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  • richardmitnick 10:23 am on June 23, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , insideHPC, Mellanox HDR 200G InfiniBand is powering next-gen supercomputers,   

    From insideHPC: “Mellanox HDR 200G InfiniBand is powering next-gen supercomputers” 

    From insideHPC

    June 23, 2019

    Today Mellanox announced that HDR 200G InfiniBand is powering the next generation of supercomputers world-wide, enabling higher levels of research and scientific discovery. HDR 200G InfiniBand solutions include the ConnectX-6 adapters, Mellanox Quantum switches, LinkX cables and transceivers and software packages. With its highest data throughput, extremely low latency, and smart In-Network Computing acceleration engines, HDR InfiniBand provides world leading performance and scalability for the most demanding compute and data applications.

    HDR 200G InfiniBand introduces new offload and acceleration engines, for delivering leading performance and scalability for high-performance computing, artificial intelligence, cloud, storage, and other applications. InfiniBand, a standards-based interconnect technology, enjoys the continuous development of new capabilities, while maintaining backward and forward software compatibility. InfiniBand is the preferred choice for world leading supercomputers, replacing lower performance or proprietary interconnect options.

    “We are proud to have our HDR InfiniBand solutions accelerate supercomputers around the world, enhance research and discoveries, and advancing Exascale programs,” said Gilad Shainer, senior vice president of marketing at Mellanox Technologies. “InfiniBand continues to gain market share, and be selected by many research, educational and government institutes, weather and climate facilities, and commercial organizations. The technology advantages of InfiniBand make it the interconnect of choice for compute and storage infrastructures.”

    The Texas Advanced Computing Center’s (TACC) Frontera supercomputer, funded by the National Science Foundation, is the fastest supercomputer at any U.S. university and one of the most powerful systems in the world.

    TACC Frontera Dell EMC supercomputer fastest at any university

    Ranked #5 on the June 2019 TOP500 Supercomputers list, Frontera utilizes HDR InfiniBand, and in particular multiple 800-port HDR InfiniBand switches, to deliver unprecedented computing power for science and engineering.

    “HDR InfiniBand enabled us to build a world-leading, 8,000+ node, top 5 supercomputer that will serve our users’ needs for the next several years,” said Dan Stanzione, TACC Executive Director. “We appreciate the deep collaboration with Mellanox and are proud to host one of the fastest supercomputers in the world. We look forward to utilizing the advanced routing capabilities and the In-Network Computing acceleration engines to enhance our users’ research activities and scientific discoveries.”

    Located at the Mississippi State University High Performance Computing Collaboratory, the new HDR InfiniBand-based Orion supercomputer will accelerate the university research, educational and service activities.

    Dell EMC Orion supercomputer at Mississippi State University

    Ranked #62 on the June 2019 TOP500 list, the 1800-node supercomputer leverages the performance advantages of HDR InfiniBand and its application acceleration engines to provide new levels of application performance and scalability.

    “HDR InfiniBand brings us leading performance and the ability to build very scalable and cost efficient supercomputers utilizing its high switch port density and configurable network topology,” said Trey Breckenridge, Director for High Performance Computing at Mississippi State University. “Over 16 years ago MSU became one of the first adopters of the InfiniBand technology in HPC. We are excited to continue that legacy by leveraging the latest InfiniBand technology to enhance the capabilities of our newest HPC system.”

    CSC, the Finnish IT Center for Science, and the Finnish Meteorological Institute Selected HDR 200G InfiniBand to accelerate a multi-phase supercomputer program. The program will serve researchers in Finnish universities and research institutes, enhancing their research into climate science, renewable energy, astrophysics, nanomaterials, and bioscience, among a wide range of exploration activities. The first supercomputer is ranked #166 on the TOP500 list.

    “The new supercomputer will enable our researchers and scientists to leverage the most efficient HPC and AI platform to enhance their competitiveness for years to come,” said Pekka Lehtovuori, Director of services for research at CSC. “The HDR InfiniBand technology, and the Dragonfly+ network topology will provide our users with leading performance and scalability while optimizing our total cost of ownership.”

    Cygnus is the first HDR InfiniBand supercomputer in Japan, located in the Center for Computational Sciences at the University of Tsukuba.

    Cygnus FPGA GPU supercomputer at University of Tsukuba Japan

    Ranked #264 on the TOP500 list, Cygnus leverages HDR InfiniBand to connect CPUs, GPUs and FPGAs together, enabling accelerated research in the areas of astrophysics, particle physics, material science, life, meteorology and artificial intelligence.

    The Center for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC) has selected HDR InfiniBand for India’s national supercomputing mission. The C-DAC HDR InfiniBand supercomputer advances India’s research, technology, and product development capabilities.

    “The Center for Development of Advanced Computing (C-DAC), an autonomous R&D institution under the Ministry of Electronics and IT, Government of India with its focus in Advanced Computing is uniquely positioned to establish dependable and secure Exascale Ecosystem offering services in various domains. As our nation embarks upon its most revolutionary phase of Digital Transformation, C-DAC has committed itself to explore and engage in the avant-garde visionary areas excelling beyond in the present areas of research transforming human lives through technological advancement,” said Dr Hemant Darbari, Director General, C-DAC.”

