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  • richardmitnick 10:52 am on June 13, 2022 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Smart­phone tech­nol­o­gy pro­vides satel­lites with in­creased com­put­ing pow­er", A general challenge for computer systems in satellites is that cosmic radiation can interfere with their operation., A larger ScOSA system consisting of radiation-hardened and commercially available processors will soon be tested on a dedicated DLR CubeSat., DLR is developing distributed and heterogeneous on-board computers for future space missions., European Space Agency, Reliable and powerful computers play a central role in spaceflight., Testing on the OPS-SAT satellite in low-Earth orbit, , The DLR researchers installed and successfully tested the ScOSA software on OPS-SAT together with ESA.   

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE): “Smart­phone tech­nol­o­gy pro­vides satel­lites with in­creased com­put­ing pow­er” 

    DLR Bloc

    From The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.](DE)

    The German Aerospace Center (DLR) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany.

    6.13.22

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    OPS-SAT re­search plat­form. Credit: ESA.

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    ScOSA computer. Credit: DLR (CC BY-NC-ND 3.0)

    -DLR is developing distributed and heterogeneous on-board computers for future space missions.
    -These combine radiation-hardened and commercially available processors that monitor one another and redistribute tasks in the event of an error.
    -A successful experiment has been conducted on board an ESA research satellite, processing Earth observation data.
    -Focus: Space, Earth observation, technology
    _________________________________________________________
    Reliable and powerful computers play a central role in spaceflight – for example, computer systems in satellites enable sophisticated Earth observation missions. The German Aerospace Center (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt; DLR) is developing a new computer architecture that will provide On-Board Computers (OBCs) with more power as well as enabling them to repair themselves. Distributed heterogeneous OBCs are being created in the Scalable On-Board Computing for Space Avionics (ScOSA) flight experiment project. They feature different computing nodes that are connected to form a network.

    A general challenge for computer systems in satellites is that cosmic radiation can interfere with their operation. “If a radiation particle impacts a digital memory element, it might turn a zero into a one,” explains Project Manager Daniel Lüdtke from the DLR Institute for Software Technology in Braunschweig. Ultimately, the system can even fail or deliver incorrect results. For this reason, radiation-hardened processors are available for use in space. However, these are very expensive and have only limited computing power. On the other hand, processors such as those used for smartphones are very powerful and also much cheaper. They are, however, much more vulnerable to space radiation. ScOSA integrates both types of processors in one system.

    Testing on the OPS-SAT satellite in low-Earth orbit

    Special software detects errors and failures, and manages the computers. “In this process, programs running on a faulty processor are automatically transferred to other processors via the network,” explains Lüdtke. Meanwhile, the satellite continues to function normally. The software then restarts the processor and re-integrates it into the system.

    An experiment on the European Space Agency (ESA) OPS-SAT satellite has now shown that this works. “The satellite, which is 30 by 10 by 10 centimetres in size and contains an experimental computer, has been in low-Earth orbit since the end of 2019. OPS-SAT is available to researchers as a fully equipped and open platform,” explains David Evans, ESA Project Lead for the mission.

    The DLR researchers installed and successfully tested the ScOSA software on OPS-SAT together with ESA. To do this, the satellite acquired Earth observation images, then processed and evaluated them using artificial intelligence. The satellite then only transmitted the viable images to a ground station. “Sensors with increasingly high resolutions and complex algorithms require more and more computing power,” says Daniel Lüdtke, summarising the requirements for software and hardware. A larger ScOSA system consisting of radiation-hardened and commercially available processors will soon be tested on a dedicated DLR CubeSat. This small satellite is expected to be launched at the end of 2023.

    Development of software for space missions

    The Onboard Software Systems Group of the DLR Institute for Software Technology is involved in several national and international space missions. A central research topic in this context is the development of fault-tolerant and resilient software that can react to errors and failures. In addition to the Institute for Software Technology, the DLR institutes of Space Systems and Optical Sensor Systems, and DLR Space Operations and Astronaut Training are also involved in the ScOSA flight experiment project.

    See the full article here .

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    DLR Center
    The DLR German Aerospace Center [Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt e.V.] (DE) is the national aeronautics and space research centre of the Federal Republic of Germany. Its extensive research and development work in aeronautics, space, energy, transport and security is integrated into national and international cooperative ventures. In addition to its own research, as Germany’s space agency, DLR has been given responsibility by the federal government for the planning and implementation of the German space programme. DLR is also the umbrella organisation for the nation’s largest project management agency.

    DLR has approximately 8000 employees at 16 locations in Germany: Cologne (headquarters), Augsburg, Berlin, Bonn, Braunschweig, Bremen, Goettingen, Hamburg, Juelich, Lampoldshausen, Neustrelitz, Oberpfaffenhofen, Stade, Stuttgart, Trauen, and Weilheim. DLR also has offices in Brussels, Paris, Tokyo and Washington D.C.

     
  • richardmitnick 12:35 pm on November 8, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "How space helps seriously ill patients in air ambulances", European Space Agency, Satcom 5G-enabled ambulance demonstration, Tempus Pro telemedicine device, Tempus Pro transmits data via satellite, Ultrasound patient monitoring using Tempus Pro   

    From European Space Agency: “How space helps seriously ill patients in air ambulances” 

    ESA Space For Europe Banner

    From European Space Agency

    07/11/2019

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    Medical emergencies are set to be better managed thanks to air ambulances being equipped with space-enabled technology.

    Air Ambulance Kent Surrey Sussex – which treats some 2,500 of the most seriously injured and ill patients each year in the south east of England – is to equip all its aircraft with devices developed in collaboration with ESA.

