Tagged: Rutgers University Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • richardmitnick 1:41 pm on December 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 36000 worms were aboard SpaceX Falcon 9 and 3600 were from Rutgers, Monica Driscoll, Rutgers University, School of Arts and Sciences-Molecular biology and Biochemistry, Studying the muscle deterioration that occurs during prolonged space flight,   

    From Rutgers University: Women in STEM- “Rutgers Scientist Sends Worms into Outer Space” Monica Driscoll 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    12.7.18

    Monica Driscoll and team studying muscle deterioration.

    1
    Monica Driscoll with her team, Girish Harinat and Ricardo Laranjeiro at Cape Canaveral

    When the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral Wednesday, some 36,000 worms were aboard.

    And about 3,600 of those creatures were sent by Monica Driscoll, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry in the School of Arts and Sciences. Driscoll is part of an international team of scientists studying the muscle deterioration that occurs during prolonged space flight – and whether it can be overcome for extended stints at the International Space Station or long trips to Mars.

    “In the absence of gravity, muscle deteriorates very rapidly,” Driscoll says. “We will need to stop that if humans are to make the six month trip to Mars.”

    The Molecular Muscle group, including scientists from the U.K., Japan, Korea, Greece and U.S., will look at changes that occur in muscle and neurons, candidate drugs that should help maintain muscle mass, and the relationship of degradation to accelerated aging.

    Driscoll’s team includes, Girish Harinat, a Rutgers graduate who majored in cell biology and neuroscience, and Ricardo Laranjeiro, a post-doctoral associate in the molecular biology and biochemistry department.

    “Our particular interest is in the neurons that influence muscle health,” says Driscoll, who along with her team, was on hand for the launch. “We are sending up middle-aged worms with labeled neurons and will examine what happens at the structure level.”

    The C. elegans worms used by Driscoll and her team are ideal for the study, she said.

    “The animal is transparent, so we can look through the skin to see each neuron in the body in its native context,” she says. “The worm lives only three weeks, so we can effectively track what happens to neurons during its adult life, mimicking what might be a long stint for a person on Mars.”

    The SpaceX capsule will dock at the International Space Station, where the worms will live for five or six days before they are frozen and returned to Earth, Driscoll says.

    “At which point we will get to work on checking them out,” she added.

    Earthbound patients with muscle degeneration may also benefit from the findings.

    “We can test strategies for muscle and nerve maintenance solutions that might well translate to humans,” Driscoll said. “Although a focus here is on space, no one can ignore the tremendous spin-off discoveries from previous space efforts that improve life here on Earth.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 2:33 pm on November 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Richard Weeks Hall of Engineering, Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers University: “Rutgers Dedicates State-of-the-Art, Multi-use Engineering Educational Facility” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    11.19.18

    Rutgers University President Robert Barchi, Rutgers–New Brunswick Interim Chancellor Christopher Molloy, and School of Engineering Dean Thomas Farris celebrated the opening of a state-of-the-art facility for student learning and research. Richard Weeks Hall of Engineering anchors the School of Engineering complex on the Busch campus and is the most recent facility built as part of an effort to create a core of new STEM facilities on the university’s Piscataway campus.

    1
    Richard Weeks Hall of Engineering

    Classes and research began this fall at the four-story, 106,000-square-foot modern learning facility that provides expanded teaching, collaboration and laboratory space to pursue new ideas and sustainable solutions in energy, infrastructure, and advanced manufacturing. The $84 million project was funded by the School of Engineering along with several generous gifts from alumni and industry partners, including $10 million in leadership gifts and pledges to name the building in honor of 1950 alumnus Richard N. Weeks, who chairs Weeks Marine, one of the leading marine construction, dredging and tunneling firms in North America. The School of Engineering recently announced an additional $10 million gift from Weeks to support undergraduate scholarships, the largest-ever scholarship gift to Rutgers. Weeks attended the dedication event along with several family members.

    “In Dick Weeks we have a great champion for our School of Engineering and a model of philanthropy for the entire university,” President Barchi said. “Through his vision and generosity, we have a facility that will contribute greatly to the prestige of being a Rutgers-educated engineer and will help us recruit outstanding students and scholars. We are grateful to him and to all those who contributed to the completion of this project.”

