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  • richardmitnick 11:29 am on July 20, 2016 Permalink | Reply
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    From FNAL: “Mu2e reaches its CD-3 milestone” 

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    FNAL Art Image
    FNAL Art Image by Angela Gonzales

    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    Mu2e reaches its CD-3 milestone

    July 20, 2016
    Ron Ray

    The Mu2e Project achieved a significant milestone on July 14 when Pat Dehmer, deputy director for science programs in the DOE Office of Science, approved Critical Decision 3 (CD-3), which authorizes start of full construction.

    FNAL Mu2e experiment
    FNAL Mu2e experiment

    Mu2e is an experiment designed to identify charged-lepton flavor violation by searching for muons converting into electrons in the field of a nucleus with unprecedented sensitivity.

    CD-3 approval comes less than a month after a DOE review of Mu2e that was held from June 14-16. The review committee recommended CD-3 approval while noting that each of the prerequisites for CD-3 had been met, commenting that the “project is well-organized and sufficiently staffed by a highly competent and experienced management team.” They determined that the Mu2e design satisfied the science requirements.

    Mu2e had previously been granted CD-3a and CD-3b approvals to begin procurement of long-lead items, including 75 kilometers of superconducting cable and the Mu2e detector hall. Sixty-five kilometers of cable have been delivered and accepted, and the detector hall is currently more than 80 percent complete.

    Deputy Project Manager Julie Whitmore and I lead the Mu2e Project, and we are supported by a large and highly competent project team, as well as the Mu2e collaboration.

    Congratulations to everyone on Mu2e for this outstanding accomplishment.

    Ron Ray is the project leader for Mu2e.

    See the full article here .

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    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. Fermilab is America’s premier laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Thousands of scientists from universities and laboratories around the world
    collaborate at Fermilab on experiments at the frontiers of discovery.

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  • richardmitnick 1:18 pm on February 3, 2016 Permalink | Reply
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    From FNAL: “Muon Campus beamline enclosure achieves beneficial occupancy” 

    FNAL II photo

    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    February 3, 2016
    Rashmi Shivni

    FNAL Mu2e facility
    The Mu2e facility continues construction, south of Wilson Hall and, in this picture, is left of the completed MC-1 building. Both facilities are a part of the Muon Campus, along with the Muon Delivery Ring (not pictured). Photo: Tom Hamernik, FESS

    With the Muon g-2 and Mu2e experiments, Fermilab may uncover new physics that could solve discrepancies in the Standard Model, which maps our understanding of physics in the subatomic realm. Fermilab has been building a home for the two experiments – the Muon Campus – which began construction in 2013. It is also preparing for Muon g-2 to take beam in 2017.

    FNAL Muon g-2 studio
    Muon g-2 studio

    FNAL Mu2e experiment
    Mu2e

    Standard model with Higgs New
    The Standard Model of elementary particles (more schematic depiction), with the three generations of matter, gauge bosons in the fourth column, and the Higgs boson in the fifth.

    The lab met a major milestone last month, achieving beneficial occupancy on Dec. 9, for the Muon Campus’ underground beamline enclosure. The beamline links the muon experimentation facilities to the Muon Delivery Ring, which delivers beam to the Mu2e experiment. Beneficial occupancy is achieved when basic life safety systems, such as emergency lighting, fire alarms and communications, are in place.

    “That doesn’t mean the building is completely finished,” said Tom Hamernik, a FESS engineer and conventional construction manager for the Mu2e facility and beamline enclosure. “After the laboratory takes beneficial occupancy, there is a substantial period of experimental equipment installation before the facility is ready for experimentation.”

    The Muon Campus’ projected completion is in 2020.

    The Muon Campus is south of Wilson Hall, and it will be one of several experimental campuses that use the Recycler accelerator (located in the Main Injector ring). The MC-1 facility on the Muon Campus, which houses the Muon g-2 experiment, and the beamline enclosure are currently the two areas that have beneficial occupancy.

    “We’re at the peak of construction right now,” said Mary Convery, associate division head of the Accelerator Division.

    Convery oversees the Muon Campus program, which is broken into several, smaller projects. Most of the construction and civil engineering projects are complete, while the accelerator upgrades and the Mu2e building construction remain.

