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  • richardmitnick 12:37 pm on May 20, 2022 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "A mountain of learning", A group of UW students hiked up to one of Mount Baker’s most prominent glaciers-Easton Glacier-and learned how to gather highly precise data that can be used to track glacier change., , If one took a picture every year one would struggle to put a number on how much ice has melted away., It’s important to monitor glacier sites to understand the impacts of climate change., The University of Washington (US) Civil & Environmental Engineering, There are things you experience when you are standing next to a glacier that you just can’t learn in a classroom., There’s an ideal way to learn about retreating glaciers: visit them for the day., To go through the calculations and match up the elevation models and see clearly where the glacier has thinned was highly educational.   

    From The University of Washington (US) Civil & Environmental Engineering: “A mountain of learning” 

    From The University of Washington (US) Civil & Environmental Engineering

    In

    The University of Washington College of Engineering

    At


    The University of Washington

    5.20.22

    Brooke Fisher
    Photos: Mark Stone/University of Washington

    Students practice drone surveying techniques at Mount Baker.

    There’s an ideal way to learn about retreating glaciers: visit them for the day.

    That’s exactly what a group of UW students did in September 2021, when they hiked up to one of Mount Baker’s most prominent glaciers, Easton Glacier, and learned how to gather highly precise data that can be used to track glacier change.

    “It’s a great educational opportunity — students just need a pair of hiking boots,” says CEE Assistant Professor David Shean. “There are things you experience when you are standing next to a glacier that you just can’t learn in a classroom. Students feel the wind and hear the roar of the waterfall as the glacier melts. They realize there are daily variations in these things, and you don’t get that from a textbook or PowerPoint slides.”

    About twice per year, Shean takes students out to the glacier. Many have already taken or are planning to take Shean’s Advanced Surveying class, which covers modern surveying techniques for scientific and engineering applications.

    “To go through the calculations and match up the elevation models and see clearly where the glacier has thinned was interesting,” says CEE Ph.D. student Seth Vanderwilt. “Just from standing on the hiking trail, if you took a picture every year you would struggle to put a number on how much ice has melted away.”

    The outings are a mix of teaching opportunity and research for Shean, who has been studying the glacier, located in the North Cascades, since 2014. During his Ph.D. studies, Shean started using satellite data to track glaciers in Washington and continues to monitor glacial change. In the past seven years, Shean has observed hundreds of meters of retreat and up to 20 meters of thinning in places.

    “It’s important to monitor sites like Easton to understand the impacts of regional climate change, but coupled with that are changes in the snowpack, vegetation and surrounding landscape, such as bedrock that was covered with ice for thousands of years,” Shean says. “We are building a record that can be used to study this interconnected system in detail.”

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    Three images:

    CEE Assistant Professor David Shean explains how to perform a Global Navigation Satellite System survey, where receivers on board the drones communicated with multiple satellite networks, including the well-known Global Positioning System, to pinpoint the precise location where images were captured.

    Shean holds a fixed-wing drone, which can map large areas in a back-and-forth “lawnmower” pattern.

    Ph.D. student Danny Hogan sets up a Global Navigation Satellite System receiver.

    A few students ventured into the valley below to place ground control point targets that would help lock in the precise locations of the drones and surface of the glacier, while other students helped launch the two drones: a quadcopter and a small fixed-wing drone with a 3-foot wingspan, for mapping larger areas. Equipped with high-resolution cameras, the drones captured a variety of photos from different locations and angles.

    The students also gained valuable experience with satellite navigation and positioning, which would be important for their later modeling efforts. Survey-grade Global Navigation Satellite System receivers on board the drones communicated with multiple satellite networks to pinpoint the precise location where images were captured.

    “Even with the best-available satellite images, the resolution and geolocation accuracy of our measurements is around a few feet. Using the drones, we can get down to a few centimeters, which enables all sorts of new science questions to be answered,” Shean says. “We can measure subtle changes as well as capture the rate of change, which shows how the glaciers are evolving over time.”

