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  • richardmitnick 9:43 am on June 29, 2022 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Suc­cess­ful high-speed flight ex­per­i­ments with new sound­ing rock­et con­fig­u­ra­tion", , Materials that can adequately withstand and dissipate high thermal loads are crucial for dealing with the thermo-mechanical loads that occurs during the re-entry phase., Reusable launch systems, STORT research project, The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)   

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE): “Suc­cess­ful high-speed flight ex­per­i­ments with new sound­ing rock­et con­fig­u­ra­tion” 

    DLR Bloc

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    6.28.22

    1
    Before the launch

    DLR has flown a three-stage sounding rocket for the first time.
    High-temperature structures, measurement techniques and evaluation algorithms for the re-entry phase of reusable launchers were tested.
    A modular and distributed data acquisition system enabled efficient collection of data from the various experiments.
    Focus: Spaceflight, aerothermodynamics, sounding rockets

    ____________________________________________________________________
    Reusable launch systems are exposed to high dynamic and thermo-mechanical loads during their return to Earth. The German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) has now successfully tested high temperature structures, advanced measurement techniques and design tools for the re-entry phase with the STORT (Schlüsseltechnologien für hochenergetische Rückkehrflüge von Trägerstufen – key technologies for high-energy return flights of launch stages) flight experiment. In the early morning of 26 June 2022, the three-stage rocket lifted off from the Andøya Space launch site in northern Norway. The upper stage reached a flight speed of approximately 9000 kilometres per hour at the apogee of its trajectory – at an altitude of 38 kilometres. This corresponds to a Mach number in excess of eight. It then descended into the Atlantic Ocean, more than 350 kilometres away from the launch site. Extensive measurement data were transmitted to the ground station during the flight.

    “To achieve higher flight speeds, we used a DLR sounding rocket with three stages instead of two for the first time,” explains Dorian Hargarten from the DLR Space Operations and Astronaut Training facility. “In addition, the third stage carrying various scientific payloads followed a particularly shallow trajectory at an altitude of 38 kilometres, travelling at up to eight times the speed of sound. Here, various high-temperature experiments were carried out – in circumstances similar to the heat build-up that occurs during re-entry into Earth’s atmosphere – at the high thermal loads to be investigated,” Hargarten continues.

    2
    Preparation of the flight experiment. Instrumented payloads consisting of the ceramic forebody, canard module, active cooling equipment segment, data acquisition unit and CFRP module ahead of the service module. Credit: © DLR. All rights reserved.

    Instrumented high temperature payloads under test

    Materials that can adequately withstand and dissipate high thermal loads are crucial for dealing with the thermo-mechanical loads that occurs during the re-entry phase. Robust combined aerothermal sensors for health monitoring are also essential. “In STORT, the forebody of the third stage consists of five ceramic segments,” explains the Principal Investigator for the STORT project, Ali Gülhan from the DLR Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology. “We equipped this with numerous heat flux sensors, thermocouples and pressure sensors every 90 degrees along four longitudinal lines and are now very excited about the data evaluation.”

    To carry out the thermal management experiments, the researchers used three fixed canards with ceramic outer shells. These were developed by the DLR Institute of Structures and Design. While one canard was actively cooled, the second canard was passively cooled. The third reference canard (without cooling) was also used to investigate the shock wave boundary layer interaction. The three canards showed different structural responses in flight under the same thermal load.

    A modular and distributed data acquisition system enabled the efficient collection of data from the various experiments. In the predecessor project, ATEK, a standard module made of aluminium alloys was replaced by a hybrid module consisting of a CFRP structure with metal flanges to reduce the weight of the cylindrical payload segments. In the STORT project, the researchers tested an even lighter module made entirely of CFRP.

    In addition to DLR, the Technical University of Munich participated in the STORT flight experiment; their contribution involved manufacturing the CFRP module. Another international partner was the University of Arizona, which carried out simulations for the ‘shock wave boundary layer interaction’ experiment on one of the canards. The Mobile Rocket Base (MORABA) department of the DLR Space Operations and Astronaut Training facility was responsible for planning and executing the mission. The forebody and canards were designed and manufactured by the DLR Institute of Structures and Design. The project is led by the DLR Institute of Aerodynamics and Flow Technology, which was also responsible for the aerothermal design, the active cooling experiment, instrumentation of the payloads and the modular data acquisition system.

    About the STORT project

    The flight experiment that has now been successfully carried out is one element of the STORT research project. This project is part of the DLR ‘Reusable Space Transport Systems’ programme. Its goal is to develop selected technologies and methods related to the thermomechanical analysis and evaluation of launch systems. For this purpose, high-temperature structures, measurement methods and evaluation algorithms developed during fundamental research were adapted for the flight experiments and qualified during the flight. As a complement to ground-based experiments, the flight data provide validation inputs for physical modelling, numerical simulations and system analysis and thus enable the reliable design and evaluation of future launcher systems. The other institutions involved in the project are the DLR Institute of Space Systems, the DLR Institute of Composite Structures and Adaptive Systems and the DLR Institute for Software Technology.

    See the full article here .

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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    DLR Center
    The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.] (DE) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany. Its extensive research and development work in aeronautics, space, energy, transport and security is integrated into national and international cooperative ventures. In addition to its own research, as Germany’s space agency, DLR has been given responsibility by the federal government for the planning and implementation of the German space programme. DLR is also the umbrella organisation for the nation’s largest project management agency.

    DLR has approximately 8000 employees at 16 locations in Germany: Cologne (headquarters), Augsburg, Berlin, Bonn, Braunschweig, Bremen, Goettingen, Hamburg, Juelich, Lampoldshausen, Neustrelitz, Oberpfaffenhofen, Stade, Stuttgart, Trauen, and Weilheim. DLR also has offices in Brussels, Paris, Tokyo and Washington D.C.

