Tagged: IBM Corporation Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • richardmitnick 1:34 pm on July 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Gravitational anomaly seen in lab crystal, IBM Corporation, ,   

    From EarthSky: “Gravitational anomaly seen in lab crystal” 

    1

    EarthSky

    July 24, 2017
    Daniela Breitman

    An exotic effect in particle physics, theorized to occur in immense gravitational fields — near a black hole, or in conditions just after the Big Bang — has been seen in laboratory crystal.

    1
    Scientists use laboratory crystal to see how spacetime curvature affects subatomic particles known as Weyl fermions. Image by Robert Strasser, Kees Scherer, collage by Michael Buker via Nature.

    Physicist Johannes Gooth and his team from IBM Research in Zurich, Switzerland, claim to have observed an effect called an axial–gravitational anomaly in a crystal. The effect is predicted by Einstein’s General Relativity, which describes gravity as curved spacetime. The newly observed laboratory effect was thought to be observable only under conditions of immense gravity — for example, near a black hole, or shortly after the Big Bang. Yet it has been seen in a lab. The scientists published their work in the peer-reviewed journal Nature on July 20, 2017.

    What is a gravitational anomaly? A good explanation comes from co-author Karl Landsteiner at the IBM Research Blog:

    “Symmetries are the holy grail for physicists. Symmetry means that one can transform an object in a certain way that leaves it invariant. For example, a round ball can be rotated by an arbitrary angle, but always looks the same. Physicists say it is ‘symmetric under rotations.’ Once the symmetry of a physical system is identified it’s often possible to predict its dynamics.

    Sometimes however the laws of quantum mechanics destroy a symmetry that would happily exist in a world without quantum mechanics, i.e classical systems. Even to physicists this looks so strange that they named this phenomenon an ‘anomaly.’

    For most of their history, these quantum anomalies were confined to the world of elementary particle physics explored in huge accelerator laboratories such as Large Hadron Collider at CERN in Switzerland …

    But now a quantum anomaly has been observed in a lab. Nature said the result bolsters an emerging view that crystals such as these — crystals whose properties are dominated by quantum-mechanical effects – can act as experimental test-beds for physics effects that could be seen otherwise only under exotic circumstances (Big Bang, black hole, particle accelerator).

    2
    Co-author of the new paper Karl Landsteiner, a string theorist at the Instituto de Fisica Teorica UAM/CSIC, made this graphic to explain the gravitational anomaly. Image via http://newatlas.com/gravitational-anomaly-observed/50559/.

    In advanced science classes, at one point or another, we are taught Lavoisier’s Law. It states that nothing is being created, nothing is being lost, and that all is being transformed. This law – the law of the conservation of mass – is an underlying principle of basic science.

    However, when peek into the funky world of quantum materials through high energy physics, the law of the conservation of mass seems to break apart.

    Meanwhile, Einstein’s famous equation, E=mc^2, suggests that mass and energy are interchangeable (E, or energy, equals m, or mass, times c^2, or the speed of light squared).

    Gooth and his team used Einstein’s equation to create an analogy: a change heat (E) is the same as a change in mass (m). In other words, changing the temperature of a Weyl semimetal would be the same as generating a gravitational field.

    Lead author of the paper, Johannes Gooth, explained:

    “For the first time, we have experimentally observed this quantum anomaly on Earth which is extremely important towards our understanding of the universe.”

    3
    Co-authors of the paper (left to right): Fabian Menges, Johannes Gooth, and Bernd Gotsmann in a noise-free lab at IBM Research, Zurich. Image via <a href="https://c1.staticflickr.com/5/4206/34582536554_4fff0cdf49.jpg.

    Weyl fermions have been proposed in the 1920s by mathematician Hermann Weyl. They have been very interesting to scientists for some time, for some of their unique properties.

    This discovery is considered a spectacular one by many scientists, but not all scientists are convinced. Boris Spivak, physicist at the University of Washington in Seattle, doesn’t believe that an axial-gravitational anomaly could be observed in a Weyl semimetal. He said:

    "There are many other mechanisms which can explain their data."

    As always in science, time will tell.

    Bottom line: IBM scientists claim to have observed the effects of the axial-gravitational anomaly in a laboratory crystal.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 2:04 pm on March 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , IBM Corporation, Major French Bank Now Supporting Humanitarian Research Through World Community Grid, SILCA,   

    From WCG via HPC Wire: “Major French Bank Now Supporting Humanitarian Research Through World Community Grid” 

    New WCG Logo

    WCGLarge

    World Community Grid (WCG)

    1

    HPC Wire

    March 10, 2017
    No writer credit

    SILCA, the information technology and services arm for Crédit Agricole Group, has formally signed on to donate its surplus computer processing power to IBM’s (NYSE: IBM) World Community Grid in support of humanitarian research.