    See the full article here .

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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Founded on December 28, 2006, insideHPC is a blog that distills news and events in the world of HPC and presents them in bite-sized nuggets of helpfulness as a resource for supercomputing professionals. As one reader said, we’re sifting through all the news so you don’t have to!

    If you would like to contact me with suggestions, comments, corrections, errors or new company announcements, please send me an email at rich@insidehpc.com. Or you can send me mail at:

    insideHPC
    2825 NW Upshur
    Suite G
    Portland, OR 97239

    Phone: (503) 877-5048

     
  • richardmitnick 11:27 am on June 15, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , insideHPC, Japan's new supercomputer Fugaku, Kyodo News,   

    From insideHPC via Kyodo News: “Japan’s new supercomputer Fugaku to begin operations around 2021” 

    From insideHPC

    via

    Kyodo News

    1

    Fugaku supercomputer Japan

    Japan’s new supercomputer “Fugaku” is set to begin operations around 2021 with the aim of regaining the title of the world’s fastest computer, replacing the current supercomputer “K,” government-backed research institute Riken said Thursday.

    The Fugaku, a nickname for Mt. Fuji, aims to be about 40 to 120 times faster than the K, the first supercomputer in the world to achieve a speed of over 10 quadrillion computations per second.

    “A supercomputer is essential to solving social challenges such as drug development and disaster prevention,” Riken President Hiroshi Matsumoto said. “We will dedicate our best effort to its success and operation.”

    The new supercomputer, developed at a cost of about 110 billion yen ($999 million), will be utilized in a wide range of research by various companies and universities including forecasting heavy rains.

    The institute received nearly 5,100 entries for potential names between February and April from the public, with only two entries for Fugaku.

    The new computer will be placed in the institute’s Center for Computational Science in Kobe, replacing the K when it retires in August.

    “We’re aiming for the world’s fastest computing speed,” Satoshi Matsuoka, head of the center, said.

    The United States and China have both revealed plans to release supercomputers with equal computing ability to the Fugaku in 2020 or 2021.

    In June 2011, the K, which refers to the way 10 quadrillion is written in Japanese, ranked first in the world in computing speed, going into full-scale operation in September 2012. It fell to 18th place in the most recent rankings reported in November last year.

    According to the “Top 500” list of the world’s fastest supercomputers made biannually by researchers, the United States ranked top with its supercomputer “Summit” in November 2018. China had held first place from 2013 until June 2018, when the United States regained top spot.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Founded on December 28, 2006, insideHPC is a blog that distills news and events in the world of HPC and presents them in bite-sized nuggets of helpfulness as a resource for supercomputing professionals. As one reader said, we’re sifting through all the news so you don’t have to!

    If you would like to contact me with suggestions, comments, corrections, errors or new company announcements, please send me an email at rich@insidehpc.com. Or you can send me mail at:

    insideHPC
    2825 NW Upshur
    Suite G
    Portland, OR 97239

    Phone: (503) 877-5048

     
  • richardmitnick 2:43 pm on June 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , EU Funds Eight Pre-exascale Supercomputers, insideHPC,   

    From insideHPC: “EU Funds Eight Pre-exascale Supercomputers” 

    From insideHPC

    June 7, 2019
    Rich Brueckner

    1

    The European Union has selected eight supercomputing centers to host pre-exascale supercomputers. The new systems will support Europe’s researchers, industry and businesses in developing new applications in a wide range of areas, from designing medicines and new materials to fighting climate change.

    The European High Performance Computing Joint Undertaking is a good example of how EU countries can cooperate to drive innovation and compete globally in these highly strategic technologies. I am convinced that the new supercomputers that these sites will host will boost Europe’s competitiveness in the digital area. We have demonstrated the strength of our European approach which will bring concrete benefits to our citizens and help our SMEs.”

    Hosting sites:

    Sofia (Bulgaria)
    Ostrava (Czechia)
    Kajaani (Finland)
    Bologna (Italy)
    Bissen (Luxembourg)
    Minho (Portugal)
    Maribor (Slovenia)
    Barcelona (Spain)

    These sites will support the development of major applications in domains such as personalized medicine, drug and material design, bio-engineering, weather forecasting, and climate change. In total, 19 of the 28 countries participating in the Joint Undertaking will be part of the consortia operating the centers. Together with EU funds, it represents a total budget of € 840 million. The exact funding arrangements for the new supercomputers will be reflected in hosting agreements that will be signed soon.

    Why invest in HPC?

    In today’s world, high-performance computing capabilities are crucial in generating growth and jobs but also for strategic autonomy and innovation in any field. The range of supercomputing uses is vast. It can, for example, forecast the evolution of local and regional weather patterns and predict the size and paths of storms and floods, making it possible to activate early warning systems for extreme weather events. It is also used in designing new medicines, solving complex physics equations that model the molecular processes and interactions of a new drug with human tissues. The aviation and automotive industries also use supercomputing to perform complex simulations and test individual components and entire planes and cars. Moreover, as they are vital for running large-scale simulations and for data analytics, supercomputers are an extremely important component in the development of artificial intelligence, and to boost Europe’s strengths in cybersecurity and blockchain.

