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  • richardmitnick 8:16 am on September 17, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Professor Martina Stenzel, UNSW-University of New South Wales,   

    From University of New South Wales: Women in STEM-“UNSW scientist first woman honoured with top chemistry prize” Professor Martina Stenzel 

    U NSW bloc

    From University of New South Wales

    17 Sep 2019
    Lucy Carroll

    Professor Martina Stenzel is the first woman in almost 90 years to be awarded the Royal Society of NSW’s Liversidge Medal.

    1

    One of the world’s leading experts in polymer chemistry, UNSW Sydney Scientia Professor Martina Stenzel, is the first woman to receive the Royal Society of NSW’s Liversidge Medal.

    The top science prize, which has been running since 1931, recognises Australian scientists who have made an outstanding contribution to chemistry research.

    Professor Stenzel, from UNSW Science’s School of Chemistry, is widely regarded as a global pioneer in the application of novel polymer architectures. By developing chemical techniques for new polymer architectures, Professor Stenzel is creating ‘smart’ nanoparticles for drug delivery that are revolutionising the way disease is targeted and treated.

    Her work focuses on the fundamental processes that underpin nanoparticle design to make them suitable for the delivery of proteins, DNA or metal-based drugs to treat cancer – specifically ovarian and pancreatic cancer.

    “The Liversidge Medal is such an established prize and it is truly wonderful to be recognised by this enduring and respected scientific academy,” Professor Stenzel said. “I hope it will encourage more women to enter the fields of chemistry and physics, two natural sciences where female scientists have traditionally been very few and far between.”

    As Co-Director at UNSW’s Centre for Advanced Macromolecular Design, Professor Stenzel leads a team of 20 researchers working to combine synthetic polymers with nature’s building blocks such as carbohydrates, peptides and proteins. The team of researches work at the intersection of polymer science, nanoparticle design and medicine.

    The creation and adaptation of nanoparticles for various biomedical applications is the focus of Professor Stenzel’s current research. By designing nanoparticles of different shapes, sizes and surface functionalities the nanoparticles can then be “loaded” with various drugs, mimicking a water-filled sponge.

    “The beautiful thing about nanoparticles is that they can be modified in endless ways,” Professor Stenzel said. “We are trying to better understand the physical properties of these drug-loaded nanoparticles as it is directly linked to the biological activity. The aim is to create nanoparticles with the right properties that can invade cancer cells but not attack healthy cells.

    “It is incredibly exciting to be able to work more closely with medical researchers, including the ovarian cancer researcher UNSW’s Associate Professor Caroline Ford and pancreatic researchers Associate Professor Joshua McCarroll and Associate Professor Phoebe Phillips to test the ability of patented protein-based nanoparticles to help treat some of the most challenging cancers.”

    Professor Stenzel said that while nanoparticles were most commonly used in cancer treatment, they could potentially be so used for treatment of many other diseases, including Parkinson’s disease, Alzheimer’s, diabetes and infectious diseases.

    Professor Stenzel is a recipient of the LeFevre Medal from the Australian Academy of Science, the H.G. Smith Medal of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute RACI and in 2018 was elected to the Australian Academy of Science.

    The Liversidge Lecture, awarded every two years, is given on the recommendation of the Royal Australian Chemical Institute (RACI). UNSW Scientia Professor Justin Gooding was the last recipient of the award in 2016.

    Professor Stenzel will give the Liversidge Lecture in February 2020. The lectures are published in the Journal and Proceedings of the Society.

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 9:19 am on September 2, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Pilbara's ancient rocks, UNSW-University of New South Wales   

    From University of New South Wales: “NASA and European Space Agency join UNSW in outback for training crucial for Mars 2020 missions” 

    U NSW bloc

    From University of New South Wales

    NASA

    ESA

    02 Sep 2019
    Isabelle Dubach / Jane Garcia

    UNSW scientists have shown a group of Mars specialists the secrets of the remote Pilbara’s ancient rocks – all in preparation for NASA’s and ESA’s Mars 2020 missions.

    NASA Mars 2020 rover schematic

    NASA Mars 2020 Rover

    ESA/Roscosmos Rosalind Franklin ExoMars rover

    1
    The oldest, best-preserved evidence of life is contained in the Pilbara’s ancient rocks.

    NASA and European Space Agency (ESA) scientists have spent a week in the remote outback of Australia, joining UNSW Sydney’s Australian Centre for Astrobiology Director Martin Van Kranendonk for specialist training in identifying signs of life in ancient rocks.

    The trip served as preparation for NASA’s and ESA’s Mars 2020 missions, which are designed specifically to search for past life in rocks that are as old as those of the remote Pilbara region of Western Australia, where the field trip was held.

    The oldest, best-preserved evidence of life is contained in these ancient rocks – a perfect stand-in for the desolate rocky landscapes of the planet Mars. The rocks at this secret site in the Pilbara are roughly the same age as those on the red planet: three-and-a-half billion years old.

    “It’s remarkable that the history hidden in the fossil record of ancient rocks from Australia’s Pilbara region will be vital for answering the question – is there life on Mars?,” says Professor Van Kranendonk.

    The really important contribution of this trip was to give the scientists an idea of the importance of geological context in searching for signs of ancient life, and when deciding what specific samples to collect for analysis on Mars, and for sample return to Earth.

    “We were able to investigate signs of life’s earliest footholds in a variety of geological environments and then had extensive group conversations about not only what to sample, but how to sample to maximise the possibility of mission success,” says Professor Van Kranendonk.

    It is unique that the group was able to do this investigation directly on the ancient rocks, and collectively with scientists from both missions.

