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  • richardmitnick 6:26 pm on March 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , IAC, Jellyfish by Cesar Blanco   

    From IAC: “Jellyfish by Cesar Blanco” 

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    1

    In the picture above, we have an excellent work of Cesar Blanco Gonzalez, from deep sky show IC 443, which is a supernova remnant located in the constellation of Gemini. Is believed to have originated from a supernova that exploded in a period of between 3.000 and 30.000 years ago, and that the core of the star parent responsible for this event has formed the neutron star cxou j061705. 3 + 222.127. it is a subject very studied, due to their interaction with other molecular clouds. IC 443 has an angular diameter of 50 Arc minutes, at a distance of 5.000 Light-years is equivalent to a real size of about 70 Light-years away. The Nebula, in both the visible as in radio waves, is shaped like a shell, which consists of two halves with different radio, and in the center, a third layer nebula, originally attributed to IC 443, is now recognised as the Supernova Remnant oldest called G189. 6 + 3.3. through observations with the observatory chandra x-Ray and the xmm-Newton, he has identified a pulsar near the southern bypass.

    IC 443 is located in the direction of the galactic plane. Many objects are found in this area of the sky, as the region hii s249, and several young stars. The Nebula thrives in an environment rich and complex, with strong influence over its morphology; comments in long wavelengths conducted in this area of sky shows the presence of mysterious gradients and different shapes of the clouds. We know that massive stars have a relatively short life (about 30 million years ago) and end their lives when they are still within the cloud parent; the most massive stars (Stars of the class or) illuminate the environment with his mighty wind Stellar.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teachingand outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.

    Gran Telescopio  Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, Spain
    Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 11:55 am on March 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , IAC, Primordial black holes, Quasar microlensing   

    From IAC: “A new look at the nature of dark matter” 

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    Mar. 2, 2017
    Evencio Mediavilla (IAC)
    emg@iac.es
    +34 922 605 318

    A new study suggests that the gravitational waves detected by the LIGO experiment must have come from black holes generated during the collapse of stars, and not in the earliest phases of the Universe.

    The nature of the dark matter which apparently makes up 80% of the mass of the particles in the universe is still one of the great unsolved mysteries of present day sciences. The lack of experimental evidence, which could allow us to identify it with one or other of the new elementary particles predicted by the theorists, as well as the recent discovery of gravitational waves coming from the merging of two black holes (with masses some 30 times that of the Sun) by LIGO the Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory) have revived interest in the possibility that dark matter might take the form of primordial black holes with masses between 10 and 1000 times that of the Sun.

    LIGO bloc new
    Caltech/MIT Advanced aLigo Hanford, WA, USA installation
    Caltech/MIT Advanced aLigo Hanford, WA, USA installation
    Caltech/MIT Advanced aLigo detector installation Livingston, LA, USA
    Caltech/MIT Advanced aLigo detector installation Livingston, LA, USA

    Cornell SXS, the Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes (SXS) project
    Cornell SXS, the Simulating eXtreme Spacetimes (SXS) project

    Primordial black holes, which would have originated in high density fluctuations of matter during the first moments of the Universe, are in principle very interesting. As opposed to those which form from stars, whose abundance and masses are limited by models of stellar formation and evolution, primordial black holes could exist with a wide range of masses and abundances. They would be found in the halos of galaxies, and the occasional meeting between two of them having masses 30 times that of the Sun, followed by a subsequent merger, might have given rise to the gravitational waves detected by LIGO.

    “Microlensing effect”

    1

    If there were an appreciable number of black holes in the halos of galaxies, some of them intercept the light coming towards us from a distant quasar. Because of their strong gravitational fields, their gravity could concentrate the rays of light, and cause an increase in the apparent brightness of the quasar. This effect, known as “gravitational microlensing” is bigger the bigger the mass of the black hole, and the probability of detecting it would be bigger the more the presence of these black holes. So although the black holes themselves cannot be directly detected, they would be detected by increases in the brightness of observed quasars.

    On this assumption, a group of scientists has used the microlensing effect on quasars to estimate the numbers of primordial black holes of intermediate mass in galaxies. The study, led by the researcher at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the University of La Laguna (ULL), Evencio Mediavilla Gradolph, shows that normal stars like the Sun cause the microlensing effects, thus ruling out the existence of a large population of primordial black holes with intermediate mass.

