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  • richardmitnick 4:13 pm on July 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , DEll EMC Stampede 2 supercomputer, , , TACC   

    From NSF: “Stampede2 forges new frontier in advanced computing” 

    nsf
    National Science Foundation

    July 28, 2017

    The National Science Foundation (NSF) today realized the initial phase of its $30 million investment to upgrade the nation’s computational research infrastructure through the dedication of Stampede2, one of the most powerful supercomputing systems in the world. Based at the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin, this strategic national resource will serve tens of thousands of researchers and educators across the U.S.

    TACC Maverick HP NVIDIA supercomputer

    TACC Lonestar Cray XC40 supercomputer

    Dell Poweredge U Texas Austin Stampede Supercomputer. Texas Advanced Computer Center 9.6 PF

    TACC HPE Apollo 8000 Hikari supercomputer

    TACC Maverick HP NVIDIA supercomputer

    TACC DELL EMC Stampede2 supercomputer

    “Building on the success of the initial Stampede system, the Stampede team has partnered with other institutions as well as industry to bring the latest in forward-looking computing technologies combined with deep computational and data science expertise to take on some of the most challenging science and engineering frontiers,” said Irene Qualters, director of NSF’s Office of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure.

    Stampede2 is the newest strategic supercomputing resource for the nation’s research and education community, enabling scientists and engineers across the U.S., from multiple disciplines, to answer questions at the forefront of science and engineering. Importantly, Stampede2 leverages NSF’s existing investments in computational and data science, as well as user services, allowing academic researchers access to capabilities beyond the reach of a single institution while complementing other national high-performance computing infrastructure.

    Further, Stampede2 builds upon the initial Stampede system, also funded by NSF, which processed more than eight million successful jobs and delivered over three billion core hours of computation since it became operational in 2013.

    Stampede2 will offer more than twice the overall memory, storage capacity, bandwidth and system performance of the initial Stampede system. Yet Stampede2 will consume only half as much power and occupy just half the physical space of its predecessor. Innovations in how the supercomputer is cooled also resulted in efficiencies: Stampede2 is connected to a chilled water system that cools more cost-effectively and with less impact to the power grid than the standard air-conditioned approach.

    Once additional hardware and processors are added in the summer, Stampede2 will be able to process jobs at 18 petaflops, or 18 quadrillion mathematical operations per second, at peak performance. When Stampede2 is fully operational later this fall, the system will have roughly the processing power of 100,000 desktop computers; this increased speed and power will allow scientists and engineers to tackle larger, more complex problems that were not previously possible.

    Computational scientists and engineers pursuing a wide range of applications — from researchers who conduct large-scale simulations and data analyses on large swaths of the system, to those who interact with the system through web-based community platforms — will access Stampede2 through the NSF-supported eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

    Researchers have already started using the system to conduct large-scale scientific studies. Some preliminary findings from early user projects include:

    Tumor identification from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data at The University of Texas at Austin.
    Real-time weather forecasting at the University of Oklahoma that has helped direct storm-chaser trucks.
    Earthquake predictions for the Southern California region at the University of California, San Diego that achieved a fivefold performance improvement over previously reported results.
    Teams from Stephen Hawking’s cosmology research laboratory at Cambridge University, leveraging Stampede2, achieved unprecedented comparisons of previously performed simulations with gravitational wave data observed by the NSF-funded Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO).

    Several leading universities are collaborating with TACC to enable Stampede2, including Clemson University, Cornell University, Indiana University, The Ohio State University and the University of Colorado at Boulder. They are joined by industry partners Dell EMC, Intel Corporation and Seagate Technology, who are providing cyberinfrastructure expertise and services for the project.

    Stampede2 is expected to serve the scientific community through 2021, supporting tens of thousands of researchers during this period. An additional NSF award for $24 million was recently granted to cover upcoming operations and maintenance costs for the system.

    See the full article here .

