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  • richardmitnick 12:26 pm on October 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Cherenkov Telescope Network (CTA acronym), IAC-Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands, , Telescope LST-1 in the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (ORM) La Palma, This network will be dedicated to the observation of high energy gamma and consist very over 100 telescopes three different sizes located in the two hemispheres   

    From Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias via Manu Garcia at IAC: “Opening telescope LST-1 in La Palma” 


    From Manu Garcia, a friend from IAC.

    The universe around us.
    Astronomy, everything you wanted to know about our local universe and never dared to ask.

    IAC

    From Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    1
    Telescope LST-1 in the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (ORM), La Palma. Credit: Ivan Jimenez Montalvo.

    The prototype of the four large telescopes that will be part of the North CTA network, called LST-1, is inaugurated at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos on 10 October 2,018 at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos. The event will be attended by political authorities and senior representatives of scientific institutions from Japan, Germany and Spain, the main countries involved in its construction.

    On 10 October 2018 at 14:00 hours, at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (Garafía, La Palma), a new scientific infrastructure, the LST-1, a prototype telescope large (will open Size Large Telescopes) is expected to be part of the Cherenkov Telescope Network (CTA acronym). This network will be dedicated to the observation of high energy gamma and consist very over 100 telescopes, three different sizes, located in the two hemispheres rays. Simultaneously with the opening throughout the week various scientific meetings related to astrophysics that studies the most energetic phenomena in the Universe they will be held.

    Among the 200 guests attending the opening ceremony are representatives of the various centers that are part of the CTA consortium and sub-consortium building the LST, members of institutions using the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (ORM) and a broad representation of political authorities.

    The ceremony will be conducted by the administrator ORM, Juan Carlos Pérez Arencibia, start with opening speeches. The event will intervene (in this order): Rafael Rebolo, director of the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC); Federico Ferrini, managing director of LtOrd; Masahiro Teshima, director of the Max Planck Institute for Physics in Munich, principal investigator and spokesman collaboration LST; Takaaki Kajita, director of the Institute for Cosmic Ray Research (ICRR Tokyo) and 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics; Masashi Haneda, vice president of the University of Tokyo; Takeshi Nakajima, Consul General of Japan in the Canary Islands; Anselmo Pestana, President of the Cabildo Insular de La Palma; Lady Nieves Barreto, Minister of Territorial Policy of the Government of the Canary Islands; and Pedro Duque, Minister for Science, Innovation and Universities of the Government of Spain.

    2
    Roque de los Muchachos Observatory in Garafia, La Palma (Gran Canaria) Spain.
    Credit: IAC.

    After the speeches, there will be cutting ceremony to multiple tape, which the mayor of the municipality of Garafía, Yeray Rodriguez will be invited. President of the Steering Committee of the LST, Manel Martinez, will be in charge of conducting the event, to be held following a Japanese ritual in which participants, armed with scissors and white gloves shall stand and line in front of a tape red with rosettes and cut at the same time, each of the sections.

    A telescope unprecedented.

    The LST, a mirror 23 m in diameter, are the largest telescopes CTA network. The LST-1 is the prototype of such four telescopes to be installed in the North observatory, located in ORM, and are surrounded by various telescopes 12 m diameter or Medium Size Telescopes (MST). In Southern Observatory in Chile, and these two types of telescopes, it is installed a third type of 6 m in diameter called Small Size Telescopes (SST). Altogether, CTA can detect with accuracy and sensitivity unprecedented gamma in a wide range of energy rays, which will provide a whole new view of the sky.

    The LST-1 has a reflective surface 400 m2 sustained by a structure of tubes carbon fiber and steel. It is 45 m tall and weighs about 100 tonnes. However, it is extremely agile, with the ability to reposition itself in 20 seconds to capture signals gamma-ray bursts (GRB, its acronym in English). Gamma rays generally very high energy that will detect the LST come from distant objects beyond our galaxy, as active galaxy nuclei (AGN, for its acronym in English).

    3
    nother perspective Telescope LST-1 in the Roque of the
    Boys (ORM), La Palma. Credit: Ivan Jimenez Montalvo.

    The LST project team consists of more than 200 scientists from ten countries. Japan, Germany and Spain are the largest contributors of LST consortium, which also includes France, Italy, Brazil, Sweden, India and Croatia. In Spain are part of the collaboration the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC), the Institut d’Altes Energies Physics (IHEP), the Center for Environmental and Technological Research (CIEMAT), the Institut de Ciències de l’Espai (ICE ), the Complutense University of Madrid (High Energy Group, UCM-GAE and Electronics, UCM-ELEC), the University of Barcelona (Departament d’Astronomia i Meteorologia, ICC-UB), the Port de Informació Científica (PIC) and the University of Jaen.

