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  • richardmitnick 8:57 am on September 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , European XFEL, First user groups, ,   

    From XFEL: “First users at European XFEL” 

    XFEL bloc

    European XFEL

    2017/09/20
    No writer credit

    1
    DESY’s Anton Barty (left) and Henry Chapman (right), seen at the SPB/SFX instrument, were in one of the first two user groups. (Photo: DESY, Lars Berg)

    The first users have now started experiments at the new international research facility in Schenefeld.

    “This is a very important event, and we are very happy that the first users have now arrived at European XFEL so we can do a full scale test of the facility” said European XFEL Managing Director Prof. Dr. Robert Feidenhans’l. ”The instruments and the supporting teams have made great progress in the recent weeks and months. Together with our first users, we will now do the first real commissioning experiments and collect valuable scientific data. At the same time, we will continue to further advance our facility and concentrate on further improving the integration and stability of the instrumentation” he added.

    The first two instruments available for users in the underground experiment hall are the FXE (Femtosecond X-Ray Experiments) instrument, and the SPB/SFX (Single Particles, Clusters, and Biomolecules and Serial Femtosecond Crystallography) instrument.

    The FXE instrument will enable the research of extremely fast processes. It will be possible to create “molecular movies” showing the progression of chemical reactions which, for example, will help improve our understanding of how catalysts work, or how plants convert light into usable chemical energy. The first seven experiments conducted at FXE highlight the range of methods available at the instrument and the diversity of topics of study possible. Experiments will include using different spectroscopy methods to track ultrafast reactions and electron movement in model molecules, probe organic light emitting diodes, or investigate the recombination of nitrogen and oxygen in the muscle tissue protein myoglobin.

    2
    The first user group at the FXE instrument. No image credit

    The SPB/SFX instrument will be used to gain a better understanding of the shape and function of biomolecules, such as proteins, that are otherwise difficult to study. Several of the seven first experiments at this instrument will focus on method development for these new research opportunities at European XFEL or ways to reduce the amount of precious sample used for the examination of biological processes. Other groups will be studying biological structures and processes such as the Melbourne virus and the water splitting process in photosynthesis.

    3
    The first user group at the SPB/SFX instrument. No image credit

    In this first round of beamtime a total of 14 groups, of up to 80 users each and travelling to Schenefeld from across the globe, will conduct experiments at European XFEL until March 2018. Each group will have about five days of 12 hours of beamtime.

    See the full article here .

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    XFEL Campus

    The Hamburg area will soon boast a research facility of superlatives: The European XFEL will generate ultrashort X-ray flashes—27 000 times per second and with a brilliance that is a billion times higher than that of the best conventional X-ray radiation sources.

    The outstanding characteristics of the facility are unique worldwide. Starting in 2017, it will open up completely new research opportunities for scientists and industrial users.

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  • richardmitnick 1:01 pm on September 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , European XFEL, , , ,   

    From STFC: “World’s largest x-ray laser facility is now open to users” 


    STFC

    http://www.stfc.ac.uk/news/worlds-largest-x-ray-laser-facility-is-now-open-to-users/

    1 September 2017
    Becky Parker-Ellis
    STFC Media office
    01793 444564

    1
    The main linac driving the European XFEL, suspended from the ceiling to leave space at floor level, photographed in January 2017. (Image: D Nölle/DESY).

    The global science community is celebrating the official inauguration of the world’s largest X-ray laser at the international research facility, the European XFEL. This event marks the start of user operation after eight years of construction.

    European XFEL is located in Hamburg and Schleswig-Holstein in Germany, and is capable of generating extremely intense X-ray laser flashes that will offer new research opportunities for scientists across the world.

    UK scientists at the Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) have played a significant role in the creation of XFEL, by designing and creating the Large Pixel Detector (LPD) – a cutting edge X-ray camera that can capture images of ultrafast processes such as chemical reactions.

    In addition to the LPD, designed and built by STFC’s Technology Division, STFC’s Central Laser Facility is currently building a DiPOLE100 laser for the European XFEL (directly funded by STFC and EPSRC), where it will be used to recreate the conditions found within stars.

    The UK will soon be extending its relationship with XFEL by signing a partnership agreement, allowing UK researchers access to the facility through an STFC-managed subscription. The formal procedures of accession for the UK to join XFEL are underway. In anticipation of this being completed in the coming months the UK has already contributed the majority of its commitment towards the construction costs of the facility.

    Dr Brian Bowsher, Chief Executive of STFC, said: “The UK, through STFC, is already contributing a great deal to this project in terms of equipment and expertise, and we are looking forward to ratifying formally the UK’s involvement in XFEL. XFEL offers many exciting opportunities to the research community and STFC is delighted to support the UK’s involvement with this international facility.

    “Being asked to design and build significant technological infrastructure for XFEL is recognition of the leading reputation STFC’s technology and engineering teams have on the world’s stage.”

    About European XFEL

    The European XFEL is an international research facility of superlatives: 27,000 X-ray flashes per second and a brilliance that is a billion times higher than that of the best conventional X-ray sources will open up completely new opportunities for science. Research groups from around the world will be able to map the atomic details of viruses, decipher the molecular composition of cells, take three-dimensional “photos” of the nanoworld, “film” chemical reactions, and study processes such as those occurring deep inside planets. The construction and operation of the facility is entrusted to the European XFEL GmbH, a non-profit company that cooperates closely with the research centre DESY and other organisations worldwide.

    The company, which has a workforce of about 300 employees, entered in its operating phase on 4 July and has selected the first 14 groups of scientists to carry out their ambitious research projects at the facility from September 2017, including a team from the UK. With construction and commissioning costs of 1.22 billion euro (at 2005 price levels) and a total length of 3.4 kilometres, the European XFEL is one of the largest and most ambitious European research projects to date. At present, 11 countries have signed the European XFEL convention: Denmark, France, Germany, Hungary, Italy, Poland, Russia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, and Switzerland. The United Kingdom is in the process of joining.

    STFC and XFEL

    In December 2014 the UK government announced that the UK would invest up to £30M (about 38 M€) to become a full member of the European XFEL as the result of the input received to the BIS Capital Consultation exercise. The UK will become the 12th member of the European XFEL project and STFC is now working with the European XFEL project and the other partners to negotiate UK membership.

    Diamond and XFEL

    The UK, through STFC-funded Diamond Light Source, is also the host for the UK’s XFEL hub. Housed within the existing Diamond infrastructure, the hub will enable users to fully prepare for their experiments with currently operating XFELs and the European XFEL when it comes online in Hamburg in 2017. The UK Hub (which is directly supported by MRC, BBSRC and the Wellcome Trust) will provide support in terms of sample preparation, data processing and training. There will also be a dedicated fibre link from Hamburg to Harwell enabling users to carry out data analysis back in the UK, with support from the UK Hub team.