    Next steps

    The Joint Undertaking, along with the selected hosting sites, plans to acquire 8 supercomputers: 3 precursor to exascale machines (capable of executing more than 150 Petaflops, or 150 million billion calculations per second) that will be in the global top 5, and 5 petascale machines (capable of executing at least 4 Petaflops, or 4 million billion operations per second).

    “The pre-exascale systems are expected to provide 4-5 times more computing power than the current top supercomputing systems of the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe (PRACE). Together with the petascale systems, they will double the supercomputing resources available for European-level use, meaning that many more users will have access to them.”

    In the next few months, the Joint Undertaking will sign agreements with the selected hosting entities and their hosting Consortia. These agreements will reflect the way the procurement process for acquiring the machines will work and the respective budget commitments of the Commission and member countries. The supercomputers are expected to become operational during the second half of 2020 for European users from academia, industry and the public sector. All the new supercomputers will be connected to the GEANT high-speed pan-European network, like the existing supercomputers that are part of PRACE.

    In the next few days, senior Commission officials will join representatives of national governments and of the supercomputing centers involved to present this major milestone for European supercomputing.

    Background

    Proposed by the Commission and supported by the Council of the EU, the EuroHPC Joint Undertaking was established in November 2018 with the aim of equipping the EU with a world-class supercomputing infrastructure by the end of 2020.

    In February 2019, the Joint Undertaking launched its first calls for expression of interest to select the sites that will host its first supercomputers by the end of 2020. Two calls were opened: one for hosting entities for petascale supercomputers, and one for hosting entities for precursor to exascale supercomputers.

    Supercomputing is a key priority in the EU’s Digital Europe program proposed by the Commission in May 2018 in the context of the next long-term EU budget, which includes a proposal of € 2.7 billion to fund supercomputing in Europe during the 2021-2027 period. This budget will permit the Joint Undertaking to support the acquisition of exascale supercomputers (capable of executing 1018 calculations per second, or a thousand Petaflops) by 2023 and the development of leading applications running on these supercomputers and the skills for using them.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Founded on December 28, 2006, insideHPC is a blog that distills news and events in the world of HPC and presents them in bite-sized nuggets of helpfulness as a resource for supercomputing professionals. As one reader said, we’re sifting through all the news so you don’t have to!

    If you would like to contact me with suggestions, comments, corrections, errors or new company announcements, please send me an email at rich@insidehpc.com. Or you can send me mail at:

    insideHPC
    2825 NW Upshur
    Suite G
    Portland, OR 97239

    Phone: (503) 877-5048

     
  • richardmitnick 2:26 pm on June 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Big Red 200 will be the first of Cray’s revolutionary new Shasta supercomputers installed at a U.S. university., insideHPC, , The current “Big Red II” being replaced by Cray Shasta Big Red 200   

    From insideHPC: “Cray to build Big Red 200 Supercomputer for Indiana University” 

    From insideHPC

    June 7, 2019


    The current “Big Red II” being replaced by Big Red 200

    Today Cray announced that Indiana University has selected a Cray Shasta supercomputing system to advance the use of AI across diverse research fields at the university.

    Indiana University will be the first university to deploy a Shasta system, the Cray Slingshot interconnect and Cray Urika AI Suite for Shasta, providing its engineers, researchers and scientists powerful resources for the next era of computing. Named “Big Red 200,” the new supercomputer will be instrumental in the University’s exploration and advancement of AI in education, cybersecurity, medicine, environmental science and more.

    The new Cray Shasta system is a necessary addition to support Indiana University’s future research endeavors in solving some of the most pressing challenges facing the people of Indiana and our world. We’ve entered an age where AI is poised to transform the future of many industries–from healthcare to cybersecurity–and we’re confident the latest technology from Cray will meet our needs for a computing infrastructure that will build on the promise of AI in Indiana,” said Brad Wheeler, VP for information technology and CIO at Indiana University. “AI brings a whole new level of insight to our researchers and with Big Red 200, we look forward to uncovering more ways we can use AI to solve societal challenges, scientific queries and further education.”

    Big Red 200, named to celebrate the University’s bicentennial, will replace its predecessor, the “Big Red II” a Cray XK7 supercomputer. With new high-performance computing capabilities, including 2nd generation AMD EPYC processors, the new Cray Shasta supercomputer will be the platform for researchers to advance the use of AI across diverse research areas and in the University’s three Grand Challenges initiative to solve local as well as global issues: Precision Health, Prepared for Environmental Change, and Responding to the Addictions Crisis.

    “We’re honored to partner with Indiana University and support their critical AI research program,” said Peter Ungaro, CEO at Cray. “Big Red 200 is a shining example of how the same technology in our new Shasta supercomputer architecture that powers the world’s largest exascale systems can be put to work in the University’s datacenter to meet their research objectives. With a Cray Shasta system Indiana University is equipped with a unique solution that blends the best of supercomputing and cloud technologies to help them achieve breakthrough results in AI.”

    Big Red 200 will be the first of Cray’s revolutionary new Shasta supercomputers installed at a U.S. university. Larger versions of these systems will be installed over the next few years at a number of the federal Department of Energy’s laboratories as part of the Exascale Computing Project, which aims to develop the world’s fastest supercomputers with Exascale speeds in excess of 1018 calculations per second.

