrical noise from the circuitry that controls the qubits will be a critical factor in limiting their performance,” says Simmons.

    “Our results confirm that silicon is an optimal choice, because its use avoids the problem most other devices face of having a mix of different materials, including dielectrics and surface metals, that can be the source of, and amplify, electrical noise.

    “With our precision approach we’ve achieved what we believe is the lowest electrical noise level possible for an electronic nano-device in silicon – three orders of magnitude lower than even using carbon nanotubes,” she says.

    In another recent paper in Science Advances, Simmons’ team showed their precision qubits in silicon could be engineered so the electron spin had a record lifetime of 30 seconds – up to 16 times longer than previously reported. The first author, Dr Thomas Watson, was at UNSW undertaking his PhD and is now at Delft University of Technology.

    “This is a hot topic of research,” says Simmons. “The lifetime of the electron spin – before it starts to decay, for example, from spin up to spin down – is vital. The longer the lifetime, the longer we can store information in its quantum state.”

    In the same paper, they showed that these long lifetimes allowed them to read out the electron spins of two qubits in sequence with an accuracy of 99.8 percent for each, which is the level required for practical error correction in a quantum processor.

    Australia’s first quantum computing company

    Instead of performing calculations one after another, like a conventional computer, a quantum computer would work in parallel and be able to look at all the possible outcomes at the same time. It would be able to solve problems in minutes that would otherwise take thousands of years.

    Last year, Australia’s first quantum computing company – backed by a unique consortium of governments, industry and universities – was established to commercialise CQC2T’s world-leading research.

    Operating out of new laboratories at UNSW, Silicon Quantum Computing Pty Ltd has the target of producing a 10-qubit demonstration device in silicon by 2022, as the forerunner to a silicon-based quantum computer.

    The Australian government has invested $26 million in the $83 million venture through its National Innovation and Science Agenda, with an additional $25 million coming from UNSW, $14 million from the Commonwealth Bank of Australia, $10 million from Telstra and $8.7 million from the NSW Government.

    It is estimated that industries comprising approximately 40% of Australia’s current economy could be significantly impacted by quantum computing. Possible applications include software design, machine learning, scheduling and logistical planning, financial analysis, stock market modelling, software and hardware verification, climate modelling, rapid drug design and testing, and early disease detection and prevention.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 12:30 pm on February 21, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: according to signs in the world's 'loneliest tree', , OPINION Anthropocene began in 1965, Sitka Spruce on Campbell Island, UNSW   

    From UNSW: “OPINION Anthropocene began in 1965, according to signs in the world’s ‘loneliest tree'” 

    U NSW bloc

    University of New South Wales

    20 FEB 2018
    CHRIS TURNEY
    JONATHAN PALMER
    MARK MASLIN

    Chris Turney, Jonathan Palmer and Mark Maslin suggest that a single tree provides a potential marker for the start of the Anthropocene, a new geological epoch dominated by human activity.

    1
    This Sitka Spruce on Campbell Island contains a clear “global” marker of a new epoch. Photo: Pavla Fenwick

    OPINION: On Campbell Island in the Southern Ocean, some 400 miles south of New Zealand, is a single Sitka spruce. More than 170 miles from any other tree, it is often credited as the “world’s loneliest tree”. Planted in the early 20th century by Lord Ranfurly, governor of New Zealand, the tree’s wood has recorded the radiocarbon produced by above ground atomic bomb tests – and its annual layers show a peak in 1965, just after the tests were banned. The tree therefore gives us a potential marker for the start of the Anthropocene.

    But why 1965? The 1960s is a decade forever associated with the hippie movement and the birth of the modern environmentalism, a sun-blushed age in which the Apollo moon landings gave us the iconic image of a fragile planet framed against a desolate lunar surface. It was also a time when the world was fast globalising, with rapid industrialisation and economic growth driving population expansion and a massive increase in our impact on the environment.

    This postwar period has been called the “Great Acceleration”. So the question we’re interested in is whether this step change in human activity left an indelible mark on our planet, one which, if we disappeared today, would still leave a permanent signature in the geological record.