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    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 “to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense…we are the funding source for approximately 24 percent of all federally supported basic research conducted by America’s colleges and universities. In many fields such as mathematics, computer science and the social sciences, NSF is the major source of federal backing.

    seal

     
  • richardmitnick 9:50 pm on December 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , TACC   

    From Science Node: “Supercomputing an earthquake-ready building” 

    Science Node bloc
    Science Node

    19 Dec, 2016
    Tristan Fitzpatrick

    Preparing for an earthquake takes more than luck, thanks to natural hazard engineers and their supercomputers.

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    Courtesy Ellen Rathje.

    If someone is inside a building during an earthquake, there isn’t much they can do except duck under a table and hope for the best.

    That’s why designing safe buildings is an important priority for natural hazards researchers.

    Natural hazards engineering involves experimentation, numerical simulation, and data analysis to improve seismic design practices.

    To facilitate this research, the US National Science Foundation (NSF) has invested in the DesignSafe cyberinfrastructure so that researchers can fully harness the vast amount of data available in natural hazards engineering.

    Led by Ellen Rathje at the University of Texas and developed by the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC), DesignSafe includes an interactive web interface, repositories to share data sets, and a cloud-based workspace for researchers to perform simulation, computation, data analysis, and other tasks.

    TACC bloc

    For example, scientists may use a device known as a shake table to simulate earthquake movement and measure how buildings respond to them.

    “From a shaking table test we can measure the movements of a building due to a certain seismic loading,” Rathje says, “and then we can develop a numerical model of that building subjected to the same earthquake loading.”

    Researchers then compare the simulation to experimental data that’s been collected previously from observations in the field.

    “In natural hazards engineering, we take advantage of a lot of experimental data,” Rathje says, “and try to couple it with numerical simulations, as well as field data from observations, and bring it all together to make advances.”

    The computational resources of Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) make these simulations possible. DesignSafe facilitates the use of these resources within the natural hazards engineering research community.

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    Taming the tsunami? The 2011 Tohuko tsunami caused severe structural damage and the loss of many lives — almost 16,000 dead, over 6,000 injured, and 2,500 missing. Natural hazards engineers use supercomputer simulations and shake tables to minimize damage by designing safer buildings. Courtesy EPA.

    According to Rathje, the merger between the two groups is beneficial for both and for researchers interested in natural hazards engineering.

    Rathje previously researched disasters such as the Haiti earthquake in 2010 and earthquakes in Japan. While the collaboration between XSEDE and TACC is a step forward for natural hazards research, Rathje says it’s just another step toward making buildings safer during earthquakes.

    “There’s still a lot of work to be done in natural hazards engineering,” she admits, “but we’ve been able to bring it all under one umbrella so that natural hazards researchers can come to one place to get the data they need for their research.”

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
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    Stem Education Coalition

    Science Node is an international weekly online publication that covers distributed computing and the research it enables.

    “We report on all aspects of distributed computing technology, such as grids and clouds. We also regularly feature articles on distributed computing-enabled research in a large variety of disciplines, including physics, biology, sociology, earth sciences, archaeology, medicine, disaster management, crime, and art. (Note that we do not cover stories that are purely about commercial technology.)

    In its current incarnation, Science Node is also an online destination where you can host a profile and blog, and find and disseminate announcements and information about events, deadlines, and jobs. In the near future it will also be a place where you can network with colleagues.

    You can read Science Node via our homepage, RSS, or email. For the complete iSGTW experience, sign up for an account or log in with OpenID and manage your email subscription from your account preferences. If you do not wish to access the website’s features, you can just subscribe to the weekly email.”

     
  • richardmitnick 7:00 pm on September 22, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Hikari supercomputer, TACC   

    From Science Node: “Supercomputers see the light in Texas” 

    Science Node bloc
    Science Node

    20 Sep, 2016
    Jorge Salazar

    The roar can be deafening. Cooling fans and power supplies whoosh and whine from rows and rows of supercomputers at the main data center of the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) in Austin.

