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  • richardmitnick 9:24 am on July 20, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Beyond the Galileo Experiment, , IAU,   

    From SETI Institute: “100 YEARS OF THE IAU: Beyond the Galileo Experiment” 

    SETI Logo new
    From SETI Institute

    Jul 5, 2019

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    Galileo’s closest approach to our planet in December 1990 allowed scientists to perform the first controlled experiment for the search for life on Earth from space.

    NASA/Galileo 1989-2003

    Ten months earlier, Voyager 1 had returned the iconic ‘Pale Blue Dot’ image.

    NASA/Voyager 1

    1
    The Pale Blue Dot” by Carl Sagan

    From beyond the orbit of Neptune, Earth appeared as a mere fraction of a pixel. The planetary portrait was captured at the suggestion of Carl Sagan, who was also the designer of the Galileo flyby experiment. The Pale Blue Dot became an instant symbol for a civilization stepping out of its planetary cradle in search of life beyond Earth. Success would require that humanity redefine itself from a cosmic perspective. Within 10 months of the Pale Blue Dot delivering the philosophical message, the Galileo experiment provided a scientific roadmap for the journey.

    In a commentary commissioned by Nature Astronomy for the 100th Anniversary of the IAU and published on July 5th, 2019, Dr. Nathalie A. Cabrol, astrobiologist and Director of the SETI Institute Carl Sagan Center for Research shows how, 26 years after its publication, A search for life on Earth from the Galileo spacecraft by Sagan et al. (1993) reveals a fused vision of a future of biosignature detection in the Solar System and beyond that is even more relevant today.

    You can read the full article at Nature:
    https://www.nature.com/articles/s41550-019-0839-3.epdf?author_access_token=WXdpWIIvGJeTn1khGF67RdRgN0jAjWel9jnR3ZoTv0M2090hjzd3iAY8Y_7pOmkQ5jAuZcceUL2M1XuY4rFPJyt9-TBcnJZ6XSIJC-WNDLxBjEGkpL8QTL3WuqNPMnZX3qjmxGEUwidwNtPSm9-6bQ%3D%3D

    See the full article here .

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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    SETI Institute


    About the SETI Institute

    What is life? How does it begin? Are we alone? These are some of the questions we ask in our quest to learn about and share the wonders of the universe. At the SETI Institute we have a passion for discovery and for passing knowledge along as scientific ambassadors.

    The SETI Institute is a 501 (c)(3) nonprofit scientific research institute headquartered in Mountain View, California. We are a key research contractor to NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF), and we collaborate with industry partners throughout Silicon Valley and beyond.

    Founded in 1984, the SETI Institute employs more than 130 scientists, educators, and administrative staff. Work at the SETI Institute is anchored by three centers: the Carl Sagan Center for the Study of Life in the Universe (research), the Center for Education and the Center for Outreach.

    The SETI Institute welcomes philanthropic support from individuals, private foundations, corporations and other groups to support our education and outreach initiatives, as well as unfunded scientific research and fieldwork.

    A Special Thank You to SETI Institute Partners and Collaborators
    • Campoalto, Chile, NASA Ames Research Center, NASA Headquarters, National Science Foundation, Aerojet Rocketdyne,SRI International

    Frontier Development Lab Partners
    • Breakthrough Prize Foundation, European Space Agency, Google Cloud, IBM, Intel, KBRwyle. Kx Lockheed Martin, NASA Ames Research Center, Nvidia, SpaceResources Luxembourg, XPrize

    In-kind Service Providers
    • Gunderson Dettmer – General legal services, Hello Pilgrim – Website Design and Development Steptoe & Johnson – IP legal services, Danielle Futselaar

    SETI/Allen Telescope Array situated at the Hat Creek Radio Observatory, 290 miles (470 km) northeast of San Francisco, California, USA, Altitude 986 m (3,235 ft)

    SETI Institute – 189 Bernardo Ave., Suite 100
    Mountain View, CA 94043
    Phone 650.961.6633 – Fax 650-961-7099
    Privacy PolicyQuestions and Comments

    Also in the hunt, but not a part of the SETI Institute


    SETI@home, a BOINC project originated in the Space Science Lab at UC Berkeley

    BOINCLarge

    BOINC is a leader in the field(s) of Distributed Computing, Grid Computing and Citizen Cyberscience.BOINC is more properly the Berkeley Open Infrastructure for Network Computing, developed at UC Berkeley.