    In just its first month of participation, after installing the World Community Grid app on 1,100 employee workstations, it contributed the equivalent of three years of computing time to scientific research.

    World Community Grid is an IBM-funded and managed program that advances scientific research by harnessing computing power “donated” by volunteers around the globe. This resource is the equivalent of a virtual supercomputer that helps enable scientists to more quickly conduct millions of virtual experiments. These experiments aim to pinpoint promising drug candidates for further study.

    SILCA, which ensures the security and digital transformation of Crédit Agricole Group, first proposed this project at Crédit Agricole Group’s “Innovation Day” event, and won the company’s top award, chosen from among 60 initiatives described by the bank’s subsidiaries. Thanks to this project, SILCA will contribute to significant research studies in many areas, including Zika, tuberculosis, AIDS, Ebola, cancer and clean energy.

    For Philippe Mangematin, in charge of innovation development at SILCA, its participation is “a powerful message for Crédit Agricole to send about its commitment to a social responsibility agenda.”

    To date, World Community Grid has connected researchers to half a billion U.S. dollars’ worth of free supercomputing power. This resource to accelerate scientific discovery, partially hosted in IBM’s cloud, has been fueled by 720,000 individuals and 440 institutions from 80 countries who have donated more than 1 million years of computing time on more than 3 million desktops, laptops, and Android mobile devices. Their participation has helped identify potential treatments for childhood cancer, more efficient solar cells, and more efficient water filtration materials.

    World Community Grid is enabled by Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing (BOINC), an open source software platform developed at the University of California, Berkeley.

    Join World Community Grid today to enable your computer or Android device for a humanitarian project.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    World Community Grid (WCG) brings people together from across the globe to create the largest non-profit computing grid benefiting humanity. It does this by pooling surplus computer processing power. We believe that innovation combined with visionary scientific research and large-scale volunteerism can help make the planet smarter. Our success depends on like-minded individuals – like you.”
    WCG projects run on BOINC software from UC Berkeley.
    BOINCLarge

    BOINC is a leader in the field(s) of Distributed Computing, Grid Computing and Citizen Cyberscience.BOINC is more properly the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing.

    BOINC WallPaper

    CAN ONE PERSON MAKE A DIFFERENCE? YOU BET!!

    MyBOINC

    “Download and install secure, free software that captures your computer’s spare power when it is on, but idle. You will then be a World Community Grid volunteer. It’s that simple!” You can download the software at either WCG or BOINC.

    Please visit the project pages-

    FightAIDS@home Phase II

    FAAH Phase II
    OpenZika

    Rutgers Open Zika

    Help Stop TB
    WCG Help Stop TB
    Outsmart Ebola together

    Outsmart Ebola Together

    Mapping Cancer Markers
    mappingcancermarkers2

    Uncovering Genome Mysteries
    Uncovering Genome Mysteries

    Say No to Schistosoma

    GO Fight Against Malaria

    Drug Search for Leishmaniasis

    Computing for Clean Water

    The Clean Energy Project

    Discovering Dengue Drugs – Together

    Help Cure Muscular Dystrophy

    Help Fight Childhood Cancer

    Help Conquer Cancer

    Human Proteome Folding

    FightAIDS@Home

    faah-1-new-screen-saver

    faah-1-new

    World Community Grid is a social initiative of IBM Corporation
    IBM Corporation
    ibm

    IBM – Smarter Planet
    sp

     
  • richardmitnick 8:25 am on March 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: IBM Corporation, ,   

    From Science Alert: “IBM is Rolling out the World’s First Universal ‘Quantum Computing’ Service” 

    ScienceAlert

    Science Alert

    7 MAR 2017
    FIONA MACDONALD

    1
    sakkmesterke/Shutterstock.com

    If you build it, they will come.

    We’re all excited about the potential of quantum computers – devices that will harness strange quantum phenomena to perform calculations far more powerful than anything conventional computers can do today.

    Unfortunately, we still don’t have a tangible, large-scale quantum computer to freak out over just yet, but IBM is already preparing for a future when we do, by announcing that they’re rolling out a universal ‘quantum-computing’ service later this year.

    The service will be called IBM Q, and it will give people access to their early-stage quantum computer over the internet to use as they wish – for a fee.

    The big elephant in the room is that, for now, IBM’s quantum computer only runs on five qubits, so it’s not much faster (if any faster) than a conventional computer.

    But their technology is improving all the time. The company has announced it hopes to get to 50 qubits in the next few years, and in the meantime, it’s building the online systems and software so that anyone in the world can access the full power of its quantum computer when it’s ready. IBM Q is a crucial part of that.