    “The new system’s latest-generation V100 GPUs will allow my group — and many others throughout the university — to continue pushing forward the state of the art in machine learning while applying AI to important interdisciplinary applications. It will also be a fantastic teaching resource for our courses in machine learning, artificial intelligence, robotics and computer vision.”

    IU’s Center for Applied Cybersecurity Research will be one of the first groups to use Big Red 200.

    “With the application of AI to data-intensive cybersecurity, these research frontiers require advanced systems to scale our defenses to meet the high speed of today’s cyber threats,” said Von Welch, IU executive director for cybersecurity innovation. “This advancement in IU’s cyberinfrastructure will allow us to advance the state of AI in cybersecurity in IU’s leading-edge cybersecurity services: OmniSOC and ResearchSOC.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Founded on December 28, 2006, insideHPC is a blog that distills news and events in the world of HPC and presents them in bite-sized nuggets of helpfulness as a resource for supercomputing professionals. As one reader said, we’re sifting through all the news so you don’t have to!

    If you would like to contact me with suggestions, comments, corrections, errors or new company announcements, please send me an email at rich@insidehpc.com. Or you can send me mail at:

    insideHPC
    2825 NW Upshur
    Suite G
    Portland, OR 97239

    Phone: (503) 877-5048

     
  • richardmitnick 8:18 am on June 6, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , insideHPC, NVIDIA DGX-2 supercomputer to Clemson University,   

    From insideHPC: “Microway Deploys NVIDIA DGX-2 Supercomputer at Clemson University” 

    From insideHPC

    June 5, 2019

    1
    NVIDIA DGX-2

    Today Microway announced the company has shipped a NVIDIA DGX-2 supercomputer to Clemson University.

    The NVIDIA DGX-2 delivers industry-leading 2 petaFLOPS of AI deep learning performance. The system harnesses the power of 16 NVIDIA Tesla V100 GPUs, fully interconnected with the enhanced-bandwidth NVIDIA NVLink interface to boost the speed of deep learning training.

    “As the Americas 2018 NVIDIA Partner Network HPC Partner of the Year, Microway was uniquely qualified to expertly integrate and install this AI supercomputer for optimized performance.”

    The system deploys with NVIDIA’s Deep Learning software—and was ready to train models immediately after installation. DGX-2’s NGC software stack was installed by Microway experts and supports all major AI frameworks as well as offers containers for a variety of HPC applications.

    The easy-to-use DIGITS deep learning training system and interface available on DGX-2 helps users manage training data, design compare and select networks, and monitor performance—making the system an excellent, accessible educational tool.

    Clemson University’s DGX-2 will empower researchers in disciplines such as computational math, statistics, operations research, and mechanical and industrial engineering to analyze vast datasets with exceptional ease. Initial projects include research on medical imaging, drone control, autonomous driving, and ocean dynamics.

    Clemson University’s acquisition of the cutting-edge technology is funded by a grant from the Defense University Research Instrumentation Program in the Department of Defense’s Office of Naval Research.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Founded on December 28, 2006, insideHPC is a blog that distills news and events in the world of HPC and presents them in bite-sized nuggets of helpfulness as a resource for supercomputing professionals. As one reader said, we’re sifting through all the news so you don’t have to!

    If you would like to contact me with suggestions, comments, corrections, errors or new company announcements, please send me an email at rich@insidehpc.com. Or you can send me mail at:

    insideHPC
    2825 NW Upshur
    Suite G
    Portland, OR 97239

    Phone: (503) 877-5048

     
  • richardmitnick 9:49 am on June 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: CGYRO code, , GPU Technology Conference, insideHPC,   

    From insideHPC: “Advancing Fusion Science with CGYRO using GPU-based Leadership Systems” 

    From insideHPC

    June 4, 2019
    Rich Brueckner


    41 minutes
    In this video from the GPU Technology Conference, Jeff Candy and Igor Sfiligoi from General Atomics present: Advancing Fusion Science with CGYRO using GPU-based Leadership Systems.

    2
    “Learn about the science of magnetically confined plasmas to develop the predictive capability needed for a sustainable fusion energy source. Gyrokinetic simulations are one of the most useful tools for understanding fusion science. We’ll explain the CGYRO code, built by researchers at General Atomics to effectively and efficiently simulate plasma evolution over multiple scales that range from electrons to heavy ions. Fusion plasma simulations are compute- and memory-intensive and usually run on leadership-class, GPU-Accelerated HPC systems like Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Titan and Summit. We’ll explain how we designed and implemented CGYRO to make good use of the tens of thousands of GPUs on such systems, which provide simulations that bring us closer to fusion as an abundant clean energy source. We’ll also share benchmarking results of both CPU- and GPU-Based systems.”

    General Atomics is a key partner in ITER — one of the largest scientific programs in history — which seeks to demonstrate the scientific and technological feasibility of fusion power, a potentially limitless source of clean energy.


    ITER Tokamak in Saint-Paul-lès-Durance, which is in southern France

    The ITER facility is currently being constructed in France by a consortium of 35 nations. GA is manufacturing major components for this worldwide initiative, including diagnostics systems and the Central Solenoid, the world’s largest pulsed superconducting electromagnet.