    TACC bloc

    The power bill at TACC can reach over a million dollars a year keeping the machines humming. But there’s a stranger in town that might change how data centers power their systems.

    A new kind of advanced computing system called Hikari (Japanese for the word ‘light’) came online at TACC late August, 2016.

    tacc-hikari
    TACC HPE Apollo 8000 Hikari

    What’s new is that Hikari runs on solar power and high voltage direct current (HVDC.)

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    Sunny shade. High ranking officials from NEDO, NTT Facilities, Inc., and the University of Texas gathered at the solar panels that provide power for the Hikari project. Courtesy TACC.

    Hikari is a microgrid that supports a supercomputer, a first for the US. By day, solar panels that shade a TACC parking lot provide nearly all of Hikari’s power, up to 208 kilowatts. At night, it switches back to conventional AC power from the utility grid.

    “The Hikari project is a Japan and Texas collaboration project, and it aims to demonstrate the potential of the HVDC system,” says Toshihiro Hayashi, assistant manager in the engineering divisions of Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT) Facilities, Inc..

    Engineers of the Hikari HVDC power feeding system predict it will save 15 percent compared to conventional systems. “The 380 volt design reduces the number of power conversions when compared to AC voltage systems,” says James Stark, director of Engineering and Construction at the Electronic Environments Corporation (EEC).

    “What’s interesting about that,” Stark adds, “is the computers themselves – the supercomputer, the blade servers, cooling units, and lighting – are really all designed to run on DC voltage. By supplying 380 volts DC to Hikari instead of having an AC supply with conversion steps, it just makes a lot more sense. That’s really the largest technical innovation.”

    Data centers in the US consumed an estimated 70 billion kilowatt hours in 2014, which represents about 1.8 percent of total U.S. electricity consumption. HVDC also allows for ease in connection to renewable energy, solar for Hikari but potentially other sources like wind and hydrogen fuel cells.

    “That’s really one of our main focuses, trying to make data centers more sustainable so that we’re reducing overall power consumption within an industry that has traditionally consumed a lot of power,” Stark says.

    The collaboration started with a visit to TACC by engineers at NTT Facilities, Inc. in early 2014, fresh off the heels of basic studies they had done for installing HVDC at US sites. TACC also shares a strong interest in developing new technologies, including energy savings.

    “We’re very interested in UT Austin’s motto,” says Hayashi, “which is ‘what starts here changes the world.’ We very much agree with this motto.”

    Hayashi’s team worked with TACC to develop feasibility studies of the Hikari HVDC project from December 2014 to May 2015. This effort led to a Memorandum of Understanding between the State of Texas and New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization (NEDO) in August of 2015.

    NTT Facilities, Inc. worked with EEC to build out Hikari, which completed the late August 2016 system installation. “If there wasn’t such partnership, we wouldn’t have launched this project. I would like to express my gratitude to NEDO for establishing the partnership,” Hayashi says.

    The Hikari supercomputer cluster consists of 432 Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) Apollo 8000 XL730f servers coupled with HPE DL380 and DL360 nodes that are interconnected with a first-of-its-kind Mellanox End-to-End EDR InfinBand at 100 gigabytes per second. Over 10,000 cores from ‘Haswell’ Xeon processors will deliver more than 400 teraFLOPS.

    The Hikari project also aims to demonstrate energy efficiency through more than just HVDC. The HPE Apollo 8000 systems use a warm water-based liquid cooling system that eliminates the need for fans within the nodes and reduces the energy that would normally be required for water refrigeration and excess heat removal. The solar energy that would have been used for powering fans and chillers can be used for computational work.

    When it reaches production later in 2017, Hikari will be used by the University of Texas medical researchers to make progress on diseases like cancer and disorders like autism.