    Computer simulations

    Using computer simulations, they have compared the rise in brightness, in visible light and in X-rays, of 24 distant quasars with the values predicted by the microlensing effect. They have found that the strength of the effect is relatively low, as would be expected from objects with a mass between 0.05 and 0.45 times that of the Sun, and well below that of intermediate mass black holes. In addition they have estimated that these microlenses form roughly 20% of the total mass of a galaxy, equivalent to the mass expected to be found in stars. So their results show that, with high probability, it is normal stars and not primordial intermediate mass black holes which are responsible for the observed microlensing.

    “This study implies “says Evencio Mediavilla, “that it is not at all probable that black holes with masses between 10 and 100 times the mass of the Sun make up a significant fraction of the dark matter”. For that reason the black holes whose merging was detected by LIGO were probably formed by the collapse of stars, and were not primordial black holes”.

    Astronomers participating in this research include Jorge Jiménez-Vicente and José Calderón-Infante (University of Granada) and José A. Muñoz Lozano, and Héctor Vives-Arias, (University of Valencia).

    Article: Limits on the Mass and Abundance of Primordial Black Holes from Quasar Gravitational Microlensing, by E. Mediavilla et al. Published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters. Reference: E. Mediavilla et al 2017 ApJL 836 L18.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teachingand outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.

    Gran Telescopio  Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, SpainGran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC
    Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 9:17 am on October 6, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Helix Nebula, IAC,   

    From Rafa Leon at IAC: The Helix Nebula 

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    1

    The Helix Nebula, are already 10 shots that are few but it’s what’s up, this is the first that sack of this object,
    The Helix Nebula, HELIX NEBULA OR NGC 7293, is a planetary nebula in the constellation of Aquarius, approximately 680 light years away. It is one of the planetary nebulae closest to the earth and was discovered by Karl Ludwig Harding before 1824., they look very similar to the ring nebula (M57) and its physical characteristics are similar to those of the Dumbbell Nebula (M27 ).

    This nebula is an example of a planetary nebula formed by a sun-like star in the last stages of his life. The gases expelled by the star appear from our perspective as if we saw a propeller from the top, where it comes from his name. The Remnant Star is a white dwarf. The age of the nebula, based on his pace of expansion, is estimated at about 10,600 years or so.

    A team of astronomers has established that the structure of this nebula is more complex than what was initially believed, consisting of two discs gaseous placed almost perpendicular in relation to each other. X-ray observations provide evidence on the existence of a companion star. So, one of the disks may be perpendicular to the axis of rotation of the dying star, while the other is located in the orbital plane of the two stars. It was also believed that the records were formed during two different periods in where there was loss of mass on the part of the dying star. So, while the inner disc was formed about 6600 years ago, the outside came 12 000 years ago. In addition, the inner disc is expanding something faster than the outside.

    Despite his apparent large size, it is a difficult object to see due to its spread, requiring dark skies and the use of instruments as light as possible, like binoculars or a telescope operating at Low Magnification. A Nebular Filter attached to the eye of the telescope can help enough to your comment.

    Rafael Leon Batista © 2016 Gran Canaria

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teachingand outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.

    Gran Telescopio  Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, SpainGran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC
    Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 12:44 pm on August 29, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IAC, NGC 7129   

    From J. Marcoleta at IAC: “Young Suns of NGC 7129” 

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    1
    Credit: Robert Gendler, Roberto Colombari, Eric Recurt, Adam Block.
    Additional Data: Subaru (NAOJ).

    Young suns still lie within dusty NGC 7129, some 3,000 light-years away toward the royal constellation Cepheus.

    While these stars are at a relatively tender age, only a few million years old, it is likely that our own Sun formed in a similar stellar nursery some five billion years ago. Most noticeable in the sharp image are the lovely bluish dust clouds that reflect the youthful starlight.

    But the compact, deep red crescent shapes are also markers of energetic, young stellar objects. Known as Herbig-Haro objects, their shape and color is characteristic of glowing hydrogen gas shocked by jets streaming away from newborn stars. Paler, extended filaments of reddish emission mingling with the bluish clouds are caused by dust grains effectively converting the invisible ultraviolet starlight to visible red light through photoluminesence.

