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  • richardmitnick 4:18 pm on April 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , MiniBooNE, MINOS, ,   

    From Fermi National Accelerator Lab: “Search for sterile neutrinos in MINOS and MINOS+” 

    FNAL Art Image
    FNAL Art Image by Angela Gonzales

    From Fermi National Accelerator Lab , an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    April 16, 2019

    1
    MINOS far detector as seen in 2012. Photo: Reidar Hahn

    The MINOS+ collaboration at the Department of Energy’s Fermilab has published a paper in Physical Review Letters about their latest results: new constraints on the existence of sterile neutrinos. The collaboration has exploited new high-statistics data and a new analysis regime to set more stringent boundaries on the possibility of sterile neutrinos mixing with muon neutrinos. They have significantly improved on their previous results published in 2016. With close to 40 publications that have garnered more than 6,000 citations, MINOS has been at the forefront of studying neutrino oscillations physics since its first data-taking days in 2005.

    The experiment uses two iron-scintillator sampling-and-tracking calorimetric particle detectors: The near detector is placed 1.04 kilometers from the neutrino source at Fermilab, and the far detector is placed 735 kilometers away in Minnesota.

    FNAL MINOS near detector

    FNAL MINOS Far Detector in the Soudan Mine in northern Minnesota

    The MINOS experiment collected data using a low-energy neutrino beam from May 1, 2005, to April 29, 2012, and MINOS+ collected data with a medium-energy neutrino beam from Sept. 4, 2013 to June 29, 2016.

    The detectors have accumulated high-statistics samples of muon neutrino interactions. Using a Fermilab neutrino beam composed of almost 100 percent muon neutrinos, they measured the disappearance of muon neutrinos as the particles arrived at the far detector. The collaboration used these data to obtain some of the most precise to-date measurements of standard three-neutrino mixings. These data also restrict phenomena beyond the Standard Model, including the hypothetical light sterile neutrinos.

    The analysis has simultaneously employed the energy spectra of charged-current (W boson exchange) and neutral-current (Z boson exchange) interactions between the neutrinos and the atoms inside the detector.

    Using a neutrino oscillation model that assumed the existence of the three known kinds of neutrinos plus a fourth type of neutrino referred to as a single sterile neutrino, the MINOS+ collaboration found no evidence of sterile neutrinos. Instead, the collaboration was able to set rigorous limits on the mixing parameter sin2θ24 for the mass splitting Δm241 > 10−4 eV2.

    The results significantly increase the tension with results obtained by experiments conducted with single detectors studying electron neutrino appearance in a muon neutrino beam. The LSND and MiniBooNE techniques and limited statistics present challenges that are now being tackled by the MicroBooNE experiment at Fermilab, designed specifically for this task.

    LSND experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory and Virginia Tech

    FNAL/MiniBooNE

    FNAL/MicrobooNE

    Scientists from 33 institutions in five countries — the United States, UK, Brazil, Poland and Greece — are members of the MINOS+ collaboration. More information can be found on the MINOS+ website.

    This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science.

    See the full article here.


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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

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    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. Fermilab is America’s premier laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Thousands of scientists from universities and laboratories around the world collaborate at Fermilab on experiments at the frontiers of discovery.

    FNAL MINERvA front face Photo Reidar Hahn

    FNAL DAMIC

    FNAL Muon g-2 studio

    FNAL Short-Baseline Near Detector under construction

    FNAL Mu2e solenoid

    Dark Energy Camera [DECam], built at FNAL

    FNAL DUNE Argon tank at SURF

    FNAL/MicrobooNE

    FNAL Don Lincoln

    FNAL/MINOS

    FNAL Cryomodule Testing Facility

    FNAL MINOS Far Detector in the Soudan Mine in northern Minnesota

    FNAL LBNF/DUNE from FNAL to SURF, Lead, South Dakota, USA

    FNAL/NOvA experiment map

    FNAL NOvA Near Detector

    FNAL ICARUS

    FNAL Holometer

     
  • richardmitnick 1:25 pm on December 17, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Anode plane assemblies, , Components from three continents, DUNE-Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, , , MiniBooNE, , , Short-Baseline Neutrino Detector, Sterile neutrino?,   

    From Symmetry: “First critical components arrive for SBND” 

    Symmetry Mag
    From Symmetry

    12/17/18
    Jim Daley

    International collaborators are delivering parts to be used in Fermilab’s Short-Baseline Neutrino program.