    2
    If traces of nuclear testing were present even on Campbell Island then the bombs must have had a truly global impact. Image: Turney et al.

    The concept of a human-dominated geological epoch has been around since the 19th century, but the idea that we have created an Anthropocene has recently become more popular in the face of long-term global changes in the environment far beyond what may be considered “natural”. While humans have long had an impact on the planet at the local and even continental level, the scale of modern change is sufficiently large that geologists are considering the evidence to recognise the Anthropocene officially in the geological timescale. They have set the scientific community a major challenge to find a global-wide environmental marker or “golden spike” that represents this crucial change.

    A major contender for defining the start of the Anthropocene Epoch is the peak in radioactive elements produced from above ground thermonuclear bomb tests, the majority of which occurred at the height of the Cold War in the early-1960s. The problem from a geologist’s point of view is most of the records of this spike in radioactivity (for example preserved in lake sediments and the annual growth of tree-rings) have been reported from the Northern Hemisphere where the majority of the tests took place. To demonstrate a truly global human impact requires a signal from a remote, pristine location in the Southern Hemisphere that occurs at the same time as the north. This is where our new study comes in.


    Sampling the World’s Loneliest Tree.

    In the journal Scientific Reports we publish a new record that identifies a radioactive signal preserved from exactly this sort of place: Campbell Island, a rare piece of real estate in the depths of the Southern Ocean.

    During the Australasian Antarctic Expedition 2013-2014 we undertook scientific sampling across the island to get a better handle on the scale of environmental change in this most remote of locations. The solitary Sitka spruce is in the southern part of the island. The species is found naturally along the west coast of North America from Alaska to California – it is only in the Southern Hemisphere because humans transplanted it there.

    3
    Levels of radiocarbon recorded on Campbell Island peaked in late 1965. Graphic: Turney et al.

    Nonetheless, the Campbell Island tree is growing exceptionally well – at a rate five to 10 times faster than surrounding native shrubs – which gave us plenty of data to work with. Detailed analysis of the tree’s year-by-year growth shows the peak in radioactive elements took place sometime between October and December 1965, which coincides with the same signal in the Northern Hemisphere. This spruce has demonstrated unequivocally that humans have left an impact on the planet, even in the most pristine of environments, that will be preserved in the geological record for tens of millennia and beyond.

    The ConversationOur research promises to reignite the debate around when humans really became a geological superpower. Should we define the Anthropocene by when humanity invented the technology to make themselves extinct? If so, then the nuclear bomb spike recorded in the loneliest tree on the planet suggests it began in 1965.

    Chris Turney, ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage, UNSW Sydney.
    Jonathan Palmer, Research Fellow, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, UNSW.
    Mark Maslin, Professor of Palaeoclimatology, UCL.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:59 am on December 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Australia seems on the brink of embracing space in a coordinated manner but how should we do it?, Australian universities made cubesats for an international research project, , , It is encouraging that Australian organisations have anticipated the growth areas, There are also emerging Australian capabilities in small satellites and potentially disruptive technologies with space applications, Three new reports add clarity to Australia’s space sector a ‘crowded and valuable high ground’, UNSW   

    From COSMOS: “Three new reports add clarity to Australia’s space sector, a ‘crowded and valuable high ground’” 

    Cosmos Magazine bloc

    COSMOS Magazine

    02 December 2017
    Anthony Wicht

    1
    Three new reports examine Australia’s existing space capabilities, set them in the light of international developments, and identify growth areas and models for Australia to pursue. 136319147@N08/flickr. Telescope is not identified. Bad journalism.

    Australia seems on the brink of embracing space in a coordinated manner, but how should we do it?

    This week, the Australian government released three reports to help chart the future of Australia’s space industry. Their conclusions will feed into the review of Australia’s space industry underway by former CSIRO head Dr Megan Clark.

    The reports examine Australia’s existing space capabilities, set them in the light of international developments, and identify growth areas and models for Australia to pursue. The promise is there:

    Australia has scattered globally competitive capabilities in areas from space weather to deep-space communication but “by far the strongest areas” are applications of satellite data on Earth to industries like agriculture, communications and mining
    Australian research in other sectors like 3D printing and VR is being translated to space with potentially high payoffs
    global trends, including the demand for more space traffic management, play to our emerging strengths
    the prize for success is real – the UK currently has an A$8 billion space export industry, and anticipates further growth.