    “A really exciting outcome was the enthusiasm that the Mars scientists had coming away from the outcrops and thinking of how the textures they had seen would apply to their own missions,” he says.

    “Even more important was the collective realisation that life got started early on our planet, under similar conditions as what we know was happening on Mars at that time, enhancing the prospect for major discoveries during these two upcoming missions.”

    2
    The scientists’ camp in the outback

    Preparing for Mars

    The team of UNSW and other Australian and international scientists, led by Professor Van Kranendonk, have conducted research in the area for decades, following the discovery of ancient life traces there in 1980.

    This was the first time that Van Kranendonk has shared the region’s insights with a dedicated team of Mars specialists – a group including the Heads of NASA and ESA Mars 2020 missions and many of the leads of the science instruments being flown on the 2020 missions.

    ESA’s ExoMars2020 mission will visit a vast plain with sedimentary rocks that they will drill to sample for signs of microbial life. NASA’s Mars2020 rover mission will visit a previously unexplored region of Mars with a delta succession thought to have offered favourable conditions in which to search for signs of past life. It will also collect and cache samples for potential return to Earth, where they will be analysed in the laboratory.

    NASA’s Mars Exploration Program Director, James Watzin, saw his frst stromatolite on this trip.

    “After this experience, I now understand the importance of geological context in the search for life on Mars,” he says.

    “Seeing the ancient stromatolites of Western Australia, and discussing with NASA and ESA colleagues how we might look for and sample possibly similar rocks on Mars, was tremendously useful as we prepare for our rovers’ arrival on Mars about 18 months from now,” added Ken Farley, project scientist, Mars 2020 from Caltech.

    ExoMars2020 Principle Investigtor for CLUPI (the Close-up Imager), Jean-Luc Josset, says the trip was a wonderful experience.

    “It was great to see these ancient rocks of Earth and to view the early traces of life with the perspective of how to use my instrument on ExoMars.”

    “It is deeply satisfying that Australia’s ancient rocks and our scientific know-how is making such a significant contribution to our search for extra-terrestrial life and unlocking the secrets of Mars,” says Professor Van Kranendonk.

    3
    NASA and European Space Agency (ESA) scientists have spent a week in the remote outback of Australia.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:10 am on July 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Human intelligence is the key to the Artificial Intelligence age", , AI is the collection of interrelated technologies such as natural language processing; speech recognition; computer vision; machine learning and automated reasoning., Encouraging Australians to embrace emerging technology, Giving machines the ability to perform tasks and solve problems otherwise requiring human cognition., UNSW-University of New South Wales   

    From University of New South Wales: “Human intelligence is the key to the Artificial Intelligence age” 

    U NSW bloc

    From University of New South Wales

    30 Jul 2019

    Louise Templeton
    Corporate Communications
    02-9385 0857
    LOUISE.TEMPLETON@UNSW.EDU.AU

    Artificial Intelligence (AI) can enhance Australia’s wellbeing, lift the economy, improve environmental sustainability and create a more inclusive and fair society.

    1
    A new report highlights how the nation would benefit from AI. No image credit found.

    A report from the Australian Council of Learned Academies (ACOLA), titled: The Effective and Ethical Development of Artificial Intelligence – An Opportunity to Improve our Wellbeing, encourages Australians to embrace emerging technology.

    The panel, co-chaired by UNSW Sydney Professor Toby Walsh, urges Australians to reflect on what AI-enabled future the nation wants, as the future impact of AI on our society will be ultimately determined by decisions taken today.

    AI is the collection of interrelated technologies, such as natural language processing, speech recognition, computer vision, machine learning and automated reasoning, that gives machines the ability to perform tasks and solve problems that would otherwise require human cognition.

    “With careful planning, AI offers great opportunities for Australia, provided we ensure that the use of the technology does not compromise our human values. As a nation, we should look to set the global example for the responsible adoption of AI,” Professor Walsh said.

    Launching the report, Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel emphasized that nations had choices.

    “This report was commissioned by the National Science and Technology Council, to develop an intellectual context for our human society to turn to in deciding what living well in this new era will mean,” Dr Finkel said.

    “What kind of society do we want to be? That is the crucial question for all Australians, and for governments as our elected representatives.”

    The findings recognize the importance of having a national strategy, a community awareness campaign, safe and accessible digital infrastructure, a responsive regulatory system; and a diverse and highly skilled workforce.

    “By bringing together Australia’s leading experts from the sciences, technology and engineering, humanities, arts and social sciences, this ACOLA report comprehensively examines the key issues arising from the development and implementation of AI technologies, and importantly places the wellbeing of society at the centre of any development,” Professor Hugh Bradlow, Chair of the ACOLA Board, said.

    ACOLA’s report is the fourth in the Horizon Scanning series, each scoping the human implications of fast-evolving technologies in the decade ahead.
    The project was supported by the Australian Research Council; the Department of Industry, Innovation and Science; and the Department of Prime Minister and Cabinet.

    ACOLA’s expert working group:
    Professor Toby Walsh FAA (co-chair), Professor Neil Levy FAHA (co-chair), Professor Genevieve Bell FTSE, Professor Anthony Elliot FASSA, Professor Fiona Wood AM FAHMS, Professor James Maclaurin, Professor Iven Mareels FTSE.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 9:50 am on July 29, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Engineering a Fast Two-Qubit Gate in Silicon", , “We were able to bring the qubit’s electrons closer or further apart effectively turning on and off the interaction between them- a prerequisite for a quantum gate” said Yu He., , Long coherence times- the ability to hang onto delicate quantum information for more than instant., , , Qubits transistor and leads, Scanning tunneling microscope hydrogen lithography, The big problem has been getting these atoms close enough together to “talk” to one another in a quantum-mechanical sense., UNSW-University of New South Wales   

    From UNSW via Optics & Photonics: “Engineering a Fast Two-Qubit Gate in Silicon” 

    U NSW bloc

    From University of New South Wales

    Optics & Photonics

    7.29.19
    Stewart Wills

    In a tour-de-force of atom-scale engineering, a research team at the University of New South Wales (UNSW), Australia, has demonstrated a two-qubit gate between coupled donor atom qubits in silicon—the first time, according to the researchers, that such a feat has been accomplished (Nature). The work potentially overcomes one significant hurdle in building quantum computers with atom-based qubits on a silicon platform.