    The equipment enables paramedics to live stream patient medical information – including electrocardiogram, body temperature, heart rhythm, pulse and respiration rate and blood pressure – via satellite or mobile phone network from the air ambulance to the hospital doctors who are due to take over their treatment.

    The satellite link allows two‐way real-time consultations, which will help the air ambulance crew to take rapid clinical and transport decisions. It enables seamless electronic patient care reporting as the casualty leaves the care of the air ambulance crew and enters hospital.

    The technology, developed by RDT – a small UK-based firm that was acquired by health technology company Philips in June 2018 – ensures a reliable connection between the helicopter and the hospital despite the low bandwidth by optimising data packets to prevent data loss during transmission. The transmission is secure, so medics can use it to send patient data.

    The technology has previously been fitted to commercial aircraft to enable medical emergencies to be treated mid-air, potentially avoiding unnecessary flight diversions while bringing the best possible care to passengers.

    Similar devices designed for health professionals have also been used by medics working in remote areas of the world to communicate with their hospital-based colleagues.

    Richard Lyon, Associate Medical Director for Air Ambulance Kent Surrey Sussex, said: “In emergency situations where every second counts, having the ability to livestream a patient’s physiology data from an incident scene – whether en route, on the ground or in the air – offers a tremendous opportunity for our team to improve the outcomes for our patients.”

    David Welch, Chief Executive of Air Ambulance Kent Surrey Sussex, said: “This will have a very significant impact in helping us to save lives and improve patient outcomes across the south east of England.

    “We are confident the technology will be adopted by other air ambulances and partners in the health service.”

    Arnaud Runge, a Medical Engineer at ESA who is in charge of the project, said: “We are very proud to demonstrate once again that space-enabled products and services can save lives – this is the best possible reward for our work.”

    Tempus Pro telemedicine device

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    The Tempus Pro has been developed by Remote Diagnostic Technology (RDT) in the UK, with funding from ESA’s Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems programme.

    The unit combines the diagnostic facilities found in standard hospital vital signs monitors with extensive two-way communications, packaged in a compact, robust, highly portable unit that can be tailored to user needs with the use of external devices.

    It has GSM (3G), GPS, wi-fi, bluetooth and ethernet connectivity, and can use available VSAT facilities to exchange voice, video, medical data and GPS positioning.

    Satcom 5G-enabled ambulance demonstration

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    At the Mobile World Congress 2019, Hispasat (ES) and the 5G Barcelona consortium used satellite-enabled 5G to simulate connected emergency healthcare.

    A model of an ambulance, equipped with 4G/5G connections and a satellite antenna, replicated the scenario of a patient with a collapsed lung being sped to hospital, with emergency medical personnel in the vehicle consulting specialists at a hospital via a two-way high-definition audio-visual connection.

    It showed how in the future, specialists can monitor the patient’s status in real time from the second the patient is picked up, which can be key to their survival and subsequent recovery.

    The satellite connection is important, as it will enable seamless content delivery both in urban areas with established 5G networks, and in areas with only a 4G connection or without any terrestrial networks at all. In those scenarios, the satellite will close the loop from space.

    Ultrasound patient monitoring using Tempus Pro

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    The Tempus Pro has been developed by Remote Diagnostic Technologies (RDT) in the UK, with funding from ESA’s Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems programme.

    It is a robust portable device for monitoring vital signs and providing communications for medics developed with the support of ESA offers a lifeline even in the remotest areas on Earth via satcom.

    Various external devices can be connected such as a digital stethoscope, video laryngoscope, contact temperature sensors and electrocardiogram leads and USB ultrasound probe.

    Tempus Pro transmits data via satellite

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    Tempus Pro, a portable vital-signs monitor capable of telemedicine via satellite, was used by medics at the landing of ESA astronaut Thomas Pesquet following his Proxima mission.

    All data were recorded in his encrypted patient record on the device and sent from Kazakhstan via a secured satellite link to the rest of the medical team at the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne.

    Remote Diagnostic Technologies based in the UK, developed the Tempus Pro (pictured left), with funding and support from the Business Applications part of ESA’s Advanced Research in Telecommunications Systems programme.

    Tempus Pro is compatible with all conventional instruments typically used for emergency monitoring and intensive care such as blood oxygen saturation and contact temperature sensors, electrocardiogram leads, laryngoscope and a USB ultrasound probe. It includes a GPS chip and has wi-fi, Bluetooth, GPRS and ethernet connectivity, and can exchange voice, video and medical data.

    Patient data recorded with an encryption on the device can be transmitted via a secured satellite link.

    See the full article here .


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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The European Space Agency (ESA), established in 1975, is an intergovernmental organization dedicated to the exploration of space, currently with 19 member states. Headquartered in Paris, ESA has a staff of more than 2,000. ESA’s space flight program includes human spaceflight, mainly through the participation in the International Space Station program, the launch and operations of unmanned exploration missions to other planets and the Moon, Earth observation, science, telecommunication as well as maintaining a major spaceport, the Guiana Space Centre at Kourou, French Guiana, and designing launch vehicles. ESA science missions are based at ESTEC in Noordwijk, Netherlands, Earth Observation missions at ESRIN in Frascati, Italy, ESA Mission Control (ESOC) is in Darmstadt, Germany, the European Astronaut Centre (EAC) that trains astronauts for future missions is situated in Cologne, Germany, and the European Space Astronomy Centre is located in Villanueva de la Cañada, Spain.

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