    “Our School of Engineering applies cutting edge technologies and techniques that benefit society in a number of ways to solve problems and contribute to New Jersey and the world,” Interim Chancellor Molloy said. “Weeks Hall provides us with even greater opportunities to engage our students in research that addresses safer transportation, better infrastructure, responsible water resource management, and reducing the risks of plastics in waterways.

    School of Engineering Dean Thomas Farris said, “Weeks Hall of Engineering anchors the School of Engineering on the Busch campus, serving as the gateway to the engineering complex of buildings. We designed this building with engineering students in mind from the collaborative touch down spaces and state-of-the-art laboratories to the smart classrooms and lecture halls. This is their home where they can learn collaboratively with each other and faculty, get inspired and become the innovators for the 21st century.”

    Richard Weeks Hall of Engineering is an open and collaborative education center that includes two lecture halls and smart classrooms accommodating more than 700 students. Concept labs located on the first and second floors are used by students to work on team-based, often large scale projects. Students also have access to conference rooms, open study space, and smaller one-on-one meeting rooms. Dedicated laboratories allow for specialized research in robotics, aerospace, urban and coastal water systems, geo-environmental engineering, intelligent transportation, and manufacturing. The building also includes a clean room for scientific research.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
    • stewarthoughblog 12:31 am on November 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Richard,
      Nice announcement from your alma mater, you must be proud. Interesting building design, hopefully it will be filled with profound engineering accompllshments in the future.

      Happy Tthanksgiving.

      Like

  • richardmitnick 11:56 am on October 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Caliburn supercomputer at Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute, Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers University: “Caliburn, New Jersey’s Supercomputer, Catalyzes Cutting-Edge Research” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    10.23.18

    Todd Bates
    848-932-0550
    todd.bates@rutgers.edu

    New Jersey academia and industry benefit from the region’s most powerful supercomputer.

    Rutgers Caliburn Supermicro Linux supercomputer at Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute

    1
    With Caliburn from left to right: Manish Parashar, director of the Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute and Distinguished Professor of computer science; Peggy Brennan-Tonetta, associate vice president for economic development at Rutgers’ Office of Research and Economic Development; and Ivan Rodero, Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute associate director for technical operations and associate research professor.
    Photo: Nick Romanenko/Rutgers University

    Caliburn, a supercomputer with the computational power of more than 10,000 standard desktop computers, is catalyzing diverse, innovative research at Rutgers University and across New Jersey, according to the Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute.

    Caliburn is the most powerful computing system in the Garden State. It ranked No. 2 among the Big Ten universities when it was deployed and continues to enable data-driven science and engineering at unprecedented scales, the institute says. This year, Caliburn has already provided computing that would have taken more than 6,000 years on a typical desktop.

    “Computing has become a critical driver across all of science, and Caliburn provides a competitive advantage to researchers and students across New Jersey, catalyzing new research and driving innovation,” said Manish Parashar, Distinguished Professor of computer science in the Rutgers School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers-New Brunswick and founding director of the Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute (RDI2) within Rutgers’ Office of Research and Economic Development.

    The State of New Jersey through its Higher Education Leasing Fund program awarded $10 million to the institute to build a powerful computing system that could catalyze innovation in the Garden State’s data-driven economy. The funding allowed the institute to build an advanced computing infrastructure that includes Caliburn to support researchers at Rutgers and elsewhere. Parashar and Ivan Rodero, institute associate director for technical operations, designed the system with a unique architecture and capabilities. J. J. Villalobos leads the Caliburn engineering team that is responsible for systems management and operations. Paul Arias provides community outreach and user support.

    “We continue to integrate new technologies and innovative solutions with Caliburn to maximize its impact on science,” Rodero said.

    Peggy Brennan-Tonetta, associate vice president for economic development, said “Caliburn was a transformational investment in the future of New Jersey’s economic development, as the use of computation and big data have become key enablers for innovation in nearly every field of research and industry sector.”