     
  • richardmitnick 8:38 am on May 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , IAU, New "Big Ideas in Astronomy"   

    From International Astronomical Union: “Big Ideas in Astronomy” 

    IAU bloc

    From International Astronomical Union
    5.3.19

    Pedro Russo
    Astronomy & Society Group Coordinator
    Leiden Observatory, Leiden University, the Netherlands
    Email: russo@strw.leidenuni.nl

    João Retrê
    Science Communication Group Coordinator
    Institute of Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Portugal
    Email: jretre@iastro.pt

    Lars Lindberg Christensen
    IAU Press Officer
    Garching bei München, Germany
    Tel: +49 89 320 06 761
    Cell: +49 173 38 72 621
    Email: lars@eso.org

    1

    What does it mean for a citizen to be “literate” in astronomy? Those members of the International Astronomical Union (IAU) who are active in public outreach have practical experience of the kinds of astronomical knowledge commonly held by the general public. Until recently, however, there had not been a systematic evaluation and a clear definition of what astronomical literacy means. Now, the Big Ideas in Astronomy: A Proposed Definition of Astronomy Literacy booklet has been released with the aim of clarifying these ideas.

    It is intended for use by the astronomy education and outreach community, and within a process of community consultation. The booklet is the culmination of years of debate and discussion over the essential things that an astronomically literate person should know.

    The astronomy literacy booklet presents eleven “Big Ideas,” each with seven to ten sub-ideas. These cover a range of different aspects of astronomy, including the historical, philosophical, sociological, theoretical and observational. They address a variety of topics from the Earth to the edge of the cosmos and back again.

    Big Ideas in Astronomy is intended to be an evolving resource for the community to contribute to and draw from in working towards their goals. The booklet will benefit wider society by informing nations and states about what constitutes astronomical knowledge for their curricula. It also provides a framework for policy suggestions for governments, teacher training institutes and programs, and a set of guidelines for curriculum development and assessment tools. To this end, the IAU intends to invite the community, in the following months, to systematically review this document and consider whether it is an accurate representation of what experts consider astronomical literacy to be.

    The project is led by Leiden Observatory, Leiden University (the Netherlands) and the Institute of Astrophysics and Space Sciences (Portugal) with numerous collaborators and contributors from all around the world.

    It was produced within the framework of the IAU Commission C1 for Astronomy Education and Development, in particular, the Working Group on Literacy and Curriculum Development.

    The authors behind this work are: João Retrê (Institute of Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Portugal), Pedro Russo (Leiden University, the Netherlands), Hyunju Lee (Smithsonian Science Education Center, USA), Eduardo Penteado (Museu de Astronomia e Ciências Afins, Brazil), Saeed Salimpour (Deakin University, Australia), Michael Fitzgerald (Edith Cowan University, Australia), Jaya Ramchandani (The Story Of Foundation, India), Markus Pössel (Haus der Astronomie, Germany), Cecilia Scorza ( Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich & Haus der Astronomie, Germany), Lars Lindberg Christensen (European Southern Observatory), Erik Arends (Leiden University, the Netherlands), Stephen Pompea (NOAO, USA) and Wouter Schrier (Leiden University, the Netherlands)

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The International Astronomical Union (IAU) was founded in 1919. Its mission is to promote and safeguard the science of astronomy in all its aspects through international cooperation. Its individual members — structured into Divisions, Commissions, and Working Groups — are professional astronomers from all over the world, at the Ph.D. level and beyond, who are active in professional research and education in astronomy. The IAU has 12422 members. The Individual Members Directory contains 10364 names in 97 countries worldwide (These Individual Members are labeled as “active” in the IAU database: they have a valid, public email, and are affiliated to at least one Division.). Of those 74 are National Members. In addition, the IAU collaborates with various scientific organizations all over the world.

    The long-term policy of the IAU is defined by the General Assembly and implemented by the Executive Committee, while day-to-day operations are directed by the IAU Officers. The focal point of its activities is the IAU Secretariat, hosted by the Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, France. The scientific and educational activities of the IAU are organized by its 9 Scientific Divisions and, through them, its 35 specialized Commissions covering the full spectrum of astronomy, along with its 32 Working Groups.