    While it is not the first time the government has commissioned this type of research, the updates are welcome given the fast pace of space innovation. Taken together they paint a picture of potential for the future of Australian space and a firm foundation for a space agency.

    The rules of the game

    The Global Space Industry Dynamics report from Bryce Space and Technology, a US-based space specialist consulting firm, sets out the “rules of the game” in the US$344 billion (A$450 billion) space sector.

    2
    The global space economy at a glance. Figures are from 2016, and shown in US$.
    Marcella Cheng for The Conversation, adapted from Global Space Industry Dynamics Research Paper by Bryce Space and Technology

    It highlights that:

    three quarters of global revenues are made commercially, despite the prevailing perception that space is a government concern
    most commercial revenue is made from space-enabled services and applications (like satellite TV or GPS receivers) rather than the construction and launch of space hardware itself
    commercial launch and satellite manufacturing industries are still small in relative terms, at about US$20.5 billion (A$27 billion) of revenues, but show strong growth, particularly for smaller satellites and launch vehicles.

    The report also looks at the emerging trends that a smart space industry in Australia will try and run ahead of. Space is becoming cheaper, more attractive to investors and increasingly important in our data-rich economy. These trends have not gone unnoticed by global competitors, though, and the report describes space as an increasingly “crowded and valuable high ground”.

    What is particularly useful about the report is its sharp focus on the three numbers that determine commercial attractiveness:

    market size
    growth
    profitability.

    The magic comes through matching these attractive sectors against areas where Australia can compete strongly because of existing capability or geographic advantage.

    The report suggests growth opportunities across traditional and emerging space sectors. In traditional sectors, it calls out satellite services, particularly commercial satellite radio and broadband, and ground infrastructure as prime opportunities. In emerging sectors, earth observation data analytics, space traffic management, and small satellite manufacturing are all tipped as potentially profitable growth areas where Australia could compete.

    The report adds the speculative area of space mining as an additional sector worth considering given Australia’s existing terrestrial capability.

    It is encouraging that Australian organisations have anticipated the growth areas, from UNSW’s off-earth mining research, to Geoscience Australia’s integrated satellite data to Mt Stromlo’s debris tracking capability.

    Australian capabilities

    Australian capabilities are the focus of a second report, by ACIL Allen consulting, Australian Space Industry Capability. The review highlights a smattering of world class Australian capabilities, particularly in the application of space data to activities on Earth like agriculture, transport and financial services.

    There are also emerging Australian capabilities in small satellites and potentially disruptive technologies with space applications, like 3D printing, AI and quantum computing. The report notes that basic research is strong, but challenges remain in “industrialising and commercialising the resulting products”.


    Australian universities made cubesats for an international research project.

    The concern about commercialisation prompts questions about the policies that will help Australian companies succeed.

    Should we embrace recent trends and rely wholly on market mechanisms and venture capital Darwinism, or buy into traditional international space projects?

    Do we send our brightest overseas for a few years’ training, or spin up a full suite of research and development programs domestically?

    Are there regulations that need to change to level the playing field for Australian space exports?
    Learning from the world

    Part of the answer is to be found in the third report, Global Space Strategies and Best Practices, which looks at global approaches to funding, capability development, and governance arrangements. The case studies illustrate a range of styles.

    The UK’s pragmatic approach developed a £5 billion (A$8 billion) export industry by focusing primarily on competitive commercial applications, including a satellite Australia recently bought a time-share on.

    A longer-term play is Luxembourg’s use of tax breaks and legal changes to attract space mining ventures. Before laughing, remember that Luxembourg has space clout: satellite giants SES and Intelsat are headquartered there thanks to similar forward thinking in the 1980s. Those two companies pulled in about A$3 billion of profit between them last year.