    Caliburn users span wide-ranging disciplines, including chemistry and chemical biology, engineering, genomics, humanities, integrative biology, mathematics, medical informatics, microbiology, proteomics, physics and astronomy.

    For example, at Rutgers University–Camden, Associate Professor Grace Brannigan’s group is using Caliburn to study how single amino-acid mutations within proteins can affect the flow of cell signaling between neurons. Such studies can help pinpoint links between mutations and increased susceptibility to diseases such as epilepsy, addiction, schizophrenia, bipolar and unipolar depression. The group is trying to find out why certain gene mutations are tied to aging and stress-related disorders, as well as lower tolerance for drugs. Her groundbreaking research would not have been possible without access to Caliburn.

    Humna Awan, a graduate student in Professor Eric Gawiser’s research group at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, works with Caliburn and the institute to develop tools that allow researchers to maximize information about the universe stemming from large galaxy surveys that will observe billions of galaxies. Gawiser leads a team in the Department of Physics and Astronomy that seeks to explain why the distribution of galaxies is so clumpy and what that can tell us about the dark energy that is causing the expansion of the universe to accelerate.

    At Rutgers Business School, Gyorgy Matyasfalvi, a recent graduate of Professor Jonathan Eckstein’s group, built software tools for writing code that would be simple and readable yet run efficiently on hundreds or thousands of processors. Caliburn fulfilled an essential role in validating the research results on example problems involving planning the growth of electric power grid systems under thousands of possible demand scenarios.

    The institute’s 3rd annual Open House & Research Expo is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Oct. 25 in Center Hall at the Busch Student Center in Piscataway. The keynote speaker is Sanjay Padhi, principal, Amazon Web Services’ Global Scientific Computing, and the topic is “Predictive Analytics Using Amazon Web Services.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 4:39 pm on October 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Richard N. Weeks, Richard N. Weeks a 1950 Rutgers graduate has committed $10 million to support undergraduate scholarships at the Rutgers School of Engineering. His pledge is the largest-ever gift for scholarships to t, Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers University: “Rutgers Alumnus Makes Largest Scholarship Gift Ever to University” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    October 11, 2018

    Dory Devlin
    848-932-0559
    dory.devlin@rutgers.edu

    The endowed scholarship, the School of Engineering’s largest-ever gift, will help undergraduates pursue careers in the profession.

    1
    Richard N. Weeks, a 1950 Rutgers graduate, has committed $10 million to support undergraduate scholarships at the Rutgers School of Engineering. His pledge is the largest-ever gift for scholarships to the university.

    Richard N. Weeks, a 1950 Rutgers graduate who grew his family’s small marine construction company into an industry leader, has made a commitment of $10 million to support undergraduate scholarships at the Rutgers School of Engineering. Weeks’s pledge is the largest gift to Rutgers for scholarships and the largest ever to the engineering school.

    The Richard N. Weeks Endowed Scholarship will help many more talented students obtain an outstanding engineering education at Rutgers. “Rutgers is at the forefront of engineering education,” said Weeks. “I created this scholarship so that even more students will have the opportunity to get a first-class education at Rutgers and go on to find solutions to society’s greatest challenges.”

    After graduating from Rutgers, Weeks began working for his father’s company, which loaded cargo ships in New York Harbor. Upon succeeding his father in running the business, he expanded and diversified its services. Today, Weeks Marine is a leading marine construction, dredging and tunneling firm, with operations across North America. In recognition of his vital contributions to engineering and business, he was inducted into the Rutgers Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2017.

    “With this exceptional gift, Mr. Weeks has demonstrated his belief in the power of education to change lives forever,” said Rutgers President Robert Barchi. “Endowed scholarships help students pursue their dreams while incurring less debt, and help Rutgers attract and retain the finest students to the university.”

    “Mr. Weeks is a great friend to the university and to the School of Engineering. The Weeks Endowed Scholarship will elevate the school by helping it nurture future generations of leaders essential to America’s economic, technological, and industrial success,” said Thomas Farris, dean of the School of Engineering. “The pipeline of highly skilled engineers created by Mr. Weeks’s support will help feed the nation’s growing demand for the profession.”