    “We really hope this project will demonstrate the efficiency advantages of using 380 volt DC, not only in data centers, but in any commercial building,” James Stark says. “The hope is that the research that comes out of this demonstration project will help to open the door to more widespread use of 380 volt systems throughout data centers and commercial buildings worldwide.”

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    Toshihiro Hyashi of NTT FACILITIES, INC. presents the real-time monitoring of the Hikari HVDC system.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Science Node is an international weekly online publication that covers distributed computing and the research it enables.

    “We report on all aspects of distributed computing technology, such as grids and clouds. We also regularly feature articles on distributed computing-enabled research in a large variety of disciplines, including physics, biology, sociology, earth sciences, archaeology, medicine, disaster management, crime, and art. (Note that we do not cover stories that are purely about commercial technology.)

    In its current incarnation, Science Node is also an online destination where you can host a profile and blog, and find and disseminate announcements and information about events, deadlines, and jobs. In the near future it will also be a place where you can network with colleagues.

    You can read Science Node via our homepage, RSS, or email. For the complete iSGTW experience, sign up for an account or log in with OpenID and manage your email subscription from your account preferences. If you do not wish to access the website’s features, you can just subscribe to the weekly email.”

     
  • richardmitnick 8:29 am on August 24, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , TACC   

    From TACC: “National Science Foundation Awards $110 Million for XSEDE 2.0 Program” 

    TACC bloc

    Texas Advanced Computing Center

    Today, the National Science Foundation announced a $110 million, five-year award to the National Center for Supercomputing Applications at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign and 18 partner institutions, including the Texas Advanced Computing Center at The University of Texas at Austin, to continue and expand the activities undertaken through the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment, a cornerstone of the nation’s cyberinfrastructure ecosystem.

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    XSEDE accelerates open scientific discovery by enhancing the productivity and capability of researchers, engineers, and scholars, and broadening their participation in science and engineering. It does so by making advanced computational resources easier to use, integrating existing resources into new, powerful services, and building the community of users and providers.

    “XSEDE 2.0 will continue to expand access to NSF-funded cyberinfrastructure resources and services available to the science and engineering community across the nation,” said Irene Qualters, division director for the Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure (ACI) at NSF. “The nation’s discovery and innovation enterprise requires a dynamic and highly interoperable ecosystem, anticipating and responding to new instruments, new computing capabilities, new research communities, and new expertise. XSEDE 2.0 is a critical human component in NSF’s advanced computing infrastructure strategy, seeking to enable the broad and deep use of computational and data-intensive research to advance knowledge in all fields of study.”

    The project is a central feature of NSF-supported cyberinfrastructure and aligns with the strategic objectives of the National Strategic Computing Initiative (NSCI) – a whole-of-government effort that fosters a coordinated Federal strategy in high-performance computing (HPC) research and deployment. XSEDE 2.0 aligns with NSCI, particularly by holistically expanding the capabilities and capacity of a robust and enduring national HPC ecosystem and contributing the learning and workforce development necessary to prepare our current and future researchers and the critical technical experts needed to support the research enterprise.

    “As the role of computational and data science in advancing scientific and engineering frontiers has grown, it has produced a significant increase in the demand for supporting infrastructure,” said John Towns, executive director for Science and Technology at NCSA and principal investigator for XSEDE. “The XSEDE 2.0 project recognizes that investment in physical infrastructure must be complemented by investment in software and human services.”

    Cyberinfrastructure refers to the advanced instruments, computing systems, data tools, software, networks, and people that collectively improve the research productivity of the nation’s computational scientists and engineers, enabling breakthroughs not otherwise possible. Critically important to cyberinfastructure is the increasingly dynamic interplay between these resources and human developers and users. XSEDE 2.0 constitutes a virtual organization that provisions complex distributed infrastructure, support services, and technical expertise.