     
  • richardmitnick 11:19 am on June 13, 2022 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "DPAC": Data Processing and Analysis Consortium, "One step clos­er to un­der­stand­ing the Milky Way", , , , , Largest census of binary stars to date, , The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE), The full third data release (DR3) on 13 June 2022   

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE): “One step clos­er to un­der­stand­ing the Milky Way” 

    DLR Bloc

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    6.13.22

    Gaia satellite mission completes third star catalogue.

    1
    Asteroid locations 6.13.22. Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC.

    2
    Chemical composition of stars. Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC.

    3
    Gaia measures the movement of the stars. Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC.

    4
    Star spectra in color. Credit: ESA/Gaia/DPAC.
    ___________________________________________________________
    Unraveling the mysteries of the Milky Way and mapping it in the process is one of the main goals of the Gaia mission. On 13 June 2022, the mission came a step closer to achieving this with the publication of the complete third star catalogue. Gaia observed and measured approximately 1.8 billion celestial objects for this purpose. By the expected end of the mission in 2025, the largest and most accurate star catalogue to date, comprising around two billion celestial bodies, will have been created.

    Largest census of binary stars to date

    “In the last 34 months, Gaia has gained many new insights and significantly expanded the previous catalogue,” explains Alessandra Roy, Gaia Project Manager at the German Space Agency at DLR. “For example, the data contains the positions of around 156,000 small bodies, such as asteroids, in the Solar System. Another highlight is the largest census of binary stars in the Milky Way to date, which is crucial to understanding the formation of stars.” In addition, Gaia observed and documented numerous exoplanet transits.

    To achieve its scientific goals, Gaia has to record hundreds of celestial objects per second almost continuously. To do this, the spacecraft maps the objects in the Milky Way in three dimensions by measuring their positions, their distances from and their velocities with respect to Earth. The scientific instruments on board measure the apparent displacement of the stars in the sky resulting from Earth’s orbit around the Sun (stellar parallax) and distinguish it from their real movement through the galaxy.

    Even for the nearest stars, the apparent motion is tiny – it is less than one arcsecond. Gaia measures the position of stars to an accuracy of about one 20-millionth of an arcsecond, “This is equivalent to measuring the diameter of a human hair by an observer positioned 1000 kilometres away,” Roy clarifies. “But the spacecraft can do more than that; it also determines the brightness, temperature and chemical composition as well as the age of the nearly two billion objects observed.” All these parameters are important for understanding the lifecycle and origin of the observed stars.

    Big Data in space

    This enormous amount of information is analyzed by the Data Processing and Analysis Consortium (DPAC). DPAC is a collaboration of around 400 researchers and software engineers working in six different computer centres across Europe. The processed data are already being used successfully by researchers worldwide; since the beginning of the mission, the information from Gaia has been the basis for around 8000 scientific publications.

    Celestial objects have been documented since antiquity; the first star catalogue was compiled in the second century BC by the Greek astronomer Hipparchus of Nicaea. Since then, the records have become increasingly precise. But the measurement of star positions from the ground is limited by the turbulence of Earth’s atmosphere. ESA’s Hipparcos mission (1989-1993) was the first astrometry space mission and mapped about 120,000 stars.

    The complete Gaia catalogue will be 10,000 to 20,000 times larger than that of Hipparcos, as it will contain measurements of the physical parameters and 3D positions of about one percent of the hundred billion stars in our galaxy. The accuracy of the Gaia information also exceeds that of the previous data by a factor of 20 to 50.

    The Gaia mission was launched in 2013 and has been collecting scientific data ever since. The publication of this information is divided into individual catalogues due to the enormous amount of data. The first release, which took place in September 2014, already included the parallaxes and proper motions of around two million stars. The second Gaia release in April 2018 already contained 1.3 billion measurements and was even more accurate than the first. The third catalogue was split into two instalments – the early data release (eDR3), published in December 2020, and the full third data release (DR3) on 13 June 2022.

    Two more releases are currently planned. The fourth Gaia catalogue will be based on data from the first five years since Gaia’s launch and is scheduled to be published by the end of 2025. It will contain complete astrometric and photometric data for nearly two billion stars, as well as a list of variable stars, multiple star systems and exoplanets. Due to a possible mission extension to 2025, a fifth catalogue is planned, which is expected to be published in 2030.

    The new Gaia data is available in the Gaia archive as of 12:00 CEST on 13 June 2022.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    DLR Center
    The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.] (DE) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany. Its extensive research and development work in aeronautics, space, energy, transport and security is integrated into national and international cooperative ventures. In addition to its own research, as Germany’s space agency, DLR has been given responsibility by the federal government for the planning and implementation of the German space programme. DLR is also the umbrella organisation for the nation’s largest project management agency.

    DLR has approximately 8000 employees at 16 locations in Germany: Cologne (headquarters), Augsburg, Berlin, Bonn, Braunschweig, Bremen, Goettingen, Hamburg, Juelich, Lampoldshausen, Neustrelitz, Oberpfaffenhofen, Stade, Stuttgart, Trauen, and Weilheim. DLR also has offices in Brussels, Paris, Tokyo and Washington D.C.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:52 am on June 13, 2022 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Smart­phone tech­nol­o­gy pro­vides satel­lites with in­creased com­put­ing pow­er", A general challenge for computer systems in satellites is that cosmic radiation can interfere with their operation., A larger ScOSA system consisting of radiation-hardened and commercially available processors will soon be tested on a dedicated DLR CubeSat., DLR is developing distributed and heterogeneous on-board computers for future space missions., , Reliable and powerful computers play a central role in spaceflight., Testing on the OPS-SAT satellite in low-Earth orbit, The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE), The DLR researchers installed and successfully tested the ScOSA software on OPS-SAT together with ESA.   