    Scientific meetings.

    In addition to the opening of the LST-1, and taking advantage of the presence in the palm of a large number of scientists from around the world dedicated to the study of astrophysics of high energies, they have organized various specialized meetings in this area of ​​research They will celebrate, throughout the week at the Hotel H10 Taburiente Playa de Santa Cruz de La Palma. On Thursday, 11 October, will take place on “Frontiers of Astroparticle Physics” symposium, with the participation of renowned experts, such as Nobel Prize in Physics 2015, Takaaki Kajita and scientist Planck project at the European Space Research and Technology Center (ESTEC), Jan Tauber, and the principal investigator of the CTA network in the IAC, Ramon Garcia Lopez, and the director of GTC, Romano Corradi.

    In addition, on Friday, October 12, will begin the course “Extreme Universe seen in gamma very high energy 2018 rays”, organized by the ICRR and the University of Tokyo, which will discuss the important role they play network CTA in the development of multimensajero astronomy and theoretical and observational aspects related to the study of the most energetic universe will be displayed. also, on 12 and 13 October, the meeting of the International Forum of Astroparticle Physics (APIF will be held for their acronym in English), organized by the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology (KIPAC), the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory and Stanford University.

    Contacts:

    Ramón García López, Principal Investigator of the CTA network in the IAC: rgl@iac.es
    Monica Vazquez Acosta, senior scientist at the IAC in the LST project: monicava@iac.es

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).


    Roque de los Muchachos Observatory is an astronomical observatory located in the municipality of Garafía on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands, at an altitude of 2,396 m (7,861 ft)

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teaching and outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.



    Gran Telescopio Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, SpainGran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 7:59 am on September 13, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , IAC-Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands, Napoleón Torres, Spaghetti Nebula 147   

    From Napoleón Torres‎ at IAC: “The Spaghetti Nebula” 

    IAC

    From Napoleón Torres at Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    1

    2
    Simeis 147, better known as spaghetti nebula, it is a remnant of supernova in the constellations of Taurus and auriga about 3,000 light years from the earth. With 150 Light-years in diameter, it is a tremendous structure.

    If Spaghetti Nebula 147 was visible to simple view, it would cover 6 moons full in the sky. It has an estimated age of about 40,000 years.

    The Spaghetti Nebula releases a lot of energy in the form of powerful x-Rays and gamma rays, expands at a speed of about 100 km / s.

    Image Credits: NASA David de Martin.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).


    Roque de los Muchachos Observatory is an astronomical observatory located in the municipality of Garafía on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands, at an altitude of 2,396 m (7,861 ft)

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:04 am on August 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , IAC-Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands, , ,   

    From Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC via Manu Garcia: “Discover the causes of the apparent displacement of a supermassive black hole” 


    From Manu Garcia, a friend from IAC.

    The universe around us.
    Astronomy, everything you wanted to know about our local universe and never dared to ask.

    IAC

    From Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    Observing the core of Messier 87, HST-1 galaxy.

    1
    Messier 87 image with WFC3 HST (2016) with F814W filter. different knots are seen along the jet, including the first node HST-1. Credit: NASA/ESA Hubble.

    NASA/ESA Hubble Telescope

    NASA/ESA Hubble WFC3

    The study by two researchers from Instituto de Astrofísica reveals that the shift observed in the nucleus of the galaxy Messier 87 is not due to a shift of its massive black hole, but variations in light production in the center of the galaxy caused by bursts from a jet, a flow of material relativistic beam as the hole itself emits.

    Today it is assumed that all massive galaxies contain a supermassive black hole (SMBH, for its acronym in English) at its core. In recent years galaxies are looking for candidates to present a SMBHs displaced from its equilibrium position. Among the scenarios that can cause this displacement are merging two SMBHs or the existence of a binary system SMBHs, which gives information about galactic evolution and formation frequency and fusion of such objects.

    One of the galaxies candidates to present a displaced SMBHs is the giant elliptical Messier 87, containing one of the closest and best-studied active galaxy nuclei (AGN, for its acronym in English). Previous research SMBHs displacement of Messier 87 gave very different results, which was confusing. However, a new study by the student of the University of La Laguna (ULL), Elena López Navas has provided new data suggesting that the SMBHs of this galaxy is in its equilibrium position and shifts found must be variations in the production center or photocentric light caused by bursts from the relativistic jet, a flow of matter that the hole itself expelled outside at speeds near that of light.

    Research has been necessary to analyze a large number of high-resolution images of Messier 87 taken at different times and with different instruments installed on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and the Very Large Telescope (VLT).