    4

    Created by CEE Ph.D. student Seth Vanderwilt, the above animations show the change in surface elevation of the Easton Glacier from 2014-2021. The visualizations were created utilizing a technique called Structure from Motion, which creates 3D reconstructions from overlapping two-dimensional images. On the left image is a shaded relief map, which shows the topography in detail. On the right image is a color orthomosaic that depicts a geometrically accurate view of the landscape.

    Creating 3D models

    Gathering highly precise data is just the first step. In Shean’s Advanced Surveying course, students learn to use software to stitch the drone images together and create 3D models and topographic maps.

    5
    CEE Ph.D. students Seth Vanderwilt and Hannah Besso discuss the results of the Global Navigation Satellite System survey.

    For the final class deliverable, students apply what they’ve learned to a project of their choice. Teaming up with classmates, Vanderwilt processed the images gathered at Easton Glacier in September, along with all of the data going back to 2014. The students created a time series analysis with a combined 6,500 drone images, which revealed approximately 3-4 meters of thinning over the lower glacier each year.

    For Besso’s final project, she worked with classmates to collect new drone imagery at the site of the 2014 Oso landslide, which they used to create data visualizations. Comparing their 3D models to post-landslide data gathered by the United States Geological Survey, the students found that in the aftermath of the landslide, the banks of the North Fork of the Stillaguamish River were eroding and the channel was widening.

    “We took the project from the idea phase to going out to the field site to fly drones on a weekend,” Besso says. “It was something that was within our ability level after taking the class, but it took some training and planning because there were tall trees and challenging terrain and we didn’t want to crash the drones.”

    Sought-after skillset

    Hands-on experience gathering, processing and analyzing high-resolution topographic data gives students an advantage when applying for jobs, says Shean. Environmental consulting firms now rely on drones for inspections and mapping, but drone surveying is not taught in traditional college courses.

    “It gives our students a leg up,” Shean says. “They understand the data acquisition, software and how to deliver a final product. I get emails from students who took this class in previous years saying they did a drone survey at their new job and it worked beautifully. It’s one of the most rewarding aspects of teaching courses like this at UW.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The University of Washington Civil & Environmental Engineering

    Take a moment to look around you. Buildings, bridges, running water and transit systems are the work of civil and environmental engineers.
    2
    Civil and environmental engineers design, construct and manage the essential facilities, systems and structures around us. Their work plays a crucial role in enabling livable, sustainable cities, healthy environments and strong economies.

    At the University of Washington, Civil & Environmental Engineering students and faculty are taking on the challenges presented by our aging national infrastructure, while developing new approaches to address the needs of urban systems and communities around the globe. UW CEE is dedicated to providing students with leading-edge technical skill development and opportunities for hands-on practice to enable them to tackle complex engineering problems in response to changing technological and societal needs.

    Housed in an outstanding university, UW CEE offers one of the world’s premier programs in the field. The UW College of Engineering undergraduate program is ranked #18 and CEE’s graduate programs are ranked #16 for civil engineering and #27 for environmental engineering for 2020, according to U.S. News & World Report.

    The University of Washington College of Engineering

    Mission, Facts, and Stats

    Our mission is to develop outstanding engineers and ideas that change the world.

    Faculty:
    275 faculty (25.2% women)

    Achievements:

    128 NSF Young Investigator/Early Career Awards since 1984
    32 Sloan Foundation Research Awards
    2 MacArthur Foundation Fellows (2007 and 2011)

    A national leader in educating engineers, each year the College turns out new discoveries, inventions and top-flight graduates, all contributing to the strength of our economy and the vitality of our community.

    Engineering innovation

    Engineers drive the innovation economy and are vital to solving society’s most challenging problems. The College of Engineering is a key part of a world-class research university in a thriving hub of aerospace, biotechnology, global health and information technology innovation. Over 50% of UW startups in FY18 came from the College of Engineering.

    Commitment to diversity and access

    The College of Engineering is committed to developing and supporting a diverse student body and faculty that reflect and elevate the populations we serve. We are a national leader in women in engineering; 25.5% of our faculty are women compared to 17.4% nationally. We offer a robust set of diversity programs for students and faculty.