    The key activity of the IAU is the organization of scientific meetings. Every year the IAU sponsors nine international IAU Symposia. The IAU Symposium Proceedings series is the flagship of the IAU publications. Every three years the IAU holds a General Assembly, which offers six IAU Symposia, some 25 Joint Discussions and Special Sessions, and individual business and scientific meetings of Divisions, Commissions, and Working Groups. The proceedings of Joint Discussions and Special Sessions are published in the Highlights of Astronomy series. The reports of the GA business meetings are published in the Transactions of the IAU – B series.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:03 pm on May 5, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , IAU, , The case of Pluto   

    From Spaceflight Insider: “Scientists debate planet definition, status of Pluto” 

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    From Spaceflight Insider

    May 5th, 2019
    Laurel Kornfeld

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    Pluto was reclassified as a dwarf planet when the International Astronomical Union adopted a dynamical definition of a planet in 2006. Image Credit: NASA / JHUAPL / SwRI

    Scientists Ron Ekers and Alan Stern debated the planet definition and the status of Pluto in an event sponsored by the Philosophical Society of Washington.

    Following the debate, which was livestreamed April 29, 2019, audience members and those watching online voted on their definition preference: either the International Astronomical Union (IAU) dynamical definition or an alternative geophysical definition. The latter won by a vote of 130-30.

    Two central points dominated the debate—the question of a dynamical versus a geophysical definition and that of who gets to make the decision on the definition used.

    Ekers of Curtin University in Perth, Australia, specializes in radio astronomy.

    He was president of the IAU when the controversial vote that adopted the dynamical planet definition was conducted in 2006.

    Stern is a planetary scientist at the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, and principal investigator of NASA’s New Horizons mission to Pluto and the Kuiper Belt.

    Ekers discussed the history and role of the IAU, which is celebrating its centennial this year, noting the organization was founded after World War I to standardize categorization of celestial objects so astronomers could better communicate with one another. This process is not science but an issue of naming objects, he said.

    When Eris was discovered in 2005, it was erroneously thought to be larger than Pluto. The IAU’s 2006 vote was conducted to determine which organization committee should be responsible for naming it—the committee that oversees the naming of planets or the one that oversees the naming of small solar system objects.

    The definition adopted by the IAU that year has three components. It requires a planet to orbit the Sun; be rounded by its own gravity, a state known as hydrostatic equilibrium; and clear the neighborhood of its orbit.

    That third criterion, which has been at the center of the controversy for over 12 years, means an object must gravitationally dominate its orbit, sweeping out smaller objects in its path. Because it focuses on the effect a celestial object has on other objects, the IAU definition is a dynamical one.

    In contrast, Stern and many like-minded planetary scientists reject the requirement of gravitational dominance and favor a geophysical definition that centers on an object’s intrinsic properties. According to this definition, a planet is a substellar object that has never undergone nuclear fusion and is rounded by its own gravity, regardless of its orbital parameters.

    Stern argued the IAU definition was adopted by the wrong group of astronomers, as most of those who voted were not planetary scientists but astronomers with other specialties. He discussed what he views as the weaknesses of the IAU definition, one of which is the further a planet is from its parent star, the larger an orbit it has to “clear.”

    “Clearing the orbit was made up by the dynamicist planetary community, as a simple description where the giant planets throw things out completely,” Ekers said. “These objects which Alan showed you (dwarf planets in the Kuiper Belt) are in resonant orbits with the big planets. They have no free will; they have no independence, and that’s the real intention of clearing the orbit.”

    A 2015 theoretical paper published by scientist Jean Luc Margot of UCLA shows the IAU definition is sound, he added. Stern responded by illustrating a graph from the Margot paper showing how, according to the IAU definition, identical objects are classified differently solely based on their locations.

    Because the IAU definition requires an object to orbit the Sun rather than a star, the question of exoplanets has been left unresolved. Ekers emphasized the IAU definition was intended only for our solar system and that exoplanets would be addressed in the future when more is known about them. Stern said there should be a single definition for both our solar system and others.