    GA’s Theory and Computational Science program advances the fundamental theoretical understanding of fusion plasmas through development and application of industry-leading computer simulations. The theory program works with DIII-D to validate models and simulations against robust experimental data.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Founded on December 28, 2006, insideHPC is a blog that distills news and events in the world of HPC and presents them in bite-sized nuggets of helpfulness as a resource for supercomputing professionals. As one reader said, we’re sifting through all the news so you don’t have to!

    If you would like to contact me with suggestions, comments, corrections, errors or new company announcements, please send me an email at rich@insidehpc.com. Or you can send me mail at:

    insideHPC
    2825 NW Upshur
    Suite G
    Portland, OR 97239

    Phone: (503) 877-5048

     
  • richardmitnick 10:39 am on June 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Exascale for Everyone", , insideHPC, Roadrunner supercomputer,   

    From insideHPC: “Exascale for Everyone” 

    From insideHPC

    June 3, 2019

    1
    There is one inescapable conclusion: The exascale race has officially begun. (Photo: Shutterstock/By SeventyFour)

    At this June’s International Supercomputing Conference (ISC) in Frankfurt, there will be a lot of buzz about exascale computing. The exascale hype has been gaining a lot of steam in the press lately, and for good reason. Ever since the petascale barrier was broken in 2008, technology users, companies and research institutions have set their ‘sites’ on the holy grail of computing milestones. Achieving this milestone is now being seen as within reach as companies and consortia announce their plans to build the first exascale system. Those in the supercomputing field know it’s all about the “Wow!” factor: the next biggest system, the next grand achievement, and the bragging rights associated with jaw-dropping size and speed. Supercomputing means never being satisfied and always looking forward. Future system designs are finally being unveiled that show promise, and as expected, the typical players, vendors and technology companies are all vying for a piece of history. Given the scope, scale and importance of such an achievement, it’s understandable. There is one inescapable conclusion: The exascale race has officially begun.

    Is the past a prologue to the future? Let’s look back and consider previous achievements and the technology advancements that were required to make petascale attainable. At this year’s ISC when the June Top500 list is released, it will officially mark eleven years since IBM’s Roadrunner, installed at Los Alamos National Labs, officially broke the petaflop barrier. Also, important to note, when Roadrunner officially broke the petaflop barrier, it was exactly eleven years almost to the day from when ASCI Red at Sandia National labs was the first system to break the teraflop barrier. It took eleven years to increase performance 1000x. Where are we eleven years after Roadrunner? The top systems today are pushing the 200PF barrier, or only 1/5th of the performance achievement that was gained from ASCI Red to Roadrunner over the same amount of time.

    The decelerating progress to exascale over the same tera- to peta- time frame has been well documented in the industry: The slowing and, finally, extinction of Moore’s law, the challenge and expense to get to 7nm or better processor fabrication, and the physical challenges of deploying an exascale system. The physical challenges alone are daunting: power and space constraints, cooling capabilities, network scalability, systems management, building and facilities. The technology challenges required to deliver gen-to-gen performance or breakthrough technologies has put pressure both the technology providers and the high-end HPC facilities. All that being said, we still should be closer to exascale than we currently are. So as an industry, we have some ground to make up.

    1
    Roadrunner was a supercomputer built by IBM for the Los Alamos National Laboratory in New Mexico, USA. The US$100-million Roadrunner was designed for a peak performance of 1.7 petaflops. It achieved 1.026 petaflops on May 25, 2008, to become the world’s first TOP500 LINPACK sustained 1.0 petaflops system.

    Interestingly enough, the pressure to push the performance needle forward is causing the supercomputing industry to look backwards. Let me explain! Prior to Roadrunner, systems that broke performance barriers often relied on proprietary technology. Large technology companies built huge systems for a handful of customers. Supercomputers were thus only owned by a small slice of the overall computing market, and the non-supercomputing markets would have to settle on a handful of systems to perform painstakingly slow research. Computational advances were made at the top and the hope was that it would eventually trickle down to the masses. Roadrunner changed that paradigm.

    Like its supercomputing predecessors, Roadrunner was designed for a single, top-end customer. It also relied on alliances between technology heavyweights to design a system that would be able to achieve petaflop performance. However, what Roadrunner did differently democratized HPC away from the few. Roadrunner’s foundation was built using commodity-off-the-shelf (COTS) technology already available in the marketplace instead of custom, proprietary form-factors and technology. IBM chose the BladeCenter with AMD’s Opteron processor to provide the computing infrastructure. Linux was chosen as the operating system, and Extreme Cluster Administration Tool (xCAT) 2.0 version (also open source) was written specifically to tackle systems management at scale, emphatically declaring that open source technology was here to stay.