    1
    The research team behind the UNSW work on atom-based qubits in silicon included (left to right) co-lead-authors Sam Gorman and Yu He, team leader Michelle Simmons, Ludwik Kranz, Joris Keizer and Daniel Keith. [Image: UNSW Sydney]

    Bringing atom qubits to silicon

    Atom- and ion-based qubits have some notable attractions as candidates for quantum computing. A particular plus is these systems’ long coherence times, the ability to hang onto delicate quantum information for more than instant. This and other advantages have made assemblages of ions or atoms trapped in lattices of laser beams a key locus of advances in quantum research, with some standout recent accomplishments, for example, in quantum simulation.

    Technologists and engineers would like to bring some of those same advantages of atom-based qubits to silicon. In principle, that would mean that efforts to build quantum computers could leverage the infrastructure and techniques honed over decades in fashioning semiconductors for classical computers.

    Moreover, as Michelle Simmons, the leader of the UNSW team, noted in a press release accompanying the research, electron-spin qubits donated by single atoms “hold the world record” for qubits in silicon under several metrics. Previous work has shown, for example, that such qubits in silicon can have coherence times in the seconds, with potential gate fidelities (and, hence, coherent control) on the order of 99.9%.

    The big problem has been getting these atoms close enough together to “talk” to one another in a quantum-mechanical sense—through phenomena such as entanglement—and thus form quantum-computational logic gates, while still maintaining the ability to control and measure each atom qubit individually. As a result, while a number of research teams have demonstrated two-qubit gates in silicon using qubits bigger than individual atoms, such as quantum dots, the same feat hadn’t yet been achieved for individual-atoms-based qubits until the recent work by the UNSW team.

    STM hydrogen lithography

    To create such a two-qubit gate between atom-based qubits, Simmons and her team used a technique, scanning tunneling microscope (STM) hydrogen lithography, that the research group has been honing for some 20 years.

    The method begins with a natural silicon substrate—the surface of which, through a number of high-temperature chemical steps, the researchers then coat with a layer of monoatomic hydrogen. Next, the tip of an STM is used to individually pick off hydrogen atoms from that surface, creating an atom-scale lithographic mask on the surface, with nanometer precision. Finally, the surface is exposed to a phosphorous–hydrogen gas at 350 °C, leaving behind phosphorous in the exposed areas.

    3
    The UNSW team’s STM hydrogen lithography technique allowed it to construct a two-qubit logic gate consisting of phosphorous atoms placed a mere 13 nm apart, along with associated circuitry. [Image: UNSW Sydney Media Office]

    Qubits, transistor and leads

    By applying this method, the team was able to deposit phosphorous atom qubits—a left qubit consisting of two phosphorous atoms, and a right qubit including three—separated by a mere 13 nm. (The left–right asymmetry between the number of donor atoms was engineered intentionally, according to the paper, in part to increase the tunability of the exchange interaction between the qubits.)

    The researchers also used the technique to lay down associated circuitry for a quantum gate between the two qubits. That circuitry included source and drain leads, as well as a nearby single-electron transistor that serves, through weak tunnel-coupling with the qubits, as an electron reservoir and charge sensor.

    The team then popped the fabricated device into 50-mK dilution refrigerator, and tested its ability to implement a particular quantum logic gate—a so-called (SWAP)½ gate—on a variety of electron spin basis states from the donor atoms. The team was able to read out the gate results with 94% fidelity.

    “We were able to bring the qubit’s electrons closer or further apart, effectively turning on and off the interaction between them, a prerequisite for a quantum gate,” Yu He, one of the paper’s two lead co-authors (along with Sam Gorman), said in a press release. And the gate operation was blazingly fast, with the two-qubit SWAP exchange happening in a mere 800 ps.

    Exquisite engineering

    In an email to OPN, Simmons noted that one of the key points of the paper was the exquisite engineering that the technique allows. “We engineer the atoms to be [around] 13nm apart, to create entanglement,” she said, “but at the same time have the control to independently measure one qubit with high fidelity, without altering the neighboring qubit despite their close proximity.”

    Simmons added that the fact that the platform uses only phosphorous and silicon atoms allows (as the team had shown in previous work) “very low noise quantum circuitry.” That’s because the system “[gets] rid of any dielectrics of different materials, which typically cause charge noise and/or irregularities at the interfaces found in semiconductor quantum dots.”

    In the paper, the team noted that in the long run, the hope is that, by leveraging these techniques, the group can “utilize the hallmark long coherence times that are normally associated with ion trap qubits together with the scalability of the silicon material system to realize a large-scale quantum processor.” Simmons told OPN that she and her colleagues are “excited about the possibilities,” but also noted that the work is still at an early stage. “Watch this space,” she said.

    6
    Joris Keizer, Michelle Simmons and Yu He in the lab. [Image: UNSW Sydney Media Office]

    See the full article here .