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE): “Smart­phone tech­nol­o­gy pro­vides satel­lites with in­creased com­put­ing pow­er” 

    DLR Bloc

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    6.13.22

    1
    OPS-SAT re­search plat­form. Credit: ESA.

    2
    ScOSA computer. Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

    -DLR is developing distributed and heterogeneous on-board computers for future space missions.
    -These combine radiation-hardened and commercially available processors that monitor one another and redistribute tasks in the event of an error.
    -A successful experiment has been conducted on board an ESA research satellite, processing Earth observation data.
    -Focus: Space, Earth observation, technology
    _________________________________________________________
    Reliable and powerful computers play a central role in spaceflight – for example, computer systems in satellites enable sophisticated Earth observation missions. The German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) is developing a new computer architecture that will provide On-Board Computers (OBCs) with more power as well as enabling them to repair themselves. Distributed heterogeneous OBCs are being created in the Scalable On-Board Computing for Space Avionics (ScOSA) flight experiment project. They feature different computing nodes that are connected to form a network.

    A general challenge for computer systems in satellites is that cosmic radiation can interfere with their operation. “If a radiation particle impacts a digital memory element, it might turn a zero into a one,” explains Project Manager Daniel Lüdtke from the DLR Institute for Software Technology in Braunschweig. Ultimately, the system can even fail or deliver incorrect results. For this reason, radiation-hardened processors are available for use in space. However, these are very expensive and have only limited computing power. On the other hand, processors such as those used for smartphones are very powerful and also much cheaper. They are, however, much more vulnerable to space radiation. ScOSA integrates both types of processors in one system.

    Testing on the OPS-SAT satellite in low-Earth orbit

    Special software detects errors and failures, and manages the computers. “In this process, programs running on a faulty processor are automatically transferred to other processors via the network,” explains Lüdtke. Meanwhile, the satellite continues to function normally. The software then restarts the processor and re-integrates it into the system.

    An experiment on the European Space Agency (ESA) OPS-SAT satellite has now shown that this works. “The satellite, which is 30 by 10 by 10 centimetres in size and contains an experimental computer, has been in low-Earth orbit since the end of 2019. OPS-SAT is available to researchers as a fully equipped and open platform,” explains David Evans, ESA Project Lead for the mission.

    The DLR researchers installed and successfully tested the ScOSA software on OPS-SAT together with ESA. To do this, the satellite acquired Earth observation images, then processed and evaluated them using artificial intelligence. The satellite then only transmitted the viable images to a ground station. “Sensors with increasingly high resolutions and complex algorithms require more and more computing power,” says Daniel Lüdtke, summarising the requirements for software and hardware. A larger ScOSA system consisting of radiation-hardened and commercially available processors will soon be tested on a dedicated DLR CubeSat. This small satellite is expected to be launched at the end of 2023.

    Development of software for space missions

    The Onboard Software Systems Group of the DLR Institute for Software Technology is involved in several national and international space missions. A central research topic in this context is the development of fault-tolerant and resilient software that can react to errors and failures. In addition to the Institute for Software Technology, the DLR institutes of Space Systems and Optical Sensor Systems, and DLR Space Operations and Astronaut Training are also involved in the ScOSA flight experiment project.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    DLR Center
    The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.] (DE) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany. Its extensive research and development work in aeronautics, space, energy, transport and security is integrated into national and international cooperative ventures. In addition to its own research, as Germany’s space agency, DLR has been given responsibility by the federal government for the planning and implementation of the German space programme. DLR is also the umbrella organisation for the nation’s largest project management agency.

    DLR has approximately 8000 employees at 16 locations in Germany: Cologne (headquarters), Augsburg, Berlin, Bonn, Braunschweig, Bremen, Goettingen, Hamburg, Juelich, Lampoldshausen, Neustrelitz, Oberpfaffenhofen, Stade, Stuttgart, Trauen, and Weilheim. DLR also has offices in Brussels, Paris, Tokyo and Washington D.C.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:07 am on May 25, 2022 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "DLR presents tech­nolo­gies for de­car­bon­i­sa­tion in the en­er­gy and in­dus­tri­al and mo­bil­i­ty sec­tors", Hannover Messe 2022, Insights into its research for a climate-friendly energy supply system and for the decarbonization of industry and mobility., The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)   

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE): “DLR presents tech­nolo­gies for de­car­bon­i­sa­tion in the en­er­gy and in­dus­tri­al and mo­bil­i­ty sec­tors” 

    DLR Bloc

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    5.25.22

    At the Hannover Messe 2022, DLR will provide insights into its research for a climate-friendly energy supply system and for the decarbonisation of industry and mobility.
    The focus is on technologies, innovations and transfer and spin-off projects.
    Focus: Energy, energy storage, hydrogen, decarbonisation, emission-free flight, digitalisation, technology transfer

    1
    Evora Molten Salt PLatform

    2
    High-temperature Heat Pump

    3
    Krummendeich Research Wind Farm

    4
    Fuel Cell Cargo Bicycle

    5
    Electrisity Based Fuels for Climate Friendly Mobility

    The German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) will be presenting technologies, innovations and successful transfer and spin-off projects at Hannover Messe 2022. From 30 May to 2 June, at the 120-square-metre stand (Energy Solutions, Hall 13, D18), visitors will be able to gain an insight into DLR’s research for a future climate-friendly energy supply system and for the decarbonization of industrial processes and mobility.

    “Every day, new technologies emerge and valuable expertise is gained at DLR in the field of applied science. Together with partners from industry – from small and medium-sized companies to start-ups and global corporations – DLR brings these from the laboratory into practical use,” says Karsten Lemmer, the DLR Executive Board member responsible for ‘Innovation, Transfer and Research Infrastructure’. He will present selected projects during the live event (31 May 2022, 12:00 CEST, livestream) and will be available to answer questions.

    Solar thermal with salt – for low-cost and controllable electricity from renewable sources

    With the Évora Molten Salt Platform (EMSP), DLR is operating a unique test facility together with the Portuguese University of Évora and European industrial partners. The goal is to further develop the technologies of solar thermal power plants and make them more competitive. To achieve this, the partners are using molten salt as a heat transfer medium instead of thermal oil. The advantage of molten salt is that it is more cost-effective and enables higher operating temperatures. This means that electricity can be provided up to 20 percent cheaper. Solar thermal power plants use concentrated sunlight to first generate heat and then electricity. They are one of the few options currently available for producing power using renewable resources in a continuous and controllable way. During a live event at the DLR stand (31 May 2022, 10:00 CEST, livestream), a direct link will be established to Portugal, which will broadcast an overview of the plant and short interviews with the researchers on site.