    Unlike conventional computers, which use ‘bits’ of either 1 or 0 to code information, quantum computers use a strange phenomenon known as superposition, which allows an atom to be in both the 1 and 0 position at the same time. These quantum bits, or qubits, give quantum computers far more processing power than traditional computers.

    But right now, qubits are hard to make and manipulate, even for more the most high-tech labs. Which is why IBM only has five qubits working together in a computer, despite decades of research. And those qubits have to be cooled to temperatures just above absolute zero in order to function.

    Companies such as Google, and multiple university research labs, have also built primitive quantum computers, and Google has even used theirs to simulate a molecule for the first time, showing the potential of this technology as it scales up.

    But instead of just focussing on the hardware itself, IBM is also interested in the software around quantum computers, and how to give the public access to them.

    “IBM has invested over decades to growing the field of quantum computing and we are committed to expanding access to quantum systems and their powerful capabilities for the science and business communities,” said Arvind Krishna, senior vice president of Hybrid Cloud and director for IBM Research.

    The system builds on the company’s Quantum Experience, which was rolled out last year for free to approved researchers. IBM Q will use similar cloud software, but will also be open to businesses – and, more importantly, any programmers and developers who want to start experimenting with writing code for quantum systems.

    The goal is to have a functional, commercial, cloud-based service ready to go when a fully realised quantum computer does come online.

    “Putting the machine on the cloud is an obvious thing to do,” physicist Christopher Monroe from the University of Maryland, who isn’t involved with IBM, told Davide Castelvecchi over at Scientific American. “But it takes a lot of work in getting a system to that level.”

    The challenge is that while, on paper, a five-qubit machine is pretty easy to simulate and program for, real qubits don’t quite work that way, because you’re working with atoms that can change their behaviour based on environmental conditions

    “The real challenge is whether you can make your algorithm work on real hardware that has imperfections,” Isaac Chuang, a physicist at MIT who doesn’t work with IBM, told Scientific American.

    In their announcement, IBM said that in the past few months, more than 40,000 users have already used Quantum Experience to build and run 275,000 test applications, and 15 research papers have been published based off of it so far.

    And they predict that in future, the quantum service will become even more useful.

    “Quantum computers will deliver solutions to important problems where patterns cannot be seen because the data doesn’t exist and the possibilities that you need to explore to get to the answer are too enormous to ever be processed by classical computers,” said IBM in its announcement.

    There’s no word as yet on how much IBM Q will cost to use, or how users will be approved. But we have to admit it’d be pretty cool to be among the first to play around with quantum computing.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 3:33 pm on March 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , IBM Corporation, , , Scanning tunneling microscope   

    From phys.org: “New microscope technique offers a better way to measure magnetic field of individual atoms” 

    physdotorg
    phys.org

    March 7, 2017
    Bob Yirka

    1
    Credit: CC0 Public Domain

    A team of researchers at IBM has developed a new way to measure the magnetic field of individual atoms that offers 1000 times the energy resolution of conventional techniques. In their paper published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology, the team describes their approach, how well it works and their hope that they will be able to modify it in such a way as to allow others with less specialized hardware to use it.

    Scientists are eager to better measure the magnetic fields of individual atoms because they believe it will lead to a better understanding of material and biological interactions—most particularly those involving weak magnetic interactions. Current methods rely on using defects in diamonds, though the team at IBM notes that prior work at their lab shows that it is possible to measure weak interactions in another way, an approach described as challenging. In this new effort, the team has come up with a way to get the job done that is relatively simple, though, they note, it requires special hardware.

    In the new approach, an atom called a sensor is placed near a target atom inside of a scanning tunneling microscope—a magnetic field is then applied to the microscope followed by a jolt of electricity to the tunnel junction. From there on, the frequency of the atom is monitored—when it matches the spin of the precess (the axis of rotation around a magnetic field that reflects its degree of magnetism), it reveals the measure of the magnetic field. The change in orientation is measured by moving the sensor atom to the microscope’s sensor tip.

    The researchers found their approach to be far more accurate and easier to read than other methods, pointing out that the signal they got from the technique was both stronger and more robust. They note also that few other labs likely have the combination of equipment (such as the high frequency cabling added to the microscope) required to replicate their technique, so they plan to continue the work in hopes of achieving the same results under more relaxed conditions.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    About Phys.org in 100 Words

    Phys.org™ (formerly Physorg.com) is a leading web-based science, research and technology news service which covers a full range of topics. These include physics, earth science, medicine, nanotechnology, electronics, space, biology, chemistry, computer sciences, engineering, mathematics and other sciences and technologies. Launched in 2004, Phys.org’s readership has grown steadily to include 1.75 million scientists, researchers, and engineers every month. Phys.org publishes approximately 100 quality articles every day, offering some of the most comprehensive coverage of sci-tech developments world-wide. Quancast 2009 includes Phys.org in its list of the Global Top 2,000 Websites. Phys.org community members enjoy access to many personalized features such as social networking, a personal home page set-up, RSS/XML feeds, article comments and ranking, the ability to save favorite articles, a daily newsletter, and other options.

