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  • richardmitnick 2:33 pm on November 28, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , Hubble constant divergence, ,   

    From physicsworld.com: “Cosmic expansion rate remains a mystery despite new measurement” 

    physicsworld
    From physicsworld.com

    21 Nov 2018

    1
    Galaxy far away: an image taken by the Dark Energy Camera. (Courtesy: Fermilab)

    Dark Energy Survey


    Dark Energy Camera [DECam], built at FNAL


    NOAO/CTIO Victor M Blanco 4m Telescope which houses the DECam at Cerro Tololo, Chile, housing DECam at an altitude of 7200 feet

    A new value for the Hubble constant – the expansion rate of the universe — has been calculated by an international group of astrophysicists. The team used primordial distance scales to study more than 200 supernovae observed by telescopes in Chile and Australia. The new result agrees well with previous values of the constant obtained using a specific model of cosmic expansion, while disagreeing with more direct observations from the nearby universe – so exacerbating a long-running disagreement between cosmologists and astronomers.

    The Hubble constant is calculated by looking at distant celestial objects and determining how fast they are moving away from Earth. A plot of the speeds of the objects versus their distance from Earth falls on a straight line, the slope of which is the Hubble constant.

    Obtaining an object’s speed is straightforward and involves measuring the redshift of the light it emits, but quantifying its distance is much more complicated. Historically, this has been done using a “distance-ladder”, whereby progressively greater length scales are measured by using one type of “standard candle” to calibrate the output of another standard candle. The distance to stars known as Cepheid variables (one type of standard candle) is first established via parallax, and that information is used to calibrate the output of type Ia supernovae (another type of standard candle) located in galaxies containing Cepheids. The apparent brightness of other supernovae can then be used to work out distances to galaxies further away.

    Large discrepancy

    This approach has been refined over the years and has most recently yielded a Hubble constant of 73.5 ± 1.7 kilometres per second per magaparsec (one megaparsec being 3.25 million light-years). That number, however – obtained by starting close to Earth and moving outwards – is at odds with calculations of the Hubble constant that take the opposite approach — moving inwards from the dawn of time. The baseline in that latter case comes from length scales of temperature fluctuations in the radiation dating back to just after the Big Bang, known as the cosmic microwave background. The cosmic expansion rate at that time is extrapolated to the present day by assuming that the universe’s growth has accelerated under the influence of a particular kind of dark energy. Using the final results from the European Space Agency’s Planck satellite, a very different Hubble constant of 67.4 ± 0.5 is obtained.

    ESA/Planck 2009 to 2013

    To try to resolve the problem by using an alternative approach, scientists have in recent years created what is known as an “inverse distance ladder”. This also uses the cosmic microwave background as a starting point, but it calculates the expansion rate at a later time – about 10 billion years after the Big Bang – when the density fluctuations imprinted on the background radiation had grown to create clusters of galaxies distributed within “baryon acoustic oscillations”. The oscillations are used to calibrate the distance to supernovae – present in the galaxies – thanks to the fact that the oscillations lead to a characteristic separation between galaxies of 147 megaparsecs.

    In the latest work, the Dark Energy Survey collaboration draws on galaxy data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey as well as 207 newly-studied supernovae captured by the Dark Energy Camera mounted on the 4-metre Víctor M Blanco telescope in Chile. Using spectra obtained mainly at the similarly-sized Anglo-Australian Telescope in New South Wales, the collaboration calculates a value for the Hubble constant of 67.8 ± 1.3 – so agreeing with the Planck value while completely at odds with the conventional distance ladder.


    AAO Anglo Australian Telescope near Siding Spring, New South Wales, Australia, Altitude 1,100 m (3,600 ft)

    Siding Spring Mountain with Anglo-Australian Telescope dome visible near centre of image at an altitude of 1,165 m (3,822 ft)

    Fewer assumptions

    “The key thing with these results,“ says team member Ed Macaulay of the University of Portsmouth in the UK, “is that the only physics you need to assume is plasma physics in the early universe. You don’t need to assume anything about dark energy.”

