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  • richardmitnick 9:45 am on March 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: $29 million to translate clinical research into patient care and treatment more quickly, , NJ ACTS: New Jersey Alliance for Clinical and Translational Science- Additional funding from the institutions will grow the program to about $45 million., Rutgers University, The Rutgers Institute for Translational Medicine and Science includes Princeton University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology, This huge grant is a natural outgrowth of the integration of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and Rutgers.   

    From Rutgers University: “Rutgers-Led Team Awarded $29 Million NIH Grant for Statewide Translational Research Institute” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    March 11, 2019

    Patti Verbanas
    848-932-0551
    patti.verbanas@rutgers.edu

    A NIH grant will advance moving research discoveries into clinical practice and improve health care in the state.

    1
    Reynold A. Panettieri, vice chancellor for Translational Medicine and Science and director of Rutgers Institute for Translational Medicine and Science.

    The National Institutes of Health (NIH) awarded a Rutgers-led team $29 million to translate clinical research into patient care and treatment more quickly.

    The Rutgers Institute for Translational Medicine and Science, which includes Princeton University and the New Jersey Institute of Technology, will receive the grant over five years for joining the NIH’s Clinical and Translational Science Awards Program.

    Translational science takes observations made in the laboratory, clinic and community and creates interventions that improve the health of individuals and populations – from diagnostics and therapeutics to medical procedures and behavioral interventions.

    “The ultimate goal is bringing more evidence-based treatments to more patients more quickly,” said Reynold Panettieri, vice chancellor for translational medicine and science and director of Rutgers Institute for Translational Medicine and Science. “In addition, our partnership with RWJBarnabas Health gives us a great opportunity to expand our clinical research, connecting the basic science research done by our 200+ investigators to patient care statewide.”

    The clinical and translational program at Rutgers will be known as NJ ACTS: New Jersey Alliance for Clinical and Translational Science. Additional funding from the institutions will grow the program to about $45 million.

    NIH supports a national network of more than 50 programs at medical research institutions nationwide that collaborate to speed the translation of research discoveries into improved patient care. It enables research teams, including scientists, patient advocacy organizations and community members, to tackle system-wide scientific and operational problems in clinical and translational research that no one team can overcome.

    The grant will allow Rutgers and its partners to train and cultivate the translational science workforce; engage patients and communities in every phase of the translational process; promote the integration of special and underserved populations in translational research across the human lifespan; innovate processes to increase the quality and efficiency of translational research, particularly of multisite trials; and advance the use of big data information systems.

    The collaborative program develops innovative approaches to barriers in clinical research, such as the efficient recruitment of research participants and approvals for multisite clinical trials.

    Rutgers and its partners will build a new infrastructure for clinical and translational research across the entire state, which will give patients access to clinical trials with cutting-edge care.

    In addition, NJ ACTS will have the capacity to analyze big data to discover trends in population health that can inform basic science research. It will also allow for diversity in clinical trials across Rutgers’ five clinical research units, which include the Adult Clinical Research and Pediatric Clinical Research Unit at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and centers based at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, Rutgers School of Dental Medicine, and Rutgers Environmental and Occupational Health Sciences Institute.

    “This huge grant is a natural outgrowth of the integration of the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey and Rutgers, and the type of opportunity for New Jersey then envisioned by the state government. It will foster the further development of innovation in New Jersey,” said Brian L. Strom, chancellor of Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences and executive vice president for health affairs for Rutgers. “It would not have been possible without the combination of resources from these two large great universities as well as the funding provided through our partnership with RWJBarnabas Health. It indicates to the world and to New Jersey industry that New Jersey is now in the big leagues of academic clinical research.”

    The grant also will build a pipeline for new clinical investigators by funding two positions a year for five years for junior faculty or professionals finishing their post-doctoral fellowship who can move into faculty positions with two years of guaranteed support. It will fund six positions for graduate students, who will be trained in translational and clinical research.

    The grant was awarded due to the strength of the Institute for Translational Medicine and Science, the alliance between Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, Princeton and NJIT, and the partnerships with community-based organizations, hospitals, community health centers, outpatient practices, data centers and health information exchanges. It reaches nearly seven million of the state’s nine million residents.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 12:58 pm on February 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Pedro Gerum, Planet discovery, Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers University: “Rutgers Student Helps NASA Discover Planets” 

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    From Rutgers University

    February 22, 2019
    Cynthia Medina
    c.medina@rutgers.edu

    Pedro Gerum explains how working on railway tracks led to an internship with the space agency.