    Students at the prestigious Rutgers School of Engineering at Rutgers-New Brunswick are highly qualified and diverse, hailing from New Jersey, out of state and across the globe. With successful partnerships across a range of industries and an internationally recognized faculty, the school is positioned to become a leader in innovative engineering research and education. The Weeks Scholarship will heighten that trajectory by dramatically expanding opportunity and access for students hungry to make their marks in the field of engineering.

    2
    In 2014, Richard N. Weeks pledged $6 million toward the construction of the Richard Weeks Hall of Engineering, which opened in September at Rutgers-New Brunswick. No image credit.

    “Mr. Weeks’s generous gift illustrates how private philanthropy can have a transformative effect on Rutgers students, on the university’s communities, and on society as a whole,” said Nevin E. Kessler, president of Rutgers University Foundation and executive vice president for development and alumni relations. “The support of Rutgers’ alumni and friends enables the university to reach its highest aspirations of providing world-class education, research and public service.”

    Weeks has given generously to Rutgers before. In 2014, he pledged $6 million toward the construction of Richard Weeks Hall of Engineering, which opened in September. With leading-edge labs in advanced manufacturing, sustainability, aerospace and robotics, along with smart classrooms and collaborative student study space, Weeks Hall serves as the School of Engineering’s gateway facility on the Busch campus.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 3:17 pm on October 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , New Techniques Can Detect Lyme Disease Weeks Before Current Tests, Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers University: “New Techniques Can Detect Lyme Disease Weeks Before Current Tests” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    October 11, 2018
    Patti Verbanas
    patti.verbanas@rutgers.edu

    Rutgers researcher leads team analyzing more exact methods to diagnose the most common tick-borne infection

    1
    New tests are at hand that offer more accurate, less ambiguous test results that can yield actionable results in a timely fashion.

    Researchers have developed techniques to detect Lyme disease bacteria weeks sooner than current tests, allowing patients to start treatment earlier.

    The findings appear in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. The authors include scientists from Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, Harvard University, Yale University, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, FDA, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other institutions.

    The new techniques can detect an active infection with the Lyme bacteria faster than the three weeks it takes for the current indirect antibody-based tests, which have been a standard since 1994. Another advantage of the new tests is that a positive result in blood indicates the infection is active and should be treated immediately, allowing quicker treatment to prevent long-term health problems. The techniques detect DNA or protein from the Lyme disease bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi.

    “These direct tests are needed because you can get Lyme disease more than once, features are often non-diagnostic and the current standard FDA-approved tests cannot distinguish an active, ongoing infection from a past cured one,” said lead author Steven Schutzer, a physician-scientist at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. “The problem is worsening because Lyme disease has increased in numbers to 300,000 per year in the United States and is spreading across the country and world.”

    Lyme disease signs frequently, but not always, include a red ring or bull’s eye skin rash. When there is no rash, a reliable laboratory test is needed and preferably one that indicates active disease. The only FDA-approved Lyme disease tests rely on detecting antibodies that the body’s immune system makes in response to the disease. Such a single antibody test is not an active disease indicator but rather only an exposure indicator — past or present.

    “The new tests that directly detect the Lyme agent’s DNA are more exact and are not susceptible to the same false-positive results and uncertainties associated with current FDA-approved indirect tests,” said Schutzer. “It will not be surprising to see direct tests for Lyme disease join the growing list of FDA-approved direct tests for other bacterial, fungal and viral infections that include Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Candida, influenza, HIV, herpes and hepatitis, among others.”

    The authors developed the paper after a meeting at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory’s Banbury Conference Center, a nonprofit research institution in New York to discuss current Lyme disease tests and the potential of new scientific advances to increase the accuracy of an early diagnosis.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 5:29 pm on October 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Rutgers University, Scientists Uncover Possible New Causes of Tourette Syndrome   

    From Rutgers University: “Scientists Uncover Possible New Causes of Tourette Syndrome” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    September 25, 2018

    Caitlin Coyle
    848-445-1955
    caitlin.coyle@rutgers.edu

    1

    An international team that includes multiple Rutgers scientists has made significant progress in understanding the genetic causes of Tourette syndrome. They estimate that over 400 singular or combined mutated genes could pose a risk for Tourette syndrome, suggesting the disorder is as complex as autism, epilepsy and intellectual disability.

