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  • richardmitnick 11:22 am on December 16, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , ESO Vipers   

    From ESO: “3D Map of Distant Galaxies Completed” 

    ESO 50 Large

    European Southern Observatory

    15 December 2016
    Luigi Guzzo
    Dipartimento di Fisica, Università Statale di Milano
    & INAF – Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera
    Milano, Italy
    Mobile: +39 366 773 9704
    Email: luigi.guzzo@unimi.it

    Peter Grimley
    ESO Assistant Public Information Officer
    Garching bei München, Germany
    Tel: +49 89 3200 6383
    Email: pgrimley@partner.eso.org

    VLT survey shows distribution in space of 90 000 galaxies

    1

    For nearly eight years, the VIsible MultiObject Spectrograph (VIMOS) on ESO’s Very Large Telescope (VLT) in Chile has been piecing together a three-dimensional map of galaxies in two patches of the southern sky. A total of 440 hours of observing time has gone into measuring the spectra of more than 90 000 distant galaxies, producing a map of a 24-square-degree region on the sky, out to a distance corresponding to when the Universe was around half its current age [1].

    ESO VIMOS
    ESO VIMOS

    In 2013, ESO reported that the international team of astronomers behind the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Survey (VIPERS) had collected data for around 60% of their target galaxies. With the full set of observations now completed, this is the largest redshift survey ever undertaken with ESO telescopes [2] and it provides a view of structures in the younger Universe with an unprecedented combination of detail and spatial extent. By surveying how galaxies were distributed in space several billion years ago, astronomers are able to learn more about the distribution of matter on the largest scales in the cosmos, as well as to further probe the effect that the mysterious dark energy had on the young Universe, when it acquired some of the properties we see today.

    Using these unique data, astronomers are already obtaining exciting new results concerning how galaxies have evolved since the Universe was much younger, and how this connects to the details of large-scale structures, such as filaments, clusters and voids. The full set of data from the survey was released to the public in November 2016 and is now available in standard form on the ESO archive.

    Notes

    [1] Light has a finite speed limit, so the more distant an object, the more time it has taken for the light from it to reach us. This means that we see distant objects as they were long in the past.

    [2] The light from each galaxy is spread out into its component colours within the VIMOS instrument. Careful analysis allows astronomers to work out how fast the galaxy is moving away from us — usually expressed as its redshift. This in turn reveals its distance from us and, when combined with its position on the sky, its location in the Universe.
    More information

    The team is composed of astronomers in Italy, France, Poland and the UK. Full details are available on the VIPERS website.

    See the full article here .

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    ESO is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world’s most productive ground-based astronomical observatory by far. It is supported by 16 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, along with the host state of Chile. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world’s most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and two survey telescopes. VISTA works in the infrared and is the world’s largest survey telescope and the VLT Survey Telescope is the largest telescope designed to exclusively survey the skies in visible light. ESO is a major partner in ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. And on Cerro Armazones, close to Paranal, ESO is building the 39-metre European Extremely Large Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become “the world’s biggest eye on the sky”.

    ESO LaSilla
    LaSilla

    ESO VLT
    VLT

    ESO Vista Telescope
    VISTA

    ESO NTT
    NTT

    ESO VLT Survey telescope
    VLT Survey Telescope

    ALMA Array
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    ESO E-ELT
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  • richardmitnick 9:37 pm on August 19, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , ESO Vipers   

    From ESO- VIPERS 2013: “Huge Map of the Distant Universe Reaches Halfway Point” 


    European Southern Observatory

    12 March 2013
    VLT survey charts positions of 55 000 galaxies

    map

    Luigi Guzzo
    INAF – Osservatorio Astronomico di Brera
    Merate, Italy
    Tel.: +39 039 5971 025
    Mobile: +39 366 773 9704
    Email: luigi.guzzo@brera.inaf.it

    Richard Hook
    ESO, Public Information Officer
    Garching bei München, Germany
    Tel: +49 89 3200 6655
    Cell: +49 151 1537 3591
    Email: rhook@eso.org

    The largest project ever undertaken to map out the Universe in three dimensions using ESO telescopes has reached the halfway stage. An international team of astronomers has used the VIMOS instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope to measure the distances to 55 000 galaxies [1] as part of the VIPERS survey [2]. This has already allowed them to create a remarkable three-dimensional view of how galaxies were distributed in space in the younger Universe. This reveals the complex web of the large-scale structure of the Universe in great detail.

