Tagged: ESO – European Southern Observatory Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • richardmitnick 3:39 pm on August 24, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , ESO - European Southern Observatory   

    From ESA: “ESO and ESA Directors General sign Cooperation Agreement” 

    ESASpaceForEuropeBanner
    European Space Agency

    24 August 2015
    Richard Hook
    ESO Public Information Officer
    Garching bei München, Germany
    Tel: +49 89 3200 6655
    Cell: +49 151 1537 3591
    Email: rhook@eso.org

    On 20 August 2015 the Director General of ESO, Tim de Zeeuw, and the Director General of ESA, Johann-Dietrich Woerner, signed a cooperation agreement between the two organisations at ESO’s offices in Santiago, Chile. The ESA Director General was accompanied by Álvaro Giménez, Director of Science and Robotic Exploration at ESA, and Fabio Favata, Head of the ESA Programme Coordination Office.

    1
    A cooperation agreement was signed at ESO’s offices in Santiago, Chile

    There is considerable overlap of interests between ESO, pre-eminent in ground-based astronomy, and ESA, Europe’s leader in space research and technology. The new agreement provides a framework for future close cooperation and exchange of information in many areas, including technology and scientific research.

    The agreement will promote strategic coordination of the two organisations’ long-term plans as well as coordination of specific programmes. In addition, it will promote coordination of scientific and training programmes as well as the sharing of best practices in many areas. Coordination in the areas of services, tools and resources will also be encouraged. Additional areas covered by the new agreement are technology development and public outreach activities.

    On the day after the signature ceremony the two Directors General and accompanying staff visited the VLT and other facilities at ESO’s Paranal Observatory.

    ESO VLT Interferometer
    VLT

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The European Space Agency (ESA), established in 1975, is an intergovernmental organization dedicated to the exploration of space, currently with 19 member states. Headquartered in Paris, ESA has a staff of more than 2,000. ESA’s space flight program includes human spaceflight, mainly through the participation in the International Space Station program, the launch and operations of unmanned exploration missions to other planets and the Moon, Earth observation, science, telecommunication as well as maintaining a major spaceport, the Guiana Space Centre at Kourou, French Guiana, and designing launch vehicles. ESA science missions are based at ESTEC in Noordwijk, Netherlands, Earth Observation missions at ESRIN in Frascati, Italy, ESA Mission Control (ESOC) is in Darmstadt, Germany, the European Astronaut Centre (EAC) that trains astronauts for future missions is situated in Cologne, Germany, and the European Space Astronomy Centre is located in Villanueva de la Cañada, Spain.

    ESA50 Logo large

     
  • richardmitnick 5:33 pm on August 20, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: 2016 ESO Calendar, ESO - European Southern Observatory   

    From ESO: “ESO Calendar 2016 Now Available” 


    European Southern Observatory

    1

    Price 9.99 €
    at the ESOshop

    This is a beautiful wall hanging calendar with stunning astronomical views. YHou owe it to yourself to obtain one.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    Visit ESO in Social Media-

    Facebook

    Twitter

    YouTube

    ESO Bloc Icon

    ESO is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world’s most productive ground-based astronomical observatory by far. It is supported by 16 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, along with the host state of Chile. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world’s most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and two survey telescopes. VISTA works in the infrared and is the world’s largest survey telescope and the VLT Survey Telescope is the largest telescope designed to exclusively survey the skies in visible light. ESO is a major partner in ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. And on Cerro Armazones, close to Paranal, ESO is building the 39-metre European Extremely Large Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become “the world’s biggest eye on the sky”.

    ESO LaSilla
    LaSilla

    ESO VLT Interferometer
    VLT

    ESO Vista Telescope
    VISTA

    ESO VLT Survey telescope
    VLT Survey Telescope

    ALMA Array
    ALMA

    ESO E-ELT
    E-ELT

    ESO APEX
    Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) Telescope

     
  • richardmitnick 8:17 am on August 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ESO - European Southern Observatory, Poland   

    From ESO: “Poland Ratifies ESO Membership” 


    European Southern Observatory

    5 August 2015
    Lars Lindberg Christensen
    Head of ESO ePOD
    Garching bei München, Germany
    Tel: +49 89 3200 6761
    Cell: +49 173 3872 621
    Email: lars@eso.org

    Poland becomes ESO’s fifteenth Member State

    1

    Poland has now completed the ratification of its membership of ESO and becomes the organisation’s fifteenth Member State. ESO is proud to welcome Poland and looks forward to the contributions of the nation’s astronomers and industry.

    The formal ratification process for Poland’s membership of ESO was completed when the instrument of ratification was deposited at the French Ministry of Foreign Affairs in Paris on 8 July 2015. This follows the approval of the text by the Polish Congress and Senate, the signature of the ESO Accession Agreement by the President of Poland, Bronisław Komorowski, and the counter signature by the Prime Minister, Ewa Kopacz.