    Roadrunner flipped the script on how to build a supercomputer, and in the early 2000s, supercomputers based on low-cost, COTS components and open source software proliferated as new industries demanded the competitive advantages that deep research could provide. The Linux operating system, coupled with x86-processor technology, provided the world with an open, inexpensive base computing standard, eliminating the need for the $100 million ante to play. Technological advancements that began in the personal computing space moved into the datacenter space. The most important consequence of this was that multiple vendors could provide the same computing technology, creating fierce competition. In parallel, the internet age was booming, and two-socket x86 systems became the de-facto standard for ISPs and hosting facilities that would come to be known as “hyperscalers” for their size and ability to drive the lowest sustainable price point. Building large systems from standard pizza-box servers provided a cost-effective method of delivering IT. Enormous, fit-for-purpose scale-up systems gave way to scalable general-purpose Linux clusters using common technology and tools.

    Not surprisingly, governments, particularly the U.S. government, are at the forefront of pushing towards exascale. What’s interesting to note is unlike the petaflop predecessors there is a push to go back to using proprietary technologies. Proprietary interconnects, racks, cooling systems, motherboards, trays and non-standard form-factors. Non-common form-factors. Single-vendor availability. Obviously, the stall in progress toward exascale has fueled this re-reversal and could succeed in hitting 1,000 petaflops first. However, such a system would have little commercial appeal, as most customers have moved away from vendor lock-in, and their push to exascale is based on the open standards approach.

    At Lenovo, we recognize that co-development and partnerships between the best and brightest minds are needed to successfully tackle grand challenges like exascale. We believe that the approach taken in the development of Roadrunner, using commonly available components and driving performance of those technologies through collaboration and co-development with the end user, was the correct one. Lenovo’s exascale approach will combine the knowledge we’ve gained from two decades of open standards development, with insights from our successful deployments at institutions such as the Leibniz Supercomputing Center (LRZ), in Munich, Germany. Our partnership with LRZ, for example, pushes Lenovo development to drive performance in our standard products. The base technology in LRZ’s SuperMUC-NG, (the #8 system on the November 2018 Top500 system), is available to all our customers today worldwide.

    Lenovo will continue to co-design with customers like LRZ to help drive the next-generation base exascale compute system design. Lenovo’s approach to “cascade” computing advancements is at the core of who we are. Leveraging our deep partnerships and skills to advance computing, and then making those advancements available to all our customers is our ultimate goal. We adhere to designs that follow industry standards from everything to infrastructure, form-factors or software and systems management. We want to continue the legacy of Roadrunner by ensuring that advancements in HPC are available to everyone. Instead of looking backwards and developing purpose-built, proprietary systems that only a few can afford, Lenovo will continue to ensure that all users reap the benefits of technology innovation as it happens. Our goal is to make exascale available to everyone.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Founded on December 28, 2006, insideHPC is a blog that distills news and events in the world of HPC and presents them in bite-sized nuggets of helpfulness as a resource for supercomputing professionals. As one reader said, we’re sifting through all the news so you don’t have to!

    If you would like to contact me with suggestions, comments, corrections, errors or new company announcements, please send me an email at rich@insidehpc.com. Or you can send me mail at:

    insideHPC
    2825 NW Upshur
    Suite G
    Portland, OR 97239

    Phone: (503) 877-5048

     
  • richardmitnick 10:25 am on June 4, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , GENCI, insideHPC, Joliot-Curie supercomputer at CEA in France,   

    From insideHPC: “Joliot-Curie Supercomputer from Atos Powers Research at GENCI” 

    From insideHPC

    JOLIOT CURIE of GENCI Atos BULL Sequana system X1000 supercomputer France

    June 3, 2019

    GENCI has inaugurated their new Joliot-Curie supercomputer at CEA in France. Based on the Atos BullSequana architecture, the system is rated at 9.4 petaflops of peak performance. The system boasts 4.5X increase in computing capacity with half the power consumption of its predecessor.

    “Joliot-Curie is France’s third supercomputer ranked in the Top 500 in terms of power, just behind Tera-1000-2 and Pangea. Its computing power is equivalent to 75,000 desktop computers and will support researchers for projects requiring heavy computing and data processing. This supercomputer offers truly astounding RAM capacity with 400 terabytes. It also includes a 5-petabyte data storage capacity with a 300 GB/s bandwidth, remote data visualization and virtualization services. This makes Joliot-Curie an especially well-balanced machine that meets the needs both for large-scale computer simulations and for processing the large amounts of data generated.”

    Joliot-Curie computing power will be more than doubled in 2020 to reach 22 petaflops of peak performance. At that point in time, it will likely become the third most powerful research supercomputer in Europe and no. 1 in France.

    Computer simulation and high-performance computing have now become essential scientific tools to improve knowledge, design and decision-making processes in fundamental and applied research fields, and an increasing number of industrial sectors. Thanks to the investment made by GENCI, Joliot-Curie will ensure that France meets its commitments in terms of computing power made available to European researchers in the context of the PRACE European computing infrastructure.

    “Supercomputers have greatly improved over time and are now used in various research fields since they allow for computer simulation to be applied across all academic disciplines. Joliot-Curie has already been tested as part of the Grands Challenges (Great challenges), organized by GENCI at the TGCC, by running major simulations and other applications.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Founded on December 28, 2006, insideHPC is a blog that distills news and events in the world of HPC and presents them in bite-sized nuggets of helpfulness as a resource for supercomputing professionals. As one reader said, we’re sifting through all the news so you don’t have to!

