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  • richardmitnick 4:20 pm on July 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Ethical Corporation, , Smarter Planet,   

    From WCG via Ethical Corporation: “How IBM is using the world’s surplus computer power to help the planet” 

    New WCG Logo

    WCGLarge

    World Community Grid (WCG)

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    Ethical Corporation

    Jul 14, 2017
    Jennifer Ryan Crozier

    IBM’s Jennifer Ryan Crozier on how the open-source World Community Grid is advancing climate solutions by allowing researchers to complete thousands of years’ worth of research in just a few years

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    No image caption or credit.

    Summer heat used to mean summer fun. But this year, the first days of summer were ushered in by an ominous new study published in Nature Climate Change by Dr.Camilo Mora of the University of Hawaii. Mora and his team of researchers are predicting that without major reductions in greenhouse gases, up to 75% of the world’s population will be in danger of dying from heat by the year 2100. According to The Weather Company, an IBM business, “Global surface temperature has increased by around 1.8°F (1.0°C) since the late 1800s. More than half of this increase has occurred since the 1970s, and every decade since then has been warmer than the one before it.”

    The growing impact of climate change – including more drought, water shortages, intense storms, rising sea levels, and extremely hot weather – has galvanized scientists around the world to work overtime in the search for solutions, often with limited resources. Their work will figure prominently in making the Paris Agreement real, which was forged in 2015 as a pledge by countries worldwide to combat climate change with lower carbon emissions.

    Recently business, academic and science communities with a presence in the US loudly reiterated their strong support for the accord, joining collaborative action such as the We Are Still In coalition.

    Over the last few decades, the private sector has discovered the innovation related to sustainability is not only the right thing to do, but is also good for business. Customers want to do business with environmentally responsible businesses, and companies reap efficiencies that make them more competitive and creative. In fact, IBM itself has saved an enormous amount of money and done its part for the environment by meeting its own emissions and renewable energy sourcing commitments years ahead of schedule.

    But we want to do more. We want to equip the science community with the kind of resources it needs to fight climate change. Computational research is one such powerful tool for advancing climate change research and developing solutions. In fact, in awarding the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry to a group of computer scientists who pioneered the field, the Prize Committee remarked that: “Today the computer is just as important a tool as the test tube.” The rapid growth in big data also holds valuable new insights. But to uncover those insights and leverage these techniques, scientists need much more computing power than they typically have access to. 

    World Community Grid addresses that gap. IBM’s World Community Grid is a crowd-sourced virtual supercomputer that is powered by the surplus computing power of computers and Androids donated by individual volunteers and organizations. Instead of wasting energy when idle or not in full use, hundreds of thousands of these devices redirect otherwise unused processing power to research scientists to collectively perform virtual experiments at an unprecedented scale.

    Through the contributions of over 730,000 volunteers and 430 organizations, worth $400m, World Community Grid’s research partners have completed the equivalent of thousands of years of work in just a few years, enabling important advances in environmental science.

    For example, scientists at Harvard University used World Community Grid to run the Clean Energy Project, the world’s largest quantum chemistry experiment with the goal of identifying new materials for solar energy. In just a few years, they analyzed millions of chemical compounds to predict their efficiency at converting sunlight into electricity. Their discovery of thousands of promising compounds will advance the development of cheap, flexible solar cell materials that we hope will be used worldwide to reduce carbon emissions and contribute to the fight against climate change.

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    Another project, designed by a team of international researchers and led by scientists at Tsinghua University in China [Computing for Clean Water], undertook an unprecedented, massive computational simulation study powered by IBM’s World Community Grid. They found that the use of carbon nanotubes, under specific conditions, could potentially lead to more efficient water filtering with less expense and less impact on the environment. Another World Community Grid project helped scientists study the impact of water management and development policies on large watershed areas.


    WCG Computing for Clean Water Project

    World Community Grid has also enabled medical breakthroughs. For instance, the Chiba Institute in Japan identified seven novel drug candidates that could potentially be used in new medicines that fight childhood neuroblastoma, one of the most common and dangerous childhood cancers. Tests showed that even at remarkably low doses, these drug candidates are very effective at killing cancer cells with no immediately apparent side effects.

    WCG Fighting Childhood Cancer

    This week, the scientific community is being offered a new opportunity to advance the quest for ways to combat climate change. IBM is inviting scientists around the world to apply for a technology grant (valued at $40m) of crowd-sourced supercomputing power, meteorological data from The Weather Company, and IBM Cloud storage to support their climate or environmental research project.

    Up to five of the most promising environmental and climate-related research projects will be supported, with technology and services contributions valued commercially at approximately $200 million.

    These resources can support many potential areas of inquiry, such as impacts on fresh water resources, predicting migration patterns, and developing models to improve crop resilience.