    TACC is a key partner in the XSEDE project offering HPC resources, diverse domain and visualization experts, scalable cloud environments, data analytics, and replicated storage. Stampede, TACC’s flagship system, is the largest, most capable system for academic research in the U.S. In addition, TACC leads the XSEDE User Portal, a web interface that allows users to monitor and access XSEDE resources, manage jobs on those resources, report issues, and analyze and visualize results.

    TACC also leads XSEDE’s Community Engagement and Enrichment (CEE) program, which focuses on user services and engaging a new generation of diverse computational researchers. In addition to education, training and outreach activities, CEE connects to campus research computing communities to help researchers access both local and national resources.

    “XSEDE is focused on diversity and inclusion to develop the next generation of advanced digital researchers and to foster innovative collaborations for scientific discoveries,” said Kelly Gaither, TACC’s director of visualization and co-principal investigator for XSEDE. “Diversity reflects the educational, cultural, gender, and experiential makeup of our users, our students and our collaborators; inclusion reflects the quality of the experience that XSEDE provides once they are there.”

    XSEDE was first established in 2011, and the award announced today provides a continuity of services valuable to its large user community, in particular the coordination of resources and people that make the national cyberinfrastructure ecosystem so effective.

    Last year, XSEDE provided computational and data services to more than 6,000 scientists, engineers and students, and supported more than 20,000 users through its web portal. Over the past four years, users have acknowledged support by XSEDE and its related computational resources in roughly 14,000 publications.

    Among these XSEDE-supported studies were efforts that confirmed the discovery of gravitational waves, developed high-resolution maps of the Arctic, uncovered the structure of HIV, and helped prevent injuries from car accidents.

    Among its critical functions, XSEDE 2.0 will:

    Manage and deliver a set of common and coordinated services for a portfolio of supercomputers and high-end visualization and data-analysis resources across the country to address increasingly diverse scientific and engineering challenges;
    Manage the allocation process by which researchers access advanced computing resources, including continuing to improve and innovate this process in alignment with new research access workflows and new resources;
    Build on the XSEDE tradition of outstanding user services, and engage a new generation of diverse computational researchers; in addition to education, training, and outreach activities, connect to campus HPC communities, to help researchers access both local and national resources;
    Offer extended collaborative support services, which pairs XSEDE computational or software engineering experts with domain scientists to advance a project or develop a tool needed to advance research; and
    Continue to improve and operate an integrated HPC capability of national scale, providing “one-stop-shop” experience for users across the XSEDE-coordinated cyberinfrastructure ecosystem.

    For nearly four decades, NSF has supported the nation’s scientific community by providing nationwide access to advanced computing resources and services beyond the reach of individual academic institutions. This access has enabled transformative research in such diverse areas as particle physics, cosmology, biology, nanotechnology, ecological modeling, economics and civil engineering.

    Students and researchers interested in obtaining access to advanced digital resources and support from XSEDE 2.0 can learn more and register here.

    Dell Poweredge U Texas Austin Stampede Supercomputer. Texas Advanced Computer Center 9.6 PF
    Dell Poweredge U Texas Austin Stampede Supercomputer. Texas Advanced Computer Center 9.6 PF

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    Maverick supercomputer

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    Dell Wrangler supercomputer

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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    The Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) designs and operates some of the world’s most powerful computing resources. The center’s mission is to enable discoveries that advance science and society through the application of advanced computing technologies.

     
  • richardmitnick 11:02 am on August 1, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , TACC   

    From TACC: “NSF Awards $15 Million to Create Science Gateways Community Institute” 

    TACC bloc

    Texas Advanced Computing Center

    July 29, 2016
    Faith Singer-Villalobos

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    The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded a collaborative team led by researchers at six different institutions a $15 million, five-year grant to establish a Science Gateways Community Institute (SGCI) to accelerate the development and application of highly functional, sustainable science gateways that address the needs of researchers across the full spectrum of NSF directorates.

    The institute is a partnership led by the San Diego Supercomputer Center, in collaboration with the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin; Elizabeth City State University in North Carolina; Indiana University; University of Notre Dame; Purdue University; and the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor.