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    Doctoral student Pedro Gerum recently started his internship in NASA’s Ames Research Center, where he will be a part of the TESS satellite mission to help discover new planets.
    Photo: Courtesy of Pedro Gerum

    NASA/MIT TESS

    Pedro Gerum is putting the skills he developed working to improve railroad track inspections in New Jersey as a graduate student toward helping NASA discover new planets outside our solar system.

    The fourth-year industrial and sytems engineering doctoral student at Rutgers-New Brunswick recently started an internship at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California, which is part of the agency’s TESS (Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite) mission that collects and analyzes data on exoplanets, those planets outside of our solar system that orbit around other stars but not the sun.

    The space telescope is designed to scan an area of the sky that is 400 times larger than the one covered by the recently retired Kepler mission, which searched for earth-sized planets orbiting stars.

    “My job is to see light curves from the satellite and try to detect if those curves represent a planet or not using computer algorithms,” Gerum said.

    Gerum’s role at NASA will have some similarities to his research at Rutgers under Melike Baykal-Gürsoy, an associate professor in the School of Engineering, working to detect rail track defects. He uses data and statistics to create patterns that can more accurately pinpoint where a problem originates and then develops a computer program to detect those patterns.

    “In the case of railways, I am looking for patterns, and those patterns will help detect the problem areas,’’ Gerum said. “In the case of NASA, I am looking for patterns, and those patterns will help determine whether a light curve indicates the presence of new planets.”

    Baykal-Gürsoy said this process of creating patterns in search of a conclusion is called building a stochastic model, which translates to the expertise NASA needs.

    “The first step in a stochastic model for the railway system is to figure out how to model a defect process found during inspections, and then the second step is to figure out how to predict a behavioral pattern from it,” Baykal-Gürsoy said. “Then you train a computer to detect problems on its own by plugging in examples of these patterns until it learns to do it accurately, and then it does the work for you, even better than you. This is called machine-learning.”


    Watch NASA scientists explain how the TESS satellite works to find undiscovered worlds around bright nearby stars, providing targets where future studies will assess their capacity to harbor life. (Video Courtesy of NASA.)

    Gerum will be doing that exact research with NASA, along with seven other students from across the globe who will be working on other projects. Gerum, originally from Brazil, completed his undergraduate degree at the Federal University of São Carlos and landed the position at NASA as a result of a partnership between the Brazilian Space Agency and NASA. Gerum said Baykal-Gürsoy helped him develop his expertise on data science and optimization and is grateful for how much assistance the university has offered to help him reach his goals.

    “I traveled to Rutgers to meet with Dr. Baykal-Gürsoy and I really liked her expertise in her field and she made me feel welcome,” Gerum said. “As an international student, I was lucky that Rutgers could fund part of my tuition. They really helped me get to where I am.”

    Gerum, who is the first Rutgers student in the industrial and systems engineering program to work at a NASA facility, hopes others from the university will be inspired to use their skills in areas outside of their immediate field of study. He said the relationship between tracking railway defects and discovering planets is more closely related than it seems.

    “There is usually a way to use your skill set in most fields,” said Gerum, who will return to Rutgers to complete his degree after his internship ends in May 2019. “You just have to stay open and get the right support.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 2:20 pm on February 13, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Adults With Autism to Benefit From New Employment Center at Rutgers, , , , Rutgers Center for Adult Autism Services, Rutgers University, The first program of its kind in the country   

    From Rutgers University: “Adults With Autism to Benefit From New Employment Center at Rutgers” 

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    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    February 14, 2019
    Megan Schumann
    MEGAN.SCHUMANN@rutgers.edu

    2
    Craig Lillard of Princeton (left) who works at Harvest in the Institute for Food Nutrition and Health as part of the Rutgers Center for Adult Autism Services with mentor Doug Stracquadanio. Courtesy of Rutgers University

    Rutgers Center for Adult Autism Services, the first program of its kind in the country, will more than double in size

    The Rutgers University Board of Governors today approved a proposal by the Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology to build a new facility for the Rutgers Center for Adult Autism Services (RCAAS) on Rutgers-New Brunswick’s Douglass campus.

    The two-year-old center, the first of its kind at a higher education institution in the United States, currently provides employment, vocational training and other services to 12 participants who commute from home. The expansion will enable the program to serve up to 30 participants. The project, estimated to cost $9.5 million, will be paid for through philanthropic funds.

    Christopher Manente, executive director of RCAAS, said, “We are committed to serving adults with autism by providing meaningful paid employment, full integration into the Rutgers community and ongoing research and training related to helping adults with autism lead full lives. We serve as a model that can be replicated at colleges and universities, or within small communities across the country.”