    Research and commercialization

    The University of Washington is an engine of economic growth, today ranked third in the nation for the number of startups launched each year, with 65 companies having been started in the last five years alone by UW students and faculty, or with technology developed here. The College of Engineering is a key contributor to these innovations, and engineering faculty, students or technology are behind half of all UW startups. In FY19, UW received $1.58 billion in total research awards from federal and nonfederal sources.

    u-washington-campus

    The University of Washington is one of the world’s preeminent public universities. Our impact on individuals, on our region, and on the world is profound — whether we are launching young people into a boundless future or confronting the grand challenges of our time through undaunted research and scholarship. Ranked number 10 in the world in Shanghai Jiao Tong University rankings and educating more than 54,000 students annually, our students and faculty work together to turn ideas into impact and in the process transform lives and our world. For more about our impact on the world, every day.
    So what defines us —the students, faculty and community members at the University of Washington? Above all, it’s our belief in possibility and our unshakable optimism. It’s a connection to others, both near and far. It’s a hunger that pushes us to tackle challenges and pursue progress. It’s the conviction that together we can create a world of good. Join us on the journey.

     
  • richardmitnick 9:19 am on January 11, 2022 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "A new wave of research - Working to understand the chaotic nature of tsunami debris", , , The University of Washington (US) Civil & Environmental Engineering   

    From The University of Washington (US) Civil & Environmental Engineering: “A new wave of research – Working to understand the chaotic nature of tsunami debris” 

    From The University of Washington (US) Civil & Environmental Engineering

    In

    The University of Washington College of Engineering

    At


    The University of Washington(US)

    1.11.22

    By: Brooke Fisher
    Photos: Dennis Wise and Dana Brooks / University of Washington
    Video: Kiyomi Taguchi / University of Washington

    Making sense of chaos isn’t an easy task, but a team of CEE researchers is up for the challenge. With an elevated risk of a tsunami event in the Pacific Northwest, the researchers are working to better understand how debris collectively causes tsunami-induced damage in coastal communities.

    1
    A side view of the test specimen while it is struck by debris in the wave flume.

    2
    Associate Professor Mike Motley diagrams the test parameters being studied through the experiments.

    “The idea we came up with was to really embrace the chaos of the event and the fact that debris is rarely a single shipping container. It’s usually a house that has separated into its individual components or a parking lot full of cars,” says CEE Associate Professor Mike Motley. “We are looking for ways to quantify something that is random and amorphous.”

    The research is timely, with a major subduction zone earthquake predicted for the Pacific Northwest, which could trigger a tsunami along the Washington coast, extending up into British Columbia and down into California. The Cascadia Subduction Zone, which last ruptured in A.D. 1700, is active roughly every 300-600 years.

    Cascadia subduction zone

    “It’s a very urgent concern. There have been tsunamis in Chile, American Samoa, Indonesia and Japan. We are the one area that hasn’t been directly impacted in the past 20 years,” Motley says. “The interesting thing here is we get one shot — once the subduction zone event occurs, it resets and we wouldn’t expect to see another event for several hundred years.”

    To ensure that structures are designed to withstand a tsunami event, the researchers’ goal is to inform the tsunami building codes used in the United States. Now in its second year, the three-year National Science Foundation-funded project is led by Motley in collaboration with CEE Professors Pedro Arduino and Marc Eberhard. Also involved are graduate students Nikki Lewis, Dakota Mascarenas, Justin Bonus and undergraduate students Abbey Serrone and Haley Herberg.


    UW researchers look at how tsunami debris impacts buildings.

    Debris damage

    Joining forces with waves and water, debris can cause major damage during a tsunami. While existing research details how a single piece of debris impacts the built environment during a tsunami, there is a gap in understanding how different types of debris, called a debris field, interact with structures simultaneously.

    “If you look at any tsunami event, the flow itself isn’t comprised of only water, but everything the tsunami picks up when it goes through an area. Debris can include trees, collapsed buildings, vehicles and fixtures,” says Ph.D. student Nikki Lewis. “Anything that can be swept away in a flow and transported to a different location can cause damage to another structure.”