    Technologies for low-carbon-dioxide industrial processes – process heat from renewable sources

    Many industrial processes and plants require heat at high temperatures – which, at present, are often still generated using fossil fuels. Together with industry, DLR is working on solutions to use renewable sources in the future and thus substantially reduce carbon dioxide emissions. These solutions include a prototype of a special high-temperature heat pump in Cottbus and a pilot plant that is being constructed in Italy. This will supply a factory operated by the Italian pasta manufacturer Barilla with process heat generated by renewable solar power around the clock. The centrepiece is a special radiation receiver in a solar tower power plant. This receiver works with ceramic particles that are heated to temperatures of up to 1000 degrees Celsius. The receiver system is manufactured by the company Heliogen under a DLR licence.

    Wind energy research – on a large scale

    The DLR stand at the Hannover Messe also provides an exclusive insight into the wind energy research farm WiValdi (Wind Validation), which is currently under construction. This unique test infrastructure will enable wind energy research on full-size equipment – for DLR and partners from science and industry. The common goal is to make wind power more efficient, more cost-effective and quieter – as one of the pillars of a reliable and sustainable energy system. Using an instrumented rotor blade model, visitors to the DLR stand can experience and explore for themselves the forces and effects acting on the rotor blade of a wind turbine. Multimedia exhibits show data from the research park, convey the structure and focal points, and provide an insight into the production of rotor blades by DLR’s industrial partner in the Hannover Messe partner country Portugal.

    Climate-friendly mobility – bringing power-based fuels into use

    Electricity-based fuels – also referred to as e-fuels or Power-to-Liquid (PtL) fuels – are liquid fuels. To produce them, carbon dioxide from the air and hydrogen obtained using renewable electricity for electrolysis are used. In addition to alternative powertrains and further improvement options, power-based fuels are necessary to achieve climate protection targets in road transport and shipping. They are also indispensable for emission-free air transport – particularly on medium- and long-haul routes, where there are currently no technological alternatives. DLR is working with partners from industry and research to transfer the manufacturing processes from the laboratory – with the help of demonstration and pilot plants – to an industrial scale. This ‘scaling up’ is an essential step to make the technology suitable for industrial use and to be able to produce the large quantities required.

    Industrialization of hydrogen technologies

    Whether for energy, mobility or industry – hydrogen technologies will play a central role in all three sectors in order to produce less carbon dioxide. At the Hannover Messe, DLR is showing a fuel-cell-powered cargo bicycle that will be used primarily for delivering packages in inner cities. Compared to other powertrain technologies such as batteries, it offers a much greater range of 150 kilometres per tank filling, a longer daily period of use and short refuelling times of around three minutes.

    Further insights – ExoMatter spin-off project and DLR Quantum Computing Initiative

    Also part of the DLR stand are the spin-off project ExoMatter and the DLR Quantum Computing Initiative. The company ExoMatter digitalises material searches. The basis of this service is a cloud-based platform that also works with artificial intelligence methods. Within the framework of the DLR Quantum Computing Initiative, prototype quantum computers of different architectures are to be built and the associated technologies and applications developed within the next four years. DLR is contributing its own skills and expertise from research and development. The establishment of an industrially sustainable ecosystem and the implementation in commercially relevant applications are the focal points.

    DLR contributions to the Hannover Messe conference programme

    DLR is represented in the Hannover Messe conference programme (Main Stage, Hall 18, H’Up) by high-profile speakers and panellists. Topics include Space and Sustainability, Satellite Data for Industry, and Space Technology – Industrial Use Cases.

    All information about DLR at Hannover Messe can also be found on the DLR special page: https://event.dlr.de/en/hannover-messe-2022/

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    DLR Center
    The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.] (DE) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany. Its extensive research and development work in aeronautics, space, energy, transport and security is integrated into national and international cooperative ventures. In addition to its own research, as Germany’s space agency, DLR has been given responsibility by the federal government for the planning and implementation of the German space programme. DLR is also the umbrella organisation for the nation’s largest project management agency.

    DLR has approximately 8000 employees at 16 locations in Germany: Cologne (headquarters), Augsburg, Berlin, Bonn, Braunschweig, Bremen, Goettingen, Hamburg, Juelich, Lampoldshausen, Neustrelitz, Oberpfaffenhofen, Stade, Stuttgart, Trauen, and Weilheim. DLR also has offices in Brussels, Paris, Tokyo and Washington D.C.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:45 am on May 23, 2022 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Tak­ing the pulse of our plan­et", , , , Earth and environmental observation are blind to borders., , Living Planet Symposium, Observing our planet and understanding how it is changing is more important than ever., The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE), The European Space Agency   

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE): “Tak­ing the pulse of our plan­et” 

    DLR Bloc

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    1
    The ESA and DLR Living Planet Symposium opened on 23 May 2022.

    The German Space Agency at DLR is co-hosting the ESA Living Planet Symposium, which will take place for the first time in Germany from 23–27 May 2022. The theme of this year’s symposium is ‘Taking the pulse of our planet from space’.

    More than 4700 Earth observation experts from around the world will meet at the World Conference Center (WCCB) in Bonn.

    The event will focus on the role of satellite-based Earth observation in addressing global challenges such as climate change, a sustainable economy and food security.

    There will also be a supporting programme to engage the public and schools.

    Focus: Space, Earth observation, climate protection, sustainability

    Measuring biomass, observing the world’s oceans, improving agricultural sustainability, surveying and improving air quality, documenting ice melt at the poles and developing countermeasures, using satellites for climate and crisis management, the economic impact of Earth observation and its role as a catalyst for technological progress – these are among the long list of topics on the agenda at the Living Planet Symposium. Organised by the European Space Agency (ESA) and co-hosted by the German Space Agency at DLR, this year’s symposium will run from 23–27 May 2022 and marks the first time that the event has been held in Germany.