    From CERN

    The European XFEL is the culmination of a worldwide effort, with European XFEL GmbH being responsible for the construction and operation of the facility, especially the X-ray photon transport and experimental stations, and its largest shareholder DESY leading the construction and operation of the electron linac. The facility joins other major XFELs in the US (LCLS) and Japan (SACLA), and is expected to keep Europe at the forefront of X-ray science for at least the next 20 to 30 years.

    Construction of the €1.2 billion European XFEL began in January 2009, funded by 11 countries, with Germany and Russia as the largest contributors, although no fewer than 17 European institutes contributed in-kind to the accelerator complex. “The European XFEL is the result of intense technological development in a worldwide collaboration that has exceeded expectations,” says Eckhard Elsen, CERN’s Director for Research and Computing. “It is an impressive example of how cutting-edge accelerator research can benefit society, and demonstrates the continuing links between the needs of fundamental research in particle physics and X-ray science.”

    A full account of the European XFEL and its superconducting linac, which appeared in the CERN Courier July/August 2017 issue, can be read here.

    3
    The European XFEL facility in Hamburg (on the right) and Schenefeld (Schleswig-Holstein) (Image: European XFEL)

    See the full STFC article here .
    See the full CERN article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    STFC Hartree Centre

    Helping build a globally competitive, knowledge-based UK economy

    We are a world-leading multi-disciplinary science organisation, and our goal is to deliver economic, societal, scientific and international benefits to the UK and its people – and more broadly to the world. Our strength comes from our distinct but interrelated functions:

    Universities: we support university-based research, innovation and skills development in astronomy, particle physics, nuclear physics, and space science
    Scientific Facilities: we provide access to world-leading, large-scale facilities across a range of physical and life sciences, enabling research, innovation and skills training in these areas
    National Campuses: we work with partners to build National Science and Innovation Campuses based around our National Laboratories to promote academic and industrial collaboration and translation of our research to market through direct interaction with industry
    Inspiring and Involving: we help ensure a future pipeline of skilled and enthusiastic young people by using the excitement of our sciences to encourage wider take-up of STEM subjects in school and future life (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)

    We support an academic community of around 1,700 in particle physics, nuclear physics, and astronomy including space science, who work at more than 50 universities and research institutes in the UK, Europe, Japan and the United States, including a rolling cohort of more than 900 PhD students.

    STFC-funded universities produce physics postgraduates with outstanding high-end scientific, analytic and technical skills who on graduation enjoy almost full employment. Roughly half of our PhD students continue in research, sustaining national capability and creating the bedrock of the UK’s scientific excellence. The remainder – much valued for their numerical, problem solving and project management skills – choose equally important industrial, commercial or government careers.

    Our large-scale scientific facilities in the UK and Europe are used by more than 3,500 users each year, carrying out more than 2,000 experiments and generating around 900 publications. The facilities provide a range of research techniques using neutrons, muons, lasers and x-rays, and high performance computing and complex analysis of large data sets.

    They are used by scientists across a huge variety of science disciplines ranging from the physical and heritage sciences to medicine, biosciences, the environment, energy, and more. These facilities provide a massive productivity boost for UK science, as well as unique capabilities for UK industry.

    Our two Campuses are based around our Rutherford Appleton Laboratory at Harwell in Oxfordshire, and our Daresbury Laboratory in Cheshire – each of which offers a different cluster of technological expertise that underpins and ties together diverse research fields.

    The combination of access to world-class research facilities and scientists, office and laboratory space, business support, and an environment which encourages innovation has proven a compelling combination, attracting start-ups, SMEs and large blue chips such as IBM and Unilever.

    We think our science is awesome – and we know students, teachers and parents think so too. That’s why we run an extensive Public Engagement and science communication programme, ranging from loans to schools of Moon Rocks, funding support for academics to inspire more young people, embedding public engagement in our funded grant programme, and running a series of lectures, travelling exhibitions and visits to our sites across the year.

    Ninety per cent of physics undergraduates say that they were attracted to the course by our sciences, and applications for physics courses are up – despite an overall decline in university enrolment.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:56 pm on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , European XFEL, MPG Institute for Nuclear Physics, ,   

    From MPG Institute for Nuclear Physics: “Sharp x-ray pulses from the atomic nucleus” 

    Max Planck Gesellschaft Institute for Nuclear Physics

    August 17, 2017
    PD Dr. Jörg Evers
    Research Group Leader
    Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg
    Phone:+49 6221 516-177
    joerg.evers@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    Prof. Dr. Thomas Pfeifer
    Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg
    Phone:+49 6221 516-380Fax:+49 6221 516-802
    Thomas.Pfeifer@mpi-hd.mpg.de

    Honorary Professor Dr. Christoph H. Keitel
    Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics, Heidelberg
    Phone:+49 6221 516-150Fax:+49 6221 516-152
    keitel@mpi-hd.mpg

    Using a mechanical trick, scientists have succeeded in narrowing the spectrum of the pulses emitted by x-ray lasers.

    X-rays make the invisible visible: they permit the way materials are structured to be determined all the way down to the level of individual atoms. In the 1950s it was x-rays which revealed the double-helix structure of DNA. With new x-ray sources, such as the XFEL free-electron laser in Hamburg, it is even possible to “film” chemical reactions.

    XFEL


    XFEL map

    The results obtained from studies using these new x-ray sources may be about to become even more precise. A team around Kilian Heeg from the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg has now found a way to make the spectrum of the x-ray pulses emitted by these sources even narrower. In contrast to standard lasers, which generate light of a single colour and wavelength, x-ray sources generally produce pulses with a broad spectrum of different wavelengths. Sharper pulses could soon drive applications that were previously not feasible. This includes testing physical constants and measuring lengths and times even more precisely than can be achieved at present.

    1
    Upgrading x-ray lasers – a mechanical trick can be used to narrow the spectrum of the pulses emitted by x-ray lasers such as the XFEL free electron laser shown here. This would enable x-ray lasers to be used for experiments which would otherwise not be possible, for example testing whether physical constants are really constant. © DESY, Hamburg

    Researchers use light and other electromagnetic radiation for developing new materials at work in electronics, automobiles, aircraft or power plants, as well as for studies on biomolecules such as protein function. Electromagnetic radiation is also the tool of choice for observing chemical reactions and physical processes in the micro and nano ranges. Different types of spectroscopy use different individual wavelengths to stimulate characteristic oscillations in specific components of a structure. Which wavelengths interact with the structure – physicists use the term resonance – tells us something about their composition and how they are constructed; for example, how atoms within a molecule are arranged in space.

    In contrast to visible light, which has a much lower energy, x-rays can trigger resonance not just in the electron shell of an atom, but also deep in the atomic core, its nucleus. X-ray spectroscopy therefore provides unique knowledge about materials. In addition, the resonances of some atomic nuclei are very sharp, in principle allowing extremely precise measurements.