    Ultimately the natal gas and dust in the region will be dispersed, the stars drifting apart as the loose cluster orbits the center of the Galaxy. The processing of this remarkable composite image has revealed the faint red strands of emission at the upper right. They are recently recognized as a likely supernova remnant and are currently being analyzed by Bo Reipurth (Univ. Hawaii) who obtained the image data at the Subaru telescope.

    NAOJ/Subaru Telescope at Mauna Kea Hawaii, USANAOJ Subaru Telescope interior
    NAOJ/Subaru Telescope at Mauna Kea Hawaii, USA

    At the estimated distance of NGC 7129, this telescopic view spans over 40 light-years.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teachingand outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.

    Gran Telescopio  Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, Spain
    Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 12:16 pm on July 28, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IAC, Superluminous supernovas,   

    From IAC: “Light shed on a superluminous supernova which appears to have exploded twice” 

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    Jul. 11, 2016
    By Javier Pérez Barbuzano

    1
    A supernova illustration. Credit: NASA

    Supernovae are among the most violent phenomena in the universe. They are huge explosions which put an end to the lives of certain types of stars. These explosions release immense amounts of energy, so much that sometimes we can see them from Earth with the naked eye, as points of light which for a short time are brighter than all the millions of stars in the galaxies where they are found. After an intense burst of light lasting a few weeks, supernovae start to fade gradually until they have effectively burned out.

    2
    This graph shows the evolution of the apparent brigntness of the new supernova it is shown according to data collected by the Dark Energy Survey. It can be seen how an initial increase in brightness occurs which is then reduced for several days. Subsequently, the brightness increases again during the main sequence of the supernova. Credit: Mathew Smith.

    There are several different types of supernovae. The astronomers classify them by their observable characteristics, which in turn give clues about how they have originated, among the most well known are those of Type Ia, which occur when a white dwarf (which is the final state of a star slightly more massive than the Sun) absorbs mass from another nearby star, or merges with another white dwarf. When that happens its mass grows until it becomes unstable (1), and a thermonuclear explosion is triggered. As these events produce a characteristic luminosity, they can be used by astronomers as “standard candles” to measure large distances in the universe, in a similar way to that used by sailors to infer the distance of a known lighthouse at night by estimating its brightness.

    The other types of supernovae are produced when very massive stars exhaust their fuel, so that nuclear fusion in their interiors comes to an end. This fusion not only causes stars to emit light and heat, but keeps them in equilibrium so that they don’t collapse under their own gravity. When the fusion stops, the centre of the star collapses and the outer layers are flung outwards with violence, causing a supernova, while the centre implodes, leaving a neutron star, or for very massive stars, a black hole.

    In recent years a new type of supernova has been discovered, about which still very little is known, and which are brighter and longer lasting, so that they have been called superluminous supernovae (SLSN). Although only about a dozen of them are known, an international group of researchers has been able to use the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC) to observe a superluminous supernova almost from the moment it occurred. The research has revealed surprising behaviour, because this supernova showed an initial increase in brightness which later declined for a few days, and later increased again much more strongly. The scientists have used the data observed at the GTC and has combined them with other observations in order to try to explain the origin of the phenomenon.

    “Superluminous supernovas are up to a hundred times more energetic than Type 1a’s because they can remain bright for up to six months before fading rather than just a few weeks” explained Mathew Smith, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Southampton (UK) and the person directing this study, whose results have been published in the specialized journal The Astrophysical Journal Letters. “What we have managed to observe, which is completely new” adds Smith, “is that before the major explosion there is a shorter, less luminous outburst, which we can pick out because it is followed by a dip in the light curve, and which lasts just a few days”. It is the first time that something like this has been observed in a supernova. “From our data we have tried to determine if this is a characteristic unique to this object, or whether it is a common feature of all superluminous supernovas, but has not been observed before, which is perfectly possible given their unpredictable nature” comments the scientist.

    This new, intriguing object, given the cryptic name of “DES14X3taz” by the astronomers, was discovered on December 21st 2014 by the Dark Energy Survey (2) an international project which surveys the night sky making precision measurements of over 300 million galaxies which are situated thousands of millions of light years from Earth, and incidentally detecting thousands of supernovae and other transient phenomena. The objective of this survey is to help explain the expansion of the universe, and to find clues to the nature of the elusive dark energy (3). To do this astronomers are using an extremely sensitive digital camera, of 570 Megapixels, on the four metre Victor M. Blanco telescope at the Inter-American Observatory at Cerro Tololo (Chile).