    Proposals will be evaluated for scientific merit, potential to contribute to the global community’s understanding of specific climate and environmental challenges and development of effective strategies to mitigate them, and the capacity of the research team to manage a sustained research project. 

    In return for this support, winning scientists agree to support open science by publicly releasing the research data from their collaboration with us, enabling the global community to benefit from and build upon their findings. 

    Scientists from around the world are encouraged to apply at https://www.worldcommunitygrid.org/climate.action, with a first round deadline of 15 September. Individuals and organisations can also support this work by joining http://www.worldcommunitygrid.org to donate their spare computing power to the winning research projects. 

    Climate change is a serious threat to people and our planet. And time is of the essence. We know that businesses and citizens themselves are critical to meet this challenge. IBM is proud to stand with the #WeAreStillIn coalition, the broadest cross section of the American economy that has pledged its commitment to help continue leading the global fight against climate change. All of us must be a part of the solution. World Community Grid is giving scientists, citizens and their computers the ability to work around the clock for change. 

    See the full article here.

    Ways to access the blog:
    https://sciencesprings.wordpress.com
    http://facebook.com/sciencesprings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    World Community Grid (WCG) brings people together from across the globe to create the largest non-profit computing grid benefiting humanity. It does this by pooling surplus computer processing power. We believe that innovation combined with visionary scientific research and large-scale volunteerism can help make the planet smarter. Our success depends on like-minded individuals – like you.”
    WCG projects run on BOINC software from UC Berkeley.
    BOINCLarge

    BOINC is a leader in the field(s) of Distributed Computing, Grid Computing and Citizen Cyberscience.BOINC is more properly the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing.

    BOINC WallPaper

    CAN ONE PERSON MAKE A DIFFERENCE? YOU BET!!

    My BOINC
    MyBOINC
    “Download and install secure, free software that captures your computer’s spare power when it is on, but idle. You will then be a World Community Grid volunteer. It’s that simple!” You can download the software at either WCG or BOINC.

    Please visit the project pages-

    FightAIDS@home Phase II

    FAAH Phase II
    OpenZika

    Rutgers Open Zika

    Help Stop TB
    WCG Help Stop TB
    Outsmart Ebola together

    Outsmart Ebola Together

    Mapping Cancer Markers
    mappingcancermarkers2

    Uncovering Genome Mysteries
    Uncovering Genome Mysteries

    Say No to Schistosoma

    GO Fight Against Malaria

    Drug Search for Leishmaniasis

    Computing for Clean Water

    The Clean Energy Project

    Discovering Dengue Drugs – Together

    Help Cure Muscular Dystrophy

    Help Fight Childhood Cancer

    Help Conquer Cancer

    Human Proteome Folding

    FightAIDS@Home

    faah-1-new-screen-saver

    faah-1-new

    World Community Grid is a social initiative of IBM Corporation
    IBM Corporation
    ibm

    IBM – Smarter Planet
    sp

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  • richardmitnick 3:16 pm on August 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Smarter Planet,   

    From IBM via WCG: “World Community Grid Volunteers are helping scientists find cures” 

    New WCG Logo

    WCGLarge

    World Community Grid (WCG)

    While you’re asleep tonight, your Android phone can work on potential cures for the Zika virus. While you’re in a meeting today, your computer can help develop new cancer treatments. The computer and Android devices you use every day can contribute to groundbreaking research in health, clean energy, and other humanitarian causes.

    How is this possible? IBM’s World Community Grid enables anyone to donate the spare computing power of their computers and Android devices to help researchers find the next breakthrough. This IBM philanthropic initiative, winner of a 2016 People’s Voice Webby Award, is a safe, easy way to put an unused resource to work for good, without having any impact on your own use of your devices.

    Why does this matter? Because in research, time is measured in money and lives. Quicker results mean quicker benefits for patients and more. And the enormous power of World Community Grid means that computer simulations that would have taken years can be completed in weeks or months. It’s even possible for researchers to run projects that are otherwise unaffordable or unimaginable, such as comparing all the genes from all the thousands of organisms in a soil sample, modeling water flows at atomic levels of detail, or searching through an enormous index of chemical compounds to find a treatment for the Zika virus.

    Where your unused computing power could go

    World Community Grid is the world’s largest volunteer computing initiative dedicated to tackling projects that benefit humanity.

    World Community Grid essentially turns each connected device into one part of a massive virtual supercomputer. It breaks down complex research experiments into millions of smaller units and sends them to individual devices, including desktops, laptops, tablets and smartphones to work on when they’re idle. The results are then collected and delivered to researchers.

    By harnessing the unused computing power of more than 715,000 volunteers’ computers and Android devices around the world, researchers are able to access dedicated computing time worth hundreds of millions of dollars and conduct research — research that could have taken years — in weeks or months.