    The Particle Physics Division’s Alignment Group is using the lab’s beneficial occupancy to create a magnet alignment network inside the Muon Delivery Ring and the new beamline enclosures. The Accelerator Division is installing equipment, such as vacuum components, instrumentation cables, beamline magnets and water cooling systems. This work is beginning now and will continue for more than a year with many other divisions at Fermilab.

    “It’s a lot of coordination between divisions, and it’s turning into a one-lab type of mentality,” said Consolato Gattuso, the Accelerator Division summer shutdown manager and Muon Campus installation coordinator.

    The amount of time and effort that goes into constructing facilities like the Muon Campus can be daunting, Gattuso said. So the construction and installation crews manage their time wisely by planning and tackling each task in bite-sized pieces, keeping them on schedule. But challenges are also bound to arise from many areas in the construction process, since there are multiple, smaller facets to the project.

    The Mu2e building, for example, has many underground spaces, with ceilings as high as 20 feet, that must fit the 80-foot long, S-shaped Mu2e detector and supporting infrastructure.

    “The complex geometry of detailing and designing all the corners and walls, where everything comes together, creates a unique construction challenge for everybody involved,” Hamernik said.

    For Gattuso, the biggest challenge, besides the construction itself, may be planning and scheduling everyone’s tasks.

    “It’s not just having specialized people doing their work, but also knowing the appropriate pace we need to maintain to stay on schedule,” Gattuso said. “There’s a lot of shuffling that happens when we’re talking magnets that weigh somewhere between as little as 600 pounds and as much as 20 tons.”

    Although there is plenty work yet to be done, Fermilab benefits from having a wealth of existing inventory to draw from. For example, the former Antiproton Source (now the Muon Delivery Ring) and approximately 300 of the lab’s magnets are being repurposed for the two muon experiments.

    Construction and beneficial occupancy work are a part of the natural progression of building and innovating, Convery said, where innovation lies in gaining a firmer hold of fleeting particles such as muons.

    “Both experiments will be able to reach higher precision thanks to the new facilities and improved beam delivery that the Muon Campus provides,” she said. “We wouldn’t have these facilities if it weren’t for the many people who came together to make this a reality.”

    See the full article here .

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    Fermilab Campus

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. Fermilab is America’s premier laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Thousands of scientists from universities and laboratories around the world
    collaborate at Fermilab on experiments at the frontiers of discovery.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:44 pm on July 15, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    From FNAL: “Mu2e’s opportunistic run on the Open Science Grid” 

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    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    July 15, 2015
    Hanah Chang

    1
    To conduct full event simulations, Mu2e requires time on more than one computing grid. This graphic shows, by the size of each area, the fraction of the recent Mu2e simulation production through Fermigrid, the University of Nebraska, CMS computing at Caltech, MIT and Fermilab, the ATLAS Midwest and Michigan Tier-2s (MWT2 and AGLT2), Syracuse University (SU-OSG). and other sites — all accessed through the Open Science Grid. No image credit

    Scientists in Fermilab’s Mu2e collaboration are facing a challenging task: In order to get DOE approval to build their experiment and take data, they must scale up the simulations used to design their detector.

    FNAL Mu2e experiment
    Mu2E

    Their aim is to complete this simulation campaign, as they call it, in time for the next DOE critical-decision review, which Mu2e hopes will give the green light to proceed with experiment construction and data taking. The team estimated that they would need the computing capacity of about 4,000 CPUs for four to five months (followed by a much smaller need for the rest of the year). Because of the large size of the campaign and the limited computing resources at Fermilab, which are shared among all the lab’s experiments, the Mu2e team adapted their workflow and data management systems to run a majority of the simulations at sites other than Fermilab. They then ran simulations across the Open Science Grid using distributed high-throughput computer facilities.

    Mu2e scientist Andrei Gaponenko explained that last year, Mu2e used more than their allocation of computing by using any and all available CPU cycles not used by other experiments locally on FermiGrid. The experiment decided to continue this concept on the Open Science Grid, or OSG, by running “opportunistically” on as many available remote computing resources as possible.

    “There were some technical hurdles to overcome,” Gaponenko said. Not only did the scripts have to be able to see the Mu2e software, but also all of the remote sites — more than 25 — had to be able to run this software, which was originally installed at Fermilab. Further, the local operating system software needed to be compatible.

    “A lot of people worked very hard to make this possible,” he said. Members of the OSG Production Support team helped support the endeavor — getting Mu2e authorized to run at the remote sites and helping debug problems with the job processing and data handling. Members of the Scientific Computing Division supported the experiment’s underlying scripts, software and data management tools.