    Using satellites to observe Earth from space provides the essential foundation for ongoing, active environmental and climate monitoring and the measures for global and regional environmental and climate protection they enable. Over 4700 participants from 74 countries, including more than 820 students, 40 exhibitors and 240 scientific sessions, will flock to the city of Bonn to spend a week at one of the world’s largest specialist conferences on Earth observation. The German Space Agency at DLR, which coordinates Germany’s contribution to ESA on behalf of the German government, is based here, as are various UN secretariats focusing on environmental and climate issues.

    “Germany is a world leader in the development and application of Earth observation technologies,” says Walther Pelzer, Member of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) Executive Board and Head of the German Space Agency at DLR. “The symposium is an excellent opportunity for international exchange among experts on the global challenges that affect us all, such as climate protection, food security and the implementation of sustainable technologies, which we can tackle in a more focused way with the help of Earth observation. We want to seize this opportunity to locate important environmental and climate policy targets at national and international levels. It is about protecting Earth, but also about protecting space, with a particular focus on the space pollution resulting from humankind’s increasing commercial use of space.”

    “Germany is the strongest financial partner in European Earth observation, in terms of its contribution to ESA and the programmes of the European Commission, such as Copernicus. We want to continue this focus at the next ESA Council at Ministerial Level in Paris in November 2022,” says Anna Christmann, Federal Government Coordinator of German Aerospace Policy, at the opening of the Living Planet Symposium in Bonn. “Observing our planet and understanding how it is changing is more important than ever. Germany will continue to be a dependable partner in Earth observation going forward. Space agencies, industry, the science sector and institutional and commercial users can all rely on us. Against this backdrop, I would particularly recommend a visit to the ‘Space4ourPlanet’ exhibition, which shows how spaceflight and the UN’s sustainability goals go hand in hand.”

    “The Living Planet Symposium has become one of the most important conferences in the field of Earth observation,” says ESA Director General Josef Aschbacher. “Thanks to the Sentinel satellites of its Copernicus programme Europe provides the most accurate observations of our planet today.

    Earth and environmental observation are blind to borders. Together we must make every effort to better understand climate change, for the benefit of future generations within Europe and across the world. ESA’s Earth observation programme provides a globally renowned cornerstone for these endeavours.”

    Katja Dörner, Mayor of Bonn, adds: “Bonn isn’t just the city in which the United Nations have pooled their efforts towards achieving the global sustainability goals, but also a centre for Earth observation. Areas of research such as disaster forecasting, weather monitoring, agricultural sustainability, biodiversity and education for sustainable development are addressed by outstanding scientific and research organisations, public institutions and companies. The Living Planet Symposium brings everyone together and focuses on the future we want to ensure for generations to come.”

    The supporting programme running alongside the Living Planet Symposium includes the ‘Space4ourPlanet‘ travelling exhibition, sponsored by the United Nations. Interested parties can view the exhibition outside the WCCB. There is also a DLR_School_Lab with over 400 registered attendees (by appointment only), which presents remote sensing technologies and techniques in a format that is accessible to children and young people. The German Space Agency at DLR also has a stand at which you can examine climate zones with satellite images. Two exhibits from the INNOspaceEXPO will be on display, on the theme of knowledge and education. The school lab will be open to families with children aged eight and over on the mornings of 26 and 27 May.

    The Federal Ministry of Food and Agriculture has worked with the German Space Agency at DLR to organise an event on ‘Earth observation and agricultural applications’, including food security, on 24 May. On 25 May 2022 – ‘Climate Day’ at the LPS – ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano will give a talk on his expedition to the Gorner glacier, once the third-largest glacier in the Alps, which has melted significantly due to climate change.

    For more information, see: Living Planet Symposium 2022.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    DLR Center
    The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.] (DE) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany. Its extensive research and development work in aeronautics, space, energy, transport and security is integrated into national and international cooperative ventures. In addition to its own research, as Germany’s space agency, DLR has been given responsibility by the federal government for the planning and implementation of the German space programme. DLR is also the umbrella organisation for the nation’s largest project management agency.

    DLR has approximately 8000 employees at 16 locations in Germany: Cologne (headquarters), Augsburg, Berlin, Bonn, Braunschweig, Bremen, Goettingen, Hamburg, Juelich, Lampoldshausen, Neustrelitz, Oberpfaffenhofen, Stade, Stuttgart, Trauen, and Weilheim. DLR also has offices in Brussels, Paris, Tokyo and Washington D.C.

     
  • richardmitnick 11:27 am on May 6, 2022 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Test­ing in­ter­ac­tions be­tween drones and tra­di­tion­al air­craft", The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE), With the reopening of Magdeburg-Cochstedt Airport DLR now has a real laboratory for unmanned aerial systems.   

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE): “Test­ing in­ter­ac­tions be­tween drones and tra­di­tion­al air­craft” 

    DLR Bloc

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    1
    Ceremonial opening of Magdeburg/Cochstedt Airport. © DLR.

    With the reopening of Magdeburg-Cochstedt Airport, DLR now has a real laboratory for unmanned aerial systems.
    Representatives from government, science and industry were present at the opening on 6 May 2022.
    The test site will be available to start-ups through to the established aviation industry for research and testing under real conditions in a controlled environment.
    Focus: Aeronautics, aviation, uncrewed flight

    __________________________________________________________________________
    Magdeburg-Cochstedt Airport has rejoined the German aviation network. The official reopening took place on 6 May 2022, attended by representatives from government, academia and industry. Take-offs and landings for aircraft up to 5.7 tonnes will once again be possible at Magdeburg-Cochstedt Airport, initially in accordance with visual flight rules. Linking the airport with the National Experimental Test Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems of the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR), has created a unique test infrastructure. Together, they make it possible to test the integration of uncrewed air traffic into regular, controlled flight operations in a comprehensive manner. The opening of the test centre and the associated start of tests involving uncrewed aircraft systems (UAS) took place in 2021. Customers and partners from industry, research and the authorities will now be provided with more extensive testing opportunities. The test centre is part of a Europe-wide network for UAS research.