    Norway and Canada show a middle ground, combining international partnerships with clear focus areas that benefit research and the economy. Norway has taken advantage of its geography to build satellite ground stations for polar-orbiting satellites, in an interesting parallel with Australia’s longstanding ground capabilities. Canada used its relationship with the United States to build the robotic “Canadarm” for the Space Shuttle and International Space Station, developing a space robotics capability for the country.


    Canadarm played an important role in Canada-USA relations.

    The only caution is that confining the possible role models to the space sector is unnecessarily limiting. Commercialisation in technology fields is a broader policy question, and there is much to learn from recent innovations including CSIRO’s venture fund and the broader Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) program.

    As well as the three reports, the government recently released 140 public submissions to the panel.

    There is no shortage of advice for Dr Clark and the expert reference group; appropriate given it seems an industry of remarkable potential rests in their hands.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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  • richardmitnick 4:45 pm on October 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , ePESSTO collaboration, , UNSW   

    From UNSW: “When stars collide – UNSW Canberra scientists back kilonova discovery” 

    U NSW bloc

    University of New South Wales

    1
    No image caption or credit

    Two UNSW Canberra astrophysicists have played a role in helping scientists witness a cataclysmic event for the first time – the merging of two neutron stars, resulting in a kilonova explosion.

    Dr Ashley Ruiter and Dr Ivo Seitenzahl from UNSW Canberra’s School of Physical, Environmental, and Mathematical Sciences were part of a collaboration of international scientists that contributed to the discovery, which has been published in the prestigious Nature journal today. The paper, led by Professor Stephen Smarrt et al. can be read in Nature.

    “This is a major breakthrough. This is the first time we have seen gravitational waves from the merger of two neutron stars,” says Dr Seitenzahl.

    Astronomers, using a fleet of telescopes from the European Southern Observatory (ESO), picked up the explosion on August 17, this year.

    ESO says their telescopes in Chile detected the first visible counterpart to a gravitational wave source rippling the fabric of space-time.

    Seconds later, a short gamma-ray burst was spotted by both Fermi (NASA) and INTEGRAL (European Space Agency) space telescopes, coming from the same area.

    NASA/Fermi Telescope


    NASA/Fermi LAT

    ESA/Integral

    Scientists knew, based on theory that if they had witnessed two neutron stars combining in an explosive merger then a visible light counterpart, known as a kilonova, would follow.

    Astronomers around the world joined forces to use their telescopes to search for the new light source, which they described as looking for a needle in a haystack.

    After a few hours, they found it – in a galaxy 130 million light years from Earth.

    “The observations we took with the telescopes in Chile now unambiguously show that such mergers of two neutron stars create radioactive elements, which power the light emitted by the kilonova,” says Dr Seitenzahl.

    When neutron stars merge, they become furnaces that create heavy chemical elements. The kilonova explosion that follows, spreads those chemical elements throughout space.

    “Though we know most elements in the Universe are created in stars – either quietly or explosively – we are now able to confirm that specific, heavy elements like silver were created in this neutron star merger,” says Dr Ruiter.

    ESO says “the event marks the start of a new era of multi-messenger astronomy”.

    “For the first time in history we can now combine light signals with gravitational waves to provide a totally new way to probe the Universe.”

    Dr Ruiter and Dr Seitenzahl are part of the ePESSTO (extended Public ESO Spectroscopic Survey of Transient Objects) collaboration, which took the first spectrum of the event.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 8:08 am on September 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Opinion: How Antarctic ice melt can be a tipping point for the planet’s climate, UNSW   

    From UNSW- Opinion: How Antarctic ice melt can be a tipping point for the planet’s climate” 

    U NSW bloc

    University of New South Wales

    13 Sep 2017
    Chris Turney
    Jonathan Palmer
    Peter Kershaw
    Steven Phipps
    Zoë Thomas

    New research has prompted warnings that melting Antarctic ice can trigger effects on the other side of the globe.

    1
    Photo: Shutterstock

    OPINION: Melting of Antarctica’s ice can trigger rapid warming on the other side of the planet, according to our new research [Nature Communications] which details how just such an abrupt climate event happened 30,000 years ago, in which the North Atlantic region warmed dramatically.

    This idea of “tipping points” in Earth’s system has had something of a bad rap ever since the 2004 blockbuster The Day After Tomorrow purportedly showed how melting polar ice can trigger all manner of global changes.