    Current participants have paying jobs on campus, five days a week, in food service, horticulture maintenance, university mail services, document and records management, the Rutgers Cinema, computer retail services, and other areas. Participants also benefit from individualized services to help them succeed on the job and maintain their independence in the community.

    The new facility will include a multifunctional gathering space and vocational training space, administrative offices for faculty and clinical staff and support spaces and provide community-based job training, life skills and recreational opportunities.

    Autism and autism spectrum disorder are among the fastest-growing developmental disabilities in the United States. Rutgers-New Brunswick’s Graduate School of Applied and Professional Psychology created the center to address the well-documented shortage of quality services that help adults with autism lead meaningful and productive lives, and to conduct research that can inform the development of other programs for adults with autism.

    The new building will be at the location of the former Corwin Dormitories on Nichol Avenue between Comstock Street and Dudley Road in New Brunswick. Its development will include demolition of the vacant Corwin residential buildings. Groundbreaking is expected later this year.

    Rutgers-New Brunswick is a leader in autism research facilities. The Rutgers University Cell and DNA Repository, containing the world’s largest collection of autism biomaterials, and the Douglass Developmental Disabilities Center, which includes an on-campus K-12 day school for children with autism from across New Jersey, are among many research and educational programs for autism at the university.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 6:29 pm on February 12, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Count Basie Comes Home", Rutgers University, Rutgers–Newark's Institute of Jazz Studies   

    From Rutgers University: “Count Basie Comes Home” 

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    From Rutgers University

    The voluminous archives of Count Basie are entrusted to Rutgers–Newark’s Institute of Jazz Studies.

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    The Count Basie Orchestra had a breakthrough year in 1938, following a run of performances at the Famous Door, a popular club on West 52nd Street in New York City. CBS broadcast some of the shows live, giving Count Basie (seated at the piano) and his band the kind of exposure that catapulted them into the upper echelons of big band jazz, alongside Duke Ellington, Jimmie Lunceford, Benny Goodman, Artie Shaw, Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, and Cab Calloway. Basie was the first bandleader to use two tenor saxophonists in his orchestra. “After that summer at the Famous Door, Basie never looked back,” wrote jazz historian Frank Driggs.
    Photography: courtesy of the Institute of Jazz Studies at Rutgers University–Newark

    Jazz pianist, composer, and bandleader William J. “Count” Basie was born in Red Bank, New Jersey, in 1904. His father played the mellophone, his mother the piano. At 24, Basie was hired to play with Walter Page’s Blue Devils, a Kansas City-based big band that toured the small nightclubs and dance halls of the American Southwest. By the time he was 30, Basie was leading his own big band, the Barons of Rhythm, based in Kansas City and featuring the tenor saxophonist Lester Young. Over the ensuing four decades, Basie’s style of swing revolutionized jazz rhythm, and Basie himself became one of the most recognizable musicians in America.

    When Wayne Winborne, the executive director of Rutgers’ Institute of Jazz Studies, first learned that Count Basie’s estate was looking for an organization to catalog, manage, maintain, and display Basie’s vast archives, he knew the institute was just the right place. Winborne says the Basie collection will enable scholars to investigate the many chapters of Basie’s musical evolution. “Studying all those things is going to be interesting,” Winborne says, “because you’re also drawing a parallel to American music in the 20th century. So, you have to look at the broader economic context in which he was making music—how all of the big bands, post-World War II, had to struggle to find a place.”

    RUTGERS MAGAZINE: How did Rutgers come into possession of the Count Basie archives?
    WAYNE WINBORNE: I got a call about a year ago from Branford Marsalis, saying he had a conversation with a representative of the Basie estate. They were looking for a home for the collection. The Institute of Jazz Studies is the world’s foremost archival research facility in jazz. Branford said to this person, “You need to call Wayne Winborne.” There are a number of people who would have said the same thing: “You don’t need to look around; that needs to go to Rutgers. They’re going to be good stewards.”

    RM: What’s in the collection?
    WW: Count Basie kept a lot of stuff. We have home recordings, newspaper clippings, correspondence, love letters to his wife and daughter, telegrams when he was ill from Duke Ellington and Oscar Peterson and Frank Sinatra—just wonderful stuff that fans of the music would be interested in. But also ledgers—the amount they paid the band—things that historians and writers will be interested in. We’ve got his home collection of books and records, suits, his signature cap, tailor-made articles of clothing that he would wear on gigs. We’ve got the piano he would play at home, his organ—just so much wonderful stuff that we plan to exhibit and possibly also develop a touring exhibit.