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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Optics & Photonics News (OPN) is The Optical Society’s monthly news magazine. It provides in-depth coverage of recent developments in the field of optics and offers busy professionals the tools they need to succeed in the optics industry, as well as informative pieces on a variety of topics such as science and society, education, technology and business. OPN strives to make the various facets of this diverse field accessible to researchers, engineers, businesspeople and students. Contributors include scientists and journalists who specialize in the field of optics. We welcome your submissions.

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 8:53 am on July 18, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "200 times faster than ever before: the speediest quantum operation yet", , , Scanning tunnelling microscopy, The first two-qubit gate between atom qubits in silicon, UNSW-University of New South Wales   

    From University of New South Wales: “200 times faster than ever before: the speediest quantum operation yet” 

    U NSW bloc

    From University of New South Wales

    18 Jul 2019
    Isabelle Dubach

    A group of physicists at UNSW Sydney have built a super-fast version of the central building block of a quantum computer. The research is the milestone result of a vision first outlined by scientists 20 years ago.

    1
    From left to right: Professor Michelle Simmons, Dr. Sam Gorman, Postdoc Research Associate, Dr. Yu He, Postdoc Research Associate, Ludwik Kranz, PhD student, Dr. Joris Keizer, Senior Research Fellow, Daniel Keith, PhD student

    A group of scientists led by 2018 Australian of the Year Professor Michelle Simmons have achieved the first two-qubit gate between atom qubits in silicon – a major milestone on the team’s quest to build an atom-scale quantum computer. The pivotal piece of research was published today in world-renowned journal Nature.

    A two-qubit gate is the central building block of any quantum computer – and the UNSW team’s version of it is the fastest that’s ever been demonstrated in silicon, completing an operation in 0.8 nanoseconds, which is ~200 times faster than other existing spin-based two-qubit gates.

    In the Simmons’ group approach, a two-qubit gate is an operation between two electron spins – comparable to the role that classical logic gates play in conventional electronics. For the first time, the team was able to build a two-qubit gate by placing two atom qubits closer together than ever before, and then – in real-time – controllably observing and measuring their spin states.

    The team’s unique approach to quantum computing requires not only the placement of individual atom qubits in silicon but all the associated circuitry to initialise, control and read-out the qubits at the nanoscale – a concept that requires such exquisite precision it was long thought to be impossible. But with this major milestone, the team is now positioned to translate their technology into scalable processors.

    Professor Simmons, Director of the Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology (CQC2T) and founder of Silicon Quantum Computing Pty Ltd., says the past decade of previous results perfectly set the team up to shift the boundaries of what’s thought to be “humanly possible”.

    “Atom qubits hold the world record for the longest coherence times of a qubit in silicon with the highest fidelities,” she says. “Using our unique fabrication technologies, we have already demonstrated the ability to read and initialise single electron spins on atom qubits in silicon with very high accuracy. We’ve also demonstrated that our atomic-scale circuitry has the lowest electrical noise of any system yet devised to connect to a semiconductor qubit.

    “Optimising every aspect of the device design with atomic precision has now allowed us to build a really fast, highly accurate two-qubit gate, which is the fundamental building block of a scalable, silicon-based quantum computer.

    “We’ve really shown that it is possible to control the world at the atomic scale – and that the benefits of the approach are transformational, including the remarkable speed at which our system operates.”

    UNSW Science Dean, Professor Emma Johnston AO, says this key paper further shows just how ground-breaking Professor Simmons’ research is.

    “This was one of Michelle’s team’s final milestones to demonstrate that they can actually make a quantum computer using atom qubits. Their next major goal is building a 10-qubit quantum integrated circuit – and we hope they reach that within 3-4 years.”

    Getting up and close with qubits – engineering with a precision of just thousand-millionths of a metre

    Using a scanning tunnelling microscope to precision-place and encapsulate phosphorus atoms in silicon, the team first had to work out the optimal distance between two qubits to enable the crucial operation.

    “Our fabrication technique allows us to place the qubits exactly where we want them. This allows us to engineer our two-qubit gate to be as fast as possible,” says study lead co-author Sam Gorman from CQC2T.

    “Not only have we brought the qubits closer together since our last breakthrough, but we have learnt to control every aspect of the device design with sub-nanometer precision to maintain the high fidelities.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:50 am on June 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Two out of three Australians and four out of five people in NSW are likely to have significantly altered lifestyles if estuaries – tidal rivers and harbours – become impacted by climate change., UNSW takes on climate change in our estuaries, UNSW-University of New South Wales   

    From University of New South Wales: ” UNSW takes on climate change in our estuaries – where Australians live, work and play” 

    U NSW bloc

    From University of New South Wales

    26 Jun 2019
    Lachlan Gilbert

    A multi-disciplinary team led by UNSW Sydney researchers is releasing the first large-scale summary of how our estuaries – and the 80 per cent of NSW residents living on them – will be impacted by climate change.

    2
    An estuary is defined as the area that rivers meet the sea. In NSW, about four fifths of the population lives on or near estuaries. Picture: UNSW

    Two out of three Australians and four out of five people in NSW are likely to have significantly altered lifestyles if estuaries – tidal rivers and harbours – become impacted by climate change.

    To address this risk, UNSW Sydney’s water engineering researchers (working with NSW’s Government Scientists and Macquarie University) have today launched a free online resource that enables scientists and all levels of government to assess and act on threats posed to our coastal estuaries by climate change.

    Dr Valentin Heimhuber from the Water Research Laboratory of UNSW’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, and a lead researcher who helped develop the guide, describes estuaries as the “canary in the coal mine” for climate change.