    But while the movie certainly exaggerated the speed and severity of abrupt climate change, we do know that many natural systems are vulnerable to being pushed into different modes of operation. The melting of Greenland’s ice sheet, the retreat of Arctic summer sea ice, and the collapse of the global ocean circulation are all examples of potential vulnerability in a future, warmer world.

    Of course, it is notoriously hard to predict when and where elements of Earth’s system will abruptly tip into a different state. A key limitation is that historical climate records are often too short to test the skill of our computer models used to predict future environmental change, hampering our ability to plan for potential abrupt changes.

    Fortunately, however, nature preserves a wealth of evidence in the landscape that allows us to understand how longer time-scale shifts can happen [Science Direct].

    Core values

    One of the most important sources of information on past climate tipping points are the kilometre-long cores of ice drilled from the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets, which preserve exquisitely detailed information stretching back up to 800,000 years [The Conversation].

    The Greenland ice cores record massive, millennial-scale swings in temperature [Geophysical Research Letters] that have occurred across the North Atlantic region over the past 90,000 years. The scale of these swings is staggering: in some cases temperatures rose by 16℃ in just a few decades or even years.

    Twenty-five of these major so-called Dansgaard–Oeschger (D-O) [NOAA] warming events have been identified. These abrupt swings in temperature happened too quickly to have been caused by Earth’s slowly changing orbit around the Sun. Fascinatingly, when ice cores from Antarctica are compared with those from Greenland, we see a “seesaw” relationship: when it warms in the north, the south cools, and vice versa.

    Attempts to explain the cause of this bipolar seesaw have traditionally focused on the North Atlantic region, and include melting ice sheets, changes in ocean circulation or wind patterns.

    But as our new research shows, these might not be the only cause of D-O events.

    Our new paper, published today in Nature Communications [link is above], suggests that another mechanism, with its origins in Antarctica, has also contributed to these rapid seesaws in global temperature.

    Tree of knowledge

    We know that there have been major collapses of the Antarctic ice sheet in the past [Science], raising the possibility that these may have tipped one or more parts of the Earth system into a different state. To investigate this idea, we analysed an ancient New Zealand kauri tree that was extracted from a peat swamp near Dargaville, Northland, and which lived between 29,000 and 31,000 years ago.”>major collapses of the Antarctic ice sheet in the past, raising the possibility that these may have tipped one or more parts of the Earth system into a different state. To investigate this idea, we analysed an ancient New Zealand kauri tree that was extracted from a peat swamp near Dargaville, Northland, and which lived between 29,000 and 31,000 years ago.

    Through accurate dating, we know that this tree lived through a short D-O event, during which (as explained above) temperatures in the Northern Hemisphere would have risen. Importantly, the unique pattern of atmospheric radioactive carbon (or carbon-14) found in the tree rings allowed us to identify similar changes preserved in climate records from ocean and ice cores (the latter using beryllium-10, an isotope formed by similar processes to carbon-14). This tree thus allows us to compare directly what the climate was doing during a D-O event beyond the polar regions, providing a global picture.

    The extraordinary thing we discovered is that the warm D-O event coincided with a 400-year period of surface cooling in the south and a major retreat of Antarctic ice.

    When we searched through other climate records for more information about what was happening at the time, we found no evidence of a change in ocean circulation. Instead we found a collapse in the rain-bearing Pacific trade winds over tropical northeast Australia that was coincident with the 400-year southern cooling.

    To explore how melting Antarctic ice might cause such dramatic change in the global climate, we used a climate model to simulate the release of large volumes of freshwater into the Southern Ocean. The model simulations all showed the same response, in agreement with our climate reconstructions: regardless of the amount of freshwater released into the Southern Ocean, the surface waters of the tropical Pacific nevertheless warmed, causing changes to wind patterns that in turn triggered the North Atlantic to warm too.

    Future work is now focusing on what caused the Antarctic ice sheets to retreat so dramatically. Regardless of how it happened, it looks like melting ice in the south can drive abrupt global change, something of which we should be aware in a future warmer world.