    The move to use OSG proved valuable, even with the inevitable hurdles of starting something new.

    “As Mu2e experimenters, we are pilot users on OSG, and we are grabbing cycles opportunistically whenever we can. We had issues, but we solved them,” said Rob Kutschke, Mu2e analysis coordinator. “While we did not expect things to work perfectly the first time, very quickly we were able to get many hundreds of thousands of CPU hours per day.”

    Ray Culbertson, Mu2e production coordinator, agreed.

    “We exceeded our baseline goals, met the stretch goals and will continue to maintain schedule,” Culbertson said.

    Ken Herner, a member of the support team in the Scientific Computing Division that helped the experimenters port their applications to OSG, hopes that Mu2e will serve as an example for more experiments that currently conduct their event processing computing locally at Fermilab.

    “The important thing is demonstrating to other experiments here that it can work and it can work really well,” Herner said. “Ideally, this sort of running should become the norm. What you really want is to just submit the job, and if it runs on site, great. And if it runs off site, great — just give me as many resources as possible.”

    See the full article here.

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    Fermilab Campus

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. Fermilab is America’s premier laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Thousands of scientists from universities and laboratories around the world
    collaborate at Fermilab on experiments at the frontiers of discovery.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:23 am on April 21, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    From Symmetry: “Mu2e breaks ground on experiment” 

    Symmetry

    April 21, 2015
    Diana Kwon

    1

    Scientists seek rare muon conversion that could signal new physics.

    This weekend, members of the Mu2e collaboration dug their shovels into the ground of Fermilab’s Muon Campus for the experiment that will search for the direct conversion of a muon into an electron in the hunt for new physics.

    For decades, the Standard Model has stood as the best explanation of the subatomic world, describing the properties of the basic building blocks of matter and the forces that govern them.

    2
    Standard Model of Particle Physics. The diagram shows the elementary particles of the Standard Model (the Higgs boson, the three generations of quarks and leptons, and the gauge bosons), including their names, masses, spins, charges, chiralities, and interactions with the strong, weak and electromagnetic forces. It also depicts the crucial role of the Higgs boson in electroweak symmetry breaking, and shows how the properties of the various particles differ in the (high-energy) symmetric phase (top) and the (low-energy) broken-symmetry phase (bottom).

    However, challenges remain, including that of unifying gravity with the other fundamental forces or explaining the matter-antimatter asymmetry that allows our universe to exist. Physicists have since developed new models, and detecting the direct conversion of a muon to an electron would provide evidence for many of these alternative theories.

    “There’s a real possibility that we’ll see a signal because so many theories beyond the Standard Model naturally allow muon-to-electron conversion,” said Jim Miller, a co-spokesperson for Mu2e. “It’ll also be exciting if we don’t see anything, since it will greatly constrain the parameters of these models.”

    Muons and electrons are two different flavors in the charged-lepton family. Muons are 200 times more massive than electrons and decay quickly into lighter particles, while electrons are stable and live forever. Most of the time, a muon decays into an electron and two neutrinos, but physicists have reason to believe that once in a blue moon, muons will convert directly into an electron without releasing any neutrinos. This is physics beyond the Standard Model.

    Under the Standard Model, the muon-to-electron direct conversion happens too rarely to ever observe. In more sophisticated models, however, this occurs just frequently enough for an extremely sensitive machine to detect.

    The Mu2e detector, when complete, will be the instrument to do this.

    FNAL Mu2e solenoid
    Mu2E solenoid

    The 92-foot-long apparatus will have three sections, each with its own superconducting magnet. Its unique S-shape was designed to capture as many slow muons as possible with an aluminum target. The direct conversion of a muon to an electron in an aluminum nucleus would release exactly 105 million electronvolts of energy, which means that if it occurs, the signal in the detector will be unmistakable. Scientists expect Mu2e to be 10,000 times more sensitive than previous attempts to see this process.

    Construction will now begin on a new experimental hall for Mu2e. This hall will eventually house the detector and the infrastructure needed to conduct the experiment, such as the cryogenic systems to cool the superconducting magnets and the power systems to keep the machine running.

    “What’s nice about the groundbreaking is that it becomes a real thing. It’s a long haul, but we’ll get there eventually, and this is a start,” said Julie Whitmore, deputy project manager for Mu2e.

