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  • richardmitnick 9:56 am on October 23, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Experiments reveal formation of a new state of matter- Electron quadruplets", Can electrons also condense into foursomes?, KTH Royal Institute of Technology [Kungliga Tekniska högskolan](SE), The central principle of superconductivity is that electrons form pairs., The pairing of electrons enables the quantum state of superconductivity-a zero-resistance state of conductivity-is used in MRI scanners and quantum computing.   

    From KTH Royal Institute of Technology [Kungliga Tekniska högskolan](SE): “Experiments reveal formation of a new state of matter- Electron quadruplets” 

    From KTH Royal Institute of Technology [Kungliga Tekniska högskolan](SE)

    Oct 19, 2021
    David Callahan

    1
    Electron quadruplets were observed in this iron-based superconductor material, Ba1−xKxFe2As2, seen mounted for experimental measurements in Professor Babaev’s research. (Photo: Vadim Grinenko, Federico Caglieris)

    For nearly 20 years, Egor Babaev has sought to show a new state of matter—electron quadruplets. Now he has found what he was looking for.

    The central principle of superconductivity is that electrons form pairs. But can they also condense into foursomes? Recent findings have suggested they can, and a physicist at KTH yesterday published the first experimental evidence of this quadrupling effect and the mechanism by which this state of matter occurs.

    KTH Professor Egor Babaev, together with international collaborators, presented evidence of fermion quadrupling in a series of experimental measurements on the iron-based material, Ba1−xKxFe2As2. Published yesterday in Nature Physics, the results follow nearly 20 years after Babaev first predicted this kind of phenomenon (Read Egor Babaev’s 2004 paper [Nature]), and eight years after he published a paper predicting that it could occur in the material.

    The pairing of electrons enables the quantum state of superconductivity-a zero-resistance state of conductivity-is used in MRI scanners and quantum computing. It occurs within a material as a result of two electrons bonding rather than repelling each other, as they would in a vacuum. The phenomenon was first described in a theory by, Leon Cooper, John Bardeen and John Schrieffer, whose work was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1972.

    So-called Cooper pairs are basically “opposites that attract”. Normally two electrons, which are negatively-charged subatomic particles, would strongly repel each other. But at low temperatures in a crystal they become loosely bound in pairs, giving rise to a robust long-range order. Currents of electron pairs no longer scatter from defects and obstacles and a conductor can lose all electrical resistance, becoming a new state of matter: a superconductor.

    Only in recent years has the theoretical idea of four-fermion condensates become broadly accepted.

    For a fermion quadrupling state to occur there has to be something that prevents condensation of pairs and prevents their flow without resistance, while allowing condensation of four-electron composites, says Babaev, professor in theoretical physics.

    The Bardeen-Cooper-Schrieffer theory didn’t allow for such behavior, so when Babaev’s experimental collaborator at Dresden University of Technology [Technische Universität Dresden] (DE), Vadim Grinenko, found in 2018 the first signs of a fermion quadrupling condensate, it challenged years of prevalent scientific agreement.

    What followed was three years of experimentation and investigation at labs at multiple institutions in order to validate the finding.

    Babaev says that key among the observations made is that fermionic quadruple condensates spontaneously break time-reversal symmetry. In physics time-reversal symmetry is a mathematical operation of replacing the expression for time with its negative in formulas or equations so that they describe an event in which time runs backward or all the motions are reversed.

    If one inverts time direction, the fundamental laws of physics still hold. That also holds for typical superconductors: if the arrow of time is reversed, a typical superconductor would still be the same superconducting state.

    “However, in the case of a four-fermion condensate that we report, the time reversal puts it in a different state,” he says.

    “It will probably take many years of research to fully understand this state,” he says. “The experiments open up a number of new questions, revealing a number of other unusual properties associated with its reaction to thermal gradients, magnetic fields and ultrasound that still have to be better understood.”

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    KTH Royal Institute of Technology[Kungliga Tekniska högskolan](SE) is a public research university in Stockholm, Sweden. KTH conducts research and education within engineering and technology, and is Sweden’s largest technical university. Currently, KTH consists of five schools with four campuses in and around Stockholm.