    To learn how different types of debris act together to cause damage during a tsunami, the researchers are investigating the collective forces in a debris field. They are also exploring a phenomenon called damming, which occurs when debris collects in an open space, such as between two columns on a bridge. This creates a dam that causes additional debris and fluid to accumulate, which may cause the structure to give way — and potentially join the debris field.

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    Top:Ph.D. student Nikki Lewis watches video from an overhead webcam in the wave flume that offers a better view of the lateral movement of debris. Middle: A field of debris of various shapes impacts the test specimen and accumulates, creating a damming force. Bottom: Undergraduate student Haley Herberg organizes debris for future tests. To study the effect of geometry and mass when the debris strikes the specimen, the debris was cut into various thicknesses and lengths.

    Early experiments

    By conducting repetitious experiments with slight variations, the researchers hope to identify patterns that emerge. During the course of 10 weeks, more than 400 trials were conducted in a wave flume that simulated tsunami-like waves at The Oregon State University (US)’s O.H. Hinsdale Wave Laboratory in spring 2021.

    5
    Tests conducted at Oregon State University entailed releasing debris into a wave flume, which tsunami-like waves transported to an orange instrumented box that measured the impact.

    “If you take one piece of debris, it is easy to quantify the ways it impacts something, but there are a lot of ways numerous pieces of debris can orient themselves,” Motley says. “So, we tried to do as many realizations as we could, to look at how much randomness we would get and the disparity of results for tests that are to some extent the same.”

    During the experiments, which ran continuously in 15-minute increments, rectangular debris blocks were lowered into a wave tank. Once released, a tsunami-like wave carried the debris toward an instrumented box equipped with sensors and other technology to measure the impact of the debris. The researchers used debris of varying sizes and quantity and arranged them in different configurations, from random to organized. The velocity of the waves also varied.

    “If you envision a house that collapsed during a tsunami event, what remains could affect other structures in a random assortment of impacts. And so we tested configurations with various parameters, including how tightly packed the debris field was,” says master’s student Dakota Mascarenas, who led the experiments.

    Subsequent experiments were conducted at the UW’s Harris Hydraulics Lab this autumn, as the researchers evaluated the facility’s capabilities in preparation for additional trials in the coming year.

    “The idea moving forward is to have thousands of pieces of debris that can be introduced into the flume and will be representative of a tsunami-like event,” Motley says. “We hope to model the actual physical tsunami a little better on a smaller scale.”

    Looking for patterns

    Identifying trends and patterns in the preliminary data will enable the researchers to begin building computer models capable of predicting how a debris field will interact with structures during a tsunami.

    6
    Ph.D. student Nikki Lewis takes notes as an array of high density polyurethane blocks, which serve as debris, is deployed into the flume.

    “We are already starting to see some trends shake out, such as trends based on the amount of debris that we put in the flume and the orientation of the debris field,” Motley says.

    Considering the complex nature of a debris field, the researchers will combine multiple modeling methods: high fidelity fluid models that explore how water flows around rigid shapes and material point models that evaluate how objects interact in a fluid flow. The modeling work will be undertaken in collaboration with the Natural Hazards Engineering Research Infrastructure SimCenter at The University of California-Berkeley (US). In addition to predicting tsunami damage, the models will also help answer pressing questions, such as pinpointing what caused the ultimate failure of a structure — the tsunami or the earthquake.

    “We are on a quest for understanding,” Lewis says. “We want to ensure that design guidelines are suitable for future tsunamis, which are so chaotic and unpredictable that it’s hard to intuitively say what will happen.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The University of Washington (US) Civil & Environmental Engineering

    Take a moment to look around you. Buildings, bridges, running water and transit systems are the work of civil and environmental engineers.
    2
    Civil and environmental engineers design, construct and manage the essential facilities, systems and structures around us. Their work plays a crucial role in enabling livable, sustainable cities, healthy environments and strong economies.