    ESO VLT at Cerro Paranal in the Atacama Desert, •ANTU (UT1; The Sun ),
    •KUEYEN (UT2; The Moon ),
    •MELIPAL (UT3; The Southern Cross ), and
    •YEPUN (UT4; Venus – as evening star).
    elevation 2,635 m (8,645 ft) from above Credit J.L. Dauvergne & G. Hüdepohl atacama photo

    “Given these results, we realized that the images showed a shift in the center of the galaxy were taken at a time when M87 was a huge explosion that could be measured in all ranges of the electromagnetic spectrum,” adds Almudena Prieto , co-author and researcher at the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC). This outbreak took place between 2003 and 2007 at the node nearest the nucleus known as Messier 87 HST-1 jet. During the duration of the phenomenon, this knot increased its flow coming to shine even more than the core itself. “Temporal analysis of displacement of center of the galaxy shows that indeed the burst is related to the change of the position of photocentric – clarifies the astrophysics, however, after this phenomenon, and the core photocentric meet occupying the same place, so we deduce that the core and the black hole are always in the same location coinciding with the minimum of galactic potential. ”

    2
    Displacements found (in milli – arcseconds) against the date of
    observation of each analyzed image. An increase of displacement is observed
    around 2005, when the maximum emission occurred in the first
    knot jet, HST-1. Credit: Elena Lopez.

    “In our work we have found that the SMBHs is in a stable over the last 20 years position; On the contrary, what changes is the production center of light or Fotocentro “says Lopez, author of this study, as work Master’s Research in Astrophysics, which has just been published in the journal <em>Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society</em> (MNRAS).

    The new data have caused great interest among the astrophysics community, as the study SMBHs position of M87 is crucial to understanding the evolution of this galaxy and analysis of other AGN jets. “In addition, this research reminds us that we must be cautious when considering variables sources with irregularities such as, in this case, a huge jet,” says Lopez, who is currently conducting a training grant in astrophysical research at the IAC.

    Work Master Thesis: E. Lopez Navas (2018 ULL), “Measurement and analysis of the displacement between the Fotocentro and the supermassive black hole in M87“.

    Contact:
    Elena Lopez Navas, ULL student / IAC: eln_ext@iac.es
    Almudena Prieto Escudero, a researcher at the IAC: aprieto@iac.es

    See the full article here.


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings
    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    Roque de los Muchachos Observatory is an astronomical observatory located in the municipality of Garafía on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands, at an altitude of 2,396 m (7,861 ft)

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teaching and outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.



    Gran Telescopio Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, SpainGran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 11:15 am on August 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: After the explosion of Kepler's supernova there were no survivors., , , , , IAC-Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands,   

    From Manu at IAC: “After the explosion of Kepler’s supernova, there were no survivors.” 


    From Manu Garcia, a friend from IAC.

    The universe around us.
    Astronomy, everything you wanted to know about our local universe and never dared to ask.

    Investigating the remains of a supernova explosion.

    1
    Image and Supernova Kepler performed with optical light and X-rays Credit: X-ray: NASA / CXC / NCSU / M. Burkey et al; Optical: DSS.

    NASA/Chandra X-ray Telescope

    A study in which a researcher participates Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC) , which has been led by a researcher at the Institute of Fundamental Physics of the CSIC and the Institute of Cosmos of the UB (UB-IEEC) Science says the explosion Johannes Kepler observed in 1604 was produced by a fusion of two stellar residues.

    Kepler’s supernova, which currently is only the nebulous structure of its remnant, took place in the constellation Ophiuchus, in the plane of the Milky Way galaxy, 16,300 light years from the sun. An international team, led by researcher Pilar Ruiz Lapuente ( UB – IECC and CSIC ), in which the IAC researcher involved Jonay Hernández González, he has tried to find a possible survivor binary star system in which the explosion occurred.

    In these systems, when at least one of the stars (the greater mass) reaches the end of its life and becomes a white dwarf, the other can start transferring material progressively bringing it to a certain limit mass (equivalent to 1, 44 solar masses, called “Chandrasekhar limit”). This process results in the ignition of the carbon in the nucleus of the white dwarf, causing an explosion which can multiply to 100,000 times its original brightness. This phenomenon, brief and violent, is known as a supernova. Sometimes, as in Kepler’s supernova (SN 1604), observed and identified by German astronomer Johannes Kepler in 1604, can reach visually observed from Earth.

