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  • richardmitnick 1:18 pm on February 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , FNAL Muon g-2,   

    From FNAL: “Muon Campus beamline enclosure achieves beneficial occupancy” 

    FNAL II photo

    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    February 3, 2016
    Rashmi Shivni

    FNAL Mu2e facility
    The Mu2e facility continues construction, south of Wilson Hall and, in this picture, is left of the completed MC-1 building. Both facilities are a part of the Muon Campus, along with the Muon Delivery Ring (not pictured). Photo: Tom Hamernik, FESS

    With the Muon g-2 and Mu2e experiments, Fermilab may uncover new physics that could solve discrepancies in the Standard Model, which maps our understanding of physics in the subatomic realm. Fermilab has been building a home for the two experiments – the Muon Campus – which began construction in 2013. It is also preparing for Muon g-2 to take beam in 2017.

    FNAL Muon g-2 studio
    Muon g-2 studio

    FNAL Mu2e experiment
    Mu2e

    Standard model with Higgs New
    The Standard Model of elementary particles (more schematic depiction), with the three generations of matter, gauge bosons in the fourth column, and the Higgs boson in the fifth.

    The lab met a major milestone last month, achieving beneficial occupancy on Dec. 9, for the Muon Campus’ underground beamline enclosure. The beamline links the muon experimentation facilities to the Muon Delivery Ring, which delivers beam to the Mu2e experiment. Beneficial occupancy is achieved when basic life safety systems, such as emergency lighting, fire alarms and communications, are in place.

    “That doesn’t mean the building is completely finished,” said Tom Hamernik, a FESS engineer and conventional construction manager for the Mu2e facility and beamline enclosure. “After the laboratory takes beneficial occupancy, there is a substantial period of experimental equipment installation before the facility is ready for experimentation.”

    The Muon Campus’ projected completion is in 2020.

    The Muon Campus is south of Wilson Hall, and it will be one of several experimental campuses that use the Recycler accelerator (located in the Main Injector ring). The MC-1 facility on the Muon Campus, which houses the Muon g-2 experiment, and the beamline enclosure are currently the two areas that have beneficial occupancy.

    “We’re at the peak of construction right now,” said Mary Convery, associate division head of the Accelerator Division.

    Convery oversees the Muon Campus program, which is broken into several, smaller projects. Most of the construction and civil engineering projects are complete, while the accelerator upgrades and the Mu2e building construction remain.

    The Particle Physics Division’s Alignment Group is using the lab’s beneficial occupancy to create a magnet alignment network inside the Muon Delivery Ring and the new beamline enclosures. The Accelerator Division is installing equipment, such as vacuum components, instrumentation cables, beamline magnets and water cooling systems. This work is beginning now and will continue for more than a year with many other divisions at Fermilab.

    “It’s a lot of coordination between divisions, and it’s turning into a one-lab type of mentality,” said Consolato Gattuso, the Accelerator Division summer shutdown manager and Muon Campus installation coordinator.

    The amount of time and effort that goes into constructing facilities like the Muon Campus can be daunting, Gattuso said. So the construction and installation crews manage their time wisely by planning and tackling each task in bite-sized pieces, keeping them on schedule. But challenges are also bound to arise from many areas in the construction process, since there are multiple, smaller facets to the project.

    The Mu2e building, for example, has many underground spaces, with ceilings as high as 20 feet, that must fit the 80-foot long, S-shaped Mu2e detector and supporting infrastructure.

    “The complex geometry of detailing and designing all the corners and walls, where everything comes together, creates a unique construction challenge for everybody involved,” Hamernik said.

    For Gattuso, the biggest challenge, besides the construction itself, may be planning and scheduling everyone’s tasks.

    “It’s not just having specialized people doing their work, but also knowing the appropriate pace we need to maintain to stay on schedule,” Gattuso said. “There’s a lot of shuffling that happens when we’re talking magnets that weigh somewhere between as little as 600 pounds and as much as 20 tons.”

    Although there is plenty work yet to be done, Fermilab benefits from having a wealth of existing inventory to draw from. For example, the former Antiproton Source (now the Muon Delivery Ring) and approximately 300 of the lab’s magnets are being repurposed for the two muon experiments.

    Construction and beneficial occupancy work are a part of the natural progression of building and innovating, Convery said, where innovation lies in gaining a firmer hold of fleeting particles such as muons.

    “Both experiments will be able to reach higher precision thanks to the new facilities and improved beam delivery that the Muon Campus provides,” she said. “We wouldn’t have these facilities if it weren’t for the many people who came together to make this a reality.”

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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    Fermilab Campus

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. Fermilab is America’s premier laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Thousands of scientists from universities and laboratories around the world
    collaborate at Fermilab on experiments at the frontiers of discovery.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:36 pm on December 22, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , FNAL Muon g-2, Kane County Chronical   

    From FNAL via Kane County Chronical: “Prepping for Muon g-2 experiment continues at Fermilab in Batavia” 

    FNAL II photo

    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    Temp 1

    Dec. 22, 2015
    CHARLES MENCHACA

    1

    When Rachel Osofsky saw a picture of a monitor readout on Sept. 22 in her email, she was thrilled.

    Osofky, a graduate student in physics at the University of Washington in Seattle, was waiting to see if a large electromagnet would turn on after being dormant for roughly a decade.

    The reading she saw in the picture signified that the 17-ton, 50-foot wide circular object was indeed operational.

    “After all the work that went into making that happen, it was really exciting,” Fermilab researcher Brendan Kiburg said.