    1
    Photo by Reidar Hahn, Fermilab

    Major components for a new neutrino experiment at the US Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory are arriving at the lab from around the world. The components will be used in the upcoming Short-Baseline Near Detector, an important piece of the laboratory’s neutrino program. The first of four anode plane assemblies, highly sensitive electronic components, came to Fermilab in October. More are on their way.

    SBND is one of three particle detectors that make up the Short-Baseline Neutrino program at Fermilab. Neutrinos, renegade particles that are famously difficult to study, could provide scientists with clues about the evolution of the universe.

    The Short-Baseline Neutrino program, or SBN, focuses its search on a particular type of neutrino, called the sterile neutrino, which could be the explanation for unexpected results seen in several past neutrino experiments. The particle’s existence has been teased but never clearly confirmed.

    SBND will also be a testing ground for some of the technologies, including the anode plane assemblies, that will be used in the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, known as DUNE, a megascience experiment hosted by Fermilab that is currently under construction in South Dakota.

    Fermilab’s three Short-Baseline Neutrino detectors will be positioned at various distances along the path of a neutrino beam generated by Fermilab’s particle accelerators.

    “The reason you have three detectors is that you want to sample the neutrino beam along the beamline at different distances,” says Ornella Palamara, SBND co-spokesperson and neutrino scientist at Fermilab.

    Of the three, SBND will be the nearest to the beam source at a distance of 110 meters. The other two, MicroBooNE and ICARUS, are 470 meters and 600 meters from the source, respectively. MicroBooNE has been taking data since 2015. ICARUS, installed earlier this year, is expected to begin taking data in 2019.

    FNAL Short-Baseline Near Detector

    FNAL/MicroBooNE

    FNAL/ICARUS

    As neutrinos pass through one detector after the other, some of them leave behind traces in the detectors. SBN scientists will analyze this information to search for firm evidence of the hypothesized but never seen member of the neutrino family.

    Making a (dis)appearance

    Neutrinos come in one of three lepton flavors, or types, which correspond to three other particles: electron, muon and tau. They change from one flavor into another as they travel through space, a behavior called oscillation. Neutrinos are known to oscillate in and out of the three flavors, but only further evidence will help scientists determine whether they also oscillate into a fourth type—a sterile neutrino.

    SBN scientists will look for signs of neutrinos oscillating into the new type.

    “The overall goal of the SBN program is to perform a definitive measurement that tests the possibility of sterile neutrino oscillations,” Palamara says.

    Sterile neutrinos are hypothetical particles that don’t interact with matter at all. (The neutrinos we’re familiar with do interact, but only rarely.) In 1995, results from the LSND experiment at Los Alamos National Laboratory hinted at the possibility of the sterile neutrino’s existence, but so far, no one has confirmed it. Results from the MiniBooNE experiment at Fermilab also indicate that something is going on with neutrinos that we don’t yet fully understand.

    FNAL/MiniBooNE

    SBND, as the first detector in the beam, will record the number of electron and muon neutrinos that pass through it before oscillation can occur. The vast majority of them—about 99.5 percent—will be muon neutrinos. By the time of their arrival at the far detectors, MicroBooNE and ICARUS, a few out of every thousand muon neutrinos may have converted into electron neutrinos.

    “The SBN program is powerful because you can measure this oscillation by looking at two different effects,” Palamara says.

    One is that the far detectors see more electron neutrinos than expected. This could be evidence that sterile neutrinos are also present: The neutrinos could be converting into and out of sterile neutrino states in a way that produces an excess of electron neutrinos.

    The other is that the far detectors see fewer muon neutrinos than expected—the muon neutrinos spotted in SBND “disappear”—because they converted into sterile neutrinos.