    KTH was established in 1827 as Teknologiska Institutet (Institute of Technology), and had its roots in Mekaniska skolan (School of Mechanics) that was established in 1798 in Stockholm. But the origin of KTH dates back to the predecessor to Mekaniska skolan, the Laboratorium Mechanicum, which was established in 1697 by Swedish scientist and innovator Christopher Polhem. Laboratorium Mechanicum combined education technology, a laboratory and an exhibition space for innovations. In 1877 KTH received its current name, Kungliga Tekniska högskolan (KTH Royal Institute of Technology). It is ranked top 100 in the world among all universities in the 2020 QS World University Rankings.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:40 pm on March 3, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Heat-free optical switch would enable optical quantum computing chips", An optical switch that is reconfigured with microscopic mechanical movement rather than heat., Controlling and manipulating single photons without generating heat, KTH Royal Institute of Technology [Kungliga Tekniska högskolan](SE), Quantum computing and communication   

    From KTH Royal Institute of Technology [Kungliga Tekniska högskolan](SE): “Heat-free optical switch would enable optical quantum computing chips” 

    From KTH Royal Institute of Technology [Kungliga Tekniska högskolan](SE)

    Mar 03, 2021
    David Callahan

    1
    Illustration of a controlled quantum circuit enabled by the reported heat-free switches. Credit: Lucas Schweickert.

    In a potential boost for quantum computing and communication, a European research collaboration reported a new method of controlling and manipulating single photons without generating heat. The solution makes it possible to integrate optical switches and single-photon detectors in a single chip.

    Publishing in Nature Communications, the team reported to have developed an optical switch that is reconfigured with microscopic mechanical movement rather than heat, making the switch compatible with heat-sensitive single-photon detectors.

    Optical switches in use today work by locally heating light guides inside a semiconductor chip. “This approach does not work for quantum optics,” says co-author Samuel Gyger, a PhD student at KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm.

    “Because we want to detect every single photon, we use quantum detectors that work by measuring the heat a single photon generates when absorbed by a superconducting material,” Gyger says. “If we use traditional switches, our detectors will be flooded by heat, and thus not work at all.”

    The new method enables control of single photons without the disadvantage of heating up a semiconductor chip and thereby rendering single-photon detectors useless, says Carlos Errando Herranz, who conceived the research idea and led the work at KTH as part of the European Quantum Flagship project, S2QUIP.

    Using microelectromechanical (MEMS) actuation, the solution enables optical switching and photon detection on a single semiconductor chip while maintaining the cold temperatures required by single-photon detectors.

    “Our technology will help to connect all building blocks required for integrated optical circuits for quantum technologies,” Errando Herranz says.

    “Quantum technologies will enable secure message encryption and methods of computation that solve problems today’s computers cannot,” he says. “And they will provide simulation tools that enable us to understand fundamental laws of nature, which can lead to new materials and medicines.”

    The group will further develop the technology to make it compatible with typical electronics, which will involve reducing the voltages used in the experimental setup.

    Errando Herranz says that the group aims to integrate the fabrication process in semiconductor foundries that already fabricate on-chip optics – a necessary step in order to make quantum optic circuits large enough to fulfill some of the promises of quantum technologies.

    Financial support for the research was made possible by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation program under grant agreement No. 820423 (S2QUIP); the Swedish Research Council, the Knut and Alice Wallenberg Foundation, the State of Upper Austria, and the Austrian Science Fund.

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    KTH Royal Institute of Technology[Kungliga Tekniska högskolan](SE) is a public research university in Stockholm, Sweden. KTH conducts research and education within engineering and technology, and is Sweden’s largest technical university. Currently, KTH consists of five schools with four campuses in and around Stockholm.

    KTH was established in 1827 as Teknologiska Institutet (Institute of Technology), and had its roots in Mekaniska skolan (School of Mechanics) that was established in 1798 in Stockholm. But the origin of KTH dates back to the predecessor to Mekaniska skolan, the Laboratorium Mechanicum, which was established in 1697 by Swedish scientist and innovator Christopher Polhem. Laboratorium Mechanicum combined education technology, a laboratory and an exhibition space for innovations. In 1877 KTH received its current name, Kungliga Tekniska högskolan (KTH Royal Institute of Technology). It is ranked top 100 in the world among all universities in the 2020 QS World University Rankings.

     
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