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  • richardmitnick 5:25 pm on June 14, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , KEK Laboratory, , , SuperKEKB detector   

    From CMU: “CMU Researchers Aid in Japan’s Search for Anti-matter 

    Carnegie Mellon University logo
    Carnegie Mellon University

    June 13, 2016
    Jocelyn Duffy,
    jhduffy@andrew.cmu.edu

    1
    View of the SuperKEKB collision point in late 2015. The accelerator beam line is now covered with a concrete shield. The Belle II detector can be seen in the background.

    The hunt to solve an anti-matter mystery may have new clues, thanks to an upgrade of the SuperKEKB, an electron-positron colliding accelerator at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) in Japan.

    SuperKEKB accelerator Japan
    SuperKEKB accelerator Japan

    Test operations started earlier this year, and Carnegie Mellon University Physics Professor Roy Briere has been a member of KEK’s Belle II collaboration since 2013.

    When fully operational, the rate of collisions produced by SuperKEKB will be several tens of times larger than that of its predecessor, KEKB.

    “By producing collisions with much higher intensity, we hope to accumulate 50 times more data. And that means our measurements are going to be very precise,” Briere said.

    Scientists will use the collision data to pursue the mystery of the disappearance of anti-matter during the early, developmental processes of the universe, and to discover and clarify new physical laws that go beyond the Standard Model of particle physics.

    “When you have 50 times the data, you can test things much more accurately and try to find the little chink in the Standard Model’s armor, so to speak,” Briere said.

    The Standard Model of elementary particles (more schematic depiction), with the three generations of matter, gauge bosons in the fourth column, and the Higgs boson in the fifth.
    The Standard Model of elementary particles (more schematic depiction), with the three generations of matter, gauge bosons in the fourth column, and the Higgs boson in the fifth.

    The Belle II collaboration, named after the collider’s detector, is an international research organization hosted by KEK’s Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies. The group is assembling the Belle II detector, which will gather data at the point where the beams of electrons and positrons smash into each other. Briere and postdoctoral researcher Jake Bennett are working on the software infrastructure needed to calibrate one portion of the massive detector.

    While SuperKEKB and Belle II physicists continue to optimize the collider and the detector, Briere also is working with members of the collaboration to anticipate what they may see when the collider records its first collisions and how to plan their analyses accordingly. Briere assisted Professor Vladimir Savinov and colleagues at the University of Pittsburgh in organizing a conference in May, which brought together theorists and experimentalists for workshops on this topic.

    Briere also is a member of the BESIII experiment at the BEPCII collider in Beijing, and was a member and former co-spokesperson for the CLEO detector collaboration at Cornell University.

    See the full article here .

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    Carnegie Mellon University (CMU) is a global research university with more than 12,000 students, 95,000 alumni, and 5,000 faculty and staff.
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    Today, we are a global leader bringing groundbreaking ideas to market and creating successful startup businesses.
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  • richardmitnick 7:43 pm on May 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , KEK Laboratory, New TRIUMF branch office bolsters Canada-Japan partnership in physics research,   

    From UBC Science: “New TRIUMF branch office bolsters Canada-Japan partnership in physics research” 

    U British Columbia bloc

    University of British Columbia

    Triumf (2)
    TRIUMF

    KEK
    KEK

    May 16, 2016
    Chris Balma
    balma@science.ubc.ca
    604.822.5082
    c 604-202-5047

    1
    The Cyclotron at TRIUMF, Canada’s national laboratory for particle and nuclear physics at UBC

    TRIUMF, Canada’s national laboratory for particle and nuclear physics housed at UBC, has launched a branch office in Japan, cementing ties with the nation’s high-energy accelerator cluster.

    The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Canada’s Minister of Science, announced the partnership between Canada and Japan this weekend as she unveiled the new TRIUMF branch office located at Japan’s KEK. Duncan was joined by dignitaries from both laboratories to perform the ribbon cutting, celebrating the research collaboration between these two hubs for subatomic physics research.

    The new branch office, which is also shared with CERN, follows the recent signing of a new partnership agreement this December by Jonathan Bagger, Director of TRIUMF – Canada’s national laboratory for particle and nuclear physics and accelerator-based science – and Dr. Masanori Yamauchi, Director General of KEK – The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization in Japan. This agreement enhances research collaborations between the two labs to answer questions on areas ranging from the breadth and composition of the universe to topics closer to home, such as the properties of advanced materials.

    “As world leaders in subatomic physics, TRIUMF and KEK have forged an extraordinary collaboration that continues to unlock new opportunities to advance this important field,” said Duncan. “I congratulate both organizations on this new milestone and wait in anticipation to see the strides in fundamental research that will undoubtedly come out of this new era of innovation and partnership between our two countries.”