    “Estuaries are subjected to a ‘double-whammy’ of climate change impacts,” Dr Heimhuber says. “On the land side, climate change is influencing rainfall and temperature patterns, which is critical for agricultural productivity and healthy ecosystems. On the ocean side, we have concerns with sea level rise and oceanic warming. Estuaries are where these two forces – land and ocean – collide, and it happens to be where most Australians live.”

    Associate Professor Will Glamore, Chief Investigator at the Water Research Laboratory, UNSW, sees estuaries as the lifeblood of Australian society. “Our estuaries are where 80% of people live, work and play.” he says. “This research highlights how the 180+ estuaries in NSW may be threatened by climate change.”

    Since European settlement, A/Professor Glamore says, estuaries and harbours have been impacted to the extent that ecosystems are now at risk across the state.

    “Our fear is that climate change, mixed with ongoing development, may be the tipping point for these systems,” he says.

    “Sydney Harbour is an iconic example but only one of the many estuaries at risk across the state. Our harbour is fighting a battle on all fronts. This includes an urbanising catchment, changing water quality, rising temperatures and rising tides.

    “This research shows that rising tides won’t just threaten our beaches. With climate change, the tide will penetrate into our harbours and estuaries, potentially impacting farm productivity and the environment.”

    “Cities like Sydney, Newcastle and Wollongong will need to adapt to the changing water regime. This includes our planning levels, our freshwater resources and everything that lives in and around our estuaries and harbours. The potential impact to our daily life is daunting and we are just beginning to understand the extent of the problem.”

    Beyond the direct impact to humans, climate change may be devastating to the environment, A/Professor Glamore says.

    “Climate change threatens our mangroves, oysters, sea grasses, fish, bird-life and saltmarsh,” he says. “Research presented in this study highlights our current knowledge on how these systems will respond when we face climate change and population growth pressures at the same time.”

    Launch of a Climate Change Risk Assessment Guide

    To understand the implications of climate change in estuaries, researchers from UNSW, Macquarie University, the Sydney Institute of Marine Science, and the NSW’s Office of Environment and Heritage have joined forces to prepare a guide for assessing climate change in our estuaries. Titled, Climate change in estuaries – state of the science and framework for assessment, the eight reports bring together the latest knowledge into an easy to understand and transparent guide. The reports are designed to empower planning authorities, local councils and businesses to make informed decisions about our harbours, ports and estuaries in a rapidly changing climate.

    3
    Ecosystems of estuaries are under stress from the impact of human development. Picture: UNSW

    An important component of the project is the Eco-Thresholds database developed by marine ecologists A/Professor Melanie Bishop and Dr. Gabriel Dominguez from Macquarie University’s Department of Biological Sciences. The Eco-Thresholds database is an online tool that compiles more than 300 research publications on the effects of climate change on estuarine species in Australia and worldwide.

    “Understanding how individual species respond to changes in their environment, such as increasing water temperature or salinity, is a critical factor in assessing climate change impacts in estuaries. To address this, we have collated information from every previous climate change study on flora and fauna – mangroves, salt marshes, oysters, fish – you name it,” A/Professor Melanie Bishop says.

    She says anyone can use the tool to see key findings from previous research or to add new research via an easy-to-use online map.

    “For example, you could use the database to search how increased salinity from sea level rise will affect the abundance and health of different fish species or how saltmarsh or oysters can withstand heatwave conditions from rising water temperature.

    “This work also highlights that there are many issues left to understand. The Eco-Thresholds Database and the reports are living documents, freely available to the global community. Researchers from all over the world can now contribute new information as it becomes available.”

    4
    Mangroves, which are part of an estuary ecosystem, could be drastically affected if tidal marks are altered by climate change. Picture: UNSW

    Renewed hope

    A/Professor Glamore says a sense of urgency is needed when acting to protect our estuaries. Thankfully, the NSW State Government has recently updated legislation protecting and planning for estuaries within the Coastal Management Act and the Marine Estate Management Act.

    “The legislation is an acknowledgment that we need to understand and plan for the impact of climate change on our estuaries,” A/Professor Glamore says.

    “Everyone hears about the threat of climate change, but few understand what it means to them locally.”

    “We believe our detailed guide and online resources will ensure this information is open, transparent and available for all. This is just the beginning of an important process to better manage the waters where we live, work and play.”

    This research was funded by the NSW Government via the OEH Adaptation Hub Coastal Node. More details about this research can be found at: http://estuaries.wrl.unsw.edu.au/index.php/climate-change/

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 8:58 am on May 29, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Designing a new solution to our waste crisis", , , UNSW-University of New South Wales   

    From University of New South Wales: “Designing a new solution to our waste crisis” 

    U NSW bloc

    From University of New South Wales

    29 May 2019
    Veena Sahajwalla

    Creating new materials from waste products is essential if we’re to solve the global recycling, waste and emissions crisis.

    1
    Veena Sahajwalla

    If they don’t know it already, designers of all types will soon be at the forefront of a new recycling ethos in Australia and around the world.

    For too long products of all kinds have been designed without consideration of the environmental consequences of their disposal.

    The burden of what to do with all of the unwanted items in our households has fallen to consumers and local councils in the ‘down-stream’ part of the life cycle of products via bin collections and waste sorting.

    Many of these waste materials are ending up in landfill and causing damaging greenhouse gases, and if the world keeps doing this, the waste crisis experienced in Australia since China last year and now India this year banned the importation of international waste, will become critical.

    The reality is that much of the waste that ends up in landfill is actually a renewable resource. This has been proved in our labs at the Sustainable Materials Research and Technology Centre at UNSW Sydney through our microrecycling science and with our prototype green microfactory technology.