    X-ray sources generate ultra-short flashes with a broad spectrum

    Modern x-ray sources such as the XFEL free electron laser in Hamburg and the PETRA III (Hamburg), and ESRF (Grenoble) synchrotron sources are prime candidates for carrying out such studies.

    DESI Petra III

    ESRF. Grenoble, France

    Free- electron lasers in particular are optimized for generating very short x-ray flashes, which are primarily used to study very fast processes in the microscopic world of atoms and molecules. Ultra short light pulses, however, in turn have a broad spectrum of wavelengths. Consequently, only a small fraction of the light is at the right wavelength to cause resonance in the sample. The rest passes straight through the sample, making spectroscopy of sharp resonances rather inefficient.

    It is possible to generate a very sharp x-ray spectrum – i.e. x-rays of a single wavelength – using filters; however, since this involves removing unused wavelengths, the resulting resonance signal is still weak.

    The new method developed by the researchers in Heidelberg delivers a three to four-fold increase in the intensity of the resonance signal. Together with scientists from DESY in Hamburg and ESRF in Grenoble, Kilian Heeg and Jörg Evers from Christoph Keitel’s Division and a team around Thomas Pfeifer at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg have succeeded in making some of the x-ray radiation that would not normally interact with the sample contribute to the resonance signal. They have successfully tested their method on iron nuclei both at the ESRF in Grenoble and at the PETRA III synchrotron of DESY in Hamburg.

    A tiny jolt amplifies the radiation

    The researchers’ approach to amplifying the x-rays is based on the fact that, when x-rays interact with iron nuclei (or any other nuclei) to produce resonance, they are re-emitted after a short delay. These re-emitted x-rays then lag exactly half a wavelength behind that part of the radiation which has passed straight through. This means that the peaks of one wave coincide exactly with the troughs of the other wave, with the result that they cancel each other out. This destructive interference attenuates the X-ray pulses at the resonant wavelength, which is also the fundamental origin of absorption of light.

    “We utilize the time window of about 100 nanoseconds before the iron nuclei re-emit the x-rays,” explains project leader Jörg Evers. During this time window, the researchers move the iron foil by about 40 billionths of a millimetre (0.4 angstroms). This tiny jolt has the effect of producing constructive interference between the emitted and transmitted light waves. “It’s as if two rivers, the waves on one of which are offset by half a wavelength from the waves on the other, meet,” says Evers, “and you shift one of the rivers by exactly this distance.” This has the effect that, after the rivers meet, the waves on the two rivers move in time with each other. Wave peaks coincide with wave peaks and the waves amplify, rather than attenuating, each other. This trick, however, does not just work on light at the resonance wavelengths, but also has the reverse effect (i.e. attenuation) on a broader range of wavelengths around the resonance wavelength. Kilian Heeg puts it like this. “We squeeze otherwise unused x-ray radiation into the resonance.”

    To enable the physicists to move the iron foil fast enough and precisely enough, it is mounted on a piezoelectric crystal. This crystal expands or contracts in response to an applied electrical voltage. Using a specially developed computer program, the Heidelberg-based researchers were able to adjust the electrical signal that controls the piezoelectric crystal to maximize the amplification of the resonance signal.

    Applications in length measurement and atomic clocks

    The researchers see a wide range of potential applications for their new technique. According to Thomas Pfeifer, the procedure will expand the utility of new high-power x-ray sources for high-resolution x-ray spectroscopy. This will enable more accurate modelling of what happens in atoms and molecules. Pfeifer also stresses the utility of the technique in metrology, in particular for high-precision measurements of lengths and the quantum-mechanical definition of time. “With x-rays, it is possible to measure lengths 10,000 times more accurately than with visible light,” explains Pfeifer. This can be used to study and optimize nanostructures such as computer chips and newly developed batteries. Pfeifer also envisages x-ray atomic clocks which are far more precise than even the most advanced optical atomic clocks nowadays based on visible light.

    Not least, better X-ray spectroscopy could enable us to answer one of physics’ great unanswered questions – whether physical constants really are constant or whether they change slowly with time. If the latter were true, resonance lines would drift slowly over time. Extremely sharp x-ray spectra would make it possible to determine whether this is the case over a relatively short period.

    Evers reckons that, once mature, the technique would be relatively easy to integrate into experiments at DESY and ESRF. “It should be possible to make a shoe-box sized device that could be rapidly installed and, according to our calculations, could enable an approximately 10-fold amplification,” he adds.

    Science paper:
    Spectral narrowing of x-ray pulses for precision spectroscopy with nuclear resonances
    http://science.sciencemag.org/content/357/6349/375

    See the full article here .

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    The Max-Planck-Institut für Kernphysik (“MPI for Nuclear Physics” or MPIK for short) is a research institute in Heidelberg, Germany.

    The institute is one of the 80 institutes of the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (Max Planck Society), an independent, non-profit research organization. The Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics was founded in 1958 under the leadership of Wolfgang Gentner. Its precursor was the Institute for Physics at the MPI for Medical Research.

    The Max Planck Society is Germany’s most successful research organization. Since its establishment in 1948, no fewer than 18 Nobel laureates have emerged from the ranks of its scientists, putting it on a par with the best and most prestigious research institutions worldwide. The more than 15,000 publications each year in internationally renowned scientific journals are proof of the outstanding research work conducted at Max Planck Institutes – and many of those articles are among the most-cited publications in the relevant field.

    What is the basis of this success? The scientific attractiveness of the Max Planck Society is based on its understanding of research: Max Planck Institutes are built up solely around the world’s leading researchers. They themselves define their research subjects and are given the best working conditions, as well as free reign in selecting their staff. This is the core of the Harnack principle, which dates back to Adolph von Harnack, the first president of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society, which was established in 1911. This principle has been successfully applied for nearly one hundred years. The Max Planck Society continues the tradition of its predecessor institution with this structural principle of the person-centered research organization.

    The currently 83 Max Planck Institutes and facilities conduct basic research in the service of the general public in the natural sciences, life sciences, social sciences, and the humanities. Max Planck Institutes focus on research fields that are particularly innovative, or that are especially demanding in terms of funding or time requirements. And their research spectrum is continually evolving: new institutes are established to find answers to seminal, forward-looking scientific questions, while others are closed when, for example, their research field has been widely established at universities. This continuous renewal preserves the scope the Max Planck Society needs to react quickly to pioneering scientific developments.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:24 pm on August 17, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: European XFEL, Large Pixel Detector,   

    From STFC: “UK provides first advanced detector for world’s largest X-ray laser” 


    STFC

    17 August 2017

    Becky Parker-Ellis
    becky.parker-ellis@stfc.ac.uk
    STFC Media office
    01793 444564

    1
    The Large Pixel Detector. (Credit: European XFEL)

    One of the world’s fastest detectors, capable of capturing images in billionths of a second, has been developed by the UK for use at the world’s largest X-ray laser, the European XFEL.