    Adam Riess, an astrophysicist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, US who studies the distance-ladder, says that the new work “adds more weight” to the disparity in values of the Hubble constant obtained from the present and early universe.

    Cosmic Distance Ladder, skynetblogs


    Dark Energy Camera Enables Astronomers a Glimpse at the Cosmic Dawn. CREDIT National Astronomical Observatory of Japan

    (Indeed, the distance-ladder itself has gained independent support from expansion rates calculated using gravitational lensing.) He reckons that the similarity between the Planck and Dark Energy Survey results means that redshifts out to z=1 (going back about 8 billion years) are “probably not where the tension develops” and that the physics of the early universe might be responsible instead.

    Chuck Bennett of Johns Hopkins University, who led the team on Planck’s predecessor WMAP, agrees. He points to a new model put forward by his Johns Hopkins colleagues Marc Kamionkowski, Vivian Poulin and others that adds extra dark energy to the universe very early on (before rapidly decaying). This model, says Bennett, “proves that it is theoretically possible to find cosmological solutions to the Hubble constant tension”.

    Macaulay is more cautious. He acknowledges the difficulty of trying to find an error, reckoning that potential systematic effects in any of the measurements “are about ten times smaller” than the disparity. But he argues that more data are needed before any serious theoretical explanations can be put forward. To that end, he and his colleagues are attempting to analyse a further 2000 supernovae observed by the Dark Energy Camera, although they are doing so without the aid of (costly) spectroscopic analysis. Picking out the right kind of supernovae and then working out their redshift “will be very difficult,” he says, “and not something that has been done with this many supernovae before”.

    A preprint describing the research is available on arXiv.

    See the full article here .


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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.


    Stem Education Coalition

    PhysicsWorld is a publication of the Institute of Physics. The Institute of Physics is a leading scientific society. We are a charitable organisation with a worldwide membership of more than 50,000, working together to advance physics education, research and application.

    We engage with policymakers and the general public to develop awareness and understanding of the value of physics and, through IOP Publishing, we are world leaders in professional scientific communications.
    IOP Institute of Physics

     
  • richardmitnick 10:24 am on July 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Hubble constant divergence,   

    From NASA/ESA Hubble Telescope and ESA GAIA Mission: “Hubble and Gaia Team Up to Fuel Cosmic Conundrum” 

    NASA Hubble Banner

    NASA/ESA Hubble Telescope

    From NASA/ESA Hubble Telescope
    and

    ESA/GAIA satellite

    ESA GAIA Mission

    1
    Most precise measurement yet adds to debate over universe’s expansion rate

    Jul 12, 2018

    Ann Jenkins
    Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland
    410-338-4488
    jenkins@stsci.edu

    Ray Villard
    Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland
    410-338-4514
    villard@stsci.edu

    Adam Riess
    Space Telescope Science Institute, Baltimore, Maryland
    410-516-4474
    ariess@stsci.edu

    Using the powerful Hubble and Gaia space telescopes, astronomers just took a big step toward finding the answer to the Hubble constant, one of the most important and long-sought numbers in all of cosmology. This number measures the rate at which the universe is expanding since the big bang, 13.8 billion years ago. The constant is named for astronomer Edwin Hubble, who nearly a century ago discovered that the universe was uniformly expanding in all directions. Now, researchers have calculated this number with unprecedented accuracy.

    Intriguingly, the new results further intensify the discrepancy between measurements for the expansion rate of the nearby universe, and those of the distant, primeval universe — before stars and galaxies even existed. Because the universe is expanding uniformly, these measurements should be the same. The so-called “tension” implies that there could be new physics underlying the foundations of the universe.

    The Full Story

    Using the power and synergy of two space telescopes, astronomers have made the most precise measurement to date of the universe’s expansion rate.

    The results further fuel the mismatch between measurements for the expansion rate of the nearby universe, and those of the distant, primeval universe — before stars and galaxies even existed.

    This so-called “tension” implies that there could be new physics underlying the foundations of the universe. Possibilities include the interaction strength of dark matter, dark energy being even more exotic than previously thought, or an unknown new particle in the tapestry of space.