    As the lead partner for the Scientific Software Collaborative, TACC will receive almost $3 million to oversee a component-based, open-source, extensible framework for gateway design, integration, and services, including gateway hosting and capabilities for external developers to integrate their own software into Institute offerings. TACC will also be participating in other aspects of the project including Community Engagement and Extended Developer Support.

    “Science Gateways make use of familiar web-based interfaces to make it easier to employ advanced computing resources for science and engineering. TACC is excited to be part of the first Institute that empowers gateway developers to more quickly and effectively build powerful web gateways for innovation and discovery,” said Maytal Dahan, co-principal investigator (PI) for the Science Gateways Community Institute, Portal & Gateway Infrastructure Manager at TACC, and who leads the User Information and Online Interfaces area of XSEDE. “The goal is to help researchers focus on the science they want to accomplish, and not the technologies they need to get there.”

    The Institute’s goal is to increase the number, ease of use, and effective application of gateways for the greater research and engineering community, resulting in broader gateway use and more widespread engagement in science by professionals, citizen scientists, students, and more. The project will officially get underway starting this summer.

    A science gateway is a community-developed set of tools, applications, and data services and collections that are integrated through a web-based portal or suite of applications. Such gateways provide scientists access to many of the tools used in cutting-edge research – telescopes, seismic shake tables, supercomputers, sky surveys, undersea sensors, and more – and connect often diverse resources in easily accessible ways that save researchers and institutions time and money.

    “Gateways foster collaborations and the exchange of ideas among researchers and can democratize access, providing broad access to resources sometimes unavailable to those who are not at leading research institutions.” said Nancy Wilkins-Diehr, SDSC associate director and PI for the entire project.

    TACC already participates in the development of a wide variety of Science Gateways such as DesignSafe, a National Science Foundation (NSF) grant to build a software platform, data repository, and tools that will help the U.S. design more resilient buildings, levees and other public infrastructure that could protect lives, property and communities. The goal of the institute is to enable new and existing Gateway projects such as DesignSafe to get the resources, services and support they need to be successful.

    Wilkins-Diehr also is co-PI of the NSF-funded eXtreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) program, one of the most advanced collections of integrated digital resources and services in the world. In her role with XSEDE, Dahan is excited to leverage her management and software engineering expertise to the Science Gateways Institute.

    “In XSEDE, we have observed tremendous growth in terms of the number of gateway users, the number of processing hours used on HPC resources and the number of published research papers using gateways in the last couple of years,” said Wilkins-Diehr. “We see the services offered by SGCI dovetailing nicely with those offered by XSEDE. In the XSEDE Extended Collaborative Support (ECSS) program, our primary focus is supporting developers of existing gateways with their back-end connections to XSEDE resources. SGCI frees us up to offer services developing front ends – both for projects that use supercomputers and those that do not.”

    Multiple Partnerships, Multiple Components
    In early 2015, the NSF identified science gateways as one of two focus areas for the implementation phase of its Software Institute program. Through a $500,000 award, a team led by Wilkins-Diehr developed a strategic plan for a much larger Science Gateways Institute as part of that Software Institute program’s conceptualization phase.

    The Institute’s five-component design is the result of several years of studies, including many focus groups and a 5,000-person survey of the research community, including NSF principal investigators, campus CIOs and CTOs, and others. Those component areas include:

    An Incubator, to provide shared expertise in business and sustainability planning, cybersecurity, user interface design, and software engineering practices. This area will be led by Michael Zentner (Purdue University).
    Extended Developer Support, to provide expert developers for up to one year to projects that request assistance and demonstrate the potential to achieve the most significant impacts on their research communities. Led by Marlon E. Pierce (Indiana University).
    The Scientific Software Collaborative, to oversee a component-based, open-source, extensible framework for gateway design, integration, and services, including gateway hosting and capabilities for external developers to integrate their own software into Institute offerings. Led by Maytal Dahan (TACC).
    Community Engagement and Exchange will provide a forum for communication and sharing experiences among gateway developers – within the NSF, across federal agencies, and internationally. Led by Katherine A. Lawrence (University of Michigan) with support from Sandra Gesing (University of Notre Dame).
    Workforce Development will increase the pipeline of gateway developers with training programs, including special emphasis on recruiting underrepresented minorities, and by helping universities form gateway support groups. Led by Linda B. Hayden (Elizabeth City State University).