    For instance, we are producing building panels from old clothing and textiles, as well as from coffee grounds and cups, and even from glass and saw dust. We are also extracting from electronic waste such as printers, computers and mobile phones the valuable metal alloys they contain and from the plastics we can produce high quality filament for 3D printing.

    And we need to do this if we want to achieve a ‘circular economy’ which minimises waste by ensuring that the valuable resources contained in waste and discarded products are kept in use for as long as possible. For instance, metals can be reformed over and over ad infinitum while glass and even plastics can also be reformed and re-used many times depending on quality.

    But it is not just the designers of products in the so called ‘up-stream’ part of our market places, it is the producers and manufacturers of their products and services in the ‘mid-stream’ that must also play a key role in creating a true circular economy.

    A key problem is there is little commercial appetite to ensure we divert from landfill the waste that can be reformed into new, valued-added materials, products and manufacturing feedstock.

    To that end, the NSW Government has announced in 2019 via its Office of Chief Scientist and Engineer funding to be awarded to UNSW Sydney to establish the Circular Economy Innovation Network, to which I’ve been appointed Director.

    There are so many stakeholders across all supply chains that the challenge is to work together to find the opportunities to make changes that not only reduce waste but to ensure it can be valued and used over and over as a renewable resource to create a circular economy.

    If designers and producers of products, packaging and applicable services accounted for and built in, from the very beginning of the product lifecycle, a consideration for how all of the materials in products will become part of the circular economy so they do not have to end up in landfill, then we may have a positive impact on addressing the world’s growing waste problem.


    For example, using a modular design means that if a part of a product breaks, a replacement component could be made from 3D printing technology from filament made from recovered quality plastic so the whole product is not thrown in the bin. This reduces waste, the need to mine finite resources and the associated environmental impacts and costs of transportation and processing.

    Some designers and producers are now making products from waste resources that otherwise would have gone to the tip and produced green house gases – high-end furniture, is one example. In our labs, we work with various industry partners and one is Dresden which makes prescription glasses and has a mission to do it sustainably using recycled and recyclable plastics materials. Our researchers are helping them by testing the viability of using plastics from things like discarded fishing netting, plastic bags and plastic lids.

    The new Circular Economy Innovation Network will bring together key stakeholders and case studies to accelerate partnerships and opportunities to build the circular economy not just in NSW but across Australia to address the waste and recycling issue, while enhancing manufacturing and industry capability to create new jobs.

    Workshops, seminars and identifying market opportunities and new partnerships with researches, industry and governments, will be some of the key activities and I am excited to be leading this exciting new initiative.

    It’s a big challenge to create a Network like this to bring together all of the touchpoints along business supply chains to help build a true circular economy, but we must act now for the future.

    Let me give you some stark statistics and facts.

    Let me give you some stark statistics and facts.

    The clothing and textiles industry is the second most polluting sector in the world, accounting for 10% of the world’s total carbon emissions. That clothing is now one of the biggest consumer waste streams, with 92 million tons estimated to be thrown out in a year, means we must urgently and seriously consider new ways to deal with unwanted clothes.

    Much of the materials collected from kerbside recycling bins has been going to developing nations and in Australia that gets ticked off as ‘recycled’ but much of it ends up in landfill or burnt. And due to the China and Indian waste importation bans, recyclable materials around Australian are being stockpiled and going into local landfill. Other Asian countries are also getting sick of being the Australia and the world’s dumping grounds.

    UNSW’s own research shows 65.4% of people believe recyclables put into council bins goes to landfill (69.5% female, 51.4% aged 18-34, 75.1% aged 65-plus); 49% of people believe green and ecofriendly efforts will not have an effect in their lifetime; 63.8% of those aged 65-plus see no benefits being realised; and 72.4% of people would recycle more if the material was reliably recycled.

    So, when considering that the population growth trend is expected to continue in the following decades, from a current world population of 7.6 billion to approximately 9.8 billion by 2050, our resources globally and at home need to be preserved and re-used.

    Smart design and production in a new ‘circular economy’ can make a big difference.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 11:06 am on May 27, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "'Submarines' small enough to deliver medicine inside human body", , Dr Liang: each capsule of medicine could contain millions of micro-submarines and within each micro-submarine would be millions of drug molecules., , , Micro-submarines powered by nano-motors, , This is significant not just for medical applications but for micro-motors generally., UNSW-University of New South Wales   

    From University of New South Wales: “‘Submarines’ small enough to deliver medicine inside human body” 

    U NSW bloc

    From University of New South Wales

    27 May 2019
    Lachlan Gilbert

    UNSW engineers have shown that micro-submarines powered by nano-motors could navigate the human body to provide targeted drug delivery to diseased organs without the need for external stimulus.

    1
    An artist’s representation of ‘micro-submarines’ transporting their medical cargo through capillaries among red blood cells. Picture: UNSW.

    Cancers in the human body may one day be treated by tiny, self-propelled ‘micro-submarines’ delivering medicine to affected organs after UNSW Sydney chemical and biomedical engineers proved it was possible.

    In a paper published in Materials Today, the engineers explain how they developed micrometre-sized submarines that exploit biological environments to tune their buoyancy, enabling them to carry drugs to specific locations in the body.

    Corresponding author Dr Kang Liang, with both the School of Biomedical Engineering and School of Chemical Engineering at UNSW, says the knowledge can be used to design next generation ‘micro-motors’ or nano-drug delivery vehicles, by applying novel driving forces to reach specific targets in the body.

    “We already know that micro-motors use different external driving forces – such as light, heat or magnetic field – to actively navigate to a specific location,” Dr Liang says.