    Once DES14X3taz had been identified as a possible superluminous supernova an immediate observation was requested on the GTC, which turned its powerful eye towards it during the two nights of observation: January 26th and February 6th 2915. This could be done because the GTC devotes some of its observing time to “targets of opportunity” so that other, programmed observations which can be made at another time are postponed to give priority to transient phenomena, which may offer unrepeatable opportunities.

    “The GTC, with its huge 10.4m mirror, and its OSIRIS instrument, is the ideal tool to observer this SNSL, which is at a vast distance and because we are looking for information in the visible and the near infrared” commented Smith, who is a participant in the Dark Energy Survey. Thanks to the observations made with the GTC and other telescopes, Smith and his collaborators could reconstruct the evolution of the brightness of DES14X3taz from almost the moment of its detection. They have also determined its absolute brightness with great precision, as well as its distance, some 6,400 million light years (4),

    After comparing their observations with several physical models the astronomers concluded in their article that the most plausible explanation is that the mechanism which causes this supernova is the birth of a “magnetar”, a neutron star which rotates very rapidly on its axis. In the data the initial peak of the brightness graph is followed by rapid cooling of the object, after which there is a new, and quicker rise in brightness. This is consistent with the emission of a huge bubble of material into the surrounding space, with cools rapidly as it grows in size. “We think that a very massive star, some 200 times the mass of the Sun, collapses to form a magnetar. In the process the first explosion occurs, which expels into space a quantity of matter equivalent to the mass of our Sun, and this gives rise to the first peak of the graph. The second peak occurs when the star collapses to form the magnetar, which is a very dense object rotating rapidly on its axis, and which heats up the matter expelled from the first explosion. This heating is what generates the second peak in the luminosity” explains Smith.

    Research of this type allows us to get to know the physical phenomena which cause the superluminous supernovas, and this understanding may allow us to “standardize” it (as has been done for the type Ia’s) so we could use it as a reference source for distance measurement on large scales in the universe. Its high luminosity may make these objects very useful for making distances on larger scales, and with greater accuracy than we can do at the moment. However before we get to that point we need a much deeper understanding of their origin and their nature.

    Another mystery about this new type of supernovae is that, up to now, all the cases detected have been in small galaxies with low metallicity (low content in heavy elements) and we have no explanation of this. “It is a part of the mystery of these objects “says Smith, in humorous vein, and adds that among future priorities we need to detect more superluminous supernovae, and oberve them since the moment they explode, and in real time with a telescope of the size of the GTC.

    Notes:

    (1) The Chandrasekhar limit is the maximum mass which a white dwarf can attain without collapsing into a neutron star (or black hole) under its own gravity. This limit is at 1.4 times the mass of the Sum.

    (2) The Dark Energy Survey is an international collaboration of over 400 scientists from 25 institutions in 7 countries: The US, Spain, the UK, Brazil, Germany, Switzerland, and Australia.

    Dark Energy Survey

    (3) Dark energy is a form of energy present throughout space, which produces a pressure tending to accelerate the expansion of the universe. This acts as a type of gravitational repulsion.

    (4) A light year, in spite of its name, is really a distance, defined by the distance light travels in a year. The light emitted by the explosion of DES14X3taz has taken 6,400 million years to reach the Earth. The age of the universe is almost 14 thousand million years.

    Article:

    DES14X3taz: A type I superluminous supernova showins a luminous, rapidly cooling initial pre-peak bump by M. Smith (University of Southampton), M. Sullivan (University of Southampton), C. B. D’Andrea (University of Southampton, Southampton), F. J. Castander (Institut de Ci`encies de l’Espai, IEEC-CSIC), R. Casas (Institut de Ci`encies de l’Espai, IEEC-CSIC), S. Prajs (University of Southampton) and others.

    Contact:

    Mathew Smith: School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Southampton, Southampton, UK. mat.smith@soton.ac.uk

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teachingand outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.

    Gran Telescopio  Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, Spain
    Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 1:24 pm on July 14, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IAC, , The Horsehead Nebula   

    From Raul Lopez Ramirez at IAC: The Horsehead Nebula 

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    1

    I went back to process the photo of this striking nebula since the previous version ne convince me of everything.
    There are 46 pictures of 360 sec, ISO 1600, with Canon 60 d chilled to-4º C + Telescope Takahashi 102 with Focal Reducer (about 30) increases.
    The Horsehead Nebula is a cloud of gas cold and dark, located approximately 1.500 light years from earth in the constellation of Orion. Measures Approximately 3,5 light-years across.