    XFEL


    XFEL map

    The Large Pixel Detector (LPD) is the first advanced detector to be installed at the European XFEL in Hamburg, Germany. The LPD is a cutting-edge X-ray camera developed at the Science and Technology Facilities Council’s (STFC) Rutherford Appleton Laboratory near Oxford.

    Dr Brian Bowsher, Chief Executive of STFC, said: “This is a significant milestone for the European XFEL and we are delighted to make such an important contribution to the project.

    “International collaborations are key to developing these state-of-the-art facilities and this work reinforces the international role STFC and the UK has in science.

    “It’s an extremely exciting time for the XFEL facility, and I am looking forward to seeing the first experiments taking place.”

    The LPD is the first fully functional X-ray light detector to record at a rate of 4.5 MHz—4.5 million pictures per second, fast enough to keep up with the European XFEL’s high repetition rate of 27,000 pulses per second, which are arranged into short bursts. The LPD will allow users to take clear snapshots of ultrafast processes such as chemical reactions as they take place.

    STFC’s Matthew Hart, the lead engineer who has worked on the LPD since 2007, said: “It’s such a great feeling to see the detector installed ready for experiments. It’s taken 10 years of development to meet some really challenging requirements and finally the day has arrived to see it working for real.

    “It was made possible thanks to the world class engineering team we have at STFC’s Rutherford lab in the UK, huge credit goes to them for their hard work and commitment over such a long and difficult project.

    “Now the detector is in the hands of the scientists at XFEL I’m really looking forward to hearing about their research and discoveries they will make.”

    The LPD operates far beyond the scope of any commercial detector or camera. Its design enables the detector to capture an image every 222 nanoseconds (billionths of a second)—an unprecedented rate that allows it to capture individual ultrashort X-ray laser flashes from the European XFEL. Additionally, the detector has a very high so-called dynamic range, meaning it can pick up signals as weak as a single particle of light, also known as a photon, and as strong as a flash of several tens of thousands of photons in two neighbouring pixels.

    In a typical experiment at the European XFEL, users will place samples in the path of incoming X-ray laser pulses in order to study their structure at the atomic level. Detectors will pick up the X-ray laser light scattering off of the sample, which often consists of individual molecules. The LPD’s high dynamic range allows for very high resolutions showing the finest details from samples.

    European XFEL Detector Development group leader Markus Kuster said: “The years of intensive collaboration with STFC’s Rutherford Appleton Laboratory on the LPD have paid off, and resulted in a unique detector that can record data on the timescale of a billionth of a second.”

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    STFC Hartree Centre

    Helping build a globally competitive, knowledge-based UK economy

    We are a world-leading multi-disciplinary science organisation, and our goal is to deliver economic, societal, scientific and international benefits to the UK and its people – and more broadly to the world. Our strength comes from our distinct but interrelated functions:

    Universities: we support university-based research, innovation and skills development in astronomy, particle physics, nuclear physics, and space science
    Scientific Facilities: we provide access to world-leading, large-scale facilities across a range of physical and life sciences, enabling research, innovation and skills training in these areas
    National Campuses: we work with partners to build National Science and Innovation Campuses based around our National Laboratories to promote academic and industrial collaboration and translation of our research to market through direct interaction with industry
    Inspiring and Involving: we help ensure a future pipeline of skilled and enthusiastic young people by using the excitement of our sciences to encourage wider take-up of STEM subjects in school and future life (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)

    We support an academic community of around 1,700 in particle physics, nuclear physics, and astronomy including space science, who work at more than 50 universities and research institutes in the UK, Europe, Japan and the United States, including a rolling cohort of more than 900 PhD students.

    STFC-funded universities produce physics postgraduates with outstanding high-end scientific, analytic and technical skills who on graduation enjoy almost full employment. Roughly half of our PhD students continue in research, sustaining national capability and creating the bedrock of the UK’s scientific excellence. The remainder – much valued for their numerical, problem solving and project management skills – choose equally important industrial, commercial or government careers.

    Our large-scale scientific facilities in the UK and Europe are used by more than 3,500 users each year, carrying out more than 2,000 experiments and generating around 900 publications. The facilities provide a range of research techniques using neutrons, muons, lasers and x-rays, and high performance computing and complex analysis of large data sets.

    They are used by scientists across a huge variety of science disciplines ranging from the physical and heritage sciences to medicine, biosciences, the environment, energy, and more. These facilities provide a massive productivity boost for UK science, as well as unique capabilities for UK industry.

    Our two Campuses are based around our Rutherford Appleton Laboratory at Harwell in Oxfordshire, and our Daresbury Laboratory in Cheshire – each of which offers a different cluster of technological expertise that underpins and ties together diverse research fields.

    The combination of access to world-class research facilities and scientists, office and laboratory space, business support, and an environment which encourages innovation has proven a compelling combination, attracting start-ups, SMEs and large blue chips such as IBM and Unilever.

    We think our science is awesome – and we know students, teachers and parents think so too. That’s why we run an extensive Public Engagement and science communication programme, ranging from loans to schools of Moon Rocks, funding support for academics to inspire more young people, embedding public engagement in our funded grant programme, and running a series of lectures, travelling exhibitions and visits to our sites across the year.

    Ninety per cent of physics undergraduates say that they were attracted to the course by our sciences, and applications for physics courses are up – despite an overall decline in university enrolment.

     
  • richardmitnick 5:43 pm on August 15, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: and Biomolecules / Serial Femtosecond Crystallography) instrument, , , Clusters, European XFEL, , Preparing for first user groups, The FXE (Femtosecond X-Ray Experiments) instrument, The SPB/SFX (Single Particles   

    From European XFEL: “First users invited to European XFEL” 

    XFEL bloc

    European XFEL

    15 August 2017
    No writer credit

    Facility preparing to welcome research groups to first two instruments.

    At European XFEL, a flurry of activity can be seen throughout the facility as staff prepare for the arrival of the first users in September. After years of development and construction, the world’s largest X-ray laser is now just weeks away from doing what it was designed to do: enabling scientists from across the world to push the frontiers of scientific knowledge.

    Underground in the experiment hall, the first two instruments are now getting ready for the first users. The FXE (Femtosecond X-Ray Experiments) instrument, coordinated by leading scientist Christian Bressler, will enable the research of extremely fast processes. Here it will be possible to create “molecular movies” showing the progression of chemical reactions which, for example, will help improve our understanding of how catalysts work, or how plants convert light into usable chemical energy. The SPB/SFX (Single Particles, Clusters, and Biomolecules / Serial Femtosecond Crystallography) instrument, coordinated by leading scientist Adrian Mancuso, will be used to gain a better understanding of the shape and function of biomolecules, such as proteins, that are otherwise difficult to study.