    If you would like to contact me with suggestions, comments, corrections, errors or new company announcements, please send me an email at rich@insidehpc.com. Or you can send me mail at:

    insideHPC
    2825 NW Upshur
    Suite G
    Portland, OR 97239

    Phone: (503) 877-5048

     
  • richardmitnick 10:58 am on June 1, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Converging Workflows Pushing Converged Software onto HPC Platforms", and AI?, Are we witnessing the convergence of HPC, big data analytics, insideHPC   

    From insideHPC: “Converging Workflows Pushing Converged Software onto HPC Platforms” 

    From insideHPC

    May 31, 2019
    Richard Friedman

    1
    Are we witnessing the convergence of HPC, big data analytics, and AI? (Photo: Shutterstock/Sergey Nivens)

    This sponsored post explores the intersection of HPC, big data analytics, and AI. The resulting converged software will provide capabilities researchers need tackle their business’ next big challenge.

    Are we witnessing the convergence of HPC, big data analytics, and AI?

    Once, these were separate domains, each with its own system architecture and software stack, but the data deluge is driving their convergence. Traditional big science HPC is looking more like big data analytics and AI, while analytics and AI are taking on the flavor of HPC.

    The data deluge is real. In 2018, CERN’s Large Hadron Collider generated over 50 petabytes (1,000 terabytes, or 1015 bytes) of data, and expects that to increase tenfold by 2025. The average Internet user generates over a GB of data traffic every day; smart hospitals over 3,000 GB per day; a manufacturing plant over 1,000,000 GB per day. A single autonomous vehicle is estimated to generate 4,000 GB per day. Every day. The total annual digital data output is predicted to reach or exceed 163 zettabytes (one sextillion, or 1021 bytes) by 2025. This is data that needs to be analyzed at near-real-time speed and stored somewhere for easy access by multiple collaborators. Extreme performance, storage, networking―sounds a lot like HPC.

    What characterized “traditional” HPC was achieving extreme performance on computationally complex problems, typically simulations of real-world systems (think explosions, oceanography, global weather hydrodynamics, even cosmological events like supernovae, etc.). This meant very large parallel processing systems with hundreds, even thousands, of dedicated compute nodes and vast multi-layer storage appliances, over vast high-speed networks.

    “Workflows that unify artificial intelligence, data analytics, and modeling/simulation will make high-performance computing more essential and ubiquitous than ever.” — Patricia Damkroger, manager, Intel Extreme Computing

    Big data analytics, as it has come to be known, can be characterized as workflows with datasets that are so large that I/O transfer rates, storage footprints, and secure archiving are primary considerations. Here, I/O consumes a significant portion of the runtime and puts great stress on the filesystem.

    For artificial intelligence, complex algorithms train models to analyze multiple sources of streaming data to draw inferences and predict events so that real-time actions can be taken.

    We’re seeing applications from one domain employing techniques from the others. Look at just one example: Biological and medical science now generate vast streams of data from electron microscopes, genome sequencers, bedside patient monitors, diagnostic medical equipment, wearable health devices, and a host of other sources. Using AI-based analytics on HPC systems, life science researchers can construct and refine robust models that simulate the function and processes of biological structures at cellular and sub-cellular levels. AI analysis of these massive data sets is transforming our understanding of disease, while practical AI solutions in hospitals are already helping clinicians quickly and accurately identify medical conditions and their treatment.

    Up to now, HPC, big data, and AI domains have developed their own widely divergent hardware/software environments. A traditional HPC environment would typically deploy Fortran/C++ hybrid applications with MPI over a large cluster using Slurm* for large-scale resource management and Lustre* high-speed remote storage on a high-performance network of servers, fabric switches, and appliances.

    On the other hand, with data analytics and AI environments, you would tend to see Python* and Java* applications using open source Hadoop* and Spark* frameworks over HDFS* local storage and standard networked server components.

    As workloads converge, they will require platforms that bring these technologies together. There are already efforts to develop a unified infrastructure with converged software stacks and compute infrastructure. For example, the Intel® Select Solutions for HPC includes solutions for HPC and AI converged clusters. The recently announced Aurora Supercomputer, to be delivered by Intel, will be a converged platform (see Accelerating the Convergence of HPC and AI at Exascale). Intel is also working hard to optimize AI frameworks on CPU-based systems, which is crucial for the performance of converged workflows. Intel Deep Learning Boost, a new AI extension to Intel® Xeon® processors, accelerates AI applications while delivering top HPC performance using features like Intel® AVX-512.

    For systems to converge, they must handle the full range of scientific and technical computing applications—from equation-driven, batch-processing simulations to the automated, data-fueled analysis needed to support human decision-making in real time. And, they must be easy to use. Figure 1 shows the framework that Intel® and its collaborators are using to enable converged, exascale computing.

    2
    Figure 1: The convergence of HPC, data analysis, and AI requires a unified software stack and a consistent architecture. (Image courtesy of Intel.)