    Chris Turney, Professor of Earth Sciences and Climate Change, UNSW; Jonathan Palmer, Research Fellow, School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences, UNSW; Peter Kershaw, Emeritus Professor, Earth, Atmosphere and Environment, Monash University; Steven Phipps, Palaeo Ice Sheet Modeller, University of Tasmania, and Zoë Thomas, Research Associate, UNSW.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
    • Agustin 7:49 am on September 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply

      Actually when someone doesn’t understand after that its up to other people that they will help, so
      here it occurs.

      Like

  • richardmitnick 12:06 pm on September 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Crucially this new qubit can be controlled using electric signals instead of magnetic ones, Flip-flop qubits: radical new quantum computing design invented, Hundreds of nanometres apart and still remain coupled, Radical new architecture for quantum computing, Silicon quantum processor that can be scaled up without the precise placement of atoms required in other approaches, Still allows us to place a million qubits on a square millimetre, This is a theory or proposal – the qubit has yet to be built, UNSW   

    From UNSW: ” Flip-flop qubits: radical new quantum computing design invented” 

    U NSW bloc

    University of New South Wales

    06 Sep 2017
    Wilson da Silva

    Media Contacts
    Andrea Morello
    School of Electrical Engineering & Telecommunications
    +61 422 543 261
    a.morello@unsw.edu.au

    Dr Guilherme Tosi
    ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology
    +61 451 664 771
    g.tosi@unsw.edu.au

    Wilson da Silva
    Faculty of Engineering
    0407 907 017
    w.dasilva@unsw.edu.au

    UNSW engineers have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel ‘flip-flop qubits’, that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically easier.

    1
    Artist’s impression of flip-flop qubit embedded in the silicon matrix of a chip. Illustration: Dr Guilherme Tosi

    Engineers at Australia’s University of New South Wales have invented a radical new architecture for quantum computing, based on novel ‘flip-flop qubits’, that promises to make the large-scale manufacture of quantum chips dramatically cheaper – and easier – than thought possible.

    The new chip design, detailed in the journal Nature Communications, allows for a silicon quantum processor that can be scaled up without the precise placement of atoms required in other approaches. Importantly, it allows quantum bits (or ‘qubits’) – the basic unit of information in a quantum computer – to be placed hundreds of nanometres apart and still remain coupled.

    The design was conceived by a team led by Andrea Morello, Program Manager in UNSW-based ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T), who said fabrication of the new design should be easily within reach of today’s technology.

    Lead author Guilherme Tosi, a Research Fellow at CQC2T, developed the pioneering concept along with Morello and co-authors Fahd Mohiyaddin, Vivien Schmitt and Stefanie Tenberg of CQC2T, with collaborators Rajib Rahman and Gerhard Klimeck of Purdue University in the USA.

    “It’s a brilliant design, and like many such conceptual leaps, it’s amazing no-one had thought of it before,” said Morello.

    “What Guilherme and the team have invented is a new way to define a ‘spin qubit’ that uses both the electron and the nucleus of the atom. Crucially, this new qubit can be controlled using electric signals, instead of magnetic ones. Electric signals are significantly easier to distribute and localise within an electronic chip.”

    Tosi said the design sidesteps a challenge that all spin-based silicon qubits were expected to face as teams begin building larger and larger arrays of qubits: the need to space them at a distance of only 10-20 nanometres, or just 50 atoms apart.

    “If they’re too close, or too far apart, the ‘entanglement’ between quantum bits – which is what makes quantum computers so special – doesn’t occur,” Tosi said.

    Morello said researchers at UNSW already lead the world in making spin qubits at this scale. “But if we want to make an array of thousands or millions of qubits so close together, it means that all the control lines, the control electronics and the readout devices must also be fabricated at that nanometric scale, and with that pitch and that density of electrodes. This new concept suggests another pathway.”

    2
    Artist’s impression of a ‘flip flop’ qubit in an entangled quantum state. Illustration: Tony Melov

    At the other end of the spectrum are superconducting circuits – pursued, for instance, by IBM and Google – and ion traps. These systems are large and easier to fabricate, and are currently leading the way in the number of qubits that can be operated. However, due to their larger dimensions, in the long run they may face challenges when trying to assemble and operate millions of qubits, as required by the most useful quantum algorithms.