    More than 60 user groups answered a call for proposals issued in early 2017 for access to these two instruments. The project proposals were evaluated by international committees of experts on the basis of scientific merit and technical feasibility. The first 14 groups of scientists have now been selected and invited to carry out their ambitious research projects at the facility from September 2017.

    1
    The SPB/SFX instrument will enable novel studies of structural biology. It is one of two instruments that will be available for users in fall 2017. European XFEL

    2
    The FXE instrument will enable studies of ultrafast processes, such as the intermediate steps of chemical reactions. The instrument uses the ultrashort pulses of the European XFEL to create sequential images of reacting molecules, producing a slow-motion molecular movie of a previously invisible process. The FXE instrument is one of two instruments that will be available to users in fall 2017. European XFEL

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    XFEL Campus

    The Hamburg area will soon boast a research facility of superlatives: The European XFEL will generate ultrashort X-ray flashes—27 000 times per second and with a brilliance that is a billion times higher than that of the best conventional X-ray radiation sources.

    The outstanding characteristics of the facility are unique worldwide. Starting in 2017, it will open up completely new research opportunities for scientists and industrial users.

     
  • richardmitnick 5:09 pm on June 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , European XFEL, In order to use the limited beam time and the precious sample material more efficiently the team developed a new method., Micro-patterned chip containing thousands of tiny pores to hold the protein crystals, , Speed up protein analysis, Structural biology, , X-ray free-electron laser,   

    From SLAC: “SLAC Experiment is First to Decipher Atomic Structure of an Intact Virus with an X-ray Laser” 


    SLAC Lab

    June 20, 2017

    1
    Surface structure of the bovine enterovirus 2. The three virus proteins are color-coded. (Jingshan Ren/University of Oxford)

    A ground-breaking experimental method developed by an international research team will substantially speed up protein analysis.

    An international team of scientists has for the first time used an X-ray free-electron laser to unravel the structure of an intact virus particle on the atomic level. The method dramatically reduces the amount of virus material required, while also allowing the investigations to be carried out several times faster than before. This opens up entirely new research opportunities, as the research team led by Alke Meents, a scientist at Germany’s DESY lab, reports in the journal Nature Methods.

    The researchers tested their method with the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) X-ray free-electron laser at the Department of Energy’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. Now they are working to increase the capacity and speed of the technique in anticipation of future experiments at the European XFEL X-ray free-electron laser, which is just going into operation near Hamburg, Germany.

    SLAC/LCLS

    European XFEL

    “This is a much-welcome and important technological development that will greatly optimize data collection at LCLS and other X-ray free-electron lasers for certain classes of challenging experiments,” says co-author Roberto Alonso Mori, a staff scientist in the LCLS hard X-ray group. “The same technology could be used not only for biological science but could also help data collection in other areas.”

    2
    Micrograph of the microstructured chip, loaded with crystals for the investigation. Each square is a tiny crystal. (Philip Roedig/DESY)

    A Well-Rounded View of Life

    In the field known as structural biology, scientists examine the three-dimensional structure of biological molecules in order to work out how they function. This knowledge enhances our understanding of fundamental biological processes, such as the way substances are transported in and out of a cell, and can also inform drug development.

    “Knowing the three-dimensional structure of a molecule like a protein gives great insight into its biological behaviour,” explains co-author David Stuart, director of life sciences at the Diamond Light Source synchrotron facility in the United Kingdom and a professor at the University of Oxford. “One example is how understanding the structure of a protein that a virus uses to ‘hook’ onto a cell could mean that we’re able to design a defense for the cell to make the virus incapable of attacking it.”

    X-ray crystallography is by far the most prolific tool used by structural biologists and has already been used to determine the structure of thousands of biological molecules. Tiny crystals of the protein of interest are grown, and then illuminated using high-energy X-rays. The crystals diffract the X-rays in characteristic ways so that the resulting diffraction patterns can be used to deduce the spatial structure of the crystal – and hence of its components – on the atomic scale. However, protein crystals are nowhere near as stable and sturdy as salt crystals, for example. They are difficult to grow, often remaining tiny, and are easily damaged by the X-rays.

    “X-ray lasers have opened up a new path to protein crystallography, because their extremely intense pulses can be used to analyse even extremely tiny crystals that would not produce a sufficiently bright diffraction image using other X-ray sources,” says co-author Armin Wagner from Diamond Light Source. However, each of these microcrystals can only produce a single diffraction image before it evaporates as a result of the X-ray pulse. To perform the structural analysis, though, hundreds or even thousands of diffraction images are needed. In such experiments, scientists therefore inject a fine liquid jet of protein crystals through an X-ray laser beam that pulses in a rapid sequence of extremely short bursts. Each time an X-ray pulse happens to strike a microcrystal, a diffraction image is produced and recorded.

    This method is very successful and has already been used to determine the structure of more than 80 biomolecules, the researchers point out in their paper. However, most of the sample material is wasted. “The hit rate is typically less than 2 percent of pulses, so most of the precious microcrystals end up unused in the collection container,” says Meents, who is based at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg, a cooperation of DESY, the University of Hamburg and the German Max Planck Society. The standard method therefore typically requires several hours of beam time and significant amounts of sample material.

    Protein Crystals on a Chip

    In order to use the limited beam time and the precious sample material more efficiently, the team developed a new method. The scientists use a micro-patterned chip containing thousands of tiny pores to hold the protein crystals. The X-ray laser then scans the chip line by line, and ideally this allows a diffraction image to be recorded for each pulse of the laser.

    The research team tested its method on two virus samples using SLAC’s LCLS X-ray laser, which produces 120 pulses per second. They loaded their sample holder with a small amount of microcrystals of the bovine enterovirus 2 (BEV2), a virus that causes miscarriages, stillbirths and infertility in cattle, and which is very difficult to crystallise.

    In this experiment, the scientists achieved a hit rate – where the X-ray laser successfully targeted the crystal – of up to 9 percent, five times the hit rate of the previous method. Within just 14 minutes they had collected enough data to determine the correct structure of the virus – which was already known from other experiments – down to a scale of 2.3 angstroms.

    “To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the atomic structure of an intact virus particle has been determined using an X-ray laser,” Meents says. “Whereas earlier methods at other X-ray light sources required crystals with a total volume of 3.5 nanoliters, or billionths of a liter, we managed using crystals that were more than 10 times smaller, having a total volume of just 0.23 nanoliters.”

    This experiment was conducted at room temperature; while rapidly cooling the protein crystals would protect them to some extent from radiation damage, this is not generally feasible when working with extremely sensitive virus crystals. Crystals of isolated virus proteins can, however, be frozen and in a second test, the researchers studied a viral protein called polyhedrin that makes up a viral occlusion body — a container used by certain virus species to protect up to several thousand virus particles at a time against environmental influences so they can remain intact much longer.