    The work is funded via NSF award number is ACI-1547611 and more information about SGCI is available here.

    See the full article here .

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    The Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) designs and operates some of the world’s most powerful computing resources. The center’s mission is to enable discoveries that advance science and society through the application of advanced computing technologies.

     
  • richardmitnick 7:29 am on June 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Stampede supercomputer, TACC,   

    From NSF: “Stampede 2 drives frontiers of science and engineering forward” 

    nsf
    National Science Foundation

    Media Contacts
    Ivy F. Kupec, NSF
    (703) 292-8796
    ikupec@nsf.gov

    Gera Jochum, NSF
    (703) 292-8794
    gjochum@nsf.gov

    Faith Singer-Villalobos
    University of Texas at Austin
    (512) 232-5771
    faith@tacc.utexas.edu

    Program Contacts
    Bob Chadduck, NSF
    (703) 292-2247
    rchadduc@nsf.gov

    Irene M. Qualters, NSF
    (703) 292-2339
    iqualter@nsf.gov

    June 2, 2016

    Today, the National Science Foundation (NSF) announced a $30 million award to the Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC) at The University of Texas at Austin (UT Austin) to acquire and deploy a new large-scale supercomputing system, Stampede 2, as a strategic national resource to provide high-performance computing (HPC) capabilities for thousands of researchers across the U.S.

    U Texas Stampede Supercomputer. Texas Advanced Computer Center
    Dell Poweredge Stampede supercomputer, U Texas, Austin, TX , 9.6PF

    This award builds on technology and expertise from the Stampede system first funded by NSF in 2011 and will deliver a peak performance of up to 18 Petaflops, over twice the overall system performance of the current Stampede system. Stampede 2 will be among the first systems to employ cutting-edge processor and memory technology to continue to bridge users to future cyberinfrastructure.

    Stampede 2 will be deployed by TACC in conjunction with vendor partners Dell Inc., Intel Corporation, and Seagate Technology, and operated by a team of cyberinfrastructure experts at TACC, UT Austin, Clemson University, Cornell University, the University of Colorado at Boulder, Indiana University, and Ohio State University.

    “NSF is proud to join with the University of Texas at Austin in supporting the nation’s academic researchers in science and engineering with the latest in advanced computing technology and expertise,” said Irene Qualters, NSF Division Director for Advanced Cyberinfrastructure. “Stampede 2’s capabilities will complement and significantly expand the diverse portfolio of computing resources increasingly essential to exploration at the frontiers of science and engineering.”

    The announcement of Stampede 2 comes at a time when the use of NSF-supported research cyberinfrastructure resources is at an all-time high and continuing to increase across all science and engineering disciplines. Since 2005, the number of active institutions using this research cyberinfrastructure has doubled, the number of principal investigators has tripled, and the number of active users has quintupled. Furthering the Stampede system will help enable a growing number of scientists to have access to computation at-scale.

    “The original Stampede system has run more than 7 million simulation and data analysis jobs for tens of thousands of users around the country and around the world,” noted Dan Stanzione, executive director of TACC and principal investigator of the Stampede and Stampede 2 projects. “The kind of large-scale computing and data capabilities systems like Stampede and Stampede 2 provide are crucial for innovation in almost every area of research and development, from providing insights to fundamental theory to applied work that has real near-term impacts on society. Stampede has been used for everything from determining earthquake risks to help set building codes for homes and commercial buildings, to computing the largest mathematical proof ever constructed. We thank the NSF for trusting us again with the tremendous responsibility of supporting our nation’s researchers as they push the boundaries of discovery.”