    Kepler’s supernova emerged from the explosion of a white dwarf in a binary system. Therefore, in this research published today in the journal The Astrophysical Journal, the possible survivor of the white dwarf companion, who allegedly transferred mass to bring it to explode it sought. The impact of this explosion would have increased the brightness and speed of the missing companion. You could even have modified its chemical composition. The team selected, therefore, star anomaly that allowed them to identify one of them as the companion of the white dwarf that exploded 414 years ago.

    “We looked explains Pilar Ruiz-Lapuente, a researcher at the Institute of Fundamental Physics ICC CSIC and UB (UB-IEEC) – a peculiar star as a possible partner of the parent of Kepler’s supernova, and for that have characterized all stars around the center of the remnant of SN 1604. But we have not found any with the expected characteristics. So it seems that the explosion occurred by fusion mechanism white dwarf with another or with the core of the mate and evolved. ”

    To carry out this research, they used images taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) .

    NASA/ESA Hubble Telescope

    “The goal was to determine the movements of a group of 32 stars around the center of the supernova remnant that still lingers , ” says Luigi Bedin, Osservatorio Astronomico researcher di Padova (INAF) and co-author. They also used data from the instrument FLAMES , installed in the Very Large Telescope (VLT), 8.2 m in the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and used to characterize stars, determine its distance and its radial velocity relative to the Sun .

    ESO/FLAMES on The VLT. FLAMES is the multi-object, intermediate and high resolution spectrograph of the VLT. Mounted at UT2, KUEYEN, FLAMES can access targets over a field of view 25 arcmin in diameter. FLAMES feeds two different spectrograph covering the whole visual spectral range:GIRAFFE and UVES.

    ESO VLT Platform at Cerro Paranal elevation 2,635 m (8,645 ft), • ANTU (UT1; The Sun ),
    • KUEYEN (UT2; The Moon ),
    • MELIPAL (UT3; The Southern Cross ), and
    • YEPUN (UT4; Venus – as evening star).

    “the star field Kepler’s supernova are very faint stars, only accessible from the south with a telescope large diameter telescopes like the VLT hemisphere , ” notes John Pritchard, a researcher at ESO and one of the study authors.

    “There is an alternative mechanism to produce the explosion. Consists of the merger of two white dwarfs, or white dwarf core carbon and oxygen companion star at a late stage of its evolution, in both cases resulting in a supernova “explains Jonay Gonzalez Hernandez , Ramón y Cajal researcher and co-author of the IAC publication. “In the field of Kepler we do not see any star that present anomalies. However it adds find evidence that the explosion was caused by the merger of two white dwarfs or a white dwarf with the core of the star companion, possibly exceeding the “Chandrasekhar limit” “.

    Kepler’s supernova is one of the five “historic” thermonuclear supernovae type. The other four are the supernova of Tycho Brahe, Danish astronomer documented in 1572 and has also been investigated previously by this team; the SN 1006 , also studied by this team in 2012, the SN 185 (which could be the origin of the remaining RCW86 ); and the newly discovered SNIa G1.9 + 03 , held in our galaxy around 1900 and was only visible from the Southern Hemisphere.

    Animation origin of Kepler Supernova 1604: https://youtu.be/be2Qpw6om1E

    Article: Ruiz-Lapuente, P., et al. “No companion in Kepler’s surviving supernova” 2018, ApJ, 862, 124 DOI: https://doi.org/10.3847/1538-4357/aac9c4. The Astrophysical Journal.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    Roque de los Muchachos Observatory is an astronomical observatory located in the municipality of Garafía on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands, at an altitude of 2,396 m (7,861 ft)

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teaching and outreach activities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.


    Gran Telescopio Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, SpainGran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 1:14 pm on February 20, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , Dwarf star J0023+0307, IAC-Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands   

    From IAC: “IAC astronomers find a star in the Milky Way that shouldn’t really exist” 

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    Feb. 20, 2018

    1
    Artistic image of J0023 + 0307 star that was created in the early stages of the formation of the Milky Way. The J0023 + 0307 star formed from the first ejected by supernovas material. Credit: Gabriel Pérez, SMM (IAC).

    2
    Artistic image of supernova explosions of the first stars mass that formed in the Milky Way. Credit: Gabriel Pérez, SMM (IAC).

    Scientists from the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) have discovered the dwarf star J0023+0307, which is 9,450 light years away, in the halo of our Galaxy.

    The article published today in the scientific journal The Astrophysical Journal Letters analyzes the primaeval chemical composition of this star. Because of its low metal content, and specifically its low carbon content this star “ throws doubt on the models of low mass star formation in the early universe” explains David Aguado, the first author of the paper.

    This finding is similar to that made last December by the same group of observers, otra estrella enana, J0815+4729 also situated in the halo of the Milky Way and with low metallicity. In this new star, however, even carbon has not been detected, which makes its composition different from that normally found in similar stars.