    “The resumption of airport operations is another decisive step in the development and expansion of DLR’s Cochstedt site,” says Anke Kaysser-Pyzalla, Chair of the DLR Executive Board. “With Magdeburg-Cochstedt Airport, we are establishing a comprehensive field laboratory for our National Experimental Test Center for Unmanned Aircraft Systems. This laboratory serves to develop and test new technology concepts that will expand Germany’s pioneering role in the field of uncrewed flight and strengthen targeted technology transfer from research to industry.”

    Minister President Dr Reiner Haseloff said: “I am pleased that we have found a solid and reliable user of the traditional Cochstedt airfield in DLR. I am convinced that this will enable the site to be used on a permanent basis. The test centre will advance the region and permanently strengthen Saxony-Anhalt as a hub of science and innovation. The work on unmanned aerial systems will lead to many more possible applications. An important contribution to this will be made from Cochstedt in the future.”

    Armin Willingmann, Minister for Science, Energy, Climate Protection and the Environment of Saxony-Anhalt emphasised: “Uncrewed flight is an important topic for the future. I am therefore very pleased that, together with DLR, we have succeeded in developing Cochstedt Airport into a test centre for uncrewed aircraft systems. In the coming years, Cochstedt can develop into a beacon of research and an attractive place for companies from the aviation and logistics sector, giving Saxony-Anhalt a further boost as a location for science and business. It is therefore important that the Ministry of Science continues to institutionally support the test centre in the coming years.”

    Lydia Hüskens, Minister for Infrastructure and Digital Affairs of Saxony-Anhalt added: “The recently reopened Magdeburg-Cochstedt commercial airport enjoys special state interest as a national test centre for unmanned aircraft systems. The DLR initiative will break new ground in crewed and uncrewed aviation through the unique interactions between flight operations and research at the Magdeburg-Cochstedt site. I would like to thank all those involved – in particular the responsible aviation authorities and the airport operator, DLR – who have worked tirelessly over the past few months to make the airport fit for future research and who will continue to support this development.”

    The state administration office in Halle initially granted permission for take-offs and landings based on DLR’s operating concept on 1 April 2022. This has now been followed by the official reopening of the airport under the International Air Transport Association (IATA) code CSO. “With the reopening of the airport in Cochstedt, DLR is making a contribution to the provision of public services in the state of Saxony-Anhalt in addition to the site’s test operations,” says Lutz Tilgner, Managing Director and shareholder of Magdeburg-Cochstedt Airport Operating Company (Flughafen Magdeburg-Cochstedt Betriebsgesellschaft mbH), a subsidiary founded by DLR and Tilgner. “Traffic is initially limited to a permitted take-off weight of 5.7 tonnes in visual flight operations until the end of 2023, with operating hours on weekdays between 10:00 and 17:00.”

    Currently, the airport operating company employs six people to handle airport operations. As part of the phased concept to expand flight operations at Cochstedt, additional airport operations jobs are expected to follow from 2024, in addition to an increase in the weight restriction to 14 tonnes and the establishment of an instrument landing system.

    A wide range of partnerships for uncrewed aviation

    The activities in Cochstedt are integrated into DLR-wide projects and cooperation with partners from research and industry in Germany, Europe and around the world. DLR already cooperates scientifically in the field of UAS research with major research institutions such as the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Netherlands Aerospace Centre (NLR) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency. The test site in Saxony-Anhalt will be accessible to start-ups and established aerospace companies for research and testing and function as an incubator and enabler for start-ups and SMEs. For licensing reasons, it is necessary that new UAS are tested and qualified under realistic conditions in a controlled environment. New regulations for the operation of UAS also need to be extensively researched and developed.

    Existing buildings and facilities will be repaired and converted. The scientific infrastructure will then be developed and built up. To achieve operational status, the re-commissioning of the commercial airport took place on a smaller scale. A total of approximately 15 million euros will be invested in the development of scientific as well as operational infrastructures by the end of 2022. For the establishment of operational capability, 2.5 million euros were invested directly in the airport infrastructure. The remaining investment funds will be used primarily to build up research infrastructure as part of the establishment of the UAS test centre. New scientific and technical staff will advance the development in the coming months. The goal is to have a total of around 30 employees in research and operations at the site by the end of 2022, with up to 60 employees in the future.

    The first projects and test campaigns have already taken place in Cochstedt. For example, in 2021 there were extensive final tests of the DLR project City-ATM, in which several real drones were flown alongside approximately 100 virtual drones in a complex traffic scenario. In addition, various flight tests took place with the DLR uncrewed flight test vehicles SuperARTIS and the ALAADy Demonstrator. Additional research projects such as Drones4Good and HorizonUAM are being added. Projects with European research partners, industrial companies and NGOs, in the field of humanitarian aid, for example, are also working with the research facilities in Cochstedt. Further projects are in preparation.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    DLR Center
    The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.] (DE) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany. Its extensive research and development work in aeronautics, space, energy, transport and security is integrated into national and international cooperative ventures. In addition to its own research, as Germany’s space agency, DLR has been given responsibility by the federal government for the planning and implementation of the German space programme. DLR is also the umbrella organisation for the nation’s largest project management agency.