    The reddish color of the emission nebula originated by the recombination of electrons with protons of atoms of hydrogen. The Brightest Star, located to the left of the nebula, is the popular alnitak.

    In the photo of the surroundings are also nebulae of reflection, which reflect preferably the blue light of nearby stars.
    In Photography can also be seen, in orange, the Flame Nebula, in the bottom left. It is given this name because of its resemblance to a bonfire. A Dark Strip of Interstellar Dust Absorbent Stands out in silhouette against the glare of the issuance of the hydrogen and, in fact, it hides the true source of energy of the Flame Nebula. Behind the dark strip lies a cluster of stars young and hot. A massive star young of this cluster is the likely source of the intense Ultraviolet radiation that ionizes the hydrogen gas in the Flame Nebula.
    In the picture is also appreciated, under the horse’s head, the little nebula NGC 2023, is a reflection nebula, hence its characteristic color blue.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teachingand outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.

    Gran Telescopio  Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, Spain
    Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 3:28 pm on July 13, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IAC,   

    From Raul Lopez Ramirez and Fotographia-EsmuySimple at IAC 

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    1

    A few celestial objects very curious, little known and rarely photographed, as only you can see in the southern hemisphere and a little bit from the Canary Islands. Taking advantage of that for these dates could photographed a few hours. I had the opportunity to do so. It took a lot of the processed for dredging up the entire contents of the image and your dark cloud of dust. There were 30 shots of 500 SEC ISO 1600 Canon 60 D+ 102 mm refracting telescope.
    NGC 6726 is a reflection nebula located in the constellation of Corona Australis. This region is considered to be an accidental association of dust and stars.
    The two bright blue fogs are the reflection of the light of the stars embedded against the particles of dust that surrounds them. The dark side amarronada is a very active place of formation of new stars.
    We also note, almost in the top right corner the globular cluster NGC 6723 it was discovered by James Dunlop from paramatta in new south Wales, Australia on 3 June 1826 it is close to 30 000 Light years away. – in Gran Canaria.

    Received via email.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teachingand outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.

    Gran Telescopio  Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, Spain
    Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 8:04 am on July 13, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IAC, Omega nebula,   

    From Rafa Leon at IAC: The Omega Nebula 

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    7.13.16
    Rafa Leon

    1
    Omega nebula by Rafa Leon

    The Omega Nebula (aka the Swan Nebula, Shoehorn Nebula, Lobster Nebula, M17 and NGC 6618) is an H II region in the constellation Sagittarius. It was discovered by Philippe Loys de Cheseaux in 1745. Charles Messier cataloged it in 1764.

    The Omega Nebula is located at a distance between 5000 and 6000 Light-years, and has a size of about 15 light years in diameter, being associated with a molecular cloud of about 40 light years in diameter and a Mass of 30000 solar masses. The total mass of the Nebula Omega is estimated at about 800 solar masses and is one of the most brilliant hii regions and mass of our galaxy; if it does not appear more impressive is starting to be practically “singing”.

    There is a cluster (NGC 6618) in the nebula, which contains in its centre two stars of the spectral type o4v, plus two stars of type o5v, and 100 stars of spectral type sooner than the b9. is the radiation of These young stars and hot-especially that of the two o4v-LA that excites and makes shine the fumes of the nebula; recent studies show that this is one of the youngest clusters known, with an age that can’t come to the million Years and that the nebula surely houses between 8000 and 10000 stars that have been born in her, 1/3 of them in the cluster NGC 6618.

    To the southeast of the nebula can also be found the stars hipergigantes HD 168607 and HD 168625.
    First processing of the M17 hope to improve eye Canon 550D without any modification, Tube APO TS 106 F / 5 400s are 40 outlets to 800 outlets calibration iso more.
    Rafael Leon Batista © 2016 Gran Canaria

    Received via email, no link.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teachingand outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.