    Lena Kolarska-Bobińska, the Polish Minister of Science and Higher Education, had signed the Accession Agreement in October 2014.

    The ratification cements Poland’s position at the forefront of the world’s astronomical community. With membership, they have access to ESO’s suite of telescopes and instruments, including the Very Large Telescope (VLT) on Paranal and the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) at Chajnantor, as well as the opportunity to contribute to the construction of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT) over the coming years.

    By joining ESO, Poland adds to their already rich astronomical history, stretching back to the titanic figure of Nicolaus Copernicus, mathematician and astronomer, most notable for his model of the Solar System with the Sun, not the Earth, at its centre.

    Poland hosted an ESO Industry Day in Warsaw on 3 July 2015 and Polish astronomers continue to make many important contributions to modern astronomy — a trend Poland’s membership to ESO will only bolster.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    Visit ESO in Social Media-

    Facebook

    Twitter

    YouTube

    ESO Bloc Icon

    ESO is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world’s most productive ground-based astronomical observatory by far. It is supported by 16 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, along with the host state of Chile. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world’s most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and two survey telescopes. VISTA works in the infrared and is the world’s largest survey telescope and the VLT Survey Telescope is the largest telescope designed to exclusively survey the skies in visible light. ESO is a major partner in ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. And on Cerro Armazones, close to Paranal, ESO is building the 39-metre European Extremely Large Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become “the world’s biggest eye on the sky”.

    ESO LaSilla
    LaSilla

    ESO VLT Interferometer
    VLT

    ESO Vista Telescope
    VISTA

    ESO VLT Survey telescope
    VLT Survey Telescope

    ALMA Array
    ALMA

    ESO E-ELT
    E-ELT

    ESO APEX
    Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) Telescope

     
  • richardmitnick 2:21 pm on April 28, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ESO - European Southern Observatory   

    Postal Cards from ESO 


    European Southern Observatory

    If you want some beautiful postal cards to mail to your friends in Astronomy or just in general, ESO is your source.

    1
    Postcard Facilities set
    Price 2.49€
    A set of six postcards, at a reduced price, each one depicting one of ESO’s telescope facilities:
    E-ELT
    ALMA
    VLT
    VLT Auxiliary Telescopes
    VISTA
    La Silla

    2
    Postcards set with 6 astronomical images (new)
    Price 2.49€
    Centaurus A (NGC 5128) WFI
    Orion Nebula (Messier 42) VISTA
    Carina Nebula (NGC 3372) VST
    Carina Nebula (NGC 3372) VLT
    Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) VST
    Thor’s Helmet Nebula (NGC 2359) VLT

    Individual cards are also available at .49€ or .99€

    Cards can be ordered at the ESOshop

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    Visit ESO in Social Media-

    Facebook

    Twitter

    YouTube

    ESO Bloc Icon

    ESO is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world’s most productive ground-based astronomical observatory by far. It is supported by 16 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, along with the host state of Chile. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world’s most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and two survey telescopes. VISTA works in the infrared and is the world’s largest survey telescope and the VLT Survey Telescope is the largest telescope designed to exclusively survey the skies in visible light. ESO is a major partner in ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. And on Cerro Armazones, close to Paranal, ESO is building the 39-metre European Extremely Large Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become “the world’s biggest eye on the sky”.

    ESO LaSilla
    LaSilla

    ESO VLT Interferometer
    VLT

    ESO Vista Telescope
    VISTA

    ESO VLT Survey telescope
    VLT Survey Telescope

    ALMA Array
    ALMA

    ESO E-ELT
    E-ELT

    ESO APEX
    Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) Telescope

     
  • richardmitnick 3:29 pm on April 6, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Biosphere the Video, , ESO - European Southern Observatory   

    From ESO: Biosphere Video 


    European Southern Observatory

    Sep 26, 2014

    Biosphere | First FULL 4K Film on YouTube. Produced by GALA MEDIA – ESO The European Southern Observatory & Cybermagic. A Film by Jennifer Athena Galatis & Dominique Müller. Aerial cinematography by Yousef Alghefari. Original Music by Jennifer Athena Galatis. CG Vector Companies Logos Biosphere Earth by Arunav Sharma. CG Animations 3DSMax – Eon Vue & Compositing Jennifer Athena Galatis.

    Description

    Biosphere is a groundbreaking non narrative documentary filmed in 4K around the globe in remote areas and dense cities showcasing our planet and its inhabitants in their daily lives. Global warming is also part of the documentary’s subject and is created with state of the art CG. The documentary was shot in Canada – Bhutan – Papua New Guinea and Chile. Is produced by the European Southern Observatory – Gala Media and Cybermagic. Music is a very important part being a non narrative film and is composed by award film composer Jennifer Athena Galatis.