    “For decades, TRIUMF and KEK have been recognized internationally in the areas of subatomic physics, accelerator science and materials science,” said KEK Director General Masanori Yamauchi. “Through our growing partnership, we will continue to be global leaders in advancing these areas of research, as well acting as pillars of scientific co-operation.”

    “The opening of this new branch office represents not just a strengthening of the partnership between TRIUMF and KEK, but also the importance of collaboration on the global scale,” said Bagger, TRIUMF Director. “I look forward to the leaps that TRIUMF and KEK will make together to advance discovery and innovation at home and abroad.”

    TRIUMF and KEK have numerous shared projects in the areas of subatomic physics, accelerator science, and materials science. Current efforts include the T2K and Belle II experiments in Japan, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, and the proposed International Linear Collider The hope of this new office and indeed the new partnership agreement is to advance scientific discovery through enhanced bilateral collaboration.

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    See the full article here .

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    The University of British Columbia is a global centre for research and teaching, consistently ranked among the 40 best universities in the world. Since 1915, UBC’s West Coast spirit has embraced innovation and challenged the status quo. Its entrepreneurial perspective encourages students, staff and faculty to challenge convention, lead discovery and explore new ways of learning. At UBC, bold thinking is given a place to develop into ideas that can change the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 12:30 pm on March 2, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , KEK Laboratory, , , SuperKEKB reborn   

    From Symmetry: “SuperKEKB reborn” 

    Symmetry

    03/02/16
    Lauren Biron

    SuperKEKB accelerator
    KEK SuperKEKB accelerator. No image credit found.

    The Japanese accelerator takes its first steps toward resuming its hunt for the universe’s missing antimatter.

    Everyone knows the electron, but in our daily routines of charging laptops and phones, we don’t often think of its antiparticle, the positron. Where has all the antimatter gone, in the long time passing since the dawn of the universe?

    That’s what scientists working on Japan’s electron-positron colliding accelerator, SuperKEKB, hope to find out. They’ll accelerate electrons and their antimatter brothers close to the speed of light before slamming them together. By peering into the debris and searching for rare particle decays, they’ll try to figure out why we live in a world full of matter.

    Japan’s high-energy accelerator research organization, known as KEK, announced today that scientists successfully accelerated and stored electrons and positrons in their separate rings, each nearly 2 miles around. This is the first in several steps to commission the accelerator after a five-year upgrade that included new beam pipes, new magnets (and magnet power supplies) to guide the beam, and a reinforced radio-frequency system that accelerates the particles. Technicians also added a new positron source for the antimatter particles and a new electron gun.

    The improvements should create many more collisions per second than the previous iteration of the accelerator, KEKB, was capable of–and that means a better chance of seeing interesting particle decays. The collisions will create pairs of bottom quarks and bottom antiquarks, hence the “B” in SuperKEKB.

    The project will also involve an upgraded version of the Belle detector that previously recorded the collisions.

    KEK Belle detector
    Belle

    The initial run of the Belle detector yielded some interesting results, including a difference in the way particles called B mesons decayed. The asymmetry, called CP violation, was an intriguing find.

    “This is still puzzling,” KEK Director-General Masanori Yamauchi said in a Symmetry interview last year. “We still don’t know how it happens. We need at least 10 times more data to find out. That’s why we started the upgrade of KEKB.”

    The rare decays that Belle II will try to capture might also have occurred early in our universe’s history. Replicating them could provide clues to the current matter-antimatter imbalance and help us better understand the physics that underlies our cosmos, which can’t be fully explained by the current Standard Model.

    Standard model with Higgs New
    The Standard Model of elementary particles (more schematic depiction), with the three generations of matter, gauge bosons in the fourth column, and the Higgs boson in the fifth.

    Before that can happen, researchers need to tune the accelerator so it operates perfectly, a process slated to take through June. They’ll also add powerful superconducting magnets that will focus the beam and install the Belle II detector. Once it is in place and working properly, they’ll get back to work on the case of the missing antimatter.

    See the full article here .

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    Symmetry is a joint Fermilab/SLAC publication.


     
  • richardmitnick 3:26 pm on December 7, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , KEK Laboratory,   

    From TRIUMF: “Canada and Japan Strengthen Partnership” 

    TRIUMF

    1

    At a signing ceremony hosted on Friday, December 4 at the Canadian Embassy in Japan, the heads of Canada’s TRIUMF and Japan’s High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, KEK, signed a new partnership agreement to significantly enhance research collaborations between the two centres and promote joint projects in the areas of subatomic physics, accelerator science, and materials science.

    “This agreement represents an important milestone in the TRIUMF-KEK and Canada-Japan bilateral relationship,” said Dr. Jonathan Bagger, TRIUMF Director. “This agreement will enhance cooperation between our organizations and countries in support of cutting-edge research, such as the Ultra-Cold Neutron project in Canada and the T2K experiment in Japan.”