    RM: Is this material going to be of greater importance to scholars or equally accessible to the public?
    WW: Yes to both. Our intention is to make it available to the public and we’re already doing so. We have several pieces that are on loan to three Grammy museums—the one in Los Angeles, the one in Mississippi, and then the Grammy Museum Experience here in Newark. So, we’re absolutely partnering with other organizations and museums and sharing some pieces of the collection to expose the public to Count Basie’s music.

    RM: How important is it that this collection is going to be in New Jersey?
    WW: I think it’s extremely important. This is a son of New Jersey. People forget what a global icon he was—the first African American to win a Grammy. He has four tunes—either written by him or strongly associated with him—in the Grammy Hall of Fame. He was extremely influential and crossed over into the popular culture, from his music and his band appearing in movies in the 1940s and ’50s and ’60s, to that iconic image in the Mel Brooks film Blazing Saddles of Count Basie sitting at the piano. The fact that Mel Brooks would put that in the film, and understand that people would both recognize the musician and laugh at the juxtaposition—again, it speaks to how large he was as an icon. So that New Jersey connection is important, and that’s part of his story that needs to be highlighted.

    RM: Is there a single most important item in this collection?
    WW: No, there is not, and don’t make me try to think of one. There were so many aspects to his life. He was a husband. He was a father. Some of the personal things are so touching to me: letters he would write to his daughter, who has disabilities. Some of the letters he wrote to her from the road are very, very touching. I tell people of the telegrams he’d gotten from folks, either from birthday parties or from when he was sick. There’s one from Oscar Peterson. I guess Basie must’ve had a birthday party at the Waldorf Astoria. Oscar Peterson says something like: “Sorry I couldn’t be there, but you didn’t have to go through all that trouble for everybody to tell you what I need to say to you: I love you, man.”

    I love the one he got from Frank Sinatra. Basie had been in the hospital at the time, and Sinatra says something like, “Hey, man, that ain’t no way for a cat to behave. Get out of there soon.” And he signed it: “Your boy singer, Francis Albert.” Oh, man, I just love that so much. The respect, you know, from Frank Sinatra—this is, again, a global icon. For him to pay that kind of respect: “Your boy singer, Francis Albert.” C’mon, is that cool?

    RM: One Jersey guy to another, right?
    WW: One Jersey guy to another. One icon to another. That’s beautiful. I love that.

    RM: What else should we know about the Basie collection?
    WW: His wife, Catherine, was a very interesting woman. They lived in Queens. They were very immersed in the community, local civic organizations, did a lot of work with the NAACP. She received a lot of awards herself. She’d been a dancer for years, and raised their daughter at home, and was his life partner in every sense of the word for almost 50 years. I really believe she’s going to be the subject of serious study.

    RM: Will the collection be digitized?
    WW: To the extent that we can. This is something I’ve got to raise money for. There’s a donor or three who has a particular interest in digitization, and that’s a very important piece of work with archives and libraries across the country. So, I’ve got to raise some money to do that.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 11:21 am on December 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Rutgers University, Two Compounds in Coffee May Team Up to Fight Parkinson's   

    From Rutgers University: “Two Compounds in Coffee May Team Up to Fight Parkinson’s” 

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    From Rutgers University

    December 12, 2018
    Rutgers Today
    Media Contact
    Neal Buccino
    732-668-8439
    neal.buccino@rutgers.edu

    December 10, 2018
    Caitlin Coyle
    caitlin.coyle@rutgers.edu

    1
    M. Maral Mouradian of Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School has found a compound in coffee that when paired with caffeine may help to fight Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia. Photo by Steve Hockstein/Harvard Studio

    Caffeine plus another compound in coffee beans’ waxy coating may protect against brain degeneration, Rutgers study finds.

    2

    Rutgers scientists have found a compound in coffee that may team up with caffeine to fight Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia – two progressive and currently incurable diseases associated with brain degeneration.

    The discovery, recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, suggests these two compounds combined may become a therapeutic option to slow brain degeneration.

    Lead author M. Maral Mouradian, director of the Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School Institute for Neurological Therapeutics and William Dow Lovett Professor of Neurology, said prior research has shown that drinking coffee may reduce the risk of developing Parkinson’s disease. While caffeine has traditionally been credited as coffee’s special protective agent, coffee beans contain more than a thousand other compounds that are less well known.

    The Rutgers study focused on a fatty acid derivative of the neurotransmitter serotonin, called EHT (Eicosanoyl-5-hydroxytryptamide), found in the bean’s waxy coating. The researchers found that EHT protects the brains of mice against abnormal protein accumulation associated with Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia.