    At the University of Washington, Civil & Environmental Engineering students and faculty are taking on the challenges presented by our aging national infrastructure, while developing new approaches to address the needs of urban systems and communities around the globe. UW CEE is dedicated to providing students with leading-edge technical skill development and opportunities for hands-on practice to enable them to tackle complex engineering problems in response to changing technological and societal needs.

    Housed in an outstanding university, UW CEE offers one of the world’s premier programs in the field. The UW College of Engineering undergraduate program is ranked #18 and CEE’s graduate programs are ranked #16 for civil engineering and #27 for environmental engineering for 2020, according to U.S. News & World Report.

    The University of Washington College of Engineering

    Mission, Facts, and Stats

    Our mission is to develop outstanding engineers and ideas that change the world.

    Faculty:
    275 faculty (25.2% women)

    Achievements:

    128 NSF Young Investigator/Early Career Awards since 1984
    32 Sloan Foundation Research Awards
    2 MacArthur Foundation Fellows (2007 and 2011)

    A national leader in educating engineers, each year the College turns out new discoveries, inventions and top-flight graduates, all contributing to the strength of our economy and the vitality of our community.

    Engineering innovation

    Engineers drive the innovation economy and are vital to solving society’s most challenging problems. The College of Engineering is a key part of a world-class research university in a thriving hub of aerospace, biotechnology, global health and information technology innovation. Over 50% of UW startups in FY18 came from the College of Engineering.

    Commitment to diversity and access

    The College of Engineering is committed to developing and supporting a diverse student body and faculty that reflect and elevate the populations we serve. We are a national leader in women in engineering; 25.5% of our faculty are women compared to 17.4% nationally. We offer a robust set of diversity programs for students and faculty.

    Research and commercialization

    The University of Washington is an engine of economic growth, today ranked third in the nation for the number of startups launched each year, with 65 companies having been started in the last five years alone by UW students and faculty, or with technology developed here. The College of Engineering is a key contributor to these innovations, and engineering faculty, students or technology are behind half of all UW startups. In FY19, UW received $1.58 billion in total research awards from federal and nonfederal sources.

    u-washington-campus

    The University of Washington is one of the world’s preeminent public universities. Our impact on individuals, on our region, and on the world is profound — whether we are launching young people into a boundless future or confronting the grand challenges of our time through undaunted research and scholarship. Ranked number 10 in the world in Shanghai Jiao Tong University rankings and educating more than 54,000 students annually, our students and faculty work together to turn ideas into impact and in the process transform lives and our world. For more about our impact on the world, every day.
    So what defines us —the students, faculty and community members at the University of Washington? Above all, it’s our belief in possibility and our unshakable optimism. It’s a connection to others, both near and far. It’s a hunger that pushes us to tackle challenges and pursue progress. It’s the conviction that together we can create a world of good. Join us on the journey.

     
  • richardmitnick 8:58 am on January 6, 2022 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Satellite system success", , , Bangladesh, , In each country the system is tailored to the specific needs of the farmers., , Irrigation provided water, More than 100000 farmers benefit from water conservation and improved crop yield., , Satellite-based irrigation advisory system, The system can be used for a variety of crops from rice to bananas to wheat., The system utilizes weather and satellite data and estimated water consumption by crop to generate text messages that are delivered directly to farmers’ cell phones., The University of Washington (US) Civil & Environmental Engineering, Water scarcity is a pressing issue throughout South Asia and beyond.   

    From The University of Washington (US) Civil & Environmental Engineering: “Satellite system success” 

    From The University of Washington (US) Civil & Environmental Engineering

    In

    The University of Washington College of Engineering

    At


    The University of Washington(US)

    December 13, 2021 [Just today in social media.]

    Brooke Fisher
    Marketing & Communications Manager
    206-543-4514
    brooke22@uw.edu

    2
    Checking his cell phone, a Pakistani farmer reads weather updates and estimates of how much irrigation water he will need over the next few days, provided by the Irrigation Advisory System. Credit: Faisal Hossain and Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources.

    Five years ago, when Professor Faisal Hossain helped implement a new satellite-based irrigation advisory system in Pakistan, it was uncharted territory. But that territory now includes three countries and more than 100,000 farmers who benefit from water conservation and improved crop yield.