    FNAL Muon g-2 studio
    Muon g-2 studio

    The magnet is an essential part of the Muon g-2 experiment. The experiment aims to study the properties of muons, or subatomic particles, so researchers can try to determine whether there are elementary particles beyond the ones already known.

    “The point is that we are trying to build a better periodic table of the components of nature,” Kiburg said. “It’s research for knowledge’s sake.”

    Researchers need the circular magnet so they can examine the interactions of the muons with a strong magnetic field.

    The ring was built in the 1990s at Brookhaven National Laboratory in New York for a similar experiment, one which found hints of new physics beyond what scientists have observed.

    The magnet had to be transported 3,200 miles across the country in 2013 from Brookhaven to Fermilab through special arrangements involving night trips and road closures.

    The magnet’s current home is in a new building on the Fermilab campus. Once placed in a magnetic field, the muons will figuratively race or spin about the area. The short-lived muons will be observed with instruments until they decay, Kiburg said.

    Muons live for only 64 millionths of a second, and they will take 150 billionths of a second to move around the ring, Kiburg said.

    The scientists have plenty of work to do before the experiments can begin by March 2017, said Aria Soha, installation manager for the Muon g-2 magnet,

    Part of the work involves shimming, or shaping the magnetic field around the magnet. The staff is doing this by making physical changes around the ring to see if it increases or decreases the magnetic field variance around the ring, said Osofsky, who is working on preparations for the experiment.

    “Some days you’re working with scissors, and some days the crane operator is working with the crane on it,” Osofsky said.

    A total of 150 people are working on the experiment on- and offsite, not including several Fermilab staff helping with the preparations, Soha said. The experiment receives support from the Department of Energy, Soha said, and the department is the main source of funding for Fermilab.

    Muons also will be used for a separate project located nearby known as the Mu2e, or the muon-to-electron conversion experiment.

    FNAL Mu2e solenoid
    Mu2e solenoid

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Fermilab Campus

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. Fermilab is America’s premier laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Thousands of scientists from universities and laboratories around the world
    collaborate at Fermilab on experiments at the frontiers of discovery.

     
  • richardmitnick 2:02 pm on January 23, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , FNAL Muon g-2,   

    From FNAL- “Frontier Science Result: Muon g-2 New detectors for the Muon g-2 experiment” 

    FNAL Home


    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    Friday, Jan. 23, 2015
    David Hertzog and Jarek Kaspar, University of Washington

    1
    Members of the Muon g-2 collaboration at Fermilab are developing this lead fluoride crystal, 14 centimeters long, and the large-area SiPMs for the experiment’s detector. They will help scientists measure more precisely the energies of particles from decaying muons, as well as the decay time of the particles.

    The Muon g-2 experiment at Fermilab is under construction in the new MC-1 building. It aims to measure with unprecedented precision — 140 parts per billion — a property of the muon called the anomalous magnetic dipole moment. The effort will improve upon the famous experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory, which finished data taking in 2001.

    The new Fermilab experiment aims to improve the precision with 20 times more data and by reducing key systematic uncertainties. These factors significantly affect the design of the detector, which measures the muon decay data used to deduce the magnetic dipole moment.

    Now, after six years and four beam tests, members of the original team from Brookhaven along with several new collaborators have finished testing a production prototype of a new calorimeter — the detector that measures particle energies and decay time — for the Fermilab experiment. The new calorimeter design improves on its Brookhaven counterpart by reducing something called detector pile-up, which occurs when two particles strike a detector in rapid succession, and with custom electronics that can withstand higher signal rates. To address these issues, the collaboration will segment the electromagnetic calorimeter into 54 independent elements, and the signal in each of these will have an ultrashort duration in time.

    The Fermilab accelerator complex will deliver a beam of polarized muons into a storage ring, which guides the muons around a circular path. Fermilab will deliver the muons at a much higher rate than the Brookhaven experiment. The detectors, positioned along the inside of the ring, are designed to operate near, but not disturb, the highly uniform and strong magnetic field of the storage ring. A combination of lead fluoride crystals, which convert deposited energy into Cherenkov photons (light), and devices called silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), which collect photons, serves these purposes well.

    2
    Cherenkov radiation glowing in the core of the Advanced Test Reactor at INL.
    a
    ATR

    p
    Photomultiplier

    After a positive muon stored in the magnetic ring decays into a positron and a pair of neutrinos, the positron curls inward and hits a calorimeter station. Its energy is converted into many thousands of Cherenkov photons in the 14-centimeter-long crystals. The conversion process takes less than a few nanoseconds. Some thousands of these photons successfully propagate through the crystal and strike a SiPM adhered to the crystal’s rear face. This photodetector preserves the very fast nature of the incoming photon pulse and faithfully encodes it into an equally narrow charge pulse, which is finally digitized by electronics.

    The collaboration performed a study at SLAC of a prototype array of 28 crystals read out by 16-channel large-area SiPMs. This electromagnetic calorimeter is a half-size prototype for one of the 24 stations that are required for the experiment. Analysis of the data indicates that the new design will handle the high rate at Fermilab and reduce the dreaded pile-up as planned.

    To date, the detector team has received 500 of the 1,300 crystals needed and is continuing to prepare for the production of the custom SiPM boards and the overall mechanical housings and stands. The equipment will be shipped to Fermilab in spring 2016 and assembled here into the 24 stations that summer. The Muon g-2 experiment is scheduled to start running in early 2017.

    The results of the beam test and associated R&D were recently submitted to NIM-A, the first technical publication for the new experiment.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Fermilab Campus

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics.

     
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