    ESO VLT Interferometer
    ESO/VLT

    ESO VIMOS
    VIMOS

    By studying the cosmic web astronomers can test theories of how the Universe formed and evolved and help to track down the properties of the mysterious dark energy that is making the expansion of the Universe speed up. By mapping how large-scale structure grows with time they can also check whether [Albert] Einstein’s theory of general relativity holds precisely, or whether it may need to be revised.

    VIPERS is the most detailed survey so far of galaxies that are seen from the time when astronomers think that the Universe became dominated by dark energy, as it is today. This happened when the Universe was between about five and nine billion years old — about half its current age of 13.7 billion years. Although it is not yet complete, VIPERS is already delivering exciting science results, including both a first estimate of the growth rate of large-scale structure at this time and the best census ever of the average number of massive galaxies during this period of the Universe’s history.

    This week, to mark this milestone, the team is submitting several papers that describe the survey and the initial results for publication in scientific journals. The results from VIPERS are made public for use by astronomers around the world. The current catalogue of galaxy distances will be released in September this year.
    Notes

    [1] The light of each galaxy is spread out into its component colours within VIMOS. Subsequent careful analysis then allows astronomers to work out how fast the galaxy appears to move away from us — its redshift. This in turn reveals its distance and, when combined with its position on the sky, its location in the Universe.

    [2] VIPERS stands for the VIMOS Public Extragalactic Redshift Survey. Further information is available here.

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    See the full article here.

     
  • richardmitnick 9:34 am on March 12, 2013 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , , , ESO Vipers   

    From ESO: “Huge Map of the Distant Universe Reaches Halfway Point” 

    12 March 2013

    VLT survey charts positions of 55,000 galaxies

    The largest project ever undertaken to map out the Universe in three dimensions using ESO telescopes has reached the halfway stage. An international team of astronomers has used the VIMOS instrument on the ESO Very Large Telescope to measure the distances to 55000 galaxies as part of the VIPERS survey . This has already allowed them to create a remarkable three-dimensional view of how galaxies were distributed in space in the younger Universe. This reveals the complex web of the large-scale structure of the Universe in great detail.

    vimos
    Vimos

    vipers

    By studying the cosmic web astronomers can test theories of how the Universe formed and evolved and help to track down the properties of the mysterious dark energy that is making the expansion of the Universe speed up. By mapping how large-scale structure grows with time they can also check whether Einstein’s theory of general relativity holds precisely, or whether it may need to be revised.

    vimos

    The light of each galaxy is spread out into its component colours within VIMOS. Subsequent careful analysis then allows astronomers to work out how fast the galaxy appears to move away from us — its redshift. This in turn reveals its distance and, when combined with its position on the sky, its location in the Universe.”

    See the full article here.

    Visit ESO in Social Media-

    Facebook

    Twitter

    YouTube
    THE BASIC TOOLS OF E.S.O.
    i1
    Paranal Platform The VLT
    ESO NTT

    NTT – New Technology Telescope


    La Silla

    alma
    ALMA Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array

    i2
    The European Extremely Large Telescope
    VISTAVISTA (the Visible and Infrared Survey Telescope for Astronomy)


    Atacama Pathfinder Experiment telescope (APEX)

    ESO, European Southern Observatory, builds and operates a suite of the world’s most advanced ground-based astronomical telescopes.


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