    From Room Temperature to a Deep Chill

    For the second test, the scientist loaded their chip with polyhedrin crystals and examined them using the X-ray laser while keeping the chip at temperatures below minus 180 degrees Celsius. Here, the scientists achieved a hit rate of up to 90 percent. In just 10 minutes they recorded more than enough diffraction images to determine the protein structure to within 2.4 angstroms.

    “For the structure of polyhedrin, we only had to scan a single chip that was loaded with four micrograms of protein crystals; that is orders of magnitude less than the amount that would normally be needed,” explains Meents.

    “Our approach not only reduces the data collection time and the quantity of the sample needed, it also opens up the opportunity of analysing entire viruses using X-ray lasers,” Meents sums up. The scientists now want to increase the capacity of their chip by a factor of ten, from 22,500 to some 200,000 micropores, and further increase the scanning speed to up to one thousand samples per second. This would better exploit the potential of the European XFEL, which will be able to produce up to 27,000 X-ray laser pulses per second, as well as an upgraded LCLS that is scheduled to come on line in the early 2020s and produce up to a million pulses per second. Furthermore, the next generation of chips will expose only those micropores that are targeted for analysis, to prevent the remaining crystals from being damaged by scattered radiation from the X-ray laser.

    Diamond scientists have collaborated with the team at DESY, with much of the development and testing of the micro-patterned chip being on Diamond’s I02 and I24 beamlines. Researchers from the University of Oxford, the University of Eastern Finland, the Swiss Paul Scherrer Institute, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory and SLAC were also involved in the research. LCLS is a DOE Office of Science User Facility.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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    SLAC Campus
    SLAC is a multi-program laboratory exploring frontier questions in photon science, astrophysics, particle physics and accelerator research. Located in Menlo Park, California, SLAC is operated by Stanford University for the DOE’s Office of Science.
    i1

     
  • richardmitnick 12:01 pm on June 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , European XFEL, First atomic structure of an intact virus deciphered with an X-ray laser, ,   

    From DESY: “First atomic structure of an intact virus deciphered with an X-ray laser” 

    DESY
    DESY

    2017/06/19

    Groundbreaking experimental method will speed up protein analysis substantially.

    1
    Surface structure of the bovine enterovirus 2, the three virus proteins are colour coded. Credit: Jingshan Ren, University of Oxford

    An international team of scientists has for the first time used an X-ray free-electron laser to unravel the structure of an intact virus particle on the atomic level. The method used dramatically reduces the amount of virus material required, while also allowing the investigations to be carried out several times faster than before. This opens up entirely new research opportunities, as the research team lead by DESY scientist Alke Meents reports in the journal Nature Methods.

    In the field known as structural biology, scientists examine the three-dimensional structure of biological molecules in order to work out how they function. This knowledge enhances our understanding of the fundamental biological processes taking place inside organisms, such as the way in which substances are transported in and out of a cell, and can also be used to develop new drugs.

    “Knowing the three-dimensional structure of a molecule like a protein gives great insight into its biological behaviour,” explains co-author David Stuart, Director of Life Sciences at the synchrotron facility Diamond Light Source in the UK and a professor at the University of Oxford. “One example is how understanding the structure of a protein that a virus uses to ‘hook’ onto a cell could mean that we’re able to design a defence for the cell to make the virus incapable of attacking it.”

    X-ray crystallography is by far the most prolific tool used by structural biologists and has already revealed the structures of thousands of biological molecules. Tiny crystals of the protein of interest are grown, and then illuminated using high-energy X-rays. The crystals diffract the X-rays in characteristic ways so that the resulting diffraction patterns can be used to deduce the spatial structure of the crystal – and hence of its components – on the atomic scale. However, protein crystals are nowhere near as stable and sturdy as salt crystals, for example. They are difficult to grow, often remaining tiny, and are easily damaged by the X-rays.

    “X-ray lasers have opened up a new path to protein crystallography, because their extremely intense pulses can be used to analyse even extremely tiny crystals that would not produce a sufficiently bright diffraction image using other X-ray sources,” adds co-author Armin Wagner from Diamond Light Source. However, each of these microcrystals can only produce a single diffraction image before it evaporates as a result of the X-ray pulse. To perform the structural analysis, though, hundreds or even thousands of diffraction images are needed. In such experiments, scientists therefore inject a fine liquid jet of protein crystals through a pulsed X-ray laser, which releases a rapid sequence of extremely short bursts. Each time an X-ray pulse happens to strike a microcrystal, a diffraction image is produced and recorded.

    This method is very successful and has already been used to determine the structure of more than 80 biomolecules. However, most of the sample material is wasted. “The hit rate is typically less than two per cent of pulses, so most of the precious microcrystals end up unused in the collection container,” says Meents, who is based at the Center for Free-Electron Laser Science (CFEL) in Hamburg, a cooperation of DESY, the University of Hamburg and the German Max Planck Society. The standard method therefore typically requires several hours of beamtime and significant amounts of sample material.

    3
    Micrograph of the microstructured chip, loaded with crystals for the investigation. Each square is a tiny crystal. Credit: Philip Roedig, DESY

    n order to use the limited beamtime and the precious sample material more efficiently, the team developed a new method. The scientists use a micro-patterned chip containing thousands of tiny pores to hold the protein crystals. The X-ray laser then scans the chip line by line, and ideally this allows a diffraction image to be recorded for each pulse of the laser.

    The research team tested its method on two different virus samples using the LCLS X-ray laser at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory in the US, which produces 120 pulses per second.

    SLAC/LCLS

    They loaded their sample holder with a small amount of microcrystals of the bovine enterovirus 2 (BEV2), a virus that can cause miscarriages, stillbirths, and infertility in cattle, and which is very difficult to crystallise.

    In this experiment, the scientists achieved a hit rate – where the X-ray laser successfully targeted the crystal – of up to nine per cent. Within just 14 minutes they had collected enough data to determine the correct structure of the virus – which was already known from experiments at other X-ray light sources – down to a scale of 0.23 nanometres (millionths of a millimetre).

    “To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the atomic structure of an intact virus particle has been determined using an X-ray laser,” Meents points out. “Whereas earlier methods at other X-ray light sources required crystals with a total volume of 3.5 nanolitres, we managed using crystals that were more than ten times smaller, having a total volume of just 0.23 nanolitres.”

    This experiment was conducted at room temperature. While cooling the protein crystals would protect them to some extent from radiation damage, this is not generally feasible when working with extremely sensitive virus crystals. Crystals of isolated virus proteins can, however, be frozen, and in a second test, the researchers studied the viral protein polyhedrin that makes up a viral occlusion body for up to several thousands of virus particles of certain species. The virus particles use these containers to protect themselves against environmental influences and are therefore able to remain intact for much longer times.