    Researchers across the nation can gain access to Stampede and other advanced computing resources, including other HPC machines, high throughput computing machines, visualizations, data storage, testbeds, and services through the NSF-funded Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE).

    The award for Stampede 2 will deploy a new system that will surpass performance of the current Stampede system, doubling peak performance, memory, storage capacity and bandwidth. The new system will be deployed in phases, using a variety of new and upcoming technologies. The processors in the system will include a mix of upcoming Intel® Xeon Phi™ Processors, codenamed “Knights Landing,” and future-generation Intel® Xeon® processors, connected by Intel® Omni-Path Architecture. The last phase of the system will include integration of the upcoming 3D XPoint non-volatile memory technology.

    “The first Stampede system has been the workhorse of XSEDE, supporting the advanced modeling, simulation, and analysis needs of many thousands of researchers across the country,” said Omar Ghattas, a computational geoscientist/engineer at UT Austin and recent winner of the Gordon Bell prize for the most outstanding achievement in high-performance computing.

    “Stampede has also given us a window into a future in which simulation is but an inner iteration of a ‘what-if?’ outer loop. Stampede 2’s massive performance increase will make routine the principled exploration of parameter space entailed in this outer loop. This will usher in a new era of HPC-based inference, data assimilation, design, control, uncertainty quantification, and decision-making for large-scale complex models in the natural and social sciences, engineering, technology, medicine, and beyond.”

    The announcement was made today during an event at TACC recognizing the center’s 15th anniversary and dedicating a new building for advanced computing on the UT Austin J.J. Pickle Research Campus. Speakers included Qualters; Stanzione; Bill McRaven, chancellor of the University of Texas System; Jim Ganthier, vice president and general manager, Engineered Solutions, HPC & Cloud, Dell, Inc.; and Charlie Wuischpard, vice president and general manager, HPC Platform Group, Intel Corporation.

    “We are both excited for and proud to power TACC’s multiple Stampede Systems. TACC has been a great Dell customer and partner over the years, helping us to evolve our own portfolio as we continue to push the HPC industry forward,” said Ganthier. “Our Dell technologies at the core of the Stampede 2 supercomputing cluster will continue powering leading-edge research to both enable and advance science and society.”

    “The NSF and TACC continue to recognize the need for advanced HPC solutions as a fundamental tool to accelerate academic and scientific discovery,” Wuischpard said. “Stampede 2 will be a leadership-class system based on the Intel® Scalable System Framework, delivering a common platform for modeling, simulation, and data-driven science, and fueling scientific research and discovery for the next generation of researchers.”

    The event also included a symposium on advanced computing featuring users of the system: Ghattas; Ellen Rathje, of UT Austin, who leads the NSF-funded DesignSafe infrastructure; Peter Couvares of Syracuse University from the Advanced LIGO project, which recently confirmed the first observation of gravitational waves; and Nirav Merchant from the University of Arizona, who is co-principal investigator of the NSF-funded CyVerse life sciences cyberinfrastructure.

    Intel, Xeon and Xeon Phi are trademarks or registered trademarks of Intel Corporation in the United States and other countries.

    Related Websites
    Texas Advanced Computing Center (TACC): http://www.tacc.utexas.edu/
    NSF announcement of Stampede dedication: http://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=127194
    NSF announcement of 2011 Stampede award: https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=121763

    See the full article here .

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    The National Science Foundation (NSF) is an independent federal agency created by Congress in 1950 “to promote the progress of science; to advance the national health, prosperity, and welfare; to secure the national defense…we are the funding source for approximately 24 percent of all federally supported basic research conducted by America’s colleges and universities. In many fields such as mathematics, computer science and the social sciences, NSF is the major source of federal backing.

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