     
  • richardmitnick 11:32 am on November 30, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , IBM Corporation, ,   

    From popsci.com: “IBM Creates A Molecule That Could Destroy All Viruses” 

    popsci-bloc

    Popular Science

    May 13, 2016 [Just found this in social media.]
    Claire Maldarelli

    Finding a cure for viruses like Ebola, Zika, or even the flu is a challenging task. Viruses are vastly different from one another, and even the same strain of a virus can mutate and change–that’s why doctors give out a different flu vaccine each year. But a group of researchers at IBM and the Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology in Singapore sought to understand what makes all viruses alike. Using that knowledge, they’ve come up with a macromolecule that may have the potential to treat multiple types of viruses and prevent them from infecting us. The work was published recently in the journal Macromolecules.

    For their study, the researchers ignored the viruses’ RNA and DNA, which could be key areas to target, but because they change from virus to virus and also mutate, it’s very difficult to target them successfully.

    Instead, the researchers focused on glycoproteins, which sit on the outside of all viruses and attach to cells in the body, allowing the viruses to do their dirty work by infecting cells and making us sick. Using that knowledge, the researchers created a macromolecule, which is basically one giant molecule made of smaller subunits. This macromolecule has key factors that are crucial in fighting viruses. First, it’s able to attract viruses towards itself using electrostatic charges. Once the virus is close, the macromolecule attaches to the virus and makes the virus unable to attach to healthy cells. Then it neutralizes the virus’ acidity levels, which makes it less able to replicate.

    As an alternative way to fight, the macromolecule also contains a sugar called mannose. This sugar attaches to healthy immune cells and forces them closer to the virus so that the viral infection can be eradicated more easily.

    The researchers tested out this treatment in the lab on a few viruses, including Ebola and dengue, and they found that the molecule did work as they thought it would: According to the paper, the molecules bound to the glycoproteins on the viruses’ surfaces and reduced the number of viruses. Further, the mannose successfully prevented the virus from infecting immune cells.

    This all sounds promising, but the treatment still has a ways to go before it could be used as a disinfectant or even as a potential pill that we could take to prevent and treat viral infections. But it does represent a step in the right direction for treating viruses: figuring out what is similar about all viruses to create a broad spectrum antiviral treatment.

    IBM

    SmarterPlanet

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 3:16 pm on August 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IBM Corporation, ,   

    From IBM via WCG: “World Community Grid Volunteers are helping scientists find cures” 

    New WCG Logo

    WCGLarge

    World Community Grid (WCG)

    While you’re asleep tonight, your Android phone can work on potential cures for the Zika virus. While you’re in a meeting today, your computer can help develop new cancer treatments. The computer and Android devices you use every day can contribute to groundbreaking research in health, clean energy, and other humanitarian causes.

    How is this possible? IBM’s World Community Grid enables anyone to donate the spare computing power of their computers and Android devices to help researchers find the next breakthrough. This IBM philanthropic initiative, winner of a 2016 People’s Voice Webby Award, is a safe, easy way to put an unused resource to work for good, without having any impact on your own use of your devices.

    Why does this matter? Because in research, time is measured in money and lives. Quicker results mean quicker benefits for patients and more. And the enormous power of World Community Grid means that computer simulations that would have taken years can be completed in weeks or months. It’s even possible for researchers to run projects that are otherwise unaffordable or unimaginable, such as comparing all the genes from all the thousands of organisms in a soil sample, modeling water flows at atomic levels of detail, or searching through an enormous index of chemical compounds to find a treatment for the Zika virus.

    Where your unused computing power could go

    World Community Grid is the world’s largest volunteer computing initiative dedicated to tackling projects that benefit humanity.

    World Community Grid essentially turns each connected device into one part of a massive virtual supercomputer. It breaks down complex research experiments into millions of smaller units and sends them to individual devices, including desktops, laptops, tablets and smartphones to work on when they’re idle. The results are then collected and delivered to researchers.

    By harnessing the unused computing power of more than 715,000 volunteers’ computers and Android devices around the world, researchers are able to access dedicated computing time worth hundreds of millions of dollars and conduct research — research that could have taken years — in weeks or months.

    The fight against the Zika virus

    The Zika virus began spreading rapidly through the Americas in 2015, and there is no vaccine or effective treatment for the disease. Moreover, Zika has been linked to severe neurological complications in some adults as well as serious brain and development problems in some infants whose mothers contracted Zika while pregnant. A multi-institutional group of researchers is using World Community Grid to identify which of millions of chemical compounds might lead them to a cure for this virus. More than 50,000 volunteers signed up to help in the project’s first two months, but with additional volunteers the researchers will be able to make even more progress.