    “In this research, we designed micro-motors that no longer rely on external manipulation to navigate to a specific location. Instead, they take advantage of variations in biological environments to automatically navigate themselves.”

    What makes these micro-sized particles unique is that they respond to changes in biological pH environments to self-adjust their buoyancy. In the same way that submarines use oxygen or water to flood ballast points to make them more or less buoyant, gas bubbles released or retained by the micro-motors due to the pH conditions in human cells contribute to these nanoparticles moving up or down.

    This is significant not just for medical applications, but for micro-motors generally.

    “Most micro-motors travel in a 2-dimensional fashion,” Dr Liang says.

    “But in this work, we designed a vertical direction mechanism. We combined these two concepts to come up with a design of autonomous micro-motors that move in a 3D fashion. This will enable their ultimate use as smart drug delivery vehicles in the future.”

    Dr Liang illustrates a possible scenario where drugs are taken orally to treat a cancer in the stomach or intestines. To give an idea of scale, he says each capsule of medicine could contain millions of micro-submarines, and within each micro-submarine would be millions of drug molecules.

    “Imagine you swallow a capsule to target a cancer in the gastrointestinal tract,” he says.

    “Once in the gastrointestinal fluid, the micro-submarines carrying the medicine could be released. Within the fluid, they could travel to the upper or bottom region depending on the orientation of the patient.

    “The drug-loaded particles can then be internalised by the cells at the site of the cancer. Once inside the cells, they will be degraded causing the release of the drugs to fight the cancer in a very targeted and efficient way.”

    For the micro-submarines to find their target, a patient would need to be oriented in such a way that the cancer or ailment being treated is either up or down – in other words, a patient would be either upright or lying down.

    Dr Liang says the so-called micro-submarines are essentially composite metal-organic frameworks (MOF)-based micro-motor systems containing a bioactive enzyme (catalase, CAT) as the engine for gas bubble generation. He stresses that he and his colleagues’ research is at the proof-of-concept stage, with years of testing needing to be completed before this could become a reality.

    Dr Liang says the research team – comprised of engineers from UNSW, University of Queensland, Stanford University and University of Cambridge – will be also looking outside of medical applications for these new multi-directional nano-motors.

    “We are planning to apply this new finding to other types of nanoparticles to prove the versatility of this technique,” he says.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 12:09 pm on May 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Silicon surges as quantum tech favourite", , UNSW-University of New South Wales   

    From UNSW via COSMOS Magazine: “Silicon surges as quantum tech favourite” 

    U NSW bloc

    From University of New South Wales

    via

    Cosmos Magazine bloc

    COSMOS Magazine

    22 May 2019
    Alan Duffy

    1
    Beads made of silicon balanced on the head of a pin. Once thought to be useful only in traditional computing, the element is enjoying a new lease of life in quantum research. Credit: Texas Instruments/Getty Images

    Three breakthrough papers published in just the past year have confirmed that silicon is neck-and-neck with competing technology for quantum computing, including those under active research by corporate giants Google, Microsoft and IBM.

    Creating the quantum entangled pairs that form the qubits, the heart of quantum computation, has thus far required the use of complex, exotic materials and structures, such as from honeycomb boron nitride and trapping molecules in lasers.

    Although these techniques are incredibly promising they have one significant downside – throwing away the trillions of dollars and decades of research and development invested in the traditional computing material, silicon.

    Now an Australian team led by Andrew Dzurak from the University of New South Wales (UNSW) has made a series of breakthroughs that have suddenly made silicon a leading focus for materials research quantum computer development.

    Qubits hold great promise, but unlike bits in traditional computing, they are error prone. This means millions are required for complex calculations to allow for error correction.

    Using existing techniques for forming quantum entangled pairs, any potential quantum computer would be unfeasibly large. That’s why three recent papers by the UNSW researchers are so important.

    The first, published in the journal Nature Electronics, showed silicon reaching an accuracy (or fidelity) for one-qubit logic of 99.96%.

    “This puts it on an even par with all other competing qubit technologies”, explains Dzurak, “since all qubits have errors, and these must be kept very low if we want to do useful computations, otherwise the final answers to calculations will be unreliable.”

    The result was followed up by a second paper, in the journal Nature, which demonstrated that two-qubit computations had reached 98% accuracy, an important step because linking qubits together is how quantum computations are undertaken.

    “We think that we’ll achieve significantly higher fidelities in the near future, opening the path to full-scale, fault-tolerant quantum computation,” says Dzurak.

    “We’re now on the verge of a two-qubit accuracy that’s high enough for quantum error correction.”

    These two sets of findings are key to constructing more feasible quantum computers, because greater accuracy means fewer redundant qubits are required for error correction.

    A third paper, just published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, took the team’s work to an all-new practical level.

    “It shows it is possible to read out the state of a quantum bit in a silicon device using only a single wire (in this case a nanoscale electrode), vastly simplifying the on-chip electronics needed for a full-scale quantum processor chip,” explains Dzurak.

    The fewer qubits required for processing problems, combined with reducing the size of read-outs required for each qubit enough, dramatically reduces the size and complexity of a quantum computer, thus bringing it that much closer to reality.

    And industry has taken note.

    The advances have made possible the scaling up of a system using silicon, based on industry-standard complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistors, in a joint venture between UNSW, Australian company Silicon Quantum Computing (SQC) and the CMOS chip manufacturing capabilities at the French technology agency CEA.