    The fight against the Zika virus

    The Zika virus began spreading rapidly through the Americas in 2015, and there is no vaccine or effective treatment for the disease. Moreover, Zika has been linked to severe neurological complications in some adults as well as serious brain and development problems in some infants whose mothers contracted Zika while pregnant. A multi-institutional group of researchers is using World Community Grid to identify which of millions of chemical compounds might lead them to a cure for this virus. More than 50,000 volunteers signed up to help in the project’s first two months, but with additional volunteers the researchers will be able to make even more progress.

    Nanotech joins the quest for clean water

    A billion people lack access to clean water. Droughts decimate once-fertile farmlands. Ocean water is plentiful but, of course, too salty for most urgent needs. Now an international group of scientists, using the massive computing power contributed by 150,000 World Community Grid volunteers, has uncovered important new information about applying carbon nanotubes to water shortage issues. These tiny water filters have the potential to provide more affordable, efficient access to clean water — and contribute further to energy and medical research.

    Working to stop one of the world’s deadliest diseases

    Tuberculosis (TB) has plagued humans for thousands of years, yet it remains one of the world’s most dangerous diseases. About one-third of the world’s population harbors the TB bacterium, with 1.5 million infected people dying in 2014 alone. The World Health Organization now ranks TB alongside HIV as the world’s deadliest infectious disease. Researchers are using World Community Grid to help understand the molecular structure of the TB bacterium to come up with more effective treatments.

    Breakthrough in the fight against childhood cancer

    3

    Partnering with the Chiba Cancer Research Institute and Chiba University in Japan, World Community Grid launched a project to search for new treatments for neuroblastoma, one of the most common and dangerous forms of childhood cancer. Out of more than three million drug candidates screened by 200,000 volunteers, seven promising drug candidates with no apparent side effects were identified in 2013. The highly successful in vivo test results are a major milestone that sets up the research team for the next step: human trials.

    Helping develop affordable solar energy

    In 2013 Harvard University announced the discovery of more than 35,000 compounds with the potential to double the rate of efficiency of most carbon-based solar cells in production today, after scanning more than 2.3 million materials on World Community Grid. Previously, carbon-based solar cells were made from a handful of highly efficient molecules that were painstakingly discovered one by one. Now, there are thousands more to explore: an exponential increase.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    World Community Grid (WCG) brings people together from across the globe to create the largest non-profit computing grid benefiting humanity. It does this by pooling surplus computer processing power. We believe that innovation combined with visionary scientific research and large-scale volunteerism can help make the planet smarter. Our success depends on like-minded individuals – like you.”

    WCG projects run on BOINC software from UC Berkeley.
    BOINCLarge

    BOINC is a leader in the field(s) of Distributed Computing, Grid Computing and Citizen Cyberscience.BOINC is more properly the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing.

    BOINC WallPaper

    CAN ONE PERSON MAKE A DIFFERENCE? YOU BET!!

    MyBOINC

    “Download and install secure, free software that captures your computer’s spare power when it is on, but idle. You will then be a World Community Grid volunteer. It’s that simple!” You can download the software at either WCG or BOINC.

    Please visit the project pages-

    FightAIDS@home Phase II

    FAAH Phase II
    OpenZika

    Rutgers Open Zika

    Help Stop TB
    WCG Help Stop TB
    Outsmart Ebola together

    Outsmart Ebola Together

    Mapping Cancer Markers
    mappingcancermarkers2

    Uncovering Genome Mysteries
    Uncovering Genome Mysteries

    Say No to Schistosoma

    GO Fight Against Malaria

    Drug Search for Leishmaniasis

    Computing for Clean Water

    The Clean Energy Project

    Discovering Dengue Drugs – Together

    Help Cure Muscular Dystrophy

    Help Fight Childhood Cancer

    Help Conquer Cancer

    Human Proteome Folding

    FightAIDS@Home

    World Community Grid is a social initiative of IBM Corporation
    IBM Corporation
    ibm

    IBM – Smarter Planet
    sp

     
  • richardmitnick 9:24 pm on June 30, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Smarter Planet,   

    From the WCG Clean Energy Project at Harvard: The IBM Contribution 

    The Clean Energy Project (CEP2) at Harvard University gives us the look into IBM’s contribution to the betterment of Society via World community Grid (WCG).

    Watch this short video.

    You can visit the WCG web site (link is above), download the BOINC software agent, and attach to the Clean Energy Project. We would love to have you.

    From the project:

    Mission
    The mission of The Clean Energy Project is to find new materials for the next generation of solar cells and later, energy storage devices. By harnessing the immense power of World Community Grid, researchers can calculate the electronic properties of hundreds of thousands of organic materials – thousands of times more than could ever be tested in a lab – and determine which candidates are most promising for developing affordable solar energy technology.

     
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