    Either effect could indicate the existence of the new particle.

    “Having a single experiment where we can see electron neutrino appearance and muon neutrino disappearance simultaneously and make sure their magnitudes are compatible with one another is enormously powerful for trying to discover sterile neutrino oscillations,” says David Schmitz, SBND co-spokesperson and assistant professor at the University of Chicago. “The near detector substantially improves our ability to do so.”

    Components from three continents

    SBND will be a 4-by-4-by-5-meter tank—the size of a large bedroom—filled with liquid argon. Its active liquid-argon mass—the volume monitored by the anode plane assemblies, or APAs—comes to 112 tons. The APAs, situated inside the detector, are huge frames covered with thousands of delicate sense wires. An electric field lies between the wire planes and a cathode plane.

    When a neutrino collides with the nucleus of an argon atom, charged particles are produced. These particles stream through the liquid volume, ionizing argon atoms as they pass by. The ionization produces thousands of free electrons, which “drift” under the influence of the electric field toward the APAs, where they are detected. By collecting these clouds of electrons on the wires, scientists create detailed images of the tracks of the particles emerging from a collision, which give information about the original neutrino that triggered the interaction.

    The construction of the wire planes is a collaboration between a group of universities in the United Kingdom funded by the Science and Technology Facilities Council, part of UK Research and Innovation, and another group of universities in the United States funded by a grant from the National Science Foundation. The US effort to build the wire planes was a collaboration between Syracuse University, the University of Chicago and Yale University. In the United Kingdom, Lancaster University, Manchester University and the University of Sheffield contributed to the effort.

    The APA technology will also be an integral part of DUNE, which will be the world’s largest liquid-argon neutrino detector when complete. The National Science Foundation recently funded a planning grant for DUNE’s anode plane assemblies; the NSF has a long history of pioneering investments in major particle physics experiments, including several neutrino experiments.

    Institutions in Europe, South America and the United States are helping build SBND’s various components. In all, more than 20 institutions on three continents are involved in the effort. Another dozen are collaborating on software tools to analyze data once the detector is operational, Schmitz says.

    “Being part of an international collaboration is great,” Palamara says. “Of course, there are challenges, but it’s fantastic to see people coming from all around the world to work on the program. Having pieces of the detector built in different places and then seeing everything come together is exciting.”

    Assembly of SBND is expected to finish in fall 2019, after which the detector will be installed in its building along the accelerator-generated neutrino beam. SBND is scheduled to be commissioned and begin receiving beam in June 2020.

    See the full article here .


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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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    Symmetry is a joint Fermilab/SLAC publication.


     
  • richardmitnick 2:01 pm on August 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Hunt for the sterile neutrino, , , , , MiniBooNE, , , Short-Baseline Neutrino experiments   

    From Fermi National Accelerator Lab: “ICARUS neutrino detector installed in new Fermilab home” 

    FNAL II photo

    FNAL Art Image
    FNAL Art Image by Angela Gonzales

    From Fermi National Accelerator Lab , an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    August 16, 2018
    Leah Hesla

    For four years, three laboratories on two continents have prepared the ICARUS particle detector to capture the interactions of mysterious particles called neutrinos at the U.S. Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory.

    On Tuesday, Aug. 14, ICARUS moved into its new Fermilab home, a recently completed building that houses the large, 20-meter-long neutrino hunter. Filled with 760 tons of liquid argon, it is one of the largest detectors of its kind in the world.

    With this move, ICARUS now sits in the path of Fermilab’s neutrino beam, a milestone that brings the detector one step closer to taking data.

    It’s also the final step in an international scientific handoff. From 2010 to 2014, ICARUS operated at the Italian Gran Sasso National Laboratory, run by the Italian National Institute for Nuclear Physics. Then the detector was sent to the European laboratory CERN, where it was refurbished for its future life at Fermilab, outside Chicago. In July 2017, ICARUS completed its trans-Atlantic trip to the American laboratory.