    In using silicon for the quantum computing revolution, Australian researchers have shown that an old element can be taught new tricks.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
  • richardmitnick 7:26 am on May 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: “CoastSnap is a network of simple camera mounts at beaches that invite the public to take a photo and upload it to social media using a specific hashtag” says Dr Mitchell Harley., Citizen science project led by UNSW engineers, CoastSnap, UNSW-University of New South Wales   

    From University of New South Wales: ” Revolutionising coastal monitoring, one social media photo at a time” 

    U NSW bloc

    From University of New South Wales

    20 May 2019
    Cecilia Duong

    1
    CoastSnap is a network of simple camera mounts at beaches that invite the public to take a photo and upload it to social media.

    A citizen science project led by UNSW engineers is leveraging thousands of crowd-sourced photos from social media, helping create new insights into how beaches respond to changing weather and wave conditions, and extreme storms – and now a new study has shown the program to be nearly as accurate and effective as professional shoreline monitoring equipment.

    The study – recently published in the journal Coastal Engineering – is a collaboration between engineers from the UNSW Water Research Laboratory and the NSW Office of Environment and Heritage.

    “To collect data about shoreline change over time, we previously had to rely on expensive monitoring equipment or exhaustive fieldwork to gather data by hand,” explains Dr Mitchell Harley from UNSW’s School of Civil and Environmental Engineering, who has led the study.

    “In our new study, we present an innovative ‘citizen science’ approach to collecting shoreline data, by tapping into the incredible amount of social media images taken at the coast every single day.

    “We rigorously tested this technique at two beaches in Sydney over a 7-month period – Manly and North Narrabeen – and found that the shoreline data obtained from this community-based technology was comparable in accuracy to that collected by professional shoreline monitoring equipment.”

    CoastSnap – a community program founded in 2017 – turns the average community member into a coastal scientist, using only their smartphone to take pictures of the coastline.

    “CoastSnap is a network of simple camera mounts at beaches that invite the public to take a photo and upload it to social media, using a specific hashtag,” says Dr Mitchell Harley.

    Using algorithms to track the shoreline position, the images collected are then analysed to help researchers and the community understand why some beaches are more resilient to change than others. The imagery can also be used to inform coastal management and planning decisions. Despite the technical challenges presented with this method of data collection, which include the low resolution of social media images and the involvement of non-professionals in the gathering of the data, the technique has proven that the research does not need expensive equipment to collect useful data.

    Dr Harley says the collection of photos at all the different stations will be the global eyes observing likely changes to the coastline in the coming years.

    “The data we have collected so far has revealed some very interesting patterns that waves and tides have caused. Some sites have seen the coastline fluctuate by up to 50m back and forth, whereas at some nearby sites, the same coastline has remained stagnant.

    “This type of information is critical to be able to help predict how the coastline changes in response to changing waves and storms,” says Dr Harley.

    “Ultimately we would like to use this information to assist coastal managers in reducing the risk of coastal erosion – and to identify coastal erosion hotspots that need particular attention.”

    2
    Dr Mitchel Harley (far right) at the installation of a CoastSnap station in Fiji. Photo credit: Navneet Lal

    Two years and thousands of images later

    The idea for CoastSnap stems from the Water Research Laboratory’s work in coastal imaging technology, which has been in development for over a decade. The technology made use of high-tech video cameras installed on top of beachfront buildings; but in contrast to CoastSnap, that equipment was quite expensive. Now celebrating the program’s two-year anniversary this month, CoastSnap had humble beginnings, with the first two snap stations installed at Manly and North Narrabeen in May 2017. Since then, over 2,500 images have been submitted from 4 NSW CoastSnap stations from almost 1,000 individual community participants.

    The team says the technique has the potential to revolutionise the way coastlines are monitored worldwide, by expanding to coastlines where there previously was little data coverage, particularly in countries with limited resources.

    “That’s why we’ve already rapidly expanded internationally, with CoastSnap stations located in 9 different countries – Brazil, England, Fiji, France, The Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, USA and Australia,” says Dr Harley.

    The team have had positive community feedback and participation so far.

    “What we often find in coastal engineering and management is that the solution to coastal erosion issues is relatively simple, but that the solution is held back by a range of societal roadblocks,” Dr Harley says.

    “Engaging the community in the data collection process really helps to break down barriers between coastal managers, government and the people that enjoy the coast on a daily basis.

    “This leads to a greater democratisation of decisions being made at the coast, so that better decisions are made for everyone to benefit.”

    How to get CoastSnapping:

    Visit a CoastSnap photo point at North Narrabeen Beach, Manly Beach, Cape Byron or Blacksmiths Beach with your mobile device and follow these simple steps:

    Place your mobile device in the CoastSnap cradle, with the camera facing through the gap in the cradle and the screen facing you. This is important: if you don’t place your phone in the cradle we can’t use your snap.
    Push your mobile device up against the left side of the phone cradle.
    Take a standard photo with your mobile device camera, without using zoom or filters.
    Carefully remove your mobile device from the phone cradle.
    Share or submit your CoastSnap photo so that we can measure the beach:
    share on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter using the hashtag shown on the sign
    submit your photo via email to Coast.Snap@environment.nsw.gov.au

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    U NSW Campus

    Welcome to UNSW Australia (The University of New South Wales), one of Australia’s leading research and teaching universities. At UNSW, we take pride in the broad range and high quality of our teaching programs. Our teaching gains strength and currency from our research activities, strong industry links and our international nature; UNSW has a strong regional and global engagement.

    In developing new ideas and promoting lasting knowledge we are creating an academic environment where outstanding students and scholars from around the world can be inspired to excel in their programs of study and research. Partnerships with both local and global communities allow UNSW to share knowledge, debate and research outcomes. UNSW’s public events include concert performances, open days and public forums on issues such as the environment, healthcare and global politics. We encourage you to explore the UNSW website so you can find out more about what we do.

     
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