    The detector hall will be complete in late 2016. The experiment, funded mainly by the Department of Energy Office of Science, is expected to begin in 2020 and run for three years until peak sensitivity is reached.

    “This is a project that will be moving along for many years. It won’t just be one shot,” said Stefano Miscetti, the leader of the Italian INFN group, Mu2e’s largest international collaborator. “If we observe something, we will want to measure it better. If we don’t, we will want to increase the sensitivity.”

    Physicists around the world are working to extend the frontiers of the Standard Model. One hundred seventy-eight people from 31 institutions are coming together for Mu2e to make a significant impact on this venture.

    “We’re sensitive to the same new physics that scientists are searching for at the Large Hadron Collider, we just look for it in a complementary way,” said Ron Ray, Mu2e project manager. “Even if the LHC doesn’t see new physics, we could see new physics here.”

    See the full article here.

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    Symmetry is a joint Fermilab/SLAC publication.


     
  • richardmitnick 11:48 am on March 3, 2015 Permalink | Reply
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    From FNAL: “Detecting something with nothing” 

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    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    Tuesday, March 3, 2015
    Lauren Biron

    1
    From left: Jason Bono (Rice University), Dan Ambrose (University of Minnesota) and Richie Bonventre (Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory) work on the Mu2e straw chamber tracker unit at Lab 3. Photo: Reidar Hahn

    Researchers are one step closer to finding new physics with the completion of a harp-shaped prototype detector element for the Mu2e experiment.

    FNAL Mu2e experiment
    Mu2e

    Mu2e will look for the conversion of a muon to only an electron (with no other particles emitted) — something predicted but never before seen. This experiment will help scientists better understand how these heavy cousins of the electron decay. A successful sighting would bring us nearer to a unifying theory of the four forces of nature.

    The experiment will be 10,000 times as sensitive as other experiments looking for this conversion, and a crucial part is the detector that will track the whizzing electrons. Researchers want to find one whose sole signature is its energy of 105 MeV, indicating that it is the product of the elusive muon decay.

    In order to measure the electron, scientists track the helical path it takes through the detector. But there’s a catch. Every interaction with detector material skews the path of the electron slightly, disturbing the measurement. The challenge for Mu2e designers is thus to make a detector with as little material as possible, says Mu2e scientist Vadim Rusu.

    “You want to detect the electron with nothing — and this is as close to nothing as we can get,” he said.

    So how to detect the invisible using as little as possible? That’s where the Mu2e tracker design comes in. Panels made of thin straws of metalized Mylar, each only 15 microns thick, will sit inside a cylindrical magnet. Rusu says that these are the thinnest straws that people have ever used in a particle physics experiment.

    These straws, filled with a combination of argon and carbon dioxide gas and threaded with a thin wire, will wait in vacuum for the electrons. Circuit boards placed on both ends of the straws will gather the electrical signal produced when electrons hit the gas inside the straw. Scientists will measure the arrival times at each end of the wire to help accurately plot the electron’s overall trajectory.

    “This is another tricky thing that very few have attempted in the past,” Rusu said.

    The group working on the Mu2e tracker electronics have also created the tiny, low-power circuit boards that will sit at the end of each straw. With limited space to run cooling lines, necessary features that whisk away heat that would otherwise sit in the vacuum, the electronics needed to be as cool and small as possible.

    “We actually spent a lot of time designing very low-power electronics,” Rusu said.

    This first prototype, which researchers began putting together in October, gives scientists a chance to work out kinks, improve design and assembly procedures, and develop the necessary components.

    One lesson already learned? Machining curved metal with elongated holes that can properly hold the straws is difficult and expensive. The solution? Using 3-D printing to make a high-tech, transparent plastic version instead.

    Researchers also came up with a system to properly stretch the straws into place. While running a current through the straw, they use a magnet to pluck the straw — just like strumming a guitar string — and measure the vibration. This lets them set the proper tension that will keep the straw straight throughout the lifetime of the experiment.

    Although the first prototype of the tracker is complete, scientists are already hard at work on a second version (using the 3D-printed plastic), which should be ready in June or July. The prototype will then be tested for leaks and to see if the electronics pick up and transmit signals properly.

    A recent review of Mu2e went well, and Rusu expects work on the tracker construction to begin in 2016.

    See the full article here.