    The study appears in the journal Cell Reports.

    Jay Tischfield, MacMillan Distinguished Professor of Genetics, and Gary Heiman, associate professor in the Department of Genetics at Rutgers-New Brunswick are part of the ongoing Tourette International Collaborative Genetics (TIC Genetics) study, which is the largest DNA sequencing study of Tourette. The new results are the second major set to come out of the 11-year-old study, following last year’s findings Neuron, that four damaged, high-risk genes may disrupt the normal brain development.

    2
    Rutgers and a group of scientists from across the country identified one damaged, or mutant, “high confidence” risk gene for Tourette’s as well as three others they believe are genes whose mutation is a probable risk for the disorder. Photo: Courtesy of Neuron

    In the new study, scientists and clinicians from Rutgers, the University of California-San Francisco, and from around the United States, Europe and South Korea report two significant findings: Tourette syndrome is sometimes caused by new and rare damaging mutations in specific genes or through structural mutations, known as copy number variants (CNVs), spanning multiple genes. In addition to likely Tourette risk genes, they found another “high confidence” risk gene called CELSR3.

    According to Tischfield, CNVs change the structure of segments of DNA, either through duplication or deletion. “We discovered that CNVs occur two to three times more often in children with Tourette syndrome compared to those without,” he said.

    Additionally, the reoccurring damaging mutations in CELSR3 in different families, as well as observation of new mutations in other genes involved in cell polarity, provide additional evidence for how brain development is disrupted in Tourette syndrome. “These two significant findings provide a framework for future research into the causes and treatment of this remarkable and peculiar disorder,” said Tischfield.

    Recently, the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) awarded the TIC Genetics study a grant of more than $10 million to continue the research for the next five years.

    According to Heiman, the ongoing funding and research would not have been possible without the support of the New Jersey Center for Tourette Syndrome and Associated Disorders (NJCTS).

    “NJCTS executive director Faith Rice and the more than 200 families at NJCTS were instrumental in launching the pilot study,” said Heiman. “Through the initial families who participated, we were able to collect samples and data to start the study and establish the first sharing repository for researchers from all over the world interested in studying Tourette syndrome.”

    In 2011, the NJCTS sharing repository at Rutgers was incorporated as part of the study, which allows researchers around the world to work together to investigate the possible causes of Tourette and attempt to ultimately enable the development of more effective treatments.

    “It has been rewarding to see researchers come together as a strong team committed not only to research but to finding answers,” Rice said.

    According to NJCTS, Tourette syndrome is a neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by involuntary movements and uncontrollable vocal sounds referred to as tics. Tourette usually presents in early childhood, affects all races and ethnic groups, and is often accompanied by co-occurring conditions such as depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder or attention deficit disorder. Currently, there is no known cause for Tourette syndrome nor is there a medication available that completely eliminates symptoms.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 5:13 pm on October 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Rutgers Researchers Discover Possible Cause for Alzheimer's and Traumatic Brain Injury, Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers University: “Rutgers Researchers Discover Possible Cause for Alzheimer’s and Traumatic Brain Injury” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    September 26, 2018

    Jennifer Forbes Mullenhard
    732-788-8301
    mullenjf@rwjms.rutgers.edu

    Caitlin Coyle
    848-445-1955
    caitlin.coyle@rutgers.edu

    The new mechanism may have also led to the discovery of an effective treatment.

    1
    Federico Sesti, a professor of neuroscience and cell biology at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School discovered possible cause for Alzheimer’s which may have also led to the discovery of an effective treatment.
    Photo: Kim Sokoloff

    Rutgers researchers have discovered a new mechanism that may contribute to Alzheimer’s disease and traumatic brain injury. They now hope to launch a clinical trial to test the treatment in humans.

    What causes Alzheimer’s is unknown, but a popular theory suggests a protein known as amyloid-beta slowly builds up a plaque in the brains of people with Alzheimer’s. But in a recent study in the journal Cell Death & Disease, Federico Sesti, a professor of neuroscience and cell biology at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, looked at a new mechanism, which involves a non-amyloid-beta protein, a potassium channel referred to as KCNB1.