    4
    Schematic of the experimental set-up: The chip loaded with nanocrystals is scanned by the fine X-ray beam (green) pore by pore. Ideally, each crystal produces a distinctive diffraction pattern. Credit: Philip Roedig, DESY

    For the second test, the scientist loaded their chip with polyhedrin crystals and examined them using the X-ray laser while keeping the chip at temperatures below minus 180 degrees Celsius. Here, the scientists achieved a hit rate of up to 90 per cent. In just ten minutes they had recorded more than enough diffraction images to determine the protein structure to within 0.24 nanometres. “For the structure of polyhedrin, we only had to scan a single chip which was loaded with four micrograms of protein crystals; that is orders of magnitude less than the amount that would normally be needed,” explains Meents.

    “Our approach not only reduces the data collection time and the quantity of the sample needed, it also opens up the opportunity of analysing entire viruses using X-ray lasers,” Meents sums up. The scientists now want to increase the capacity of their chip by a factor of ten, from 22,500 to some 200,000 micropores, and further increase the scanning speed to up to one thousand samples per second. This would better exploit the potential of the new X-ray free-electron laser European XFEL, which is just going into operation in the Hamburg region and which will be able to produce up to 27,000 pulses per second.

    European XFEL

    Furthermore, the next generation of chips will only expose those micropores that are currently being analysed, to prevent the remaining crystals from being damaged by scattered radiation from the X-ray laser.

    Researchers from the University of Oxford, the University of Eastern Finland, the Swiss Paul Scherrer Institute, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the US and SLAC were also involved in the research. Diamond scientists have collaborated with the team at DESY, with much of the development and testing of the micro-patterned chip being done on Diamond’s I02 and I24 beamlines.

    See the full article here .

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    desi

    DESY is one of the world’s leading accelerator centres. Researchers use the large-scale facilities at DESY to explore the microcosm in all its variety – from the interactions of tiny elementary particles and the behaviour of new types of nanomaterials to biomolecular processes that are essential to life. The accelerators and detectors that DESY develops and builds are unique research tools. The facilities generate the world’s most intense X-ray light, accelerate particles to record energies and open completely new windows onto the universe. 
That makes DESY not only a magnet for more than 3000 guest researchers from over 40 countries every year, but also a coveted partner for national and international cooperations. Committed young researchers find an exciting interdisciplinary setting at DESY. The research centre offers specialized training for a large number of professions. DESY cooperates with industry and business to promote new technologies that will benefit society and encourage innovations. This also benefits the metropolitan regions of the two DESY locations, Hamburg and Zeuthen near Berlin.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:20 am on April 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Accelerator Consortium, , , European XFEL, Particle accelerator for the European XFEL X-ray laser operational, Superconducting linear accelerator,   

    From XFEL: “Particle accelerator for the European XFEL X-ray laser operational” 

    XFEL bloc

    European XFEL

    19 April 2017
    No writer credit

    World’s longest superconducting linear accelerator

    1
    View into the 2.1-kilometre long accelerator tunnel of European XFEL with the yellow superconducting accelerator modules hanging from the ceiling. Heiner Müller-Elsner / European XFEL

    The international X-ray laser European XFEL has reached one of its final major milestones on the way to scientific user operation. DESY has successfully commissioned the particle accelerator, which drives the X-ray laser along its full length.

    Accelerated electrons have passed through the complete 2.1 kilometre length of the accelerator tunnel. In the next step, the energy of the electrons will be raised further, before they will be sent into a magnetic slalom section where the bright X-ray laser light will be generated. This first lasing is planned for May. DESY is the largest shareholder of the European XFEL and is responsible for the construction and operation of the superconducting linear accelerator.

    “The European XFEL’s particle accelerator is the first superconducting linear accelerator of this size in the world to go into operation. With the commissioning of this complex machine, DESY and European XFEL scientists have placed the crown on their 20-year engagement in developing and building this large international project. The first experiments are within reach, and I am quite excited about the discoveries ahead of us”, says Chairman of the DESY Board of Directors Helmut Dosch. “I am exceptionally happy about arriving at this milestone and congratulate all involved for the outstanding work and their great tenacity.”

    Chairman of the European XFEL Management Board Robert Feidenhans’l says: “The successful commissioning of the accelerator is a very important step that brings us much closer to the start of user operation in the fall. Under the leadership of DESY, the Accelerator Consortium, comprising 17 research institutes, has done an excellent job in the last years. I thank all colleagues involved for their work, which entailed a great deal of know-how and precision but also much personal commitment. The accelerator is an outstanding example of successful global cooperation, encompassing research facilities, institutes, and universities alongside companies that produced certain components.”

    The European XFEL is an X-ray laser of superlatives: The research facility will produce up to 27 000 X-ray laser flashes per second, each so short and intense that researchers can make pictures of structures and processes at the atomic level.
    The superconducting particle accelerator of the facility, which is now operational across its full length, is the key component of the 3.4 km long X-ray laser. The accelerator’s superconducting TESLA technology, which was developed in an international collaboration led by DESY, is the basis for the unique high rate of X-ray laser flashes. Superconductivity means that the accelerator components have no electrical resistance. For this, they have to be cooled to extremely low temperatures.

    From December into January, the accelerator was cooled to its operating temperature of -271°C. The so-called electron injector and first section of the main accelerator then went into operation, comprising altogether 18 of 98 total accelerator modules. Within this section, the electron bunches were both accelerated and compressed three times, down to 10 micrometres (a thousandth of a millimetre). Finally, the team placed the third section of the accelerator into operation. Currently, the electrons reach an energy of 12 gigaelectronvolts (GeV), and in regular operation, an energy of up to 17.5 GeV is planned.

    “The energy and other properties of the electron bunches are already within the range where they will be during first user operation”, says DESY physicist Winfried Decking, who leads the commissioning of the European XFEL accelerator.

    The coordination of the unique components of the accelerator and the control of the electron beam will now be intensively tested before the accelerated electrons are allowed into the following section: the up to 210 m long special magnetic structures called undulators. There, the ultrabright X-ray laser flashes will be generated. Scientific experiments should begin this fall.

    The superconducting particle accelerator of the European XFEL was built over the last seven years through an international consortium, under the leadership of DESY, composed of the following research institutes: CEA and CNRS in France; INFN in Italy; IFJ-PAN, NCBJ, and the Wrocław University of Technology in Poland; the Budker Institute, Institute for High Energy Physics, Institute for Nuclear Research, and NIIEFA in Russia; CIEMAT and Universidad Politécnica de Madrid in Spain; the Manne Siegbahn Laboratory, Stockholm University, and Uppsala University in Sweden; and the Paul Scherrer Institute in Switzerland.

    See the full article here .

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    XFEL Campus

    The Hamburg area will soon boast a research facility of superlatives: The European XFEL will generate ultrashort X-ray flashes—27 000 times per second and with a brilliance that is a billion times higher than that of the best conventional X-ray radiation sources.