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  • richardmitnick 4:39 pm on December 26, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From Yale- “Research in the News: Yale joins the Mu2e physics collaboration” 

    Yale University bloc

    Yale University

    December 15, 2014

    Jim Shelton
    james.shelton@yale.edu
    203-361-8332

    A research team led by Yale physicist Sarah Demers has been accepted into an international collaboration to push the known boundaries of physics.

    The Mu2e Collaboration — the muon-to-electron conversion experiment — is based at the Fermilab facility in Illinois and includes 23 universities and 10 domestic and international research laboratories. Its mission is to probe physics questions at energy scales 1,000 times higher than what can be attempted at other experiment sites.

    m
    The Mu2e detector is a particle physics detector embedded in a series of superconducting magnets, as shown here.

    In the experiment, a beam of muons (heavy, unstable subatomic particles) will be produced from protons that interact with a tungsten target. The muons, in turn, will convert to electrons. The Demers group will contribute its experience with triggering and data acquisition for the experiment.

    “Many ideas that physicists have had — new theories — if true, would result in this reaction happening at a measurable rate,” Demers said.

    The Mu2e experiment is one of several experiments around the world currently probing new areas of physics. In Switzerland, for example, the ATLAS experiment at the Large Hadron Collider will resume in 2015 after upgrades to run at higher energy. Yale physicists Keith Baker, Paul Tipton and Demers have research groups involved in the ATLAS experiment.

    See the full article here.

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  • richardmitnick 1:10 pm on December 9, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From FNAL: “Digging begins for Muon g-2 and Mu2e beamlines” 


    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    Tuesday, Dec. 9, 2014
    Rich Blaustein

    This month construction has commenced on beamline tunnel extensions for Fermilab’s two muon experiments, Mu2e and Muon g-2.

    2
    A team of physicists from all over the world, including postdocal researchers and graduate and undergraduate students, are working together to design, test, and build the Mu2e experiment. The Mu2e Collaboration is comprised of over one hundred physicists and continues to grow.

    w
    Mu2e will have the ability to indirectly probe energy scales well beyond the terascale being explored at the LHC. At these higher energies the effects of new particles or new forces may become evident and may provide evidence that the four known forces that govern particle interations – the gravitational, electromagnetic, weak and strong forces – unify at some ultra-high energy. (Credit: symmetry magazine/Sandbox Studio)

    t
    The Mu2e detector is a particle physics detector embedded in a series of superconducting magnets. The magnets are designed to create a low-energy muon beam that can be stopped in a thin aluminum stopping target. The magnets also provide a constant magnetic field in the detector region that allows the momentum of the conversion electrons to be accurately determined. These superconducting magnets are big. The first, to the left, is about 12 feet long at 4.5 Tesla; the middle, S-shaped section about 40 feet along the curve at about 2 Tesla, and the third about 30 ft long and almost six feet across at 1 Tesla. The Earth’s field, for comparison, is 0.0006 Tesla.
    (Credit: symmetry magazine)

    g2
    Muon g-2 (pronounced gee minus two) will use Fermilab’s powerful accelerators to explore the interactions of short-lived particles known as muons with a strong magnetic field in “empty” space. Scientists know that even in a vacuum, space is never empty. Instead, it is filled with an invisible sea of virtual particles that—in accordance with the laws of quantum physics—pop in and out of existence for incredibly short moments of time. Scientists can test the presence and nature of these virtual particles with particle beams traveling in a magnetic field.

    In the area of the current Delivery Ring (the former Antiproton Debuncher), southwest of the Booster, the existing beam tunnel will be extended approximately 200 feet, at which point it will branch in two separate directions. The Muon g-2 tunnel, about 75 feet long, will terminate in the MC-1 Building, which houses the experiment’s muon storage ring. The Mu2e tunnel, around 550 feet long, will head toward a new building to be constructed for the experiment. Construction is expected to take one year. The start of the construction of the Mu2e building is planned for 2015.

    g
    Fermilab has begun construction on new beamlines for its muon programs, Muon g-2 and Mu2e. Image: Fermilab

    Digging for the tunnels began this month. Part of Kautz Road will become permanently inaccessible, with a detour from South Booster Road and Indian Creek Road serving as the new road.

    Fermilab Accelerator Division physicist Mary Convery, who oversees the Muon Campus program, coordinated the tunnel designs with Tom Lackowski, project manager; Rod Jedziniak, project design coordinator; and Tim Trout, project construction coordinator, all of FESS.

    The primary challenge in constructing the beamlines will be in accommodating fixed features and structures, both man-made and natural.