    In the current research, Mouradian’s team asked whether EHT and caffeine could work together for even greater brain protection. They gave mice small doses of caffeine or EHT separately as well as together. Each compound alone was not effective, but when given together they boosted the activity of a catalyst that helps prevent the accumulation of harmful proteins in the brain. This suggests the combination of EHT and caffeine may be able to slow or stop the progression of these diseases. Current treatments address only the symptoms of Parkinson’s disease but do not protect against brain degeneration.

    Mouradian said further research is needed to determine the proper amounts and ratio of EHT and caffeine required for the protective effect in people.

    “EHT is a compound found in various types of coffee but the amount varies. It is important that the appropriate amount and ratio be determined so people don’t over-caffeinate themselves, as that can have negative health consequences,” she said.

    According to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Parkinson’s disease is a brain disorder that can lead to shaking, stiffness and difficulty with walking, balance and coordination. Nearly one million people in the United States are living with Parkinson’s disease. Lewy body dementia, one of the most common forms of dementia, affects more than one million people in the United States. It causes problems with thinking, behavior, mood and movement.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:41 pm on December 7, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 36000 worms were aboard SpaceX Falcon 9 and 3600 were from Rutgers, Monica Driscoll, Rutgers University, School of Arts and Sciences-Molecular biology and Biochemistry, Studying the muscle deterioration that occurs during prolonged space flight,   

    From Rutgers University: Women in STEM- “Rutgers Scientist Sends Worms into Outer Space” Monica Driscoll 

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    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    12.7.18

    Monica Driscoll and team studying muscle deterioration.

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    Monica Driscoll with her team, Girish Harinat and Ricardo Laranjeiro at Cape Canaveral

    When the SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket blasted off from Cape Canaveral Wednesday, some 36,000 worms were aboard.

    And about 3,600 of those creatures were sent by Monica Driscoll, professor of molecular biology and biochemistry in the School of Arts and Sciences. Driscoll is part of an international team of scientists studying the muscle deterioration that occurs during prolonged space flight – and whether it can be overcome for extended stints at the International Space Station or long trips to Mars.

    “In the absence of gravity, muscle deteriorates very rapidly,” Driscoll says. “We will need to stop that if humans are to make the six month trip to Mars.”

    The Molecular Muscle group, including scientists from the U.K., Japan, Korea, Greece and U.S., will look at changes that occur in muscle and neurons, candidate drugs that should help maintain muscle mass, and the relationship of degradation to accelerated aging.

    Driscoll’s team includes, Girish Harinat, a Rutgers graduate who majored in cell biology and neuroscience, and Ricardo Laranjeiro, a post-doctoral associate in the molecular biology and biochemistry department.

    “Our particular interest is in the neurons that influence muscle health,” says Driscoll, who along with her team, was on hand for the launch. “We are sending up middle-aged worms with labeled neurons and will examine what happens at the structure level.”

    The C. elegans worms used by Driscoll and her team are ideal for the study, she said.

    “The animal is transparent, so we can look through the skin to see each neuron in the body in its native context,” she says. “The worm lives only three weeks, so we can effectively track what happens to neurons during its adult life, mimicking what might be a long stint for a person on Mars.”

    The SpaceX capsule will dock at the International Space Station, where the worms will live for five or six days before they are frozen and returned to Earth, Driscoll says.

    “At which point we will get to work on checking them out,” she added.

    Earthbound patients with muscle degeneration may also benefit from the findings.

    “We can test strategies for muscle and nerve maintenance solutions that might well translate to humans,” Driscoll said. “Although a focus here is on space, no one can ignore the tremendous spin-off discoveries from previous space efforts that improve life here on Earth.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 2:33 pm on November 19, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Richard Weeks Hall of Engineering, Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers University: “Rutgers Dedicates State-of-the-Art, Multi-use Engineering Educational Facility” 

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    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    11.19.18

    Rutgers University President Robert Barchi, Rutgers–New Brunswick Interim Chancellor Christopher Molloy, and School of Engineering Dean Thomas Farris celebrated the opening of a state-of-the-art facility for student learning and research. Richard Weeks Hall of Engineering anchors the School of Engineering complex on the Busch campus and is the most recent facility built as part of an effort to create a core of new STEM facilities on the university’s Piscataway campus.