    “Because this was never something I planned to do, I am pleasantly surprised at how successful the system has been and how it’s grown and expanded to other countries like India and Bangladesh,” Hossain says. “This is one of the most enjoyable things I’ve worked on.”

    Water scarcity is a pressing issue throughout South Asia and beyond. While modern-day irrigation practices enable more farming and food production, they are estimated to consume between 60-90% of global freshwater. To help conserve water by preventing the overwatering of crops, the Pakistan Council of Research in Water Resources began working on a project in 2015 to utilize satellite-based data to provide irrigation advisories to farmers. When the government agency realized that available information wasn’t user-friendly for farmers, they reached out to Hossain.

    “I had an epiphany; we do all this great scientific research driven by making it user-inspired,” Hossain recalls. “I realized this is not hard to solve, we just need to package it in a way that is user-ready.”

    The advisory system that Hossain and his research team helped develop utilizes weather and satellite data and estimated water consumption by crop to generate text messages that are delivered directly to farmers’ cell phones. The system can be used for a variety of crops from rice to bananas to wheat. Examples of messages include “Dear farmer friend, we would like to inform you that the irrigation need for your banana crop is two inches this week” and “Corn fields do not need irrigation due to sufficient rainfall prediction this week.”

    “The farmers mostly over-irrigate and sometimes under-irrigate due to lack of information. I grew up in a farmer family in Bangladesh, so I understand the stressful time that farmers pass during the winter dry season,” says alumnus Nishan Kumar Biswas (Ph.D. ’21), who worked on the advisory systems during his graduate studies. “Farmers don’t have access to weather forecast information and crop water demand. Thus, they don’t know if plants need water right at the moment and if there will be any rain in the upcoming days.”


    Cotton Ivory Final 18 June HD.
    17 minutes

    Expanding east

    First implemented in Pakistan, the irrigation advisory system has since expanded to India and northeastern Bangladesh, now serving more than 100,000 farmers. In Bangladesh, which is the world’s fourth largest rice producer, the system is being considered for adoption countrywide in 2022 by the government’s Department of Agricultural Extension (DAE).

    In each country the system is tailored to the specific needs of the farmers. For example, farmers in India and Bangladesh grow a wider variety of crops on a smaller scale than farmers in Pakistan. To account for the greater variety in crops, the researchers introduced inexpensive low-power ground sensors in India. The sensors collect information specific to each plot of land, such as temperature and humidity, which is used to generate a greater number of irrigation advisories. And depending on the country, text messages are customized to reflect how farmers in a particular area may measure water. For example, a text message may advise farmers to “apply half a finger of irrigation,” which ends up being about 1.5 inches. This is based on finger markings that divide fingers into three parts, each about 1 inch in length.

    4
    Based on satellite data, a map shows shallow groundwater storage in southern Asia for March 15, 2021. Areas in blue have abundant water, while red and orange areas contain less water than usual.

    5
    UW graduate student Shahryar Ahmad (Ph.D. ’21) takes a photo while setting-up an automatic weather station that measures weather parameters in real time.

    “We realized that we had to customize the solution,” Hossain says. “We couldn’t use the same exact method somewhere else, as it would be received differently given different customs and culture.”

    The researchers have also been eager to add innovations along the way. In Bangladesh, the advisory system was made “smarter” by adding additional satellite data that helps track farmers’ individual water use. This allows the DAE to strategically target farmers in specific areas where severe over-irrigation occurs.

    _____________________________________

    Timeline of implementation:

    2016: 700 farmers in Pakistan trial the Irrigation Advisory System (IAS).

    2017: 10,000 farmers total use IAS in Pakistan.

    2018: 50,000 farmers in two countries use the advisory system after the Provision of Advisory for Necessary Irrigation (PANI) system is implemented in India.