    Ekers said he favors distinguishing dwarf planets from full planets, adding that Kuiper Belt dwarf planets have much more in common with their smaller, Kuiper Belt Object (KBO) counterparts than with the eight gravitationally dominant planets. Stern contested this, noting the 2015 New Horizons flyby revealed Pluto to have the same complex geology as the larger planets.

    See the full article here .

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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    SpaceFlight Insider reports on events taking place within the aerospace industry. With our team of writers and photographers, we provide an “insider’s” view of all aspects of space exploration efforts. We go so far as to take their questions directly to those officials within NASA and other space-related organizations. At SpaceFlight Insider, the “insider” is not anyone on our team, but our readers.

    Our team has decades of experience covering the space program and we are focused on providing you with the absolute latest on all things space. SpaceFlight Insider is comprised of individuals located in the United States, Europe, South America and Canada. Most of them are volunteers, hard-working space enthusiasts who freely give their time to share the thrill of space exploration with the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 8:21 am on April 16, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , IAU, The Shaw Prize   

    International Astronomical Union: “IAU Embarks on Collaboration with the Shaw Prize Foundation” 

    IAU bloc

    International Astronomical Union

    1

    16 April, 2019

    Representatives from the IAU and the Shaw Prize today signed an agreement to work together towards their shared goal of promoting astronomy, and utilising its potential as a valuable tool for education. The details of the agreement involve both recognising excellence in professional astronomy and the enhancement of astronomy in education.

    The Shaw Prize was established in 2002 to recognise active researchers who have recently achieved excellence in, or made outstanding contributions to, their scientific fields. The Prize is awarded in three categories of sciences, one of which is astronomy, the branch the IAU will be collaborating with.

    The agreement states that the IAU will issue a yearly press release announcing the winner of the Shaw Prize in astronomy to the media, its members and the public. In addition, the winner will be invited to give a plenary lecture at an IAU event within a year of receiving the prize, either at the IAU General Assembly, one of the regional IAU meetings, or one of the IAU Symposia, depending on which meeting the topic is most appropriate for.

    Furthermore, the Shaw Prize Foundation will provide funding for an annual Shaw–IAU workshop on “Astronomy for Education”, a key activity of the IAU’s new Office of Astronomy for Education which is part of the IAU Strategic Plan 2020–2030.

    “I am delighted with this partnership, which not only celebrates top science but also highlights the importance of science education for society,” said Ewine van Dishoeck, President of the IAU. “It comes at a very good time when the IAU is just starting to implement its new Strategic Plan.”

    “I am very pleased that we have this opportunity to collaborate with IAU, in giving recognition to the best achievements, and in promoting science as part of education”, said Kenneth Young, Chairman of the Shaw Prize Council.

    Teresa Lago, General Secretary of the IAU, said: “The signature of this Agreement between the Shaw Foundation and IAU and the financial support for the organisation of the annual Shaw–IAU Workshop ‘Astronomy for Education’ could not come at a better time. IAU is deeply engaged in setting up the new Office of Astronomy for Education and in arranging the 1st Workshop”.

    The agreement will come into effect with the announcement of the 2019 Shaw Prize winner and the organisation of the 1st Shaw–IAU Workshop in December 2019 in Paris. It will continue for an initial period of five years, with the possibility of renewal after that time.

    3

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The International Astronomical Union (IAU) was founded in 1919. Its mission is to promote and safeguard the science of astronomy in all its aspects through international cooperation. Its individual members — structured into Divisions, Commissions, and Working Groups — are professional astronomers from all over the world, at the Ph.D. level and beyond, who are active in professional research and education in astronomy. The IAU has 12422 members. The Individual Members Directory contains 10364 names in 97 countries worldwide (These Individual Members are labeled as “active” in the IAU database: they have a valid, public email, and are affiliated to at least one Division.). Of those 74 are National Members. In addition, the IAU collaborates with various scientific organizations all over the world.

    The long-term policy of the IAU is defined by the General Assembly and implemented by the Executive Committee, while day-to-day operations are directed by the IAU Officers. The focal point of its activities is the IAU Secretariat, hosted by the Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, France. The scientific and educational activities of the IAU are organized by its 9 Scientific Divisions and, through them, its 35 specialized Commissions covering the full spectrum of astronomy, along with its 32 Working Groups.