    2
    otra estrella enana, J0815+4729

    This is a challenge to the theoretical models of the formation of stars with low metallicity.

    J0023+0307 is still on the Main Sequence, the stage in which stars remain for most of their lives, and has an age “virtually similar to that of the universe”, explains Jonay González González, a Ramón y Cajal research fellow of the IAC, and another author of the article. According to the established models for the formation of these stars their carbon content ought to be much bigger than those observed. For that reason “This star should not really exist” according to another IAC researcher, and the second author of this publication, Carlos Allende Prieto.

    The instruments used

    This observation was carried out using spectroscopy with the instruments ISIS and OSIRIS, on the William Herschel Telescope and the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS respectively.

    ISIS Spectrograph on the ING William Herschel Telescope


    ING 4 meter William Herschel Telescope at Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on La Palma in the Canary Islands, 2,396 m (7,861 ft)

    IAC Gran Telescopio Canarias OSIRIS spectrograph

    Both telescopes are at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory, in the municipality of Garafía (La Palma). The former has a primary mirror with 4.2m diameter, and the latter with a 10.4 m primary, made up of segments, which is one of the largest and most advanced optical-infrared telescopes in the world.

    The next goal of the research programme for the science team at the IAC will be to try to detect other chemicla elements in the star, such as lithium and iron. Because the star is so old lithium in particular could give us crucial information about the production of atomic nuclei (“nucleosynthesis”) in the period just after the Big Bang.

    To do this large telescopes, between 8m and 10 m diameter are needed, with spectrographs yielding high spectral resolution. The researchers are confident that the HORS spectrograph, now in a testing phase in the GTC, will in the near future be used for the chemical analysis of faint stars such as J0023+0307 y J0815+4729.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Roque de los Muchachos Observatory is an astronomical observatory located in the municipality of Garafía on the island of La Palma in the Canary Islands, at an altitude of 2,396 m (7,861 ft)

    Stem Education Coalition
    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teaching and outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.


    Gran Telescopio Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, SpainGran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 12:07 pm on January 31, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Andromeda Galaxy Messier 31, , , , , IAC-Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands,   

    From IAC via Manu: “Messier 31, the Andromeda Galaxy by IAC.” 


    Manu Garcia, a friend from IAC.

    The universe around us.
    Astronomy, everything you wanted to know about our local universe and never dared to ask.

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    1
    Andromeda Galaxy, the first image of the “cosmic Fotomatón”
    Identification of objects in the image of Messier 31. Credit: Daniel Lopez / IAC

    With this astrophotography, obtained under the “Niépce: from negative to positive” project, the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands opens his Instagram account.

    “Cosmic Fotomatón” remote astrograph of the Communication and Scientific Culture (UC3) of the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC), and fully operational at the Observatorio del Teide (Izaña, Tenerife). The first image of the object is obtained Messier 31 , the Andromeda galaxy, and with it the IAC opens its account on the social network Instagram ( https://www.instagram.com/iac_astrofisica/ ).

    Our neighboring galaxy, with nearly a trillion stars, is located 2.5 million light years away, so the photons recorded in the image left of it that long ago when hominids evolved in South Africa yet. These photons increasingly take less time to reach us since the galaxy is approaching us at a speed of 300 km / s and collide with the Milky Way shortly before the death of the Sun, at 5,000 million years.

    Andromeda is one of the three largest spiral galaxies in the Local Group, our galactic neighborhood, covering a large area of sky equivalent to seven Lunas placed one after another, although not perceptible to our eyes.

    Local Group. Andrew Z. Colvin 3 March 2011

    However, despite being the most distant object we can see the Cosmos naked eye from dark locations especially as the skies of the Observatories of the Canary Islands, this distance represents only 0.02% of the observable universe with telescopes and advanced instrumentation .

    Image a dwarf elliptical galaxy, Messier 110 which is orbiting is also appreciated Andromeda and which also belongs to the local group.

    “Cosmic Fotomatón” is an instrument of “Niépce: from negative to positive” project, a tribute of astronomy to photography, which aims to obtain astronomical images like this, wide-field and depth. With it will develop projects for different audiences, such as traveling educational exhibition “100 square LUNAS” designed to reach out to schools next October. It will also serve to train teachers of schools, cultural centers and museums, and the “Send us your piece of heaven” competition with amateur astronomers will take place.

    Under the Niépce project they are also getting other images with telescopes of the Canarian Observatories including the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) in order to expand the gallery of astronomical images for publicity purposes.