    1
    The second of two ICARUS detector modules is lowered into its place in the detector hall. Photo: Reidar Hahn

    “In the first part of its life, ICARUS was an exquisite instrument for the Gran Sasso program, and now CERN has improved it, bringing it in line with the latest technology,” said CERN scientist and Nobel laureate Carlo Rubbia, who led the experiment when it was at Gran Sasso and currently leads the ICARUS collaboration. “I eagerly anticipate the results that come out of ICARUS in the Fermilab phase of its life.”

    Since 2017, Fermilab, working with its international partners, has been instrumenting the ICARUS building, getting it ready for the detector’s final, short move.

    “Having ICARUS settled in is incredibly gratifying. We’ve been anticipating this moment for four years,” said scientist Steve Brice, who heads the Fermilab Neutrino Division. “We’re grateful to all our colleagues in Italy and at CERN for building and preparing this sophisticated neutrino detector.”

    Neutrinos are famously fleeting. They rarely interact with matter: Trillions of the subatomic particles pass through us every second without a trace. To catch them in the act of interacting, scientists build detectors of considerable size. The more massive the detector, the greater the chance that a neutrino stops inside it, enabling scientists to study the elusive particles.

    ICARUS’s 760 tons of liquid argon give neutrinos plenty of opportunity to interact. The interaction of a neutrino with an argon atom produces fast-moving charged particles. The charged particles liberate atomic electrons from the argon atoms as they pass by, and these tracks of electrons are drawn to planes of charged wires inside the detector. Scientists study the tracks to learn about the neutrino that kicked everything off.

    Rubbia himself spearheaded the effort to make use of liquid argon as a detection material more than 25 years ago, and that same technology is being developed for the future Fermilab neutrino physics program.

    “This is an exciting moment for ICARUS,” said scientist Claudio Montanari of INFN Pavia, who is the technical coordinator for ICARUS. “We’ve been working for months choreographing and carrying out all the steps involved in refurbishing and installing it. This move is like the curtain coming down after the entr’acte. Now we’ll get to see the next act.”

    ICARUS is one part of the Fermilab-hosted Short-Baseline Neutrino program, whose aim is to search for a hypothesized but never conclusively observed type of neutrino, known as a sterile neutrino. Scientists know of three neutrino types. The discovery of a fourth could reveal new physics about the evolution of the universe. It could also open an avenue for modeling dark matter, which constitutes 23 percent of the universe’s mass.

    ICARUS is the second of three Short-Baseline Neutrino detectors to be installed. The first, called MicroBooNE, began operating in 2015 and is currently taking data. The third, called the Short-Baseline Near Detector, is under construction. All use liquid argon.

    FNAL/MicroBooNE

    FNAL Short-Baseline Near Detector

    Fermilab’s powerful particle accelerators provide a plentiful supply of neutrinos and will send an intense beam of the particle through the three detectors — first SBND, then MicroBooNE, then ICARUS. Scientists will study the differences in data collected by the trio to get a precise handle on the neutrino’s behavior.

    “So many mysteries are locked up inside neutrinos,” said Fermilab scientist Peter Wilson, Short-Baseline Neutrino coordinator. “It’s thrilling to think that we might solve even one of them, because it would help fill in our frustratingly incomplete picture of how the universe evolved into what we see today.”

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    Members of the crew that moved ICARUS stand by the detector. Photo: Reidar Hahn

    The three Short-Baseline Neutrino experiments are just one part of Fermilab’s vibrant suite of experiments to study the subtle neutrino.

    NOvA, Fermilab’s largest operating neutrino experiment, studies a behavior called neutrino oscillation.


    FNAL/NOvA experiment map


    FNAL NOvA detector in northern Minnesota


    FNAL Near Detector

    The three neutrino types change character, morphing in and out of their types as they travel. NOvA researchers use two giant detectors spaced 500 miles apart — one at Fermilab and another in Ash River, Minnesota — to study this behavior.

    Another Fermilab experiment, called MINERvA, studies how neutrinos interact with nuclei of different elements, enabling other neutrino researchers to better interpret what they see in their detectors.