    Nanotech joins the quest for clean water

    A billion people lack access to clean water. Droughts decimate once-fertile farmlands. Ocean water is plentiful but, of course, too salty for most urgent needs. Now an international group of scientists, using the massive computing power contributed by 150,000 World Community Grid volunteers, has uncovered important new information about applying carbon nanotubes to water shortage issues. These tiny water filters have the potential to provide more affordable, efficient access to clean water — and contribute further to energy and medical research.

    Working to stop one of the world’s deadliest diseases

    Tuberculosis (TB) has plagued humans for thousands of years, yet it remains one of the world’s most dangerous diseases. About one-third of the world’s population harbors the TB bacterium, with 1.5 million infected people dying in 2014 alone. The World Health Organization now ranks TB alongside HIV as the world’s deadliest infectious disease. Researchers are using World Community Grid to help understand the molecular structure of the TB bacterium to come up with more effective treatments.

    Breakthrough in the fight against childhood cancer

    3

    Partnering with the Chiba Cancer Research Institute and Chiba University in Japan, World Community Grid launched a project to search for new treatments for neuroblastoma, one of the most common and dangerous forms of childhood cancer. Out of more than three million drug candidates screened by 200,000 volunteers, seven promising drug candidates with no apparent side effects were identified in 2013. The highly successful in vivo test results are a major milestone that sets up the research team for the next step: human trials.

    Helping develop affordable solar energy

    In 2013 Harvard University announced the discovery of more than 35,000 compounds with the potential to double the rate of efficiency of most carbon-based solar cells in production today, after scanning more than 2.3 million materials on World Community Grid. Previously, carbon-based solar cells were made from a handful of highly efficient molecules that were painstakingly discovered one by one. Now, there are thousands more to explore: an exponential increase.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    World Community Grid (WCG) brings people together from across the globe to create the largest non-profit computing grid benefiting humanity. It does this by pooling surplus computer processing power. We believe that innovation combined with visionary scientific research and large-scale volunteerism can help make the planet smarter. Our success depends on like-minded individuals – like you.”

    WCG projects run on BOINC software from UC Berkeley.
    BOINCLarge

    BOINC is a leader in the field(s) of Distributed Computing, Grid Computing and Citizen Cyberscience.BOINC is more properly the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing.

    BOINC WallPaper

    CAN ONE PERSON MAKE A DIFFERENCE? YOU BET!!

    MyBOINC

    “Download and install secure, free software that captures your computer’s spare power when it is on, but idle. You will then be a World Community Grid volunteer. It’s that simple!” You can download the software at either WCG or BOINC.

    Please visit the project pages-

    FightAIDS@home Phase II

    FAAH Phase II
    OpenZika

    Rutgers Open Zika

    Help Stop TB
    WCG Help Stop TB
    Outsmart Ebola together

    Outsmart Ebola Together

    Mapping Cancer Markers
    mappingcancermarkers2

    Uncovering Genome Mysteries
    Uncovering Genome Mysteries

    Say No to Schistosoma

    GO Fight Against Malaria

    Drug Search for Leishmaniasis

    Computing for Clean Water

    The Clean Energy Project

    Discovering Dengue Drugs – Together

    Help Cure Muscular Dystrophy

    Help Fight Childhood Cancer

    Help Conquer Cancer

    Human Proteome Folding

    FightAIDS@Home

    World Community Grid is a social initiative of IBM Corporation
    IBM Corporation
    ibm

    IBM – Smarter Planet
    sp

     
  • richardmitnick 11:39 am on May 14, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , IBM Corporation, ,   

    From NOVA: “A Quantum Computer Has Been Hooked Up to the Cloud For the First Time” 

    PBS NOVA

    NOVA

    04 May 2016
    Allison Eck

    You can now entangle quantum qubits directly from your smartphone.

    A team at IBM has announced today that it has hooked up a quantum processor—housed at the IBM T.J. Watson Research Center in New York—to the cloud. For the first time in history, non-scientists and scientists alike can run quantum experiments from their desktop or mobile devices.

    “It’s really about starting to have a new community of quantum learners,” said Jay Gambetta, manager of the Theory of Quantum Computing and Information Group at IBM. “We’re trying to take the mysteriousness out of quantum.”

    1
    The five-qubit processor is maintained at a temperature of 15 millikelvin. That’s 180 times colder than outer space.