    Under conditions of stress in a brain affected by Alzheimer’s, KCNB1 builds up and becomes toxic to neurons and then promotes the production of amyloid-beta. The build-up of KCNB1 channels is caused by a chemical process commonly known as oxidation.

    “Indeed, scientists have known for a long time that during aging or in neurodegenerative disease cells produce free radicals,” said Sesti. “Free radicals are toxic molecules that can cause a reaction that results in lost electrons in important cellular components, including the channels.”

    The study found that in brains affected by Alzheimer’s, the build-up of KCNB1 was much higher compared to normal brains.

    “The discovery of KCNB1’s oxidation/build-up was found through observation of both mouse and human brains, which is significant as most scientific studies do not usually go beyond observing animals,” said Sesti. “Further, KCBB1 channels may not only contribute to Alzheimer’s but also to other conditions of stress as it was found in a recent study that they are formed following brain trauma.”

    In the cases of Alzheimer’s and traumatic brain injury, the build-up of KCNB1 is associated with severe damage of mental function. As a result of this discovery, Sesti successfully tested a drug called Sprycel in mice. The drug is used to treat patients with leukemia.

    “Our study shows that this drug and similar ones could potentially be used to treat Alzheimer’s, a discovery that leads the way to launching a clinical trial to test this drug in humans.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:08 am on September 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Rutgers Receives NSF Award to Continue Pioneering Ocean Initiative, Rutgers University, ,   

    From Rutgers University: “Rutgers Receives NSF Award to Continue Pioneering Ocean Initiative” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    September 25, 2018

    Dalya Ewais
    848-445-3153
    dalya.ewais@rutgers.edu

    The project delivers insight to researchers, policymakers and the public worldwide.

    The National Science Foundation this week announced it has awarded a five-year, $220 million contract to a coalition of academic and oceanographic research organizations, including Rutgers University–New Brunswick, to operate and maintain the Ocean Observatories Initiative [OOI].

    The coalition, led by the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution with direction from the NSF, includes Rutgers, the University of Washington and Oregon State University.

    1

    The initiative includes platforms and sensors that measure physical, chemical, geological and biological properties and processes from the seafloor to the sea surface in key coastal and open-ocean sites of the Atlantic and Pacific. It was designed to address critical questions about the Earth-ocean system, including climate change, ecosystem variability, ocean acidification plate-scale seismicity and submarine volcanoes, and carbon cycling. The goal is to better understand the ocean and our planet.

    3
    The seafloor cable extends off the coast of Oregon and allows real-time communication with the deep sea. University of Washington

    Each institution will continue to operate and maintain the portion of project’s assets for which it is currently responsible. Rutgers will operate the cyberinfrastructure system that ingests and delivers data for the initiative.

    The initiative supports more than 500 autonomous instruments on the seafloor and on moored and free-swimming platforms that are serviced during regular, ship-based expeditions to the array sites. Data from each instrument is transmitted to shore, where it is freely available to users worldwide, including scientists, policy experts, decision-makers, educators and the general public.

    “Rutgers is proud to be a part of this transformative project that provides scientists and educators across the globe access to the richest source of real-time, in-water oceanographic data,” said David Kimball, interim senior vice president for research and economic development at Rutgers.

    Over the last three years, the Rutgers team led by Manish Parashar, director of the Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute and Distinguished Professor of computer science, designed, built and operated the OOI’s cyberinfrastructure. The team also included Scott Glenn and Oscar Schofield, Distinguished Professors in the Department of Marine and Coastal Sciences and co-founders of Rutgers’ Center for Ocean Observing Leadership, who led the Rutgers data team.

    3
    From left to right: Manish Parashar, director of the Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute and Distinguished Professor of computer science; Peggy Brennan-Tonetta, associate vice president for economic development at Rutgers’ Office of Research and Economic Development; and Ivan Rodero, project manager.
    Photo: Nick Romanenko/Rutgers University

    For the second phase of the OOI project, which begins on October 1 and runs for five years, Rutgers will receive about $6.6 million and will be responsible for maintaining the cyberinfrastructure and providing a network that allows 24/7 connectivity, ensuring sustained, reliable worldwide ocean observing data any time, any place, on any computer or mobile device. Peggy Brennan-Tonetta, associate vice president for economic development at Rutgers’ Office of Research and Economic Development, will serve as acting principal investigator.