    Scientists at Fermilab use the MINERvA to make measurements of neutrino interactions that can support the work of other neutrino experiments. Photo Reidar Hahn

    FNAL/MINERvA


    “Fermilab is the best place in the world to do neutrino research,” Wilson said. “The lab’s particle accelerators generate beams that are chock full of neutrinos, giving us that many more chances to study them in fine detail.”

    The construction and operation of the three Short-Baseline Neutrino experiments are valuable not just for fundamental research, but also for the development of the international Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE) and the Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF), both hosted by Fermilab.

    DUNE will be the largest neutrino oscillation experiment ever built, sending particles 800 miles from Fermilab to Sanford Underground Research Facility in South Dakota. The detector in South Dakota, known as the DUNE far detector, is mammoth: Made of four modules — each as tall and wide as a four-story building and almost as long as a football field — it will be filled with 70,000 tons of liquid argon, about 100 times more than ICARUS.

    FNAL LBNF/DUNE from FNAL to SURF, Lead, South Dakota, USA


    FNAL DUNE Argon tank at SURF


    Surf-Dune/LBNF Caverns at Sanford



    SURF building in Lead SD USA

    The knowledge and expertise scientists and engineers gain from running the Short-Baseline Neutrino experiments, including ICARUS, will inform the installation and operation of LBNF/DUNE, which is expected to start up in the mid-2020s.

    “We’re developing some of the most advanced particle detection technology ever built for LBNF/DUNE,” Brice said. “In preparing for that effort, there’s no substitute for running an experiment that uses similar technology. ICARUS fills that need perfectly.”

    Eighty researchers from five countries collaborate on ICARUS. The collaboration will spend the next year instrumenting and commissioning the detector. They plan to begin taking data in 2019.

    See the full article here .


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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    FNAL Icon

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. Fermilab is America’s premier laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Thousands of scientists from universities and laboratories around the world
    collaborate at Fermilab on experiments at the frontiers of discovery.


    FNAL/MINERvA

    FNAL DAMIC

    FNAL Muon g-2 studio

    FNAL Short-Baseline Near Detector under construction

    FNAL Mu2e solenoid

    Dark Energy Camera [DECam], built at FNAL

    FNAL DUNE Argon tank at SURF

    FNAL/MicrobooNE

    FNAL Don Lincoln

    FNAL/MINOS

    FNAL Cryomodule Testing Facility

    FNAL Minos Far Detector

    FNAL LBNF/DUNE from FNAL to SURF, Lead, South Dakota, USA

    FNAL/NOvA experiment map

    FNAL NOvA Near Detector

    FNAL ICARUS

    FNAL Holometer

     
  • richardmitnick 1:32 pm on July 25, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Hidden-sector particles, MiniBooNE, , ,   

    From FNAL: “The MiniBooNE search for dark matter” 

    FNAL II photo

    FNAL Art Image
    FNAL Art Image by Angela Gonzales

    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    July 18, 2017
    Ranjan Dharmapalan
    Tyler Thornton

    FNAL/MiniBooNE

    1
    This schematic shows the experimental setup for the dark matter search. Protons (blue arrow on the left) generated by the Fermilab accelerator chain strike a thick steel block. This interaction produces secondary particles, some of which are absorbed by the block. Others, including photons and perhaps dark-sector photons, symbolized by V, are unaffected. These dark photons decay into dark matter, shown as χ, and travel to the MiniBooNE detector, depicted as the sphere on the right.

    Particle physicists are in a quandary. On one hand, the Standard Model accurately describes most of the known particles and forces of interaction between them.

    The Standard Model of elementary particles (more schematic depiction), with the three generations of matter, gauge bosons in the fourth column, and the Higgs boson in the fifth.

    On the other, we know that the Standard Model accounts for less than 5 percent of the universe. About 26 percent of the universe is composed of mysterious dark matter, and the remaining 68 percent of even more mysterious dark energy.

    Some theorists speculate that dark matter particles could belong to a “hidden sector” and that there may be portals to this hidden sector from the Standard Model. The portals allow hidden-sector particles to trickle into Standard Model interactions. A large sensitive particle detector, placed in an intense particle beam and equipped with a mechanism to suppress the Standard Model interactions, could unveil these new particles.