    IBM is calling the cloud-based quantum platform the IBM Research Quantum Experience (which consists of a simulator as well as the live processor), and it’s a step in the direction of creating a universal quantum computer: one that can perform any calculation that is in the realm of what quantum mechanics predicts. No such computer exists today, but IBM suspects that researchers will find the means to develop one within the next decade.

    Quantum computing is a complicated beast compared to classical computing. Classical computers use bits to process information, where a bit represents either a zero or a one. Quantum computing, on other other hand, employs qubits—which represent either a zero, a one, or a superposition of both.

    IBM’s quantum computer holds five superconducting qubits, a relatively small amount. The most expensive modern-day classical computer could emulate a 30- or 40-qubit system, the researchers say. So it’s not as though IBM’s cloud-based quantum processor is going to solve anything that scientists can’t already figure out using a classical computer. Instead, the strength of IBM’s processor is derived from its use as an educational tool—anyone who is curious can experiment, play with real qubits, and explore tutorials related to quantum computing.

    In addition, scientists who access the processor will be able to use it to develop a better intuition for quantum computing. “We’ll know more about nature itself when we understand these algorithms,” Gambetta said. Specifically, experts can become more skilled at parsing quantum “noise,” or the uncertainty in physical characteristics of quantum nature. If they can minimize uncertainty—flukes in the system that cause the quantum computer to malfunction—in a small, five-qubit processor, then they can scale those lessons to create stronger quantum computers in the future.

    Eventually, given the invention of 50- to 100-qubit processors, scientists may be able to deduce the complex behavior of molecules using quantum computing. They could even make significant strides in artificial intelligence, processing big data, and more.

    IBM’s announcement also marks the launch of the IBM Research Frontiers Institute, a consortium of organizations from various industries (including Samsung and Honda) that plans to collaborate on ground-breaking computing technologies. As classical computing becomes less relevant and Moore’s law starts to fade, such projects will become even more necessary. As Gambetta noted, the amount we know about quantum computing now is similar to what we knew about classical computing in the 1950s and 60s. It’s back to square one.

    “Everything you know about computing, you have to relearn it,” he said.

    IBM

    SmarterPlanet

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    NOVA is the highest rated science series on television and the most watched documentary series on public television. It is also one of television’s most acclaimed series, having won every major television award, most of them many times over.

     
  • richardmitnick 9:42 am on April 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IBM Corporation, ,   

    From WIRED:”Technology Aids in Fight Against Tuberculosis” 

    Discovery News
    Discovery News

    For the first time ever, a supercomputer will help in the fight against one of the deadliest and fastest-spreading diseases in the world: tuberculosis.

    2

    1

    In one corner of the ring you have the IBM World Community Grid.

    WCG Logo New

    WCGLarge

    This platform gives anyone a chance to join the fight by donating their devices’ spare energy. This means they can use the energy from your computer, tablet or smartphone when your device is idle. The World Community Grid is one the most powerful platforms on the planet, and its newly launched Help Stop TB project is fantastic news for the medical community. In the other corner, we have tuberculosis.

    What Is Tuberculosis?

    Tuberculosis is a highly contagious, airborne disease that kills about 1.5 million people each year. A tuberculosis infection can begin without any symptoms and can persist for years before it becomes an active disease. If TB is detected early, then it is easily treatable. It’s important to look for symptoms and seek treatment.

    Active tuberculosis is contagious and spread through the air. Sneezing, coughing or talking is all it takes to spread the disease to another person. Anyone can easily catch this disease. This is why it’s important to find a cure as soon as possible, and IBM’s technology can certainly help in a major way.

    The Advantages of Technology

    The World Community Grid is no stranger to medical advances. Since its creation in 2014, the World Community Grid has contributed to research for many causes like curing AIDS, cancer and world hunger.

    With about 700,000 people lending their devices’ energy to IBM, the World Community Grid is a top-10 supercomputer.

    IBM

    SmarterPlanet

    This makes the research process much more efficient. Researchers can now categorize and go through data at rapid speeds.

    When it comes to medical research, the more technology the better. Scientists have been using cloud capabilities to apply tens of thousands of computer nodes to a single problem. Supercomputers offer a way to quickly scan through and recognize problems that may have taken years to uncover.

    A team at Novartis was able to run through 40 years of cancer drug simulations in just eight hours. It also cost them thousands of dollars instead of the millions it would’ve cost before supercomputers. Having a supercomputer that uses the energy from the devices of 700,000 people will only help tuberculosis research.

    The Fight Against Tuberculosis

    Tuberculosis is coined as the world’s deadliest disease, so it’s vital that scientists find a cure as soon as possible. It received this nickname because it kills about 1.5 million people a year. IBM’s World Community Grid supercomputer will tremendously speed up the process.