    While traditional HPC platforms focused on processor and interconnect performance, converged platforms will need to balance processor, memory, interconnect, and I/O performance while providing the scalability, resilience, density, and power efficiency required by these workloads. With the convergence of AI, data analytics, and modeling/simulation, these converged HPC platforms and solution stacks will provide capabilities researchers need to make progress on their toughest challenges, and for enterprises to deliver innovative products and services.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Founded on December 28, 2006, insideHPC is a blog that distills news and events in the world of HPC and presents them in bite-sized nuggets of helpfulness as a resource for supercomputing professionals. As one reader said, we’re sifting through all the news so you don’t have to!

    If you would like to contact me with suggestions, comments, corrections, errors or new company announcements, please send me an email at rich@insidehpc.com. Or you can send me mail at:

    insideHPC
    2825 NW Upshur
    Suite G
    Portland, OR 97239

    Phone: (503) 877-5048

     
  • richardmitnick 6:41 pm on May 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: insideHPC, TACC Ranch supercomputer storage system   

    From insideHPC: “TACC Upgrades Ranch Storage System for Wrangling Big Data” 

    From insideHPC

    May 22, 2019
    Rich Brueckner

    TACC Ranch long-term mass data storage system

    TACC has completed a major upgrade of their Ranch long-term mass data storage system. With thousands of users, Ranch archives are valuable to scientists who want to use the data to help reproduce the measurements and results of prior research. Computational reproducibility is one piece of the larger concept of scientific reproducibility, which forms a cornerstone of the scientific method.

    “TACC strives to comprehensively support the data needs of scientists. The local compute systems such as Stampede2 and Lonestar provide a high-speed scratch space dedicated for temporary storage of data. Next up the ladder are the front-facing data collection systems of Stockyard and Corral, which provide a combined storage of 50 petabytes directly accessible through high speed web connections or the iRODS data grid. Ranch, on the other hand, allows long-term archiving of data for months to years.”

    TACC DELL EMC Stampede2 supercomputer

    TACC Lonestar Cray XC40 supercomputer

    As of April 2019, Ranch stores over 70 petabytes, or 70 million gigabytes of scientific data. Over 52,000 users have uploaded close to 1.7 billion computer files on the old library of Ranch that’s being upgraded. Hypothetically, the new upgrades to Ranch could expand its storage to reach a mind-boggling exabyte, or 1,000 petabytes.

    “For users, more data will be more readily available, with 15 times more disk cache than what we had on the previous Ranch system,” said Tommy Minyard, director of Advanced Computing Systems at TACC. Fresh data that’s generated from TACC supercomputers such as Stampede2, Lonestar, or Maverick is staged first on Ranch’s spinning disk and flash drives, then later moved to tapes.”

    Ranch has been upgraded with a block storage system supplied by DataDirect Networks, the DDN SFA14K DCR, which provides 30 petabytes of spinning disk cache, versus just two on the replaced hardware. “That means that we’ll be able to keep a lot more data staged on disks so that it’s more quickly retrievable and you don’t have to recall it from tape,” Minyard added.

    Another welcome change to Ranch comes from the company Quantum, which provided a Scalar i6000 tape library with the Quantum StorNext archival file system that coordinates both disk and tape storage. “We chose the Quantum system based on its capability and flexibility,” said Junseong Heo, senior systems administrator and manager, Large Scale Systems of TACC’s Advanced Computing Systems group.

    “Specifically, Quantum provides a quota control mechanism that enables TACC to provide an allocation-based project area for users,” Heo added. That means that users can have much easier access to data and oversee the usage of resources. “The project-based quota has been at the top of the wish list from users in the past,” Heo said.”

    “TACC’s focus on constant innovation creates an environment that places tremendous stress on storage, and Quantum has long been at the forefront in managing solutions that meet the most extreme reliability, accessibility and massive scalability requirements,” said “Eric Bassier, Senior Director of Product Marketing, Quantum. “Combining Scalar tape with StorNext data management capabilities creates an HSM (Hierarchical storage management) solution that is capable of delivering under the demanding conditions of the TACC environment.”

    “The new system provides some additional capabilities for us to be able to handle project data and tiers of storage better than the old system did,” Minyard added. This is especially good news for heavy Ranch users, whose allocation might change frequently. The heaviest 100 users combined have more than 20 petabytes on the current archive system.”

    One of the big changes users will notice is the adoption of the Community Enterprise Operating System (CentOS) environment, which replaced the previous Solaris environment. As users navigate CentOS to migrate their files to the new Ranch libraries, TACC is providing 12 months of read-only access to data in the old library until the end of March 31, 2020. Users should inspect and migrate data in favorable sizes for the tape archives, preferably bigger than 100 gigabytes in individual file size.

    “Archival data isn’t glamorous, but it’s required,” said Minyard. “I don’t know how many times we’ve had somebody panic about accidentally deleting a file, where TACC was able to recall the file for them from Ranch. From their point of view, Ranch is a life-saver,” Minyard said.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Founded on December 28, 2006, insideHPC is a blog that distills news and events in the world of HPC and presents them in bite-sized nuggets of helpfulness as a resource for supercomputing professionals. As one reader said, we’re sifting through all the news so you don’t have to!

    If you would like to contact me with suggestions, comments, corrections, errors or new company announcements, please send me an email at rich@insidehpc.com. Or you can send me mail at:

    insideHPC
    2825 NW Upshur
    Suite G
    Portland, OR 97239

    Phone: (503) 877-5048

     
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