    Combining observations from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and the European Space Agency’s (ESA) Gaia space observatory, astronomers further refined the previous value for the Hubble constant, the rate at which the universe is expanding from the big bang 13.8 billion years ago.

    But as the measurements have become more precise, the team’s determination of the Hubble constant has become more and more at odds with the measurements from another space observatory, ESA’s Planck mission, which is coming up with a different predicted value for the Hubble constant.

    Planck mapped the primeval universe as it appeared only 360,000 years after the big bang. The entire sky is imprinted with the signature of the big bang encoded in microwaves. Planck measured the sizes of the ripples in this Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) that were produced by slight irregularities in the big bang fireball.

    CMB per ESA/Planck


    ESA/Planck 2009 to 2013

    The fine details of these ripples encode how much dark matter and normal matter there is, the trajectory of the universe at that time, and other cosmological parameters.

    These measurements, still being assessed, allow scientists to predict how the early universe would likely have evolved into the expansion rate we can measure today. However, those predictions don’t seem to match the new measurements of our nearby contemporary universe.

    “With the addition of this new Gaia and Hubble Space Telescope data, we now have a serious tension with the Cosmic Microwave Background data,” said Planck team member and lead analyst George Efstathiou of the Kavli Institute for Cosmology in Cambridge, England, who was not involved with the new work.

    “The tension seems to have grown into a full-blown incompatibility between our views of the early and late time universe,” said team leader and Nobel Laureate Adam Riess of the Space Telescope Science Institute and the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland. “At this point, clearly it’s not simply some gross error in any one measurement. It’s as though you predicted how tall a child would become from a growth chart and then found the adult he or she became greatly exceeded the prediction. We are very perplexed.”

    In 2005, Riess and members of the SHOES (Supernova H0 for the Equation of State) Team set out to measure the universe’s expansion rate with unprecedented accuracy. In the following years, by refining their techniques, this team shaved down the rate measurement’s uncertainty to unprecedented levels. Now, with the power of Hubble and Gaia combined, they have reduced that uncertainty to just 2.2 percent.

    Because the Hubble constant is needed to estimate the age of the universe, the long-sought answer is one of the most important numbers in cosmology. It is named after astronomer Edwin Hubble, who nearly a century ago discovered that the universe was uniformly expanding in all directions—a finding that gave birth to modern cosmology.

    Galaxies appear to recede from Earth proportional to their distances, meaning that the farther away they are, the faster they appear to be moving away. This is a consequence of expanding space, and not a value of true space velocity. By measuring the value of the Hubble constant over time, astronomers can construct a picture of our cosmic evolution, infer the make-up of the universe, and uncover clues concerning its ultimate fate.

    The two major methods of measuring this number give incompatible results. One method is direct, building a cosmic “distance ladder” from measurements of stars in our local universe.


    Cosmic distance ladder from measurements of stars in our local universe. http://dinosauriens.info/?u=Cosmic+distance+ladder++Wikipedia

    Another view:
    5
    http://www.google.com/url?sa=i&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=imgres&cd=&cad=rja&uact=8&ved=2ahUKEwjdleX46pncAhUlTd8KHSPbDB0QjB16BAgBEAQ&url=http%3A%2F%2Fdinosauriens.info%2F%3Fu%3DCosmic%2Bdistance%2Bladder%2B%2BWikipedia&psig=AOvVaw1Auejg5JGYw2VaC1bvmI2r&ust=1531494286412949

    The other method uses the CMB to measure the trajectory of the universe shortly after the Big Bang and then uses physics to describe the universe and extrapolate to the present expansion rate. Together, the measurements should provide an end-to-end test of our basic understanding of the so-called “Standard Model” of the universe. However, the pieces don’t fit.

    Using Hubble and newly released data from Gaia, Riess’ team measured the present rate of expansion to be 73.5 kilometers (45.6 miles) per second per megaparsec. This means that for every 3.3 million light-years farther away a galaxy is from us, it appears to be moving 73.5 kilometers per second faster. However, the Planck results predict the universe should be expanding today at only 67.0 kilometers (41.6 miles) per second per megaparsec. As the teams’ measurements have become more and more precise, the chasm between them has continued to widen, and is now about 4 times the size of their combined uncertainty.