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    Richard Weeks Hall of Engineering

    Classes and research began this fall at the four-story, 106,000-square-foot modern learning facility that provides expanded teaching, collaboration and laboratory space to pursue new ideas and sustainable solutions in energy, infrastructure, and advanced manufacturing. The $84 million project was funded by the School of Engineering along with several generous gifts from alumni and industry partners, including $10 million in leadership gifts and pledges to name the building in honor of 1950 alumnus Richard N. Weeks, who chairs Weeks Marine, one of the leading marine construction, dredging and tunneling firms in North America. The School of Engineering recently announced an additional $10 million gift from Weeks to support undergraduate scholarships, the largest-ever scholarship gift to Rutgers. Weeks attended the dedication event along with several family members.

    “In Dick Weeks we have a great champion for our School of Engineering and a model of philanthropy for the entire university,” President Barchi said. “Through his vision and generosity, we have a facility that will contribute greatly to the prestige of being a Rutgers-educated engineer and will help us recruit outstanding students and scholars. We are grateful to him and to all those who contributed to the completion of this project.”

    “Our School of Engineering applies cutting edge technologies and techniques that benefit society in a number of ways to solve problems and contribute to New Jersey and the world,” Interim Chancellor Molloy said. “Weeks Hall provides us with even greater opportunities to engage our students in research that addresses safer transportation, better infrastructure, responsible water resource management, and reducing the risks of plastics in waterways.

    School of Engineering Dean Thomas Farris said, “Weeks Hall of Engineering anchors the School of Engineering on the Busch campus, serving as the gateway to the engineering complex of buildings. We designed this building with engineering students in mind from the collaborative touch down spaces and state-of-the-art laboratories to the smart classrooms and lecture halls. This is their home where they can learn collaboratively with each other and faculty, get inspired and become the innovators for the 21st century.”

    Richard Weeks Hall of Engineering is an open and collaborative education center that includes two lecture halls and smart classrooms accommodating more than 700 students. Concept labs located on the first and second floors are used by students to work on team-based, often large scale projects. Students also have access to conference rooms, open study space, and smaller one-on-one meeting rooms. Dedicated laboratories allow for specialized research in robotics, aerospace, urban and coastal water systems, geo-environmental engineering, intelligent transportation, and manufacturing. The building also includes a clean room for scientific research.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
    • stewarthoughblog 12:31 am on November 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Richard,
      Nice announcement from your alma mater, you must be proud. Interesting building design, hopefully it will be filled with profound engineering accompllshments in the future.

      Happy Tthanksgiving.

      Like

  • richardmitnick 11:56 am on October 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Caliburn supercomputer at Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute, Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers University: “Caliburn, New Jersey’s Supercomputer, Catalyzes Cutting-Edge Research” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    10.23.18

    Todd Bates
    848-932-0550
    todd.bates@rutgers.edu

    New Jersey academia and industry benefit from the region’s most powerful supercomputer.

    Rutgers Caliburn Supermicro Linux supercomputer at Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute

    1
    With Caliburn from left to right: Manish Parashar, director of the Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute and Distinguished Professor of computer science; Peggy Brennan-Tonetta, associate vice president for economic development at Rutgers’ Office of Research and Economic Development; and Ivan Rodero, Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute associate director for technical operations and associate research professor.
    Photo: Nick Romanenko/Rutgers University

    Caliburn, a supercomputer with the computational power of more than 10,000 standard desktop computers, is catalyzing diverse, innovative research at Rutgers University and across New Jersey, according to the Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute.

    Caliburn is the most powerful computing system in the Garden State. It ranked No. 2 among the Big Ten universities when it was deployed and continues to enable data-driven science and engineering at unprecedented scales, the institute says. This year, Caliburn has already provided computing that would have taken more than 6,000 years on a typical desktop.

    “Computing has become a critical driver across all of science, and Caliburn provides a competitive advantage to researchers and students across New Jersey, catalyzing new research and driving innovation,” said Manish Parashar, Distinguished Professor of computer science in the Rutgers School of Arts and Sciences at Rutgers-New Brunswick and founding director of the Rutgers Discovery Informatics Institute (RDI2) within Rutgers’ Office of Research and Economic Development.

    The State of New Jersey through its Higher Education Leasing Fund program awarded $10 million to the institute to build a powerful computing system that could catalyze innovation in the Garden State’s data-driven economy. The funding allowed the institute to build an advanced computing infrastructure that includes Caliburn to support researchers at Rutgers and elsewhere. Parashar and Ivan Rodero, institute associate director for technical operations, designed the system with a unique architecture and capabilities. J. J. Villalobos leads the Caliburn engineering team that is responsible for systems management and operations. Paul Arias provides community outreach and user support.

    “We continue to integrate new technologies and innovative solutions with Caliburn to maximize its impact on science,” Rodero said.