    “Our new silicon-based approach sits right at the sweet spot,” said Morello, a professor of quantum engineering at UNSW. “It’s easier to fabricate than atomic-scale devices, but still allows us to place a million qubits on a square millimetre.”

    In the single-atom qubit used by Morello’s team, and which Tosi’s new design applies, a silicon chip is covered with a layer of insulating silicon oxide, on top of which rests a pattern of metallic electrodes that operate at temperatures near absolute zero and in the presence of a very strong magnetic field.

    At the core is a phosphorus atom, from which Morello’s team has previously built two functional qubits using an electron and the nucleus of the atom. These qubits, taken individually, have demonstrated world-record coherence times.

    Tosi’s conceptual breakthrough is the creation of an entirely new type of qubit, using both the nucleus and the electron. In this approach, a qubit ‘0’ state is defined when the spin of the electron is down and the nucleus spin is up, while the ‘1’ state is when the electron spin is up, and the nuclear spin is down.

    “We call it the ‘flip-flop’ qubit,” said Tosi. “To operate this qubit, you need to pull the electron a little bit away from the nucleus, using the electrodes at the top. By doing so, you also create an electric dipole.”

    3
    Dr Guilherme Tosi and Professor Andrea Morello at the UNSW quantum computing labs with a dilution refrigerator, which cools silicon chips down to 0.01 ̊ above absolute zero. Photo: Quentin Jones

    “This is the crucial point,” adds Morello. “These electric dipoles interact with each other over fairly large distances, a good fraction of a micron, or 1,000 nanometres.

    “This means we can now place the single-atom qubits much further apart than previously thought possible,” he continued. “So there is plenty of space to intersperse the key classical components such as interconnects, control electrodes and readout devices, while retaining the precise atom-like nature of the quantum bit.”

    Morello called Tosi’s concept as significant as Bruce Kane seminal 1998 paper in Nature. Kane, then a senior research associate at UNSW, hit upon a new architecture that could make a silicon-based quantum computer a reality – triggering Australia’s race to build a quantum computer.

    “Like Kane’s paper, this is a theory, a proposal – the qubit has yet to be built,” said Morello. “We have some preliminary experimental data that suggests it’s entirely feasible, so we’re working to fully demonstrate this. But I think this is as visionary as Kane’s original paper.”

    Building a quantum computer has been called the ‘space race of the 21st century’ – a difficult and ambitious challenge with the potential to deliver revolutionary tools for tackling otherwise impossible calculations, with a plethora of useful applications in healthcare, defence, finance, chemistry and materials development, software debugging, aerospace and transport. Its speed and power lie in the fact that quantum systems can host multiple ‘superpositions’ of different initial states, and in the spooky ‘entanglement’ that only occurs at the quantum level the fundamental particles.

    “It will take great engineering to bring quantum computing to commercial reality, and the work we see from this extraordinary team puts Australia in the driver’s seat,” said Mark Hoffman, UNSW’s Dean of Engineering. “It’s a great example of how UNSW, like many of the world’s leading research universities, is today at the heart of a sophisticated global knowledge system that is shaping our future.”

    The UNSW team has struck a A$83 million deal between UNSW, telco giant Telstra, Australia’s Commonwealth Bank and the Australian and New South Wales governments to develop, by 2022, a 10-qubit prototype silicon quantum integrated circuit – the first step in building the world’s first quantum computer in silicon.