    “Greater awareness and knowledge of the state of our oceans and the effects of their interrelated systems today is critical to a deeper understanding of our changing climate, marine and coastal ecosystems, atmospheric exchanges, and geodynamics. We are pleased to continue our involvement with this project that enables researchers to better understand the state of our oceans,” Brennan-Tonetta said.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 9:41 am on September 27, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 3D virtual cadaver, , , , Digital Cadavers Offer a High-Tech Lesson in Anatomy, Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers University: “Digital Cadavers Offer a High-Tech Lesson in Anatomy” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    September 26, 2018
    Beverly McCarron

    1
    Rebekah J. Thomas, center, an assistant professor at the School of Health Professions, demonstrates how to operate the school’s new virtual dissection table.
    Photo: Nick Romanenko/Rutgers University

    Rutgers University physician assistant students hovered over a virtual dissection table displaying the life-size image of a cadaver –the body of a 38-year-old man who had donated his body for medical research.

    The minutely detailed, 3D virtual cadaver had been recreated in vivid color based on actual body scans and loaded into the 6-foot long, touch-screen table.

    Swiping the screen, students peeled back layers of the cadaver, revealing pink organs and muscles, blue veins and, finally, the skeleton. To find the appendix, first-year student Lindsey DuBoff tapped on a scalpel icon, and then sliced away muscle and tissue with her finger, exposing the small organ.

    Seemingly out of science fiction (it has been used by the fictional doctors on Grey’s Anatomy), the virtual dissection table brings the future of gross anatomy and clinical science education to Rutgers’ School of Health Professions, one of eight schools and clinical and education resources that comprise the university’s academic health center. Rutgers is New Jersey’s first university to use this technology.

    “This table helps our students visualize and better understand anatomy and lays the foundation for stronger skills in clinical medicine,” said Matthew McQuillan, director of the physician assistant program, which confers a Master of Science degree.

    “Many go into surgery and subspecialties and having them understand spatial relationships is critical to becoming good clinicians. Anyone doing a physical exam has to be able to visualize the body structure. The virtual dissection table helps lay a foundation to build better skills in clinical medicine.

    Rebekah Thomas, an assistant professor in the program who brought the idea of the virtual cadaver to Rutgers, anticipates that it will complement – not replace – the school’s real cadavers.

    Removing a kidney from a real cadaver gives students a tactile sense of the body. Students holding the organ will feel its weight and size in a way they can’t on a screen.

    But a virtual kidney enables them to study the histology of an organ right down to its microscopic tissue and cells. Students can zoom in and out and see blood vessels and nerves.

    In addition, once an organ is removed, a flesh-and-bone cadaver is no longer pristine. After a year of training its students with a cadaver, the university must obtain a new donor. Virtual cadavers, on the other hand, can be digitally refreshed without limit.

    The computerized table gives students the flexibility to work on a variety of patient donors with different clinical and pathological conditions, body types, ethnicities and causes of death, Students also have access to a library of more than 1,000 images involving living clinical cases, which include conditions, such as an ectopic pregnancy and conjoined twins – with all patients giving prior consent to the digital use of their data, according to Anatomage, the California-based company that developed the table.

    “I’ve done cadaver dissections before,” said PA student Victoria Latella. “But I feel like this is a tool we never knew we needed.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:39 am on September 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers University: “New State Autism Center Opens at Rutgers” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    September 25, 2018
    Patti Verbanas
    patti.verbanas@rutgers.edu

    1
    The New Jersey Autism Center of Excellence is positioned to become a national model for programs that integrate autism research, clinical care and education.

    A new statewide center based at Rutgers University–New Brunswick has been established to improve research, treatment and services for people with autism spectrum disorder (ASD).