    Technical data of the image:
    Composition in RGB filters (18x total exposure 600s each) and Halfa (14x 1.800s) obtained with a telescope 10 cm in diameter and 380 mm focal together with a CCD camera 4k x 4k cooled to – 30 degrees. Images captured during moonless periods from the Observatorio del Teide are square and cover 10 Lunas on each side, just over five degrees of arc.

    On the Andromeda galaxy.

    2
    The Andromeda Galaxy.

    Andromeda is the nearest giant spiral galaxy to Earth. In fact, it may be located at first in skies without light pollution. Therefore, it is often portrayed by astrophotography. In this case it was Daniel López, IAC collaborator, the author of this snapshot chosen today, January 8, as Astronomy Picture of the Day by NASA.

    Our neighboring galaxy has a diameter of about 220,000 light years in which almost a trillion stars that are 2.5 million light years away meet. This means that the photons recorded in the image left of it when hominids evolved in South Africa yet. However, more and it takes less time to reach us since the Andromeda Galaxy is approaching the Milky Way at a speed of 300 km / s.

    In the image a reddish clouds that seem to be around the Andromeda Galaxy are also appreciated. However, formed of ionized hydrogen gas, these clouds take a close – up photography and, in fact, are located in the Milky Way. As it would happen when we see the moon through the clouds.

    At first glance, it may seem quite small because only the central part of the galaxy is bright enough to be appreciated by the human eye, but its actual diameter equivalent to seven full moons seen from Earth. This ratio means better knowing that the image selected as APOD today is one which will form part of the exhibition “100 Lunas²”, which have been captured portions of the sky with an area of 10 moons high by 10 moons full width. This exhibition is part of “Niépce: from negative to positive” project, a tribute of astronomy to photography.

    Credit:
    Daniel Lopez / IAC.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teaching and outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.


    Gran Telescopio Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, SpainGran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 3:29 pm on December 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , IAC-Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands, ,   

    From IAC via Manu: “IAC astronomers find one of the first stars formed in the Milky Way” 


    Manu Garcia, a friend from IAC.

    The universe around us.
    Astronomy, everything you wanted to know about our local universe and never dared to ask.

    Dec. 19, 2017
    Contact IAC:
    David Sánchez Aguado
    aguado@iac.es

    Jonay I. González Hernández
    jonay@iac.es

    Researchers at the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) have identified, using the Gran Telescopio de Canarias (GTC) a star which is a key to the formation of the first chemical elements in the Galaxy. The results of this research are published today in the scientific journal The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

    1

    The study presents the discovery of one of the stars with the least content of “metals” (heavy elements). Known. Th estar is at 7,500 light years from Earth, in the halo of the Milky Way, and is along the line of sight to the constellation of the Lynx. The star is still on the Main Sequence, the stage at which most stars spend the major part of their lives. The source of energy of these stars is, as always, the fusión of hydrogen in their cores, and their surface temperaturas and luminosities are almost constant with time. Another of its properties is its low mass, around 0.7 times the mass of the Sun, although it has a surface temperatura 400 degrees hotter.

    This discovery was made using spectra obtained with OSIRIS (Optical System for Imaging and low-intermediate-Resolution Integrated Spectoscopy) on the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Garafía, La Palma).

    1
    OSIRIS on GTC

    Spectroscopy allows us to decompose the light of celestial objects to study their physical and chemical properties, and thanks to this we know that J0815+4729 has only a millionth part of the calcium and iron that the Sun contains, but it has a comparatively huge content of carbón, almost 15% of the solar abundance.

    “ We know of only a few stars (which can be counted on the fingers of a hand) of this type in the halo, where the oldest and most metal-poor stars in our Galaxy are found”, explains David Aguado, an FPI-SO (Severo Ochoa-Training of Research Personnel) research student at the IAC and the University of La Laguna (ULL) who si the first author of the article.

    “Theory predicts that these stars could form just after, and using material fom, the first supernovae, whose progenitors were the first massive stars in the Galaxy, around 300 million years after the Big Bang” says Jonay González Hernández, a Ramon y Cajal researcher at the IAC and one of the authors of the article. “In spite of its age, and of its distance away from us, we can still observe it” he adds.

    In fact this star was first identified from the SDASS (Sloan Digital Sky Survey) data base within the BOSS (Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey) project, and it was later observed with the ISIS intermediate dispersion spectrograph on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) of the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes which is also at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory.

    SDSS Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, NM, USA, Altitude 2,788 meters (9,147 ft)

    1
    ISIS intermediate dispersion spectrograph on the William Herschel Telescope (WHT) of the Isaac Newton Group of Telescopes

    Isaac Newton Group telescopes, at Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on La Palma in the Canary Islands, Spain, at an altitude of 2400m


    ING 4 meter William Herschel Telescope at Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on La Palma in the Canary Islands, 2,396 m (7,861 ft)

    “This star was tucked away in the data base of the BOSS project, among a million stellar spectra which we have analysed to identify it, which required a considerable observational and computational effort” stated Carlos Allende Prieto, another IAC researcher, and a coauthor of this article. “It needs high resolution spectroscopy on large telescopes to try to detect the verious chemical elements in the star which can help us to understand the first supernovae and their progenitors” he emphasized.

    In the near future the HORS high resolution spectrograph, at presently in a trial phse on the GTC, will be a key instrument for the chemical analysis of weak stars such as J0815+4729

    Rafael Rebolo, the director of the IAC and a coauthor of the paper, explains that “Detecting lithium gives us crucial information related to Big Bang nucleosynthesis. We are working on a spectrograph of high resolution and wide spectral range inorder to be able to measure (among other things) the detailed chemical composition of stars with unique properties such as J0815+4719”

    The Observatories of the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias (IAC) and the Gran Telescopio CANARIAS ( GTC) are part of the network of Singular Scientific and Technical Insfrastructure (ICTS) of Spain.

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teaching and outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.


    Gran Telescopio Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, SpainGran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 9:37 am on December 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , IAC-Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands, , The magnetism of black holes,   

    From IAC: “The magnetism of black holes” 

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    11/12/17

    The magnetism of black holes is surprisingly weak.

    1
    Artistic representation of a black hole with magnetic fields. Credit: Micheal McAaler / Uf News.

    According to a study published today in the journal Science, researchers at the University of Florida have discovered, with CIRCE instrument installed in the Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC) of the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory (Garafía, La Palma), these objects, which are characterized by an intense gravitational pull devouring stars and launches streams of matter into space at nearly the speed of light, have significantly weaker than previously thought magnetic fields.

    V404 Cygni , the first black hole seen from Earth by a team of researchers from the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC), the news again. This time, thanks to him we have obtained the first accurate measurements of the magnetic field that surrounds these celestial objects. The authors of the study, published today in the journal Science, have found that the magnetic energy around this black hole is 400 times less than the estimates provided for .

    With these new measurements, scientists can better understand how magnetism of black holes, deepening our understanding of how matter behaves under extreme conditions works. These new data could extend the limits of nuclear fusion energy and GPS systems and applied to other research to reveal how the jets (jets of particles) shoot out of these heavenly depths, while everything around them is absorbed by they.

    “Our measurements surprisingly low, will force new restrictions on the theoretical models previously focused on strong magnetic fields that accelerate and direct the jet flows” explains Stephen Eikenberry, a professor of astronomy at the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at the University of Florida and one of the study authors. Eikenberry says they did not expect these results.


    2
    William Herschel Telescope, La Palma., La Palma.

    The study’s authors developed the measurements from data collected during the outbreak in 2015 of jet black hole. This event was observed with the infrared camera CIRCE (Canarias InfraRed Camera Experiment), installed in the Gran Telescopio would win (GTC) and through Ultracam, the William Herschel Telescope, both at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (Garafía, La Palma) . X-ray observations of the California Institute of Technology and Space Telescope NASA NuSTAR were also used; and data arcminute Microkelvin Imager telescope located in the UK.

    NASA NuSTAR X-ray telescope

    3
    Arcminute Microkelvin Imager AMI cosmic microwave background CMB telescope Mullard Observatory Cambridge

    Yigit Dalilar, lead author, said that these explosions in black holes are ephemeral. In the case of outbreaks of V404 Cygni in 2015, barely they lasted a couple of weeks. “Watching him was something that happens once or twice in the race , ” said Dalilar. He noted that “this discovery puts us one step closer to understanding how the universe works.”

    The Gran Telescopio Canarias (GTC), installed at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (Garafía, La Palma) is part of the network of Singular Scientific and Technical Infrastructures (ICTS) of Spain.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teaching and outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.


    Gran Telescopio Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, SpainGran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 10:52 am on October 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , IAC-Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands, , Stars from outside the Milky Way   

    From Manu Garcia for IAC: “Stars from outside the Milky Way” 


    Manu Garcia, a friend from IAC.

    The universe around us.
    Astronomy, everything you wanted to know about our local universe and never dared to ask.

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    Discovered a new family of red giant stars with a strange chemical composition in the Milky Way.

    1
    Artistic representation of the chemical composition of the new population discovered traveling around the Milky Way in highly eccentric orbits (dashed white line) and the combined spectrum of APOGEE of atypical stars in a spectral window covering regions (shades of gray) around magnesium lines. Credit: JG Fernández-Trincado.

    The results of this research, published in The Astrophysical Journal Letters and which has participated IAC suggest an extragalactic origin outside the Milky Way, and help to understand how stars evolve and how the chemical elements inside are formed.

    Science, chance is a source of surprising discoveries. Open your eyes to the unknown. Even, sometimes, it changes the course of an investigation, a theory or a paradigm completely, what has happened in this discovery. While searching for fossil relics of early Milky Way, a scientific team stumbled upon an unexpected finding: a new family of giant stars with an unusual chemical composition according to the models of nucleosynthesis (nuclear fusion processes inside the stars where they originate new chemical elements). These stars are not only different from those of the Milky Way by its chemical composition, but also for its orbital properties, suggesting a possible extragalactic origin. Details of the discovery, which involved researchers from the Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands (IAC), were recently published in the journal The Astrophysical Journal Letters.

    “It is an extremely interesting fact because just outside globular clusters in our galaxy contains stars with remarkably similar to the stellar population discovered chemical patterns, suggesting a possible relationship,” said Olga Zamora, Astronomer support of the Canarian Observatories and research IAC postdoctoral research has led, along with JG Fernández-Trincado, a researcher at the University of Concepción (Chile).

    The equipment used data from the second phase Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment (APOGEE-2), usually used to map the chemical elements in the stars of the Milky Way (carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, aluminum and magnesium, among others), and giant observed 150,000 stars in the H band by high resolution spectrograph APOGEE, accessing regions obscured by the dust in the visible range.

    2
    Sloan Foundation 2.5 meter telescope at Apache Point, NM, USWA

    After processing the data, they found a chemically atypical stellar population compared to the stars of our galaxy or even any galactic globular cluster, cluster of stars known.

    Giant stars in question are very poor in magnesium unexpected considering its high levels of other elements such as nitrogen, aluminum and iron. “They could come from globular clusters dissociated in the past and whose distribution of elements not seen in any galactic globular cluster with similar chemical properties,” says IAC researcher and one of the authors of the article, Aníbal García-Hernández.

    “These stars may be born in a globular cluster with a history of different backgrounds and then have detached from it. If formed from a gas previously contaminated by a specific combination of massive stars, about 30 solar masses, and less massive stars, 4 to 8 solar masses, could explain its exceptional chemical “adds postdoc IAC and coauthor of work, Flavia Dell’Agli.

    These anomalous stars are ideal candidates living fossils from the early days of the Milky Way or even fossil relics of extragalactic globular clusters separated by tidal forces, the gravitational pull of the Milky Way.

    Now the team plans to use this finding to better understand the processes of nucleosynthesis and stellar evolution, and to find more giant stars with atypical chemical compositions, a key to improve our knowledge about the formation and evolution of our galaxy step.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teaching and outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.


    Gran Telescopio Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, SpainGran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
  • richardmitnick 9:07 am on July 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , IAC-Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands, Impressive Emissions Nebula IC 1396,   

    From Manu Garcia at IAC: “IC 1396: Emission Nebula in Cepheus 


    Manu Garcia, a friend from IAC.

    The universe around us.
    Astronomy, everything you wanted to know about our local universe and never dared to ask.

    IAC

    Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias – IAC

    1
    Credit and copyright: Cesar Blanco González

    The Impressive Emissions Nebula IC 1396 mixes the brilliant cosmic gas and dark dust clouds in the high and distant constellation of Cepheus. Energized by the brilliant central star you see here, this star-forming region extends over hundreds of light years, spanning more than three degrees in the sky, about 3.000 Light-years from planet earth. Among the intriguing dark forms within IC 1396, the elephant’s winding trunk nebula is located just below the center. The stars could still be forming within the dark shapes by gravitational collapse. But as the denser clouds are eroded by strong stellar winds and radiation, any star in formation will ultimately be cut off from the star reservoir. The magnificent color view is an image composition of narrow band filters, atomic oxygen emission mapping of the nebula, hydrogen and sulfur in blue, green and red tones.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

    The Instituto de Astrofísica, the headquarters, which is in La Laguna (Tenerife).
    The Centro de Astrofísica en La Palma (CALP)
    The Observatorio del Teide (OT), in Izaña (Tenerife).
    The Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos (ORM), in Garafía (La Palma).

    These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory(ENO).

    The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna and Spain’s Science Research Council (CSIC).

    The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

    The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

    The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

    The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teaching and outreachactivities.

    The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.


    Gran Telescopio Canarias at the Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on the island of La Palma, in the Canaries, SpainGran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC

     
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