    The key activity of the IAU is the organization of scientific meetings. Every year the IAU sponsors nine international IAU Symposia. The IAU Symposium Proceedings series is the flagship of the IAU publications. Every three years the IAU holds a General Assembly, which offers six IAU Symposia, some 25 Joint Discussions and Special Sessions, and individual business and scientific meetings of Divisions, Commissions, and Working Groups. The proceedings of Joint Discussions and Special Sessions are published in the Highlights of Astronomy series. The reports of the GA business meetings are published in the Transactions of the IAU – B series.

     
  • richardmitnick 7:46 am on February 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , IAU, New Coordinate Systems for Solar System Bodies, Working Group for Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements (WGCCRE)   

    From IAU: “New Coordinate Systems for Solar System Bodies” 

    IAU bloc

    International Astronomical Union

    February 2018

    Brent Archinal
    USGS Geodesist, Chair of the IAU Working Group for Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements
    Tel: +1-928-556-7083
    Email: barchinal@usgs.gov

    Lars Lindberg Christensen
    IAU Press Officer
    Garching bei München, Germany
    Tel: +49 89 320 06 761
    Cell: +49 173 38 72 621
    Email: lars@eso.org

    1

    The International Astronomical Union’s (IAU) Working Group for Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements (WGCCRE) has the responsibility of defining the rotational elements of the planets, satellites, asteroids, and comets of the Solar System. WGCCRE does this on a systematic basis and relates cartographic coordinates rigorously to the rotational elements.

    The WGCCRE issues a report approximately every three years, describing the most up-to-date recommendations for the cartographic coordinates and rotational elements of all planetary bodies. The current report consolidates recommendations made at the 2015 meeting of the IAU and is entitled “Report of the IAU Working Group on Cartographic Coordinates and Rotational Elements: 2015”, published in the journal Celestial Mechanics and Dynamical Astronomy.

    The report provides updated definitions of the latitude and longitude systems and body sizes and shapes for all mapped bodies in the Solar System besides the Earth. This information can be used as a basis for all mapping of these bodies, as well as for navigation purposes in their vicinity, or on their surfaces.

    The recommended coordinate system and body size and shape information will be used by planetary science researchers to assign geographic position information to their data sets, so that such information can be registered and compared at known levels of accuracy and precision. This information can then be used by other individual scientists, instrument teams, spacecraft missions, and space agencies to make maps and to geographically register information. The recommendations also allow for the accurate and safe navigation of spacecraft near Solar System bodies.

    The chair of WGCCRE, Geodesist Brent Archinal from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) [1], explains, “Researchers doing data processing can either directly use the information from the tables presented in their own software, or rely on software maintained by others, such as the NASA Planetary Data System Navigation and Ancillary Information node”.

    Of particular interest in this report is the adoption by the IAU of new equations describing the orientation of Mars (from Kuchynka et al., 2014), that provide a significant improvement in determining coordinates on Mars over time [2].
    Notes

    [1] The USGS Astrogeology Science Center in Flagstaff, AZ has a long history of assisting the IAU with planetary cartography, as well as planetary nomenclature. The USGS Astrogeology Science Center is a national resource for the integration of planetary geoscience, cartography and remote sensing. The centre was established in 1963 to provide lunar geologic mapping for NASA and to assist in training astronauts destined for the Moon. Throughout the years, the USGS has participated in processing and analysing data from numerous missions to planetary bodies in our Solar System, and collaborates with the planning and operation of space exploration missions.