    As international hubs for subatomic physics research, both TRIUMF and KEK are involved in the research, development, and operation of particle accelerator facilities. Both share collaborative projects in these areas, with current efforts relating to T2K, the Large Hadron Collider at CERN, the Belle II experiment, the proposed International Linear Collider, materials and molecular sciences, and particle physics experiments using neutrons, muons, and kaons, in addition to accelerator science.

    T2K Experiment
    T2K

    CERN LHC Map
    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel
    CERN LHC particles
    LHC at CERN

    KEK Belle 2 detector
    Belle 2

    ILC schematic
    ILC

    Recently, the jointly awarded 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics to Canadian researcher Dr. Arthur B. McDonald and Japanese researcher Dr. Takaaki Kajita illustrates the shared spirit of inquiry between Canada and Japan.

    To further strengthen collaborative research opportunities and jointly advance scientific efforts, this new agreement stipulates that each laboratory will set up a branch office at each other’s respective institution.

    Dr. Masanori Yamauchi, Director General of KEK, said “Building on KEK and TRIUMF’s strong foundation of international scientific cooperation, this new agreement, and particularly the establishment of branch offices, will facilitate and enhance our common work on current and future scientific projects of shared interest.”

    The December 4th signing ceremony was held in the presence of the Ambassador of Canada to Japan, His Excellency Mackenzie Clugston; Ms. Susan Bincoletto, Assistant Deputy Minister, International Business Development, and Chief Trade Commissioner, Global Affairs Canada; Ms. Yayoi Komatsu, Director-General, Research Promotion Bureau of Japan’s Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT); a delegation from TRIUMF led by the laboratory’s Director Dr. Jonathan Bagger; and a delegation from KEK led by the organization’s Director General Dr. Masanori Yamauchi.

    “For nearly half a century, both laboratories have served as an international center of excellence for accelerator science … and provided opportunities for … domestic and foreign researchers,” said Ms. Yayoi Komatsu, Director General, Research Promotion Bureau, MEXT.

    “I congratulate TRIUMF and KEK on this important step for international scientific collaboration,” said The Honourable Kirsty Duncan, Minister of Science in Canada. “Canada and Japan are among the world’s leaders in the field of subatomic physics. This partnership will deepen our knowledge of this fundamental research area and create innovations to benefit both of our countries.”

    “Canada and Japan share a long history of bilateral cooperation in science, technology and innovation,” said Ambassador of Canada to Japan, His Excellency Mackenzie Clugston. “TRIUMF and KEK are an excellent example of this.”

    “This agreement is a significant achievement and another milestone in advance of the 30th anniversary of the Canada-Japan Science and Technology Cooperation Agreement in 2016,” noted Ms. Susan Bincoletto, Assistant Deputy Minister, International Business Development, and Chief Trade Commissioner, Global Affairs Canada.

    See the full article here .

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    Triumf Campus
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    World Class Science at Triumf Lab, British Columbia, Canada
    Canada’s national laboratory for particle and nuclear physics
    Member Universities:
    University of Alberta, University of British Columbia, Carleton University, University of Guelph, University of Manitoba, Université de Montréal, Simon Fraser University,
    Queen’s University, University of Toronto, University of Victoria, York University. Not too shabby, eh?

    Associate Members:
    University of Calgary, McMaster University, University of Northern British Columbia, University of Regina, Saint Mary’s University, University of Winnipeg, How bad is that !!

     
  • richardmitnick 12:34 pm on October 15, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , KEK Laboratory,   

    From LC Newsline: “KEK and the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) signed a Project Arrangement concerning high energy physics” 

    Linear Collider Collaboration header
    Linear Collider Collaboration

    15 October 2015
    No Writer Credit

    On October 6, 2015, KEK and the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) signed a Project Arrangement concerning high energy physics.

    1
    Dr. Siegrist (Associate Director, Office of High Energy physics, DOE) and Dr. Yamauchi (Director General of KEK) sign the agreement while H.E. Ms. Kennedy (Ambassador of U.S.A), H.E. Mr. Shimomura (then Minister of MEXT) look on.

    A signing ceremony was held at the American Ambassador’s Residence in the presence of H.E. Ms. Caroline Kennedy, Ambassador Extraordinary and Plenipotentiary of U.S.A and H.E. Mr. Hakubun Shimomura, then Minister of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT).

    The history of the U.S. – Japan cooperation program in the field of high energy physics has lasted for more than 35 years, with distinguished research outcomes and many talented researchers fostered through the project.

    H.E. Ms. Kennedy and H.E. Mr. Shimomura expressed admiration for fruitful cooperation between the U. S. and Japan on science and technology, mentioning meaningfulness for continuing the U. S. – Japan cooperation program in the field of high energy physics for the future.