    The outstanding characteristics of the facility are unique worldwide. Starting in 2017, it will open up completely new research opportunities for scientists and industrial users.

     
  • richardmitnick 4:32 pm on February 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , European XFEL, , High Energy Density Science instrument at the European XFEL or HED   

    From XFEL: “DFG funds investigation of exoplanets at European XFEL” 

    XFEL bloc

    European XFEL

    02 February 2017
    No writer credit found

    Interdisciplinary research project funded with 2 M€

    With the help of telescopes on Earth and in space, several thousand planets outside of our solar system have been discovered since 1996. Observation data such as mass, radius, and distance from their central star give only a few details about the composition and origin of these exoplanets. The research unit “Matter Under Planetary Interior Conditions”, led by the University of Rostock and including scientists from European XFEL will find out more about these planets in the framework of a grant funded by the German Research Foundation (DFG). The researchers want to draw inferences about exoplanets based on the planets in our own solar system and develop suitable methods for this purpose. Their interdisciplinary collaboration comprises theory, planetary modelling, and experiments. This comprises experimental investigations of materials under extreme conditions, such as those found inside of planets at, among others, the European XFEL and the research centre DESY. The DFG will fund the project for the next three years with a total contribution of around 2 million euro.

    “A strength of our proposal is that it combines theory, planetary modelling, and experiments in order to learn more about the composition and development of planets inside and outside of our solar system”, says Prof. Ronald Redmer of the University of Rostock, spokesperson for the research unit. In addition, the findings will be used for the evaluation of observation data from satellite missions.

    1
    This artist concept depicts in the foreground planet Kepler-62f, a super-Earth-size planet in the habitable zone of its star, which is seen peeking out from behind the right edge of the planet.
    NASA/JPL

    The Kepler Space Telescope has discovered a large number of planets between one and twenty times the mass of the Earth in orbits close to Sun-like stars.

    NASA/Kepler Telescope
    NASA/Kepler Telescope

    These exoplanets are defined as so-called “super-Earths”, which have a similar density and masses up to ten times that of the Earth, and neptunian planets, which have a similar density as the planet Neptune in our solar system. Neptune has a solid core; a mantle composed of liquid water, ammonia, and methane; as well as an atmosphere made of hydrogen, helium, and methane. In the interiors of all of these types of planets pressures can be many times higher than those inside the Earth and temperatures can reach several thousand degrees Celsius. The researchers want to find out how the principal constituents of these planets—for example, magnesium oxide and silicates for super-Earths as well as water, methane, and ammonia for neptunian planets—behave under these conditions.

    The High Energy Density Science instrument at the European XFEL, or HED for short, enables experimental investigations of extreme states of matter like those found inside of planets.

    3
    https://www.researchgate.net/publication/273045438_Scientific_Instrument_High_Energy_Density_Physics_HED

    “In the course of these experiments, we can generate brief spikes in pressure up to a million bar on the sample”, explains Karen Appel, a scientist at HED and project leader for this part of the research unit’s proposal. “The pressure would be as strong as having the weight of the world’s tallest building, the Burj Khalifa in Dubai, on someone’s fingertip.” The high pressures and temperatures at the HED instrument are generated through a shockwave triggered by an intense laser pulse. If the material decompresses after the shock, it goes through many different combinations of pressures and temperatures with distinctive material characteristics within very small fractions of a second. The short light flashes of the European XFEL enable sharp snapshots of these states and their properties to be taken. “Through X-ray scattering and X-ray spectroscopy, we will be able to determine the time-resolved structure and properties of magnesium oxide and silicates under these conditions”, says Appel. “With that, we can gather essential data for planetary modelling.”

    Other than the Universities of Rostock and Bayreuth and European XFEL, DESY and the DLR Institute for Planetary Research in Berlin are also participating.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

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    XFEL Campus

    The Hamburg area will soon boast a research facility of superlatives: The European XFEL will generate ultrashort X-ray flashes—27 000 times per second and with a brilliance that is a billion times higher than that of the best conventional X-ray radiation sources.

    The outstanding characteristics of the facility are unique worldwide. Starting in 2017, it will open up completely new research opportunities for scientists and industrial users.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:07 pm on January 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , European XFEL, First electrons at -271°C (2 Kelvin), ,   

    From European XFEL: “First electrons in the -271°C cooled main accelerator” 

    XFEL bloc

    European XFEL

    19 January 2017
    No writer credit

    Accelerator team start test of linac at operation temperature

    1
    View into the accelerator tunnel: behind a chicane (in front) operating at room temperature the electrons are guided into the first four superconducting accelerator modules.
    Dirk Nölle / DESY

    The European XFEL has reached an important milestone on the way to its operation phase: The Accelerator Team has guided the first electrons from their initial acceleration point in the facility’s injector into the superconducting main linear accelerator, which is cooled to -271°C (2 Kelvin). After passing through the first four accelerator modules and a subsequent section wherein the electron bunches are compressed, the particles were captured in an electron dump about 150 metres away.

    “The first cooling of the accelerator was a critical phase in the commissioning of the European XFEL”, said Hans Weise, leader of the Accelerator Consortium responsible for building the accelerator. “The cooling plant team has mastered this through great commitment and much outstanding intuition.”

    At the beginning of December, the experts began to flush the cryogenic system of the accelerator and fill it with helium. On 28 December, after three weeks at the 4-Kelvin (-269°C) mark, the so-called “cold compressors” were switched on. They lowered the pressure of the helium in the linear accelerator to 30 millibar so it could cool further to 2 Kelvin (-271°C, the operational temperature of the accelerator). At the beginning of January, the machine physicists brought the European XFEL injector, which has a superconducting segment within it as well, back into service. After a successful test operation in summer 2016, the injector had been turned off so that the chicane connecting it to the main accelerator could be built. After a short time, the injector again achieved the beam quality of the test operation in summer, and the team could then direct the first particle beam through the chicane and into the main accelerator.

    “We now have sufficient control over the pressure and temperature in the superconducting accelerator, such that we can feed the cavities with the first high frequency field”, Weise explained the next task for the scientists. The 32 resonators in the first four modules are then being brought to resonance frequency and fine-tuned to one another so that the particle bunches can be accelerated through them.

    In the next weeks and months, the successive commissioning of the remaining accelerating sections is planned. As soon as the acceleration is high enough, the electron bunches will be sent through the undulators, which are special magnetic structures in which the X-ray flashes will be generated.

    2
    The “plot for experts” shows the temperature development in the different sections of the main accelerator during the cooldown phase.
    DESY

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    XFEL Campus

    The Hamburg area will soon boast a research facility of superlatives: The European XFEL will generate ultrashort X-ray flashes—27 000 times per second and with a brilliance that is a billion times higher than that of the best conventional X-ray radiation sources.

    The outstanding characteristics of the facility are unique worldwide. Starting in 2017, it will open up completely new research opportunities for scientists and industrial users.

     
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