    DLR has approximately 8000 employees at 16 locations in Germany: Cologne (headquarters), Augsburg, Berlin, Bonn, Braunschweig, Bremen, Goettingen, Hamburg, Juelich, Lampoldshausen, Neustrelitz, Oberpfaffenhofen, Stade, Stuttgart, Trauen, and Weilheim. DLR also has offices in Brussels, Paris, Tokyo and Washington D.C.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:21 am on March 17, 2022 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "De­ter­min­ing the weight of Earth from space", The 'Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment' (GRACE) mission began on 17 March 2002 with the launch of the twin satellites 'Tom' and 'Jerry'., The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)   

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE): “De­ter­min­ing the weight of Earth from space” 

    DLR Bloc

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    The ‘Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment’ (GRACE) mission began on 17 March 2002 with the launch of the twin satellites ‘Tom’ and ‘Jerry’.
    The GRACE mission was a joint project between the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR), the US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences [Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum](DE).
    Following the end of GRACE operations in 2017, the ‘GRACE Follow-On’ mission has continued to successfully monitor the major changes in the ‘Earth ecosystem’ since its launch on 22 May 2018.
    GRACE and GRACE Follow-On data now form one of the bases for the reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).
    Focus: Space, climate change, global change

    At first glance, masses appear rigid and immobile. However, this is deceptive because they are constantly in motion. Liquid rock shifts in Earth’s interior, water is redistributed in large quantities across the oceans and on the continents, and air masses are constantly in flux. This uneven distribution means that Earth’s gravitational field is not constant across the globe. In locations with more mass, the gravitational force is slightly stronger than elsewhere.

    Since their launch, the satellites of the GRACE satellites on 17 March 2002 and those of the successor mission ‘GRACE Follow-On’ (GRACE-FO) have been recording these slow movements with great precision. “The GRACE satellites have made it possible to globally survey the mass transports in the Earth system for the first time. The GRACE and GRACE-FO missions have recorded every small change in these mass flows so precisely that researchers have been able to measure Earth’s water balance, among other things, with previously unattained accuracy and consistency. These measurements enable us to better understand the consequences of climate change, because, for example, the melting of the ice masses and the changes in the sea and groundwater levels can be determined more precisely,” explains Walther Pelzer, DLR Executive Board Member and Head of the German Space Agency at DLR.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    DLR Center
    The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.] (DE) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany. Its extensive research and development work in aeronautics, space, energy, transport and security is integrated into national and international cooperative ventures. In addition to its own research, as Germany’s space agency, DLR has been given responsibility by the federal government for the planning and implementation of the German space programme. DLR is also the umbrella organisation for the nation’s largest project management agency.

    DLR has approximately 8000 employees at 16 locations in Germany: Cologne (headquarters), Augsburg, Berlin, Bonn, Braunschweig, Bremen, Goettingen, Hamburg, Juelich, Lampoldshausen, Neustrelitz, Oberpfaffenhofen, Stade, Stuttgart, Trauen, and Weilheim. DLR also has offices in Brussels, Paris, Tokyo and Washington D.C.

     
  • richardmitnick 12:22 pm on March 16, 2022 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "DLR mea­sures flow phe­nom­e­na around wind tur­bines with a swarm of drones", The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE), The research objective is to accurately represent the three-dimensional flows and turbulence in the lowest layer of the atmosphere.   

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE): “DLR mea­sures flow phe­nom­e­na around wind tur­bines with a swarm of drones” 

    DLR Bloc

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)

    16 March 2022

    1
    Measurements at a wind turbine. Credit: DLR.

    2
    Drones in take-off position. Credit: DLR.

    The research objective is to accurately represent the three-dimensional flows and turbulence in the lowest layer of the atmosphere.

    Results could lead to a more efficient arrangement of wind turbines.

    Up to 100 drones ascend in formation.

    DLR increases the annual funding for wind energy research by one million euros.

    Focus: Energy, wind power, spaceflight, digitalisation, aeronautics, uncrewed flight

    DLR at a glance

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    The wind is not just ‘wind’ – but a complicated arrangement of turbulent features that are influenced by the surrounding environment. Air turbulence is created by the landscape, but also by buildings, roads and wind turbines. In the ESTABLIS-UAS project, the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) is researching these flow effects. For this purpose, a swarm of drones ascends and measures these phenomena. The results can be used, for example, to improve the arrangement of turbines in a wind farm.

    “Wind turbines are among the most important technologies for sustainable energy supply, both in Germany and worldwide. The further expansion of wind energy requires a significant increase in the performance of wind turbines. For this reason, the DLR Executive Board has decided to increase the annual funding for wind energy research by one million euros with immediate effect,” explains Anke Kaysser-Pyzalla, Chair of the DLR Executive Board. “DLR has been conducting research in this area for many years. Its activities make use of the many synergies with aerospace research. The work ranges from fundamental research to the further development of individual components in cooperation with industry.”

    “Understanding these turbulent, three-dimensional conditions plays an important role in the energy transition. This allows us to comprehend the loads to which wind turbines will be subjected during their lifecycle and to predict how much power they will feed into the energy grid,” says project leader Norman Wildmann from DLR’s Institute of Atmospheric Physics. Up to 100 drones take off from the ground in a fixed formation for the ESTABLIS-UAS (Exposing spatio-temporal Structures of Turbulence in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer with In-Situ measurements by a fleet of Unmanned Aerial Systems) project. The Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) measure wind characteristics, temperature and humidity with high resolution. Tests were carried out in advance with up to 20 of these small drones. They are particularly robust so that they can maintain their position and deliver results even at higher wind speeds.

    Tests in a wind tunnel and at the Wind Energy Research Farm

    Wind turbines generate their own turbulent effects in addition to the flow phenomena that already exist. As such, one goal of wind energy research at DLR is to develop a model that clearly shows the effects on the turbines in the second or third rows of a wind farm. “There is still some need for optimisation here. The answers to questions about how the wind behaves at these points are very complex,” explains Wildmann. “And this is not only dependent on the turbine, but also on local atmospheric conditions and the properties of the surrounding terrain. It is about a combination of the two.”

    In addition to measurements on wind turbines, experiments are planned in the wind tunnel at the Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg [Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg](DE), which is a partner in the Research Alliance Wind Energy (Forschungsverbund Windenergie; FVWE), and at the DLR Wind Energy Research Farm in Krummendeich. Two further measurement campaigns will take place as part of the international TEAMx initiative, which is dedicated to the study of complex flows in the boundary layer over mountainous terrain. All experiments will be supplemented by numerical simulations. Ultimately, a comprehensive model for the representation of turbulent flows will be created.