    In August, the partners launched Silicon Quantum Computing Pty Ltd, Australia’s first quantum computing company, to advance the development and commercialisation of the team’s unique technologies. The NSW Government pledged A$8.7 million, UNSW A$25 million, the Commonwealth Bank A$14 million, Telstra A$10 million and the Federal Government A$25 million.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 4:31 pm on July 3, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Australian Government’s $8 million Women in STEM and Entrepreneurship competitive grants program, Dr Caroline Ford, Science and Technology Australia, Smashing stereotypes and forging a new generation of role models for young women and girls, Superstars of STEM, UNSW,   

    From UNSW: Women in STEM -“Superstars of STEM to inspire girls into science and technology careers” Dr Caroline Ford 

    U NSW bloc

    University of New South Wales

    [AGAIN, AUSTRALIA TAKES THE LEAD IN SCIENTIFIC ACTIVITY AND WHATEVER THE USA DOES IT WILL BE A FOLLOWER AS IT HAS BECOME IN HEP AND WILL SOON BECOME IN RADIO ASTRONOMY]

    03 Jul 2017
    Deborah Smith

    UNSW’s Caroline Ford is among the first 30 researchers to be named Superstars of STEM, a national program aimed at smashing stereotypes and forging a new generation of role models for young women.

    2
    The Superstars of STEM program will support and train outstanding women to become prominent role models, promoting gender equity and inspiring more young women and girls to choose to study and work in STEM.

    UNSW cancer researcher Dr Caroline Ford is among the first 30 female scientists and technologists to be named Superstars of STEM, in a national program aimed at smashing stereotypes and forging a new generation of role models for young women and girls.

    Minister for Industry, Innovation and Science, Senator Arthur Sinodinos, announced the successful candidates at an event at Mrs Macquarie’s Chair launched by UNSW Dean of Science Professor Emma Johnston.

    More than 300 women vied for a spot in the inaugural Superstar program, run by Science and Technology Australia. Winners will receive training and development to use social media, TV, radio and public speaking opportunities to carve out a more diverse face for science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

    1
    Dr Caroline Ford

    “Superstars of STEM is the first program of its kind and will prove vital for the future of STEM in Australia,” said Professor Johnston, who is President-Elect of Science and Technology Australia.

    “Often, when you ask someone to picture or draw a scientist, they immediately think of an old man with white hair and a lab coat. We want Australian girls to realise there are some amazing, capable and impressive women working as scientists and technologists too, and they work in and out of the lab in places you might not expect.

    “Science and technology have made our lives longer, happier, healthier and more connected. With more girls considering STEM careers, we have the potential to achieve so much more,” she said.

    Senator Sinodinos said that only one in four IT graduates and fewer than one in 10 engineering graduates are women. Women also occupy fewer than 20 per cent of senior research positions in Australian universities and research institutes.

    3
    L-R: Dr Kate Umbers, Associate Professor Muireann irish, Dr Jodie Ward, Industry Minister Senator Arthur Sinodinos AO, Dr Nicky Ringland, UNSW Dean of Science Professor Emma Johnston, UNSW Adjunct Associate Professor Lisa Harvey-Smith.

    “Science and Technology Australia’s Superstars of STEM program – a world first – will support and train these outstanding women to become prominent role models, promoting gender equity and inspiring more young women and girls to choose to study and work in STEM,” he said.

    “I commend the significant commitment of these outstanding women for playing this important leadership role. Australia needs greater gender balance in the overall STEM workforce, where women occupy less than half of all positions.”

    The successful applicants work in areas including archaeology, robotics, medicine, education, psychology, neuroscience, agriculture, mathematics and engineering. They come from almost every state and territory and work in public, academic and private sectors.

    Dr Ford leads the Metastasis Research Group at the Lowy Cancer Research Centre at UNSW, whose aim is to understand how cancers metastasise or spread and identify targets for novel therapies.

    4
    Industry Minister Senator Arthur Sinodinos AO with UNSW Dean of Science Professor Emma Johnston.

    She has extensive experience researching the molecular biology of breast and ovarian cancer and she also developed a massive open online course, or MOOC, on the impact of the genetic revolution on wider society, which has attracted more than 20,000 students from 158 countries in the past two years.

    Other Superstars of STEM announced today include Director of the Australian Museum Research Institute Dr Rebecca Johnson, Bureau of Meteorology Chief Scientist Dr Sue Barrell and evolutionary scientist Dr Celine Frere of the University of the Sunshine Coast, who gained her PhD from UNSW.

    The initiative was supported by a grant of $178,500 over two years from the Australian Government’s $8 million Women in STEM and Entrepreneurship competitive grants program.

    See here for a full list of winners.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
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