    Scientists will use the World Community Grid to get a complete understanding of TB’s cell wall. They’ll be able to simulate different variations of mycolic acid structures to see if they can impact the bacteria’s functions. The supercomputer lets them test many different structures instead of just a few. They hope that one of these structures will give scientists a better understanding of how to attack tuberculosis.

    You Can Help

    You can sign up to let IBM use your devices’ energy when you aren’t using them. Sign up today and be a part of the fight against tuberculosis.

    World Community Grid (WCG) brings people together from across the globe to create the largest non-profit computing grid benefiting humanity. It does this by pooling surplus computer processing power. We believe that innovation combined with visionary scientific research and large-scale volunteerism can help make the planet smarter. Our success depends on like-minded individuals – like you.”

    WCG projects run on BOINC software from UC Berkeley.

    BOINC is a leader in the field(s) of Distributed Computing, Grid Computing and Citizen Cyberscience.BOINC is more properly the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing.

    BOINC WallPaper

    CAN ONE PERSON MAKE A DIFFERENCE? YOU BET!

    “Download and install secure, free software that captures your computer’s spare power when it is on, but idle. You will then be a World Community Grid volunteer. It’s that simple!” You can download the software at either WCG or BOINC.

    Please visit the project pages-
    Outsmart Ebola together

    Outsmart Ebola Together

    Mapping Cancer Markers
    mappingcancermarkers2

    Uncovering Genome Mysteries
    Uncovering Genome Mysteries

    Say No to Schistosoma

    GO Fight Against Malaria

    Drug Search for Leishmaniasis

    Computing for Clean Water

    The Clean Energy Project

    Discovering Dengue Drugs – Together

    Help Cure Muscular Dystrophy

    Help Fight Childhood Cancer

    Help Conquer Cancer

    Human Proteome Folding

    FightAIDS@Home

    World Community Grid is a social initiative of IBM Corporation
    IBM Corporation
    ibm

    IBM – Smarter Planet
    sp

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

     
  • richardmitnick 4:18 pm on March 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IBM Corporation,   

    From LLNL: “Lawrence Livermore and IBM collaborate to build new brain-inspired supercomputer” 


    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    Mar. 29, 2016
    Don Johnston
    johnston19@llnl.gov
    925-423-4902

    1
    The 16-chip IBM TrueNorth platform Lawrence Livermore will receive later this week. The scalable platform will process the equivalent of 16 million neurons and 4 billion synapses and consume the energy equivalent of a hearing-aid battery – a mere 2.5 watts of power. Photo courtesy of IBM.

    Chip-architecture breakthrough accelerates path to exascale computing; helps computers tackle complex, cognitive tasks such as pattern recognition sensory processing

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) today announced it will receive a first-of-a-kind brain-inspired supercomputing platform for deep learning developed by IBM Research . Based on a breakthrough neurosynaptic computer chip called IBM TrueNorth, the scalable platform will process the equivalent of 16 million neurons and 4 billion synapses and consume the energy equivalent of a hearing aid battery – a mere 2.5 watts of power.

    The brain-like, neural network design of the IBM Neuromorphic System is able to infer complex cognitive tasks such as pattern recognition and integrated sensory processing far more efficiently than conventional chips.

    1
    DARPA SyNAPSE 16 chip board with IBM TrueNorth


    Access mp4 video here .

    The new system will be used to explore new computing capabilities important to the National Nuclear Security Administration’s (NNSA) missions in cybersecurity, stewardship of the nation’s nuclear weapons stockpile and nonproliferation. NNSA’s Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program will evaluate machine-learning applications, deep-learning algorithms and architectures and conduct general computing feasibility studies. ASC is a cornerstone of NNSA’s Stockpile Stewardship Program to ensure the safety, security and reliability of the nation’s nuclear deterrent without underground testing.

    Neuromorphic computing opens very exciting new possibilities and is consistent with what we see as the future of the high performance computing and simulation at the heart of our national security missions,” said Jim Brase, LLNL deputy associate director for Data Science. “The potential capabilities neuromorphic computing represents and the machine intelligence that these will enable will change how we do science.”

    The technology represents a fundamental departure from computer design that has been prevalent for the past 70 years, and could be a powerful complement in the development of next-generation supercomputers able to perform at exascale speeds, 50 times (or two orders of magnitude) faster than today’s most advanced petaflop (quadrillion floating point operations per second) systems. Like the human brain, neurosynaptic systems require significantly less electrical power and volume.

    “The low power consumption of these brain-inspired processors reflects industry’s desire and a creative approach to reducing power consumption in all components for future systems as we set our sights on exascale computing,” said Michel McCoy, LLNL program director for Weapon Simulation and Computing.