    “The locations of the g-2 and Mu2e buildings were fairly fixed because there are already utility corridors underground,” Convery said. “There are also wetlands that we are trying not to disturb.”

    Convery said that these physical constraints were important considerations in designing the experiments’ beamlines, since the space available to accomplish the necessary beam manipulations was limited.

    “It is not only the geometry of the beamlines that we have to conform to,” Lackowski said. “We also have to make sure the many services — the cable trays and the water services for cooling — are all coordinated.”

    Because the two muon experiments use the same beamlines at different energies, they cannot be run simultaneously.

    For both experiments, protons will proceed through the Linac, course through the Booster and then travel through the Recycler. A set of beamlines connects the Recycler to the Muon Campus. For the Muon g-2 experiment, the proton beam hits a target, converting the beam to a mixture of pions, protons and muons. The particles circle the Muon Delivery Ring several times, where protons are then removed and the remaining pions decay into muons. When the Muon g-2 experiment is taking data, the muon beam will continue to the experiment in the MC-1 Building.

    In contrast, for the Mu2e experiment, the protons bypass the target station and are transported to the Delivery Ring. The Mu2e protons also circle the Delivery Ring, then continue as an all-proton beam to the target in the Mu2e building area.

    Convery says work is also being done on other technical upgrades, such as installing magnets, along the beamline route.

    She expects the Muon g-2 experiment to begin in 2017, with Mu2e starting later, as scheduled.

    “Fermilab people have worked together for many years on various beamline projects,” Lackowski said. “We have had a very tight relationship with Mary and other colleagues, so we believe the Muon Campus tunnel project will go well.”

    See the full article here.

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  • richardmitnick 2:56 pm on October 28, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From FNAL: “Mu2e moves ahead” 


    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    Tuesday, Oct. 28, 2014
    nl
    Fermilab Director Nigel Lockyer wrote this column

    In continued alignment with goals laid out in the P5 report, we’re making progress on our newest muon experiment, Mu2e. A four-day DOE Critical Decision 2/3b review of the experiment concluded Friday. The review went extremely well and validated the design, technical progress, and the cost and schedule of the project. The reviewers praised the depth and breadth of our staff’s excellent technical work and preparation. Official sign-off for CD-2/3b is expected in the next several months, followed by construction on the Mu2e building in early 2015. Construction on the transport solenoid modules should begin in the spring. The experiment received CD-0 approval in 2009 and CD-1 approval in 2012 and is slated to start up in 2020.

    Named for the muon-to-electron conversion that researchers hope to observe, Mu2e is a crucial stepping stone on our journey beyond the Standard Model. and in the hunt for new physics. It will be 10,000 times more sensitive than the previous attempts to observe that transition.

    sm
    The Standard Model of elementary particles, with the three generations of matter, gauge bosons in the fourth column, and the Higgs boson in the fifth.

    Experimenters will use a series of superconducting magnets to separate muons from other particles, guiding them to a stopping target. After the muons have been captured by aluminum nuclei, a very small number are expected to transform into only an electron rather than the typical decay into an electron and two neutrinos. It’s a change so rare, theorists liken it to finding a penny with a scratch on Lincoln’s head hidden in a stack of pristine pennies so tall that the stack stretches from the Earth to Mars and back again 130 times.

    The experiment will provide insight into how and why particles within one family change into others. It might also help narrow down theories about how the universe works and provide insight into data coming out of the LHC. Discovery of the muon-to-electron conversion would hint at undiscovered particles or forces and potentially illuminate a grand unification theory — not bad for a 75-foot-long experiment.

    Many months of hard work preceded last week’s review. Thank you to all who were involved in helping to move this important experiment forward.

    See the full article here.

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    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics.

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  • richardmitnick 1:44 pm on July 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply
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    From Fermilab: “Director’s Corner – Mu2e moves forward” 


    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    Tuesday, July 22, 2014
    nl
    Fermilab Director
    Nigel Lockyer

    Today’s column shines a spotlight on the next major experiment proposed to be built at Fermilab: Mu2e. The recent P5 report placed Mu2e first in line for construction among major projects, to be followed immediately by the high-luminosity LHC and then by LBNF.