    Over the years, Riess’ team has refined the Hubble constant value by streamlining and strengthening the “cosmic distance ladder,” used to measure precise distances to nearby and far-off galaxies. They compared those distances with the expansion of space, measured by the stretching of light from nearby galaxies. Using the apparent outward velocity at each distance, they then calculated the Hubble constant.

    To gauge the distances between nearby galaxies, his team used a special type of star as cosmic yardsticks or milepost markers. These pulsating stars, called Cephied variables, brighten and dim at rates that correspond to their intrinsic brightness. By comparing their intrinsic brightness with their apparent brightness as seen from Earth, scientists can calculate their distances.

    Gaia further refined this yardstick by geometrically measuring the distance to 50 Cepheid variables in the Milky Way. These measurements were combined with precise measurements of their brightnesses from Hubble. This allowed the astronomers to more accurately calibrate the Cepheids and then use those seen outside the Milky Way as milepost markers.

    “When you use Cepheids, you need both distance and brightness,” explained Riess. Hubble provided the information on brightness, and Gaia provided the parallax information needed to accurately determine the distances. Parallax is the apparent change in an object’s position due to a shift in the observer’s point of view. Ancient Greeks first used this technique to measure the distance from Earth to the Moon.

    “Hubble is really amazing as a general-purpose observatory, but Gaia is the new gold standard for calibrating distance. It is purpose-built for measuring parallax—this is what it was designed to do,” Stefano Casertano of Space Telescope Science Institute and a member of the SHOES Team added. “Gaia brings a new ability to recalibrate all past distance measures, and it seems to confirm our previous work. We get the same answer for the Hubble constant if we replace all previous calibrations of the distance ladder with just the Gaia parallaxes. It’s a crosscheck between two very powerful and precise observatories.”

    The goal of Riess’ team is to work with Gaia to cross the threshold of refining the Hubble constant to a value of only one percent by the early 2020s. Meanwhile, astrophysicists will likely continue to grapple with revisiting their ideas about the physics of the early universe.

    The Riess team’s latest results are published in the July 12 issue of The Astrophysical Journal.

    See the full article here .


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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    ESA GAIA Mission Objective
    A global space astrometry mission, Gaia will make the largest, most precise three-dimensional map of our Galaxy by surveying more than a thousand million stars.

    Mission
    Gaia will monitor each of its target stars about 70 times over a five-year period. It will precisely chart their positions, distances, movements, and changes in brightness. It is expected to discover hundreds of thousands of new celestial objects, such as extra-solar planets and brown dwarfs, and observe hundreds of thousands of asteroids within our own Solar System. The mission will also study about 500 000 distant quasars and will provide stringent new tests of Albert Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity.

    Gaia will create an extraordinarily precise three-dimensional map of more than a thousand million stars throughout our Galaxy and beyond, mapping their motions, luminosity, temperature and composition. This huge stellar census will provide the data needed to tackle an enormous range of important problems related to the origin, structure and evolutionary history of our Galaxy.

    For example, Gaia will identify which stars are relics from smaller galaxies long ago ‘swallowed’ by the Milky Way. By watching for the large-scale motion of stars in our Galaxy, it will also probe the distribution of dark matter, the invisible substance thought to hold our Galaxy together.

    Gaia will achieve its goals by repeatedly measuring the positions of all objects down to magnitude 20 (about 400 000 times fainter than can be seen with the naked eye).

    For all objects brighter than magnitude 15 (4000 times fainter than the naked eye limit), Gaia will measure their positions to an accuracy of 24 microarcseconds. This is comparable to measuring the diameter of a human hair at a distance of 1000 km.

    It will allow the nearest stars to have their distances measured to the extraordinary accuracy of 0.001%. Even stars near the Galactic centre, some 30 000 light-years away, will have their distances measured to within an accuracy of 20%.

    The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center manages the telescope. The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), is a free-standing science center, located on the campus of The Johns Hopkins University and operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) for NASA, conducts Hubble science operations.

    ESA50 Logo large

    AURA Icon

     
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