    [2] The previous model recommended by the Working Group has an error of several tens of metres over 20–30 years, while the new model has an error closer to ten metres over such periods. An improvement has also been made in the precision of the definition of longitude on Mars. The small, approximately 500-metre-diameter crater Airy-0 has been used since the early 1970’s to define zero degrees longitude (the prime meridian location) on Mars. However, it is difficult to precisely ascertain the centre of such a crater at the much smaller metre level of current measurements on Mars. So the Working Group has followed the recommendations of Kuchynka et al. (2014) and the NASA Mars Geodesy and Cartography Working Group to fix the longitude of the Viking 1 lander, at 47°.95137 west longitude. This keeps the prime meridian at the approximate centre of Airy-0. However, it provides for metre-level precision in measuring longitude on the Martian surface, with new measurements relative to the Viking 1 lander, whose position has been determined radiometrically relative to other Mars landers and rovers at the metre level.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The International Astronomical Union (IAU) was founded in 1919. Its mission is to promote and safeguard the science of astronomy in all its aspects through international cooperation. Its individual members — structured into Divisions, Commissions, and Working Groups — are professional astronomers from all over the world, at the Ph.D. level and beyond, who are active in professional research and education in astronomy. The IAU has 12422 members. The Individual Members Directory contains 10364 names in 97 countries worldwide (These Individual Members are labeled as “active” in the IAU database: they have a valid, public email, and are affiliated to at least one Division.). Of those 74 are National Members. In addition, the IAU collaborates with various scientific organizations all over the world.

    The long-term policy of the IAU is defined by the General Assembly and implemented by the Executive Committee, while day-to-day operations are directed by the IAU Officers. The focal point of its activities is the IAU Secretariat, hosted by the Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, France. The scientific and educational activities of the IAU are organized by its 9 Scientific Divisions and, through them, its 35 specialized Commissions covering the full spectrum of astronomy, along with its 32 Working Groups.

    The key activity of the IAU is the organization of scientific meetings. Every year the IAU sponsors nine international IAU Symposia. The IAU Symposium Proceedings series is the flagship of the IAU publications. Every three years the IAU holds a General Assembly, which offers six IAU Symposia, some 25 Joint Discussions and Special Sessions, and individual business and scientific meetings of Divisions, Commissions, and Working Groups. The proceedings of Joint Discussions and Special Sessions are published in the Highlights of Astronomy series. The reports of the GA business meetings are published in the Transactions of the IAU – B series.

     
  • richardmitnick 3:13 pm on May 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Division J Galaxies and Cosmology, IAU   

    From IAU: Division J Galaxies and Cosmology 

    IAU bloc

    International Astronomical Union

    1
    Galaxy images from the GAMA survey. Credit: ICRAR/GAMA and ESO

    Division J Galaxies and Cosmology
    Description

    Division J covers all thematics dealing with the physics of the Universe, and the physics of galaxies composing it, but not in particular the Milky Way, which is relevant to Div.H (“Interstellar Matter and Local Universe”). Also, some of the topics will be shared with Div.D (“High Energy Phenomena and Fundamental Physics”).

    The main topics can be listed in four categories:

    1. Physics and content of the Universe
    The early Universe, cosmological models;
    Baryonic and non-baryonic matter, dark matter and dark energy.
    2.Evolution of structures
    Cosmic backgrounds (CMB, and all backgrounds from radio to gamma-rays);
    Populations of galaxies, galaxy clusters and groups, intergalactic medium.
    3.Formation and evolution of galaxies
    Reionization, first objects (AGN, Starbursts), history of star formation;
    Physics of galaxies at all redshifts, role of the environment.
    4.Spatially resolved galaxies
    Star formation laws in galaxies, resolved stellar population;
    Dynamics of sub-structures (bulges, disks, spiral structure…).

    Division web page

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The International Astronomical Union (IAU) was founded in 1919. Its mission is to promote and safeguard the science of astronomy in all its aspects through international cooperation. Its individual members — structured into Divisions, Commissions, and Working Groups — are professional astronomers from all over the world, at the Ph.D. level and beyond, who are active in professional research and education in astronomy. The IAU has 12422 members. The Individual Members Directory contains 10364 names in 97 countries worldwide (These Individual Members are labeled as “active” in the IAU database: they have a valid, public email, and are affiliated to at least one Division.). Of those 74 are National Members. In addition, the IAU collaborates with various scientific organizations all over the world.

    The long-term policy of the IAU is defined by the General Assembly and implemented by the Executive Committee, while day-to-day operations are directed by the IAU Officers. The focal point of its activities is the IAU Secretariat, hosted by the Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, France. The scientific and educational activities of the IAU are organized by its 9 Scientific Divisions and, through them, its 35 specialized Commissions covering the full spectrum of astronomy, along with its 32 Working Groups.