    Mu2e solenoid
    Mu2e solenoid

    LBNF
    LBNF

    The Mu2e project took a big step forward two weeks ago when DOE approved the CD-3a step in the construction process. Until now, the team had been focused on the development of a detailed design for the experiment, including modifications to the Fermilab accelerator facility and a new hall to house the detector. CD-3a approval means that the team can purchase 45 miles of custom-made superconducting cables for the experiment’s solenoid magnets.

    Mu2e stands for muon-to-electron conversion, which tells you exactly what the 155 scientists working on the experiment will use it to search for. The collaboration has spent five years designing a sophisticated apparatus that will be used to search for the spontaneous conversion of muons into electrons in the vicinity of an atomic nucleus. While there are many predictions for how this conversion could happen, none are included in the Standard Model of particle physics. So if the conversion is detected, it’s a clear signal for new physics.

    sm
    The Standard Model of elementary particles, with the three generations of matter, gauge bosons in the fourth column, and the Higgs boson in the fifth.

    The experiment’s complex magnet system uses four different types of superconductors that required a year of R&D to develop, including an exhaustive series of tests both at vendors and at the lab. It will take two separate vendors over a year to fabricate all of the conductor required, so the DOE’s approval of this long-lead procurement will allow the experiment to accelerate its schedule to be ready to take physics data in 2020.

    Mu2e is proposed to join the Muon g-2 project on Fermilab’s new Muon Campus, making excellent use of the muon beams that our accelerator complex will provide starting later this decade.

    muon g 2
    Muon g-2

    Congratulations to Ron Ray for leading the project team through a successful CD-3a review and to the Technical Division for carrying out the conductor R&D under Mike Lamm’s leadership, with Vito Lombardo heading up the quality assurance work. And thanks very much to the whole collaboration for their work to define the science requirements that drive the experiment, which P5 has recognized as of critical importance for our field.

    See the full article here.

    Fermilab Campus

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics.


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  • richardmitnick 3:16 pm on December 16, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , FNAL Mu2e, , ,   

    From Symmetry: “Mu2e attracts magnet experts” 

    December 16, 2013
    Andre Salles

    By tapping into specialized knowledge around the world, the Mu2e collaboration will undertake a first-of-its-kind experiment.

    mu23
    Read the full article to learn about this ingenious device.

    Fermilab’s http://mu2e.fnal.gov/experiment is unlike anything ever attempted. So when the collaboration needed a first-of-its-kind magnet prototype built, they turned to an institution known for its magnet expertise: the Genoa section of the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics, or INFN, located in the University of Genoa in Italy.

    Earlier this year, INFN-Genoa became the sixth Italian institution to join the Mu2e collaboration, which now sports more than 150 members from 28 labs and universities in the United States, Italy and Russia. The team of magnet experts there has decades of experience working on high-energy physics experiments—they helped design and build magnets for BaBar at SLAC and, more recently, the CMS detector at CERN.

    Now they’re putting that knowledge toward building prototypes of the years-in-development magnets that will be used for for Mu2e, an experiment intended to study whether charged particles called leptons can change from one type to another. According to Doug Glenzinzki, the deputy project manager for Mu2e, the experiment’s goal is to narrow down the possibilities for completing physicists’ picture of the universe, by amassing evidence for one theory over others.

    “We know the Standard Model is incomplete,” Glenzinski says. “The number one goal of particle physics is to elucidate what a more complete model looks like. There are a lot of theories, and we are looking for data that tells us which is right.”

    sm
    Standard Model of Particle Physics

    It turns out, Glenzinski says, “charged lepton flavor violation”—the phenomenon Mu2e is being built to study—is a powerful way of discriminating between possible models. Seeing this violation would also open up new questions about a theory of nature that has stood for 80 years. In short, this experiment could point the way toward the future of particle physics.

    Collaborating labs and institutions:
    Member universities:
    Boston University
    University of California, Berkeley
    University of California, Irvine
    California Institute of Technology
    City University of New York
    Duke University
    University of Houston
    Lewis University
    University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign
    University of Massachusetts, Amherst
    Northwestern University
    Northern Illinois University
    Rice University
    Universita di Udine, Udine, Italy
    University of Virginia
    University of Washington

    Member laboratories:
    Brookhaven National Laboratory
    Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare Pisa, Universita di Pisa, Pisa, Italy
    Los Alamos National Laboratory
    Instituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Lecce
    Institute for Nuclear Research, Moscow, Russia
    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
    Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati, Italy
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory

    See the full article here.

    Symmetry is a joint Fermilab/SLAC publication.



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