    The New Jersey Autism Center of Excellence, which is funded by the Governor’s Council for Medical Research and Treatment of Autism, the New Jersey Department of Health, will be led by Elizabeth Torres, an associate professor in psychology at Rutgers–New Brunswick; James Millonig, an associate professor in neuroscience and cell biology at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School; and Jill Harris, director of Research Development and Coordinator of Autism Services at Children’s Specialized Hospital.

    The new center is positioned to become a national model for programs that integrate autism research, clinical care and education, said Torres. While autism affects one in 59 children in United States, one in 34 children has the disorder in New Jersey.

    “We are one of the only states in the nation that for nearly 20 years has maintained the Governor’s Council for Medical Research and Treatment of Autism. Indeed, families of people with autism come to New Jersey from across the globe due to the exceptional services offered here,” Torres said. “But like the rest of the nation, we lack a comprehensive network that allows researchers, clinicians and families to connect. We also face barriers to research and don’t have a scientifically grounded understanding of how well certain treatments work.”

    A consumer advisory board composed of parents and advocates will inform the center on the unmet needs of the autistic population and help shape the center’s vision for the future. “We reached out to people with ASD, families and service providers to better understand where the ASD research and service gaps are,” says Harris. “Their input helps ensure that the goals and planned activities of the NJACE meets these needs including creating training for current and next generation health care providers to address needs of people with ASD across the lifespan.”

    Torres notes the lack of adequate insurance coverage for basic needs for people with this condition, and families cannot afford treatment that can help their children. “Since there are no physical outcome measures that provide a solid account of how well certain treatments work, parents get discouraged,” she said. “Then, children age beyond school years and services end.”

    Over the coming year, the center will create a collaborative, interdisciplinary network of health care providers, researchers, families, biopharmaceutical companies, universities, corporations, small businesses and other autism centers. The goal is to establish best practices, share information on successes and challenges to research, educate researchers and clinicians and locate treatment and employment for people of all ages with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). “We will stimulate innovative cutting-edge research, connect researchers to experts in their respective fields, assist with reporting and help communicate important findings to the autism community,” said Millonig.

    “The members of the New Jersey Autism Council are committed to the next steps in order to advance and disseminate the understanding, treatment, and management of ASD,” said Caroline Eggerding, the Council’s chair. “We look forward to working with the New Jersey Autism Center of Excellence to carry out the vision of coordinated innovative transformation research, treatment and professional education.”

    Of prime research interest: How effective are specific treatments for individuals with autism at different stages of life? Retroactive research on the trajectory of people diagnosed with autism as far back as 15 years ago can provide crucial insights into this lifelong condition and allow clinicians to understand what interventions succeeded or failed in promoting autonomy, independence and self-sufficiency during the transition from childhood to young adulthood, Torres said. The center will create a de-identified and centralized scientific data repository to help connect research outcomes from grantees from diverse layers of the knowledge network, spanning from patient’s contributed data, to digital biomarkers and environmental exposures, the microbiome and genetics.

    “Autism is not just a childhood disorder,” said Torres. “By three years of age, we have more certainty that something deviates from typical neurodevelopment; but the evolution toward this condition starts earlier. As such, we must intervene early, but physical outcome measures required for objective evaluations do not currently exist and as such there is no data on treatments’ effectiveness in any of the existing data repositories we have access to. We are merely guessing at what treatments will work or when such treatments will be most effective. The support of the center will aid researchers in obtaining age-dependent physical outcome measurements on personalized treatments that are scientifically grounded. This could be particularly useful to guide early intervention programs, even before autism is detected and officially diagnosed.”

    The center also seeks to change the public perception of ASD, shifting it from an exclusive psychological- or psychiatric-centered description of symptoms to one that more holistically ascertains the physiological underpinnings of this condition. The aim is to improve the person’s autonomy and physical independence to promote healthy social living.

    “A staggering number of adults with autism live without any hope to be embraced by our society,” Torres said. “The descriptions of autism as a mental illness, a social deficit, a lack of empathy or a mind that cannot theorize about others’ behaviors or actions obscures a person’s inherent abilities. We need to change the model to help children with autism become adults who are an integral part of our workforce.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: