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  • richardmitnick 12:22 pm on April 18, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Matter/Antimatter, ,   

    From Fermilab- “Frontier Science Result: DZero Precise measure of matter preference 

    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    Thursday, April 18, 2013
    Mike Cooke

    “We live in a universe filled with matter, with no detectable pockets of antimatter, but don’t fully understand why. In the very early universe, matter and antimatter were created in equal abundance. As the universe cooled, the matter and antimatter annihilated each other, but left behind the small excess of matter that accounts for all of the stars, planets and galaxies in the universe today. This difference is thought to result from the slightly different ways the particles and antiparticles decayed. However, the decay rate difference predicted by the Standard Model is not nearly enough to account for the amount of matter in the universe. By precisely measuring processes that show a difference between matter and antimatter, physicists attempt to understand what caused the imbalance that led to the universe today.

    scene
    Most matter and antimatter annihilated each other in the very early universe, but a small excess of matter remained to form the universe we live in today. To attempt to understand this imbalance, scientists measure particle decay processes that show a difference between matter and antimatter.

    A recent result at DZero studied this asymmetry in the decay of a charged B meson, made of a bottom quark and an up quark, into a J/Ψ meson and a charged K meson, which involves the bottom quark decaying into a strange quark and two charm quarks. To reduce the uncertainty on the measurement, the analysis exploited the fact that the magnetic polarities of magnets in the DZero detector were systematically flipped during the decade of data collecting for Run II. Each possible source of bias in the measurement of asymmetry between matter and antimatter was carefully studied and accounted for.

    The final result is the world’s most precise measurement of matter-antimatter asymmetry in charged B meson decays to a J/Ψ meson and a charged K meson. The measured asymmetry is consistent with the Standard Model. While it does not indicate the presence of new physics and explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe, it is an important step in exploring this mystery.”

    See the full article here.

    The final result is the world’s most precise measurement of matter-antimatter asymmetry in charged B meson decays to a J/Ψ meson and a charged K meson. The measured asymmetry is consistent with the Standard Model. While it does not indicate the presence of new physics and explain the matter-antimatter asymmetry in the universe, it is an important step in exploring this mystery.

    Fermilab campus

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics.


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  • richardmitnick 1:03 pm on March 25, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Matter/Antimatter,   

    From CERN: “ATRAP: Never a dull moment for the antiproton” 

    CERN New Masthead

    March 25, 2013
    Katarina Anthony

    “In results published today in Physical Review Letters, the Antihydrogen TRAP (ATRAP) experiment at CERN’s Antiproton Decelerator reveals a new measurement of the antiproton magnetic moment made with an unprecedented uncertainty of only 4.4 parts per million. This is not just an impressive feat for the ATRAP team, but is also an important attempt to understand the matter-antimatter imbalance of the universe, one of the great mysteries of modern physics.

    apt
    Antihydrogen TRAP

    apd
    The Antiproton Decelerator

    ‘Precise comparisons of the properties of the antiproton and proton are intriguing and important,’ says ATRAP spokesperson Gerald Gabrielse of Harvard University, ‘given that the fundamental cause of the dramatic imbalance of antimatter and matter in the universe has yet to be discovered. By comparing the antiproton’s tiny magnet to that of the proton, we probe one of nature’s most fundamental symmetries, known as CPT, at a high precision.’

    The ATRAP team found that the magnets of the antiproton and proton are ‘exactly opposite’ – equal in strength but opposite in direction, consistent with the prediction of the Standard Model and its CPT theorem to 5 parts per million. However, the potential for much greater measurement precision puts ATRAP in position to test the Standard Model prediction much more stringently still.”

    Standard Model New

    See the full article here.

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Cern Courier

    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New
    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New

    LHC

    CERN LHC New

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    Quantum Diaries


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  • richardmitnick 7:40 am on February 19, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Matter/Antimatter, ,   

    From CERN: “Proton-lead run brings new physics reach to LHCb” 

    CERN New Masthead

    19 Feb 2013
    Antonella del Rosso

    During the recent lead-proton run at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), the Large Hadron Collider beauty (LHCb) experiment took data from collisions between protons and ions for the first time.

    lhcb
    A proton-lead ion collision, as observed by the LHCb detector during the 2013 data-taking period (Image: LHCb/CERN)

    LHCb is an asymmetric detector designed to study matter-antimatter asymmetries and rare decays involving heavy quarks. Though LHCb is small compared to the multipurpose detectors CMS and ATLAS and the specialized heavy-ion detector ALICE, it has something special: the location of LHCb close to the collision point allows it to identify particles that scatter at very small angles from collisions.

    ‘The detector’s unique angular coverage will enable us to study strange, charm and also beauty quark production in regions not accessible to the other experiments,’ says LHCb spokesperson Pierluigi Campana.

    See the full article here.

    Read all about LHCb here.

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Cern Courier

    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New

    LHC

    CERN LHC New

    LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries


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  • richardmitnick 11:38 am on February 12, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Matter/Antimatter,   

    From CERN: “Fat antiatoms, laser beams and matter-antimatter asymmetry” 

    CERN New Masthead

    CERN

    Stephanie Hills
    12 Feb 2013

    Imagine being able to ‘inflate’ an atom with a laser, then slow it down, catch it or bend it around corners. At the AEGIS experiment at the Antiproton Decelerator, Stephen Hogan of University College London and an international team of collaborators are trying to do just that.

    ad
    Antiproton Decelerator

    AEGIS is designed to test whether antimatter complies with the weak equivalence principle (WEP), a mathematical concept that states that the acceleration experienced by a particle in a gravitational field is independent of its mass and composition. The principle has been tested with very high precision for matter, but never for antimatter. If results from AEGIS show that the gravitational acceleration of antimatter in the Earth’s gravitational field is different to that of matter, this could provide clues to why our universe is now dominated by matter, even though matter and antimatter were created in equal amounts during the big bang.

    aegis
    The AEGIS experiment in the antimatter hall at CERN aims to make the first direct measurement of Earth’s gravitational effect on antimatter (Image: CERN)

    ‘We know that in our observable universe there is an asymmetry between matter and antimatter, but there is no consensus among the theorists as to why this is,’ says Hogan. ‘If gravity is different for antimatter, this might give us a clue. The results of our experiment will help guide us toward an appropriate theory.’”

    See the full article here.

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Cern Courier

    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New

    LHC

    CERN LHC New

    LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries


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  • richardmitnick 10:05 am on January 7, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Matter/Antimatter,   

    From Space.com: “Coldest Antimatter Yet Is Goal of New Technique” 

    SpacedotcomHeader
    Space.com

    This is copyright protected, so just a couple of hints to pique your interest.

    07 January 2013
    Clara Moskowitz

    “Scientists have devised a new method of cooling down antimatter to make it easier to experiment on than ever before. The new technique could help researchers probe the mysteries of antimatter, including why it’s so rare compared with matter in the universe.

    The new technique is focused on antihydrogen atoms, which contain one positron and one antiproton (regular hydrogen contains one electron and one proton).

    antimatter
    From StartsWithABang at ScienceBlogs

    ‘The ultimate goal of antihydrogen experiments is to compare its properties to those of hydrogen,’ physicist Francis Robicheaux of Auburn University in Alabama said in a statement. ‘Colder antihydrogen will be an important step for achieving this.’

    Robicheaux is the co-author of a paper describing the new cooling method published today (Jan. 6) in the Journal of Physics B: Atomic, Molecular and Optical Physics.”

    See the full article here.

    SPACE.com, launched in 1999, is the world’s No. 1 source for news of astronomy, skywatching, space exploration, commercial spaceflight and related technologies. Our team of experienced reporters, editors and video producers explore the latest discoveries, missions, trends and futuristic ideas, interviewing expert sources and offering up deep and broad analysis of the findings and issues that are fundamental to or understanding of the universe and our place in it. SPACE.com articles are regularly featured on the web sites of our media partners: MSNBC.com, Yahoo!, the Christian Science Monitor and others.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:17 pm on July 19, 2012 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Matter/Antimatter, ,   

    From Fermilab Today: “Result of the Week – Puzzling new pieces in the antimatter mystery” 

    Fermilab continues to be a great source of strength in the U.S. Basic Research Community.

    Thursday, July 19, 2012
    Mike Cooke

    One of the most puzzling properties of matter in our universe is that there’s so much of it in the first place. When new matter is created during a particle collision, an equal amount of antimatter accompanies it nearly every time. The Standard Model allows only a very slight deviation from this symmetry, and not nearly enough difference between matter and antimatter to explain the abundance of matter in our universe today.

    am
    New measurements from DZero add pieces to the puzzle of matter-antimatter asymmetry.

    The DZero Collaboration has previously shown evidence for a greater matter-antimatter asymmetry than predicted by the Standard Model in the decays of neutral B mesons, particles that combine a bottom quark with either a down quark (Bd0) or strange quark (Bs0). Two new measurements, which focus separately on the Bd0 and Bs0, now add complementary pieces to this puzzling matter.

    The new measurements are consistent with the previous evidence for matter-antimatter asymmetry reported by the DZero collaboration, which measured a particular mixture of the Bd0 and Bs0 system asymmetries in an independent channel. In combination, these results differ from the Standard Model by about 3 standard deviations. These new pieces hint at a very interesting picture of the universe, but more precise measurements will be required to finally solve this puzzle.”

    See the full article here.

     
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