    Fermilab is home to a number of proton beams and large, extremely sensitive detectors, initially built to detect neutrinos. These devices, such as the MiniBooNE detector, are ideal places to search for hidden-sector particles.

    In 2012, the MiniBooNE-DM collaboration teamed up with theorists who proposed new ways to search for dark matter particles. One of these proposals [FNAL PAC Oct 15 2012] involved the reconfiguration of the existing neutrino experiment. This was a pioneering effort that involved close coordination between the experimentalists, accelerator scientists, beam alignment experts and numerous technicians.

    2
    Results of this MiniBooNE-DM search for dark matter scattering off of nucleons. The plot shows the confidence limits and sensitivities with 1, 2σ errors resulting from this analysis compared to other experimental results, as a function of Y (a parameter describing the dark photon mass, dark matter mass and the couplings to the Standard Model) and Mχ (the dark matter mass). For details see the Physical Review Letters paper.

    For the neutrino experiment, the 8-GeV proton beam from the Fermilab Booster hit a beryllium target to produce a secondary beam of charged particles that decayed further downstream, in a decay pipe, into neutrinos. MiniBooNE ran in this mode for about a decade to measure neutrino oscillations and interactions.

    In the dark matter search mode, however, the proton beam was steered past the beryllium target. The beam instead struck a thick steel block at the end of the decay pipe. The resulting charged secondary particles (mostly particles called pions) are absorbed in the steel block, reducing the number of subsequent neutrinos, while the neutral secondary particles remained unaffected. The photons resulting from the decay of neutral pions may have transformed into hidden-sector photons that in turn might have decayed into dark matter, which would travel to the MiniBooNE detector 450 meters away. The experiment ran in this mode for nine months for a dedicated dark matter search.

    Using the previous 10 years’ worth of data as a baseline, MiniBooNE-DM looked for scattered protons and neutrons in the detector. If they found more scattered protons or neutrons than predicted, the excess could indicate a new particle, maybe dark matter, being produced in the steel block. Scientists analyzed multiple types of neutrino interactions at the same time, reducing the error on the signal data set by more than half.

    Analysts concluded that the data was consistent with the Standard Model prediction, enabling the experimenters to set a limit on a specific model of dark matter, called vector portal dark matter. To set the limit, scientists developed a detailed simulation that estimated the predicted proton or neutron response in the detector from scattered dark matter particles. The new limit extends from the low-mass edge of direct-detection experiments down to masses about 1,000 times smaller. Additionally, the result rules out this particular model as a description of the anomalous behavior of the muon seen in the Muon g-2 experiment at Brookhaven, which was one of the goals of the MiniBooNE-DM proposal. Incidentally, researchers at Fermilab will make a more precise measurement of the muon — and verify the Brookhaven result — in an experiment that started up this year.

    This result from MiniBooNE, a dedicated proton beam dump search for dark matter, was published in Physical Review Letters and was highlighted as an “Editor’s suggestion.”

    What’s next? The experiment will continue to analyze the collected data set. It is possible that the dark matter or hidden-sector particles may prefer to scatter off of the lepton family of particles, which includes electrons, rather than off of quarks, which are the constituent of protons and neutrons. Different interaction channels probe different possibilities.

    If the portals to the hidden sector are narrow — that is, if they are weakly coupled — researchers will need to collect more data or implement new ideas to suppress the Standard Model interactions.

    The first results from MiniBooNE-DM show that Fermilab could be at the forefront of searching for hidden-sector particles. Upcoming experiments in Fermilab’s Short-Baseline Neutrino program will use higher-resolution detectors — specifically, liquid-argon time projection chamber technology — expanding the search regions and possibly leading to discovery.

    Ranjan Dharmapalan is a postdoc at Argonne National Laboratory. Tyler Thornton is a graduate student at Indiana University Bloomington.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

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    Fermilab Campus

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. Fermilab is America’s premier laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Thousands of scientists from universities and laboratories around the world
    collaborate at Fermilab on experiments at the frontiers of discovery.

     
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