    The key activity of the IAU is the organization of scientific meetings. Every year the IAU sponsors nine international IAU Symposia. The IAU Symposium Proceedings series is the flagship of the IAU publications. Every three years the IAU holds a General Assembly, which offers six IAU Symposia, some 25 Joint Discussions and Special Sessions, and individual business and scientific meetings of Divisions, Commissions, and Working Groups. The proceedings of Joint Discussions and Special Sessions are published in the Highlights of Astronomy series. The reports of the GA business meetings are published in the Transactions of the IAU – B series.

     
  • richardmitnick 11:36 am on February 8, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IAU   

    From IAU: “IAU Receives Prestigious Edinburgh Medal” 

    IAU bloc

    International Astronomical Union

    The 2016 Edinburgh Medal will be jointly awarded to Kevin Govender from IAU’s Office of Astronomy for Development and the International Astronomical Union (IAU) on Wednesday 30 March at the 2016 Edinburgh International Science Festival, to recognise their wide-reaching contribution to science.

    It is awarded jointly for the creation and practical establishment of the Office of Astronomy for Development, which integrates the pursuit of scientific knowledge with social development for and with those most in need. Under the pioneering stewardship of Kevin Govender, the Office of Astronomy for Development, hosted at the South African Astronomical Observatory in partnership with the National Research Foundation and the South African Department of Science and Technology, has successfully harnessed astronomy in the service of global education and capacity building.

    The Edinburgh Medal is a prestigious award given each year to men and women of science and technology whose professional achievements are judged to have made a significant contribution to the understanding and well-being of humanity. The 2016 Edinburgh International Science Festival will run from 26 March to 10 April.

    Kevin Govender and President of the IAU Silvia Torres Peimbert will be presented with the Edinburgh Medal at the Chambers of the City of Edinburgh Council on Wednesday 30 March. They will give the Edinburgh Medal Address: Astronomy for a Better World as part of the 2016 Edinburgh International Science Festival, in the presence of Lord (Martin) Rees, the UK Astronomer Royal.

    On behalf of the IAU, its President Silvia Torres Peimbert said; “I am delighted that the work of the IAU in the field of development has been recognised by the award of this medal. Astronomy is an exciting and stimulating pursuit and has a large part to play in inspiring the next generation of scientists from developing countries. I hope this award will highlight this important work and encourage others to contribute.”

    The IAU General Secretary, Piero Benvenuti, adds: “IAU is proud of the prestigious recognition awarded to its Strategic Plan of Astronomy for Development and wishes to congratulate the visionary initiators of the Plan: George Miley, Robert Williams and Ian Corbett, as well as the South African National Research Foundation that, as IAU partner in the project, is effectively contributing to the success of the Plan.”

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The International Astronomical Union (IAU) was founded in 1919. Its mission is to promote and safeguard the science of astronomy in all its aspects through international cooperation. Its individual members — structured into Divisions, Commissions, and Working Groups — are professional astronomers from all over the world, at the Ph.D. level and beyond, who are active in professional research and education in astronomy. The IAU has 12422 members. The Individual Members Directory contains 10364 names in 97 countries worldwide (These Individual Members are labeled as “active” in the IAU database: they have a valid, public email, and are affiliated to at least one Division.). Of those 74 are National Members. In addition, the IAU collaborates with various scientific organizations all over the world.

    The long-term policy of the IAU is defined by the General Assembly and implemented by the Executive Committee, while day-to-day operations are directed by the IAU Officers. The focal point of its activities is the IAU Secretariat, hosted by the Institut d’Astrophysique de Paris, France. The scientific and educational activities of the IAU are organized by its 9 Scientific Divisions and, through them, its 35 specialized Commissions covering the full spectrum of astronomy, along with its 32 Working Groups.

    The key activity of the IAU is the organization of scientific meetings. Every year the IAU sponsors nine international IAU Symposia. The IAU Symposium Proceedings series is the flagship of the IAU publications. Every three years the IAU holds a General Assembly, which offers six IAU Symposia, some 25 Joint Discussions and Special Sessions, and individual business and scientific meetings of Divisions, Commissions, and Working Groups. The proceedings of Joint Discussions and Special Sessions are published in the Highlights of Astronomy series. The reports of the GA business meetings are published in the Transactions of the IAU – B series.

     
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