    Gran Telescopio  Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, SpainGran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC
    Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 2:13 pm on July 10, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , IAC, , The Lagoon Nebula   

    From Rafa Leon at IAC: “First processing of the m8” 

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    7.10.16

    Rafa Leon

    Rafael Leon Batista © 2016 Gran Canaria
    These are the shots I dedicate to Raul Lopez Ramirez, álvaro ibáñez pérez, Israel Gil Andani, German peris, iko margalef and to all who have supported me on the long road of astrophotography thank you very much friends
    The Lagoon Nebula (also known as messier object 8, Messier 8, m8 or NGC 6523), is an emission nebula (specifically this is an H II Region) located in the constellation of Sagittarius. It is, roughly, at a distance of 5.000 Light-years away. 1 was discovered by guillaume le gentil in 1747.

    1
    2

    The Nebula-associated with a molecular cloud and that is part of the Stellar Association Sagittarius ob1- seems to have a depth comparable to that of its width and includes a number of globules of bok-clouds of gas and dust in the process of collapse to form stars -, Some of whom have been catalogued by Edward Emerson Barnard How B88, B296. B89, and the discovery of five objects herbig-Haro on the southern edge of the nebula (Hh893, Hh894, Hh895, Hh896, and hh897) brings more evidence to the star formation in progress. 2

    In the most brilliant portion of the nebula is a structure known as the hourglass, in which it is producing an intense activity of the formation of stars; in it, in the year 2006, have been identified four objects herbig – Haro: Hh867, Hh868, Hh869 And Hh870. 1 also includes a structure of dust in the shape of a tornado caused by the action of ionizing radiation of the multiple star of spectral type or Herschel 36.
    Lagoon Nebula (also known as Messier 8 object, Messier 8 M8 or NGC 6523) is an emission nebula (specifically, it is an H II region) located in the constellation Sagittarius. It is approximately a distance luz.1 5,000 years was discovered by Guillaume Le Gentil in 1747.

    The nebula -associated a molecular cloud and is part of the stellar Association Sagittarius OB1- seems to have a depth comparable to its width and includes a number of -clouds Bok globules of gas and dust in the process of collapsing to form stars -, some of which they have been cataloged by Edward Emerson Barnard how B88, B89 and B296. The discovery of Herbig-Haro objects five on the south edge of the nebula (HH893, HH894, HH895, HH896 and HH897) provides more evidence for star formation in curso.2

    In the brightest portion of the nebula known how the hourglass structure, which is producing intense star formation activity is; in it, in 2006, they have been identified four Herbig-Haro objects: HH867, HH868, HH869 and HH870.1 also includes a powder-shaped structure tornado caused by the action of ionizing radiation of multiple type star spectral O Herschel 36.

    Sorry, no link this came on Facebook from Rafa Leon. You can search him up on Facebook.

    Another view, this from ESO’s VST.

    2

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teachingand outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.

    Gran Telescopio  Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, Spain
    Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 8:06 am on July 9, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , From Rafa Leon, IAC   

    From Rafa Leon at IAC: “Messier 8 object” 

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    7.8.16
    Rafa Leon

    I hope you like the processed end greetings from Gran Canaria
    The Lagoon Nebula (also known as messier object 8, Messier 8, m8 or NGC 6523), is an emission nebula (specifically this is an H II Region) located in the constellation of Sagittarius. It is, roughly, at a distance of 5.000 Light-years away. 1 was discovered by guillaume le gentil in 1747.

    1

    2
    Images by Rafa Leon

    The Nebula-associated with a molecular cloud and that is part of the Stellar Association Sagittarius ob1- seems to have a depth comparable to that of its width and includes a number of globules of bok-clouds of gas and dust in the process of collapse to form stars -, Some of whom have been catalogued by Edward Emerson Barnard How B88, B296. B89, and the discovery of five objects herbig-Haro on the southern edge of the nebula (Hh893, Hh894, Hh895, Hh896, and hh897) brings more evidence to the star formation in progress. 2

    In the most brilliant portion of the nebula is a structure known as the hourglass, in which it is producing an intense activity of the formation of stars; in it, in the year 2006, have been identified four objects herbig – Haro: Hh867, Hh868, Hh869 And Hh870. 1 also includes a structure of dust in the shape of a tornado caused by the action of ionizing radiation of the multiple star of spectral type or Herschel 36.

    First shots of contact for the processing of the m8
    Telescope ts photoline apo 102 mm F / 5
    Rafael Leon Batista © 2016

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teachingand outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.

    Gran Telescopio  Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, Spain
    Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
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