    “The delivery of this advanced computing platform represents a major milestone as we enter the next era of cognitive computing,” said Dharmendra Modha, IBM fellow and chief scientist of Brain-inspired Computing, IBM Research. “We value our partnerships with the national labs. In fact, prior to design and fabrication, we simulated the IBM TrueNorth processor using LLNL’s Sequoia supercomputer. This collaboration will push the boundaries of brain-inspired computing to enable future systems that deliver unprecedented capability and throughput, while minimizing the capital, operating and programming costs – keeping our nation at the leading edge of science and technology.”

    A single TrueNorth processor consists of 5.4 billion transistors wired together to create an array of 1 million digital neurons that communicate with one another via 256 million electrical synapses. It consumes 70 milliwatts of power running in real time and delivers 46 giga synaptic operations per second – orders of magnitude lower energy than a conventional computer running inference on the same neural network. TrueNorth was originally developed under the auspices of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency’s (DARPA) Systems of Neuromorphic Adaptive Plastic Scalable Electronics (SyNAPSE) program, in collaboration with Cornell University.

    Under terms of the $1 million contract, LLNL will receive a 16-chip TrueNorth system representing a total of 16 million neurons and 4 billion synapses. LLNL also will receive an end-to-end ecosystem to create and program energy-efficient machines that mimic the brain’s abilities for perception, action and cognition. The ecosystem consists of a simulator; a programming language; an integrated programming environment; a library of algorithms as well as applications; firmware; tools for composing neural networks for deep learning; a teaching curriculum; and cloud enablement.

    Lawrence Livermore computer scientists will collaborate with IBM Research, partners across the Department of Energy complex and universities to expand the frontiers of neurosynaptic architecture, system design, algorithms and software ecosystem.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    LLNL Campus

    Operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security
    Administration
    DOE Seal
    NNSA

     
  • richardmitnick 9:43 am on August 31, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Air Pollution, , , IBM Corporation,   

    From MIT Tech Review: “How Artificial Intelligence Can Fight Air Pollution in China” 

    MIT Technology Review
    M.I.T Technology Review

    August 31, 2015
    Will Knight

    1
    A woman wearing a face mask makes her way along a street in Beijing on January 16, 2014.

    IBM is testing a new way to alleviate Beijing’s choking air pollution with the help of artificial intelligence. The Chinese capital, like many other cities across the country, is surrounded by factories, many fueled by coal, that emit harmful particulates. But pollution levels can vary depending on factors such as industrial activity, traffic congestion, and weather conditions.

    The IBM researchers are testing a computer system capable of learning to predict the severity of air pollution in different parts of the city several days in advance by combining large quantities of data from several different models—an extremely complex computational challenge. The system could eventually offer specific recommendations on how to reduce pollution to an acceptable level—for example, by closing certain factories or temporarily restricting the number of drivers on the road. A comparable system is also being developed for a city in the Hebei province, a badly affected area in the north of the country.

    “We have built a prototype system which is able to generate high-resolution air quality forecasts, 72 hours ahead of time,” says Xiaowei Shen, director of IBM Research China. “Our researchers are currently expanding the capability of the system to provide medium- and long-term (up to 10 days ahead) as well as pollutant source tracking, ‘what-if’ scenario analysis, and decision support on emission reduction actions.”

    The project, dubbed Green Horizon, is an example of how broadly IBM hopes to apply its research on using advanced machine learning to extract insights from huge amounts of data—something the company calls “cognitive computing.” The project also highlights an application of the technology that IBM would like to export to other countries where pollution is a growing problem.

    IBM is currently pushing artificial intelligence in many different industries, from health care to consulting. The cognitive computing effort encompasses natural language processing and statistical techniques originally developed for the Watson computer system, which competed on the game show Jeopardy!, along with many other approaches to machine learning (see “Why IBM Just Bought Millions of Medical Images” and “IBM Pushes Deep Learning with a Watson Upgrade”).

    Predicting pollution is challenging. IBM uses data supplied by the Beijing Environmental Protection Bureau to refine its models, and Shen says the predictions have a resolution of a kilometer and are 30 percent more precise than those derived through conventional approaches. He says the system uses “adaptive machine learning” to determine the best combination of models to use.

    Pollution is a major public health issue in China, accounting for more than a million deaths each year, according to a study conducted by researchers at the University of California, Berkeley. It is also a major subject of public and political debate.

    China has committed to improving air quality 10 percent by 2017 through the Airborne Pollution Prevention and Control Action Plan. This past April, an analysis of 360 Chinese cities by the charity Greenpeace East Asia, based in Beijing, showed that 351 of them had pollution levels exceeding China’s own air quality standards, although levels had improved since the period 12 months before. The average level of airborne particulates measured was more than two and a half times the limit recommended by the World Health Organization.

    See the full article here.

    IBM

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The mission of MIT Technology Review is to equip its audiences with the intelligence to understand a world shaped by technology.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: