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  • richardmitnick 11:33 am on February 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Coherent population trapping, OneWeb satellite constellation, , ULPAC-ultra-low-power atomic clock   

    From Tokyo Institute of Technology: “Tinier and less power-hungry quantum atomic clock push toward intelligent IoT” 

    tokyo-tech-bloc

    From Tokyo Institute of Technology

    February 19, 2019

    Associate Professor Kenichi Okada
    School of Engineering
    Tokyo Institute of Technology
    Email okada@ee.e.titech.ac.jp
    Tel +81-3-5734-3764

    Contact
    Public Relations Section
    Tokyo Institute of Technology
    Email media@jim.titech.ac.jp
    Tel +81-3-5734-2975

    Scientists at Tokyo Tech, Ricoh co. and The National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology have developed an ultra-low-power atomic clock (ULPAC) for small satellites to enable future communication systems beyond 5G. The proposed device outperforms the current industry standards in various benchmarks, such as size, stability, and power consumption.

    1
    Figure 1. Prototype of the atomic clock (33 mm x 38 mm x 9 mm) A newly developed compact ULPACs, mounted on small satellites, automobiles, and smartphones, accelerate the realization of seamless and on-demand mobile communication networks.

    As current telecommunication technologies continue to evolve, the speed and sheer amount of data required by users worldwide increase accordingly. One promising method for satisfying this ever-growing demand is by deploying a constellation of nano- or micro-scale satellites that circle the planet in low earth orbit.

    Airbus- Artist’s impression of OneWeb satellite constellation. .

    However, such a swarm of satellites requires extremely precise synchronization to a global time standard, for which a very precise atomic clock on board each unit is necessary.

    Because conventional atomic clocks are too large (155–755 cm3) and consume too much power (up to 10 W) to be employed on small satellites, researchers have developed quantum atomic clocks with greatly reduced size and power consumption by employing a method called coherent population trapping. Based on this method, researchers at Tokyo Tech, together with Ricoh Co. Ltd. and the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), have recently designed a fully functional atomic clock that surpasses the current industry benchmarks. In terms of power consumption, the phase-locked loop of their device, which is an essential component in quantum atomic clocks, consumes an order of magnitude less power than that of previously reported devices.

    In addition to its low power consumption, the proposed atomic clock outshines currently reported devices in two other critical aspects: volume occupied and Allan deviation. Because effective use of the available space on board nano/micro-scale satellites is of the essence, so is making sure that the final design can be made to fit a very small volume. As for Allan deviation, it is a measure of the stability of the frequency of a clock; a low Allan deviation implies a very stable and reliable clock. The atomic clock developed by the team is also looking good in these two fronts as well. “The prototype of our atomic clock achieves a long-term Allan deviation of 2.2×10−12 at τ=105 s (the industry standard is 3.0×10−10 at τ=1 s) while occupying a volume of only 15.4 cm3 (slightly smaller than the smallest currently available atomic clock),” explains Associate Professor Kenichi Okada from Tokyo Tech.

    According to the research team, there is room for improvement. “The total power consumption is 59.9 mW, which is mainly because of the microcontroller unit in this prototype and can be further reduced by using custom logic circuitry,” explains Okada. A photograph of the finished product can be seen in Fig. 1 and 2. Ricoh and AIST worked on improving the Allan deviation of the device, whereas the researchers at Tokyo Tech focused on lowering its power consumption. The final result of this collaboration is a prototype of a very promising atomic clock that pushes current benchmarks further so that future telecommunications systems, such as those beyond 5G, can become a reality.

    2
    Figure 2. The integrated quantum package. The quantum package of the proposed low-power atomic clock fits in a volume even smaller than the smallest atomic clocks currently available.

    See the full article here .

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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    tokyo-tech-campus

    Tokyo Tech is the top national university for science and technology in Japan with a history spanning more than 130 years. Of the approximately 10,000 students at the Ookayama, Suzukakedai, and Tamachi Campuses, half are in their bachelor’s degree program while the other half are in master’s and doctoral degree programs. International students number 1,200. There are 1,200 faculty and 600 administrative and technical staff members.

    In the 21st century, the role of science and technology universities has become increasingly important. Tokyo Tech continues to develop global leaders in the fields of science and technology, and contributes to the betterment of society through its research, focusing on solutions to global issues. The Institute’s long-term goal is to become the world’s leading science and technology university.

     
  • richardmitnick 2:33 pm on February 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Affordable worldwide internet coverage, , GOV.UK, OneWeb satellite constellation, This ESA project will span seven nations including Canada and is an example of how the UK will continue to work across Europe and globally,   

    From UK Space Agency for GOV.UK: “£18m for OneWeb satellite constellation to deliver global communications” 

    UK Space Agency

    From UK Space Agency

    for

    GOV.UK

    Affordable worldwide internet coverage is one step closer today, after £18 million of UK Space Agency funding was awarded to OneWeb through the European Space Agency, to aid the development of its next generation satellite constellation.

    18 February 2019
    Chris Skidmore MP

    2
    Artist’s impression of OneWeb satellite constellation. Credit: Airbus.

    A global communications network in space, the system will be comprised of approximately 650 satellites initially and scale to more than 900 satellites over time.

    Science Minister Chris Skidmore is visiting the European Space Agency in the Netherlands today. He will say:

    Fast internet access is something many people take for granted but in many areas of the world connectivity is still hit and miss.

    This new £18m investment will go towards meeting the significant technical challenges of the project, putting the UK at the forefront of cutting-edge research and development.

    The commercial potential for a cost effective worldwide telecoms satellite system is huge, and the UK space sector is playing a leading role in delivering it. It is made possible by our ongoing commitment to the European Space Agency and our world-leading capabilities in space and telecommunications, which we are supporting through our modern Industrial Strategy.

    UK business OneWeb, which is headquartered in London and will employ up to 200 staff at its’ White City offices, is poised to take advantage of cost effective spacecraft launch and manufacturing to deploy hundreds of satellites that could provide more affordable internet connectivity to people and businesses across the world.

    The OneWeb Sunrise programme will initially focus on technologies for the next generation of satellite payloads, ground connections and space debris removal.

    The UK Space Agency investment will also support novel automation techniques and artificial intelligence to manage the proposed constellation of spacecraft and its interaction with terrestrial networks to realise global 5G connectivity.

    Adrian Steckel, CEO, OneWeb said:

    Providing access to people everywhere has been the mission and vision of OneWeb since the very beginning. We will be able to realize this vision in part because of important partnerships like this one with the UK Space Agency, ESA and a range of other important partners including our European and Canadian partners. Thanks to this support, we will focus together on next generation technologies that will be game changers for realizing global 5G connectivity.

    We are excited about the application of artificial intelligence and machine learning technologies to develop novel automation techniques that could help manage our constellation in future and ensure we do so safely and responsibly so that we can protect space for future generations.

    Today’s announcement comes as a result of the UK’s leading investment in the European Space Agency’s telecommunications research programme (ARTES).

    ESA is independent of the European Union and hosts its European Centre for Space Applications and Telecommunications (ECSAT) in Harwell, Oxfordshire, furthering the UK’s world-leading position in satellite communications.

    Magali Vaissiere, ESA Director of Telecommunications and Integrated Applications said:

    Sunrise is a prominent endeavour falling under our Satellite for 5G Initiative.

    It represents the exciting and required new direction ESA is taking in support of our Member States’ industry to remain at the forefront of not only the most advanced developments within the space world, but also to enable the necessary complement to the terrestrial networks that satellites will have to play to ensure a successful and fully inclusive digitalisation of industry and society.

    This ESA project will span seven nations including Canada and is an example of how the UK will continue to work across Europe and globally.

    The news comes as the first batch of 6 satellites of the OneWeb constellation are due to be launched on an Arianespace Soyuz rocket from Europe’s Spaceport in French Guiana next week (26 February).

    The UK is a world leader in telecommunications satellites. Last month EUTELSAT QUANTUM, the first satellite capable of being completely reprogrammed after launch left the UK for final assembly and testing in France.

    And in November last year, Eutelsat and Airbus signed a new contract worth hundreds of millions of pounds that will see components and parts for two further communications satellites assembled in the UK. This means that 6 out of 7 of the company’s next satellites will be partially built in Britain.

    The UK space sector is growing rapidly, employing 42,000 people and playing a major role in the global shift towards the commercialisation of space activities – known as ‘New Space’.

    The UK space industry is commercially focused with 82% of income from sales to consumers and businesses. The latest industry figures show it has an income of £14.8 billion, employment of 41,900 and exports worth £5.5 billion, while supporting a further £300 of UK GDP through the provision of satellite services to other sectors.

    See the full article here .

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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The UK Space Agency is responsible for all strategic decisions on the UK civil space programme and provides a clear, single voice for UK space ambitions.

    At the heart of UK efforts to explore and benefit from space, we are responsible for ensuring that the UK retains and grows a strategic capability in space-based systems, technologies, science and applications. We lead the UK’s civil space programme in order to win sustainable economic growth, secure new scientific knowledge and provide benefit to all citizens.

    We work to:

    co-ordinate UK civil space activity
    encourage academic research
    support the UK space industry
    raise the profile of UK space activities at home and abroad
    increase understanding of space science and its practical benefits
    inspire our next generation of UK scientists and engineers
    licence the launch and operation of UK spacecraft
    promote co-operation and participation in the European Space programme

    We’re an executive agency of the Department for Business, Innovation and Skills, made up of about 70 staff based in Swindon, London and the UK Space Gateway in Oxfordshire.

    We are responsible for:

    leading the UK civil space policy and increasing the UK contribution to European initiatives
    building a strong national space capability, including scientific and industrial centres of excellence
    co-ordinating strategic investment across industry and academia
    working to inspire and train a growing, skilled UK workforce of space technologists and scientists
    working on national and international space projects in co-operation with industry and academia
    regulating the UK civil space activities and ensuring we meet international treaty obligations

     
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