    2020: 100,000 farmers in three countries use the advisory system after the Integrated Rice Advisory System (IRAS) is trialed in northeastern Bangladesh.
    _____________________________________

    Irrigation impact

    Throughout the three countries, studies and assessments indicate that the advisory systems have been largely beneficial. During dry-season rice production, a control group study was conducted in Bangladesh, supported by the Asian Development Bank. The study revealed that the farmers utilizing the advisory system used significantly less water and diesel fuel, which powers water pumps. On average, the advisory system reduced irrigation water use and fuel consumption by up to 40% while increasing earnings by up to 30% through increased rice production, a benefit of not overwatering crops.

    Informal assessments in the other two countries similarly revealed that the advisory systems were valuable. In India, 85% of farmers reported the system was beneficial. Farmers there also saw an increase in wheat yield by up to 25% when compared to the historical yield. In Pakistan, farmers saw up to 40% savings in irrigation water and a 15% increase in crop yield.

    “I get a lot of joy when farmers tell us this advisory system is giving them so much benefit,” Hossain says. “At the end of the day, that’s what we are supposed to do. We are supposed to make the world a better place.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The University of Washington (US) Civil & Environmental Engineering

    Take a moment to look around you. Buildings, bridges, running water and transit systems are the work of civil and environmental engineers.
    2
    Civil and environmental engineers design, construct and manage the essential facilities, systems and structures around us. Their work plays a crucial role in enabling livable, sustainable cities, healthy environments and strong economies.

    At the University of Washington, Civil & Environmental Engineering students and faculty are taking on the challenges presented by our aging national infrastructure, while developing new approaches to address the needs of urban systems and communities around the globe. UW CEE is dedicated to providing students with leading-edge technical skill development and opportunities for hands-on practice to enable them to tackle complex engineering problems in response to changing technological and societal needs.

    Housed in an outstanding university, UW CEE offers one of the world’s premier programs in the field. The UW College of Engineering undergraduate program is ranked #18 and CEE’s graduate programs are ranked #16 for civil engineering and #27 for environmental engineering for 2020, according to U.S. News & World Report.

    The University of Washington College of Engineering

    Mission, Facts, and Stats

    Our mission is to develop outstanding engineers and ideas that change the world.

    Faculty:
    275 faculty (25.2% women)

    Achievements:

    128 NSF Young Investigator/Early Career Awards since 1984
    32 Sloan Foundation Research Awards
    2 MacArthur Foundation Fellows (2007 and 2011)

    A national leader in educating engineers, each year the College turns out new discoveries, inventions and top-flight graduates, all contributing to the strength of our economy and the vitality of our community.

    Engineering innovation

    Engineers drive the innovation economy and are vital to solving society’s most challenging problems. The College of Engineering is a key part of a world-class research university in a thriving hub of aerospace, biotechnology, global health and information technology innovation. Over 50% of UW startups in FY18 came from the College of Engineering.

    Commitment to diversity and access

    The College of Engineering is committed to developing and supporting a diverse student body and faculty that reflect and elevate the populations we serve. We are a national leader in women in engineering; 25.5% of our faculty are women compared to 17.4% nationally. We offer a robust set of diversity programs for students and faculty.

    Research and commercialization

    The University of Washington is an engine of economic growth, today ranked third in the nation for the number of startups launched each year, with 65 companies having been started in the last five years alone by UW students and faculty, or with technology developed here. The College of Engineering is a key contributor to these innovations, and engineering faculty, students or technology are behind half of all UW startups. In FY19, UW received $1.58 billion in total research awards from federal and nonfederal sources.

    u-washington-campus

    The University of Washington is one of the world’s preeminent public universities. Our impact on individuals, on our region, and on the world is profound — whether we are launching young people into a boundless future or confronting the grand challenges of our time through undaunted research and scholarship. Ranked number 10 in the world in Shanghai Jiao Tong University rankings and educating more than 54,000 students annually, our students and faculty work together to turn ideas into impact and in the process transform lives and our world. For more about our impact on the world, every day.
    So what defines us —the students, faculty and community members at the University of Washington? Above all, it’s our belief in possibility and our unshakable optimism. It’s a connection to others, both near and far. It’s a hunger that pushes us to tackle challenges and pursue progress. It’s the conviction that together we can create a world of good. Join us on the journey.

     
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