    Peggy Brennan-Tonetta, associate vice president for economic development, said “Caliburn was a transformational investment in the future of New Jersey’s economic development, as the use of computation and big data have become key enablers for innovation in nearly every field of research and industry sector.”

    Caliburn users span wide-ranging disciplines, including chemistry and chemical biology, engineering, genomics, humanities, integrative biology, mathematics, medical informatics, microbiology, proteomics, physics and astronomy.

    For example, at Rutgers University–Camden, Associate Professor Grace Brannigan’s group is using Caliburn to study how single amino-acid mutations within proteins can affect the flow of cell signaling between neurons. Such studies can help pinpoint links between mutations and increased susceptibility to diseases such as epilepsy, addiction, schizophrenia, bipolar and unipolar depression. The group is trying to find out why certain gene mutations are tied to aging and stress-related disorders, as well as lower tolerance for drugs. Her groundbreaking research would not have been possible without access to Caliburn.

    Humna Awan, a graduate student in Professor Eric Gawiser’s research group at Rutgers University–New Brunswick, works with Caliburn and the institute to develop tools that allow researchers to maximize information about the universe stemming from large galaxy surveys that will observe billions of galaxies. Gawiser leads a team in the Department of Physics and Astronomy that seeks to explain why the distribution of galaxies is so clumpy and what that can tell us about the dark energy that is causing the expansion of the universe to accelerate.

    At Rutgers Business School, Gyorgy Matyasfalvi, a recent graduate of Professor Jonathan Eckstein’s group, built software tools for writing code that would be simple and readable yet run efficiently on hundreds or thousands of processors. Caliburn fulfilled an essential role in validating the research results on example problems involving planning the growth of electric power grid systems under thousands of possible demand scenarios.

    The institute’s 3rd annual Open House & Research Expo is scheduled for 9:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. on Oct. 25 in Center Hall at the Busch Student Center in Piscataway. The keynote speaker is Sanjay Padhi, principal, Amazon Web Services’ Global Scientific Computing, and the topic is “Predictive Analytics Using Amazon Web Services.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 4:39 pm on October 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Richard N. Weeks, Richard N. Weeks a 1950 Rutgers graduate has committed $10 million to support undergraduate scholarships at the Rutgers School of Engineering. His pledge is the largest-ever gift for scholarships to t, Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers University: “Rutgers Alumnus Makes Largest Scholarship Gift Ever to University” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    October 11, 2018

    Dory Devlin
    848-932-0559
    dory.devlin@rutgers.edu

    The endowed scholarship, the School of Engineering’s largest-ever gift, will help undergraduates pursue careers in the profession.

    1
    Richard N. Weeks, a 1950 Rutgers graduate, has committed $10 million to support undergraduate scholarships at the Rutgers School of Engineering. His pledge is the largest-ever gift for scholarships to the university.

    Richard N. Weeks, a 1950 Rutgers graduate who grew his family’s small marine construction company into an industry leader, has made a commitment of $10 million to support undergraduate scholarships at the Rutgers School of Engineering. Weeks’s pledge is the largest gift to Rutgers for scholarships and the largest ever to the engineering school.

    The Richard N. Weeks Endowed Scholarship will help many more talented students obtain an outstanding engineering education at Rutgers. “Rutgers is at the forefront of engineering education,” said Weeks. “I created this scholarship so that even more students will have the opportunity to get a first-class education at Rutgers and go on to find solutions to society’s greatest challenges.”

    After graduating from Rutgers, Weeks began working for his father’s company, which loaded cargo ships in New York Harbor. Upon succeeding his father in running the business, he expanded and diversified its services. Today, Weeks Marine is a leading marine construction, dredging and tunneling firm, with operations across North America. In recognition of his vital contributions to engineering and business, he was inducted into the Rutgers Hall of Distinguished Alumni in 2017.

    “With this exceptional gift, Mr. Weeks has demonstrated his belief in the power of education to change lives forever,” said Rutgers President Robert Barchi. “Endowed scholarships help students pursue their dreams while incurring less debt, and help Rutgers attract and retain the finest students to the university.”

    “Mr. Weeks is a great friend to the university and to the School of Engineering. The Weeks Endowed Scholarship will elevate the school by helping it nurture future generations of leaders essential to America’s economic, technological, and industrial success,” said Thomas Farris, dean of the School of Engineering. “The pipeline of highly skilled engineers created by Mr. Weeks’s support will help feed the nation’s growing demand for the profession.”