    With the conclusion of this Project Arrangement between KEK and DOE, further development of cooperation in research is expected among the U.S. and Japanese institutes in the field.

    See the full article here .

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    The Linear Collider Collaboration is an organisation that brings the two most likely candidates, the Compact Linear Collider Study (CLIC) and the International Liner Collider (ILC), together under one roof. Headed by former LHC Project Manager Lyn Evans, it strives to coordinate the research and development work that is being done for accelerators and detectors around the world and to take the project linear collider to the next step: a decision that it will be built, and where.

    Some 2000 scientists – particle physicists, accelerator physicists, engineers – are involved in the ILC or in CLIC, and often in both projects. They work on state-of-the-art detector technologies, new acceleration techniques, the civil engineering aspect of building a straight tunnel of at least 30 kilometres in length, a reliable cost estimate and many more aspects that projects of this scale require. The Linear Collider Collaboration ensures that synergies between the two friendly competitors are used to the maximum.

    Linear Collider Colaboration Banner

     
  • richardmitnick 11:43 am on July 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , KEK Laboratory, ,   

    From interactions.org: “KEK: 50 years from the discovery of ‘CP-violation'” 

    Interactionsdotorg

    11 July 2014
    Professor Yoshihide Sakai
    Co-spokesperson, the Belle Collaboration
    The High Energy Accelerator Research Organization

    Public Relations Office, High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK), Japan
    Saeko Okada
    Senior Press Officer, Public Relations Office, KEK
    TEL: +81-29-879-6046
    FAX: +81-29-879-6049
    E-mail: press@kek.jp

    Belle and Babar complete a joint book on their experimental work to prove the Kobayashi-Maskawa theory of CP-violation

    The joint publication was completed last month. To celebrate this achievement, the first special editions of the book are presented to Drs. Cronin, Kobayashi and Maskawa today at the 50 Years of CP Violation conference held in London.

    In 1993 the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in California and the KEK laboratory near Tokyo in Japan embarked on a quest to understand the nature of CP violation, a tiny difference between matter and antimatter that is vital for our existence. This effect was discovered in the decay of a particle called a kaon in 1964. These kaons exhibited strange behaviour compared with other particles studied at the time, and we now refer to the quark that causes that behaviour as a strange (or just s) quark. The amount of CP violation in kaon decays is insufficient to explain how the universe came to be dominated by matter.

    SLAC Campus
    SLAC National Accelerator Lab

    KEK lab
    KEK

    SLAC and KEK constructed so called B Factories, which are particle accelerators and detectors to produce a large number of Bottom (or Beauty) particles, which contain b quarks, and study CP violation. The B Factory mission was to explore the phenomenon of CP violation in these particles. Twenty-one years on, these two international collaborations have come to the end of a global collaborative project: one that has produced a weighty tome over 900 pages in length, detailing all aspects of the Physics of the B Factories and their detectors: BaBar and Belle. The physics harvest from the international collaborations that run BaBar and Belle have included many notable discoveries including: CP violation in B decays, first studies of some very rare B decays, and a host of new particles. The breakthroughs have continued more recently with the determination of mixing in neutral charm mesons. This discovery paves the way for the next generation of experiments to search for certain types of CP violation in the decay of charm mesons. Almost a thousand papers have been published by these two experiments during their lifetime.

    The original flagship measurements of the B Factories were found to be consistent with the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix description of CP violation. This provides the Standard Model of particle physics with a description of CP violation as predicted by Kobayashi and Maskawa in 1972.

    sm
    The Standard Model of elementary particles, with the three generations of matter, gauge bosons in the fourth column, and the Higgs boson in the fifth.

    The B Factory confirmation of the Kobayashi-Maskawa mechanism was quickly followed by Kobayashi and Maskawa sharing a Nobel Prize (in 2008) for their insightful work. The Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix is now known to provide the leading description of CP violation. However, while this was an important step forward for the field, the amount of CP violation in the Standard Model remains about a billion times too small to explain the matter-dominated universe that we live in. As a result the focus of the field has turned from understanding how nature behaves to the much more subtle task of trying to understand if there are small deviations from this leading description that have been missed so far.

    A new book has been written as a collaboration between the two teams of physicists working on BaBar and Belle, with the help of the theory community. This is envisioned to be a pedagogical resource for the next generation of experimentalists to work in this field. Preparations started in 2008 and the concept was solidified through a number of international meetings over the past six years. This effort brought together experts from the global flavour physics communities from four continents. The KEK B Factory is in the process of being upgraded and should recommence data taking as a “Super B Factory” with a physics programme resuming in 2016. A decade from now someone will surely need to write a book on the Physics of the Super B Factory.


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