    Models of the atmospheric boundary layer complement knowledge from remote sensing

    The lowest layer of the atmosphere – the ‘Atmospheric Boundary Layer’ (ABL) – is directly influenced by Earth’s surface. Exchange and transport processes in the ABL are mainly driven by turbulence, which extends over a large range of scales; some turbulent phenomena are a few millimetres across, others are over a kilometre in size. Physical models for the ABL, which extends from the ground to an altitude of approximately 2000 metres, are not yet very accurate. Turbulence from interconnected features such as gusts, slope and valley winds, cities, wind turbines or aircraft are difficult to capture. “The ESTABLIS-UAS measurements fill an observational gap between very small, local processes near the ground and large-scale observations by remote sensing, research aircraft and satellites,” says Markus Rapp, Director of the DLR Institute of Atmospheric Physics in Oberpfaffenhofen. “Combining this with ground-based sensors and remote sensing enables completely new insights into the interaction of complex flow phenomena.” These models could then also explain how turbulent flows influence the mixing of the lower atmosphere. This is important, for example, in the dispersion of dust, pollutants and aerosols.

    The ESTABLIS-UAS project will run for five years. It is funded by the European Research Council (ERC) within the framework of an ERC Starting Grant.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    DLR Center
    The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.] (DE) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany. Its extensive research and development work in aeronautics, space, energy, transport and security is integrated into national and international cooperative ventures. In addition to its own research, as Germany’s space agency, DLR has been given responsibility by the federal government for the planning and implementation of the German space programme. DLR is also the umbrella organisation for the nation’s largest project management agency.

    DLR has approximately 8000 employees at 16 locations in Germany: Cologne (headquarters), Augsburg, Berlin, Bonn, Braunschweig, Bremen, Goettingen, Hamburg, Juelich, Lampoldshausen, Neustrelitz, Oberpfaffenhofen, Stade, Stuttgart, Trauen, and Weilheim. DLR also has offices in Brussels, Paris, Tokyo and Washington D.C.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:31 am on February 23, 2022 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Con­trol­ling mul­ti­ple air­ports from one con­trol cen­tre", The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)   

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE): “Con­trol­ling mul­ti­ple air­ports from one con­trol cen­tre” 

    DLR Bloc

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    2.23.22

    1
    Remote Tower Centre. © DLR.

    DLR and Frequentis are demonstrating in trials that remote monitoring of several airports from one control centre works.
    A pool of air traffic controllers flexibly provides their services to one or more (connected) airports.
    Novel planning tool assists with allocation and balances workload.
    Focus: Air transport

    Providing air traffic services at several airports from one central location – a ‘remote tower centre’ could make this a reality. In the future, today’s airport towers could be replaced by control centres to which several airports are connected for remote control. At the end of 2021, within the context of SESAR, the German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) and Frequentis set up a remote tower centre prototype from which Lithuanian and Polish air traffic controllers provided aerodrome traffic services to a total of 15 simulated airports. The trial showed that the idea of large-scale remote tower centres works.

    “In the test campaign, we prototyped newly developed planning tools for these large remote tower centres,” reports Jörn Jakobi from the DLR Institute of Flight Guidance. “These planning tools will be of central importance in these new working environments to optimally organise and utilise the available resources.”

    A promising concept for small, but also for medium and large airports

    Rather than relying on a few air traffic controllers in a single tower, there is a whole pool of air traffic controllers working in a remote tower centre, which means they can be deployed more flexibly when needed. Smaller airports in particular, where demand is high on weekends and public holidays but low during the week, can be operated more efficiently this way. “If the traffic volume at several airports drops significantly, a single air traffic controller can control some of them simultaneously,” says Jakobi. Medium-sized or large airports could also benefit from remote control by a centre. If the traffic volume increases during peak hours, air traffic controllers from the pool can provide support for a short time. A continuous balanced workload could be achieved in this way.

    Planning tool manages the complexity of efficient allocation

    The challenge with a large remote tower centre is the optimal allocation of the different airports to the air traffic controllers and the available workstations. “This complex task requires automatic planning tools to support the supervisor of a centre in devising the most suitable distribution of task load,” says Jakobi.

    As part of the EU-funded SESAR research project Digital Technologies for Tower (PJ05-W2 DTT), DLR, Frequentis AG and the Lithuanian and Polish air navigation services Oro Navigacija and PANSA have developed the concept and necessary planning tools for the remote control of several airports, implemented them in prototypes and tested them. The role of the supervisor position is key. This person monitors and distributes the task load to individual controllers and ensures that they are not underloaded or overworked. The planning tool combines various data, such as the number of arriving and departing aircraft and the expected traffic mix. The supervisor views the processed data and thus has a comprehensive overview of the current and future situation. In the event of poorly balanced task loads, the tool suggests possible solutions. If, for example, a controller is predicted to face an excessive workload, the planning tool helps the supervisor find an additional spare workstation and a suitable controller from the pool to assist.

    Initial feedback from the participating controllers shows the viability of the concept. “I am convinced that such remote tower centres represent the future,” says Jakobi. “They are the natural evolution of conventional towers at airports. This validation has shown the concept’s potential.”

    The project received funding from the SESAR Joint Undertaking as part of Horizon 2020, the European Union Framework Programme for Research and Innovation (grant number 874470).

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    DLR Center
    The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.] (DE) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany. Its extensive research and development work in aeronautics, space, energy, transport and security is integrated into national and international cooperative ventures. In addition to its own research, as Germany’s space agency, DLR has been given responsibility by the federal government for the planning and implementation of the German space programme. DLR is also the umbrella organisation for the nation’s largest project management agency.

    DLR has approximately 8000 employees at 16 locations in Germany: Cologne (headquarters), Augsburg, Berlin, Bonn, Braunschweig, Bremen, Goettingen, Hamburg, Juelich, Lampoldshausen, Neustrelitz, Oberpfaffenhofen, Stade, Stuttgart, Trauen, and Weilheim. DLR also has offices in Brussels, Paris, Tokyo and Washington D.C.

     
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