    Students at the prestigious Rutgers School of Engineering at Rutgers-New Brunswick are highly qualified and diverse, hailing from New Jersey, out of state and across the globe. With successful partnerships across a range of industries and an internationally recognized faculty, the school is positioned to become a leader in innovative engineering research and education. The Weeks Scholarship will heighten that trajectory by dramatically expanding opportunity and access for students hungry to make their marks in the field of engineering.

    2
    In 2014, Richard N. Weeks pledged $6 million toward the construction of the Richard Weeks Hall of Engineering, which opened in September at Rutgers-New Brunswick. No image credit.

    “Mr. Weeks’s generous gift illustrates how private philanthropy can have a transformative effect on Rutgers students, on the university’s communities, and on society as a whole,” said Nevin E. Kessler, president of Rutgers University Foundation and executive vice president for development and alumni relations. “The support of Rutgers’ alumni and friends enables the university to reach its highest aspirations of providing world-class education, research and public service.”

    Weeks has given generously to Rutgers before. In 2014, he pledged $6 million toward the construction of Richard Weeks Hall of Engineering, which opened in September. With leading-edge labs in advanced manufacturing, sustainability, aerospace and robotics, along with smart classrooms and collaborative student study space, Weeks Hall serves as the School of Engineering’s gateway facility on the Busch campus.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
  • richardmitnick 3:17 pm on October 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , New Techniques Can Detect Lyme Disease Weeks Before Current Tests, Rutgers University   

    From Rutgers University: “New Techniques Can Detect Lyme Disease Weeks Before Current Tests” 

    Rutgers smaller
    Our Great Seal.

    From Rutgers University

    October 11, 2018
    Patti Verbanas
    patti.verbanas@rutgers.edu

    Rutgers researcher leads team analyzing more exact methods to diagnose the most common tick-borne infection

    1
    New tests are at hand that offer more accurate, less ambiguous test results that can yield actionable results in a timely fashion.

    Researchers have developed techniques to detect Lyme disease bacteria weeks sooner than current tests, allowing patients to start treatment earlier.

    The findings appear in the journal Clinical Infectious Diseases. The authors include scientists from Rutgers Biomedical and Health Sciences, Harvard University, Yale University, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, FDA, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and other institutions.

    The new techniques can detect an active infection with the Lyme bacteria faster than the three weeks it takes for the current indirect antibody-based tests, which have been a standard since 1994. Another advantage of the new tests is that a positive result in blood indicates the infection is active and should be treated immediately, allowing quicker treatment to prevent long-term health problems. The techniques detect DNA or protein from the Lyme disease bacteria Borrelia burgdorferi.

    “These direct tests are needed because you can get Lyme disease more than once, features are often non-diagnostic and the current standard FDA-approved tests cannot distinguish an active, ongoing infection from a past cured one,” said lead author Steven Schutzer, a physician-scientist at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School. “The problem is worsening because Lyme disease has increased in numbers to 300,000 per year in the United States and is spreading across the country and world.”

    Lyme disease signs frequently, but not always, include a red ring or bull’s eye skin rash. When there is no rash, a reliable laboratory test is needed and preferably one that indicates active disease. The only FDA-approved Lyme disease tests rely on detecting antibodies that the body’s immune system makes in response to the disease. Such a single antibody test is not an active disease indicator but rather only an exposure indicator — past or present.

    “The new tests that directly detect the Lyme agent’s DNA are more exact and are not susceptible to the same false-positive results and uncertainties associated with current FDA-approved indirect tests,” said Schutzer. “It will not be surprising to see direct tests for Lyme disease join the growing list of FDA-approved direct tests for other bacterial, fungal and viral infections that include Staphylococcus, Streptococcus, Candida, influenza, HIV, herpes and hepatitis, among others.”

    The authors developed the paper after a meeting at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory’s Banbury Conference Center, a nonprofit research institution in New York to discuss current Lyme disease tests and the potential of new scientific advances to increase the accuracy of an early diagnosis.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    rutgers-campus

    Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is a leading national research university and the state’s preeminent, comprehensive public institution of higher education. Rutgers is dedicated to teaching that meets the highest standards of excellence; to conducting research that breaks new ground; and to providing services, solutions, and clinical care that help individuals and the local, national, and global communities where they live.

    Founded in 1766, Rutgers teaches across the full educational spectrum: preschool to precollege; undergraduate to graduate; postdoctoral fellowships to residencies; and continuing education for professional and personal advancement.

    As a ’67 graduate of University college, second in my class, I am proud to be a member of

    Alpha Sigma Lamda, National Honor Society of non-tradional students.

     
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