    LINKS

    Biosphere Website
    http://biospherethemovie.com/

    [This is truly spectacular. A sort of antidote to Godfrey Reggio’s Koyaanisqatsi. If you have a good downloader with your browser, you can download in HD. I downloaded with a SeaMonkey Browser downloader in 720p.]

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    Visit ESO in Social Media-

    Facebook

    Twitter

    YouTube

    ESO Main

    ESO is the foremost intergovernmental astronomy organisation in Europe and the world’s most productive ground-based astronomical observatory by far. It is supported by 16 countries: Austria, Belgium, Brazil, the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom, along with the host state of Chile. ESO carries out an ambitious programme focused on the design, construction and operation of powerful ground-based observing facilities enabling astronomers to make important scientific discoveries. ESO also plays a leading role in promoting and organising cooperation in astronomical research. ESO operates three unique world-class observing sites in Chile: La Silla, Paranal and Chajnantor. At Paranal, ESO operates the Very Large Telescope, the world’s most advanced visible-light astronomical observatory and two survey telescopes. VISTA works in the infrared and is the world’s largest survey telescope and the VLT Survey Telescope is the largest telescope designed to exclusively survey the skies in visible light. ESO is a major partner in ALMA, the largest astronomical project in existence. And on Cerro Armazones, close to Paranal, ESO is building the 39-metre European Extremely Large Telescope, the E-ELT, which will become “the world’s biggest eye on the sky”.

    ESO LaSilla
    LaSilla

    ESO VLT Interferometer
    VLT

    ESO Vista Telescope
    VISTA

    ESO VLT Survey telescope
    VLT Survey Telescope

    ALMA Array
    ALMA

    ESO E-ELT
    E-ELT

    ESO APEX
    Atacama Pathfinder Experiment (APEX) Telescope

     
  • richardmitnick 4:05 pm on March 11, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , ESO - European Southern Observatory   

    From ESO: The 2015 Calendar on Sale 


    European Southern Observatory

    If you love Astronomy, then you need to know European Southern Observatory (ESO). And, you will love the 2015 Calendar. I have it, it is absolutley wonderful.
    Right now, it is on sale at the ESOShop for €4.99 instead of €9.99 . You can order it here.

    1
    Cover image description: The Milky Way above ALMA’s antennas. The stunning Milky Way forms a magnificent background above the antennas at the ALMA Observatory.

    Beautiful astronomical images together with unique pictures of ESO’s telescopes and breathtaking landscapes will inspire you each month in 2015 thanks to this ESO calendar. Inside, Lunar phases are also indicated.

    The calendar measures 42 x 42 cm when packed and has 14 pages, with a cardboard back. It is delivered in a cardboard box.

    Please visit ESO at the link above. Visit the Telescopes and Instruments page on the web site and get to know this astounding organization.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    Visit ESO in Social Media-

    Facebook

    Twitter

    YouTube

    ESO Main

    ESO, European Southern Observatory, builds and operates a suite of the world’s most advanced ground-based astronomical telescopes.

     
  • richardmitnick 7:36 pm on January 3, 2015 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , ESO - European Southern Observatory   

    From ESA: “A New View of An Icon” 2012, but well worth it. 

    ESASpaceForEuropeBanner
    European Space Agency

    17 January 2012
    No Writer Credit

    1
    Stunning new Herschel and XMM-Newton image of the Eagle Nebula

    ESA Herschel
    Herschel

    ESA XMM Newton
    XMM Newton

    The Eagle Nebula as never seen before.

    In 1995, the Hubble Space Telescope’s ‘Pillars of Creation’ image of the Eagle Nebula became one of the most iconic images of the 20th century. Now, two of ESA’s orbiting observatories have shed new light on this enigmatic star-forming region.

    NASA Hubble Telescope
    NASA/ESA Hubble

    2
    Pillars of Creation
    The most famous astronomical image of the 20th century

    The Eagle Nebula is 6500 light-years away in the constellation of Serpens. It contains a young hot star cluster, NGC6611, visible with modest back-garden telescopes, that is sculpting and illuminating the surrounding gas and dust, resulting in a huge hollowed-out cavity and pillars, each several light-years long.

    The Hubble image hinted at new stars being born within the pillars, deeply inside small clumps known as evaporating gaseous globules or EGGs. Owing to obscuring dust, Hubble’s visible light picture was unable to see inside and prove that young stars were indeed forming.

    The ESA Herschel Space Observatory’s new image shows the pillars and the wide field of gas and dust around them. Captured in far-infrared wavelengths, the image allows astronomers to see inside the pillars and structures in the region.

    4
    XMM-Newton: hot stars in X-rays

    5
    Individual images that make up the final stunning new view

    In parallel, a new multi-energy X-ray image from ESA’s XMM-Newton telescope shows those hot young stars responsible for carving the pillars.

    Combining the new space data with near-infrared images from the European Southern Observatory’s (ESO’s) Very Large Telescope at Paranal, Chile, and visible-light data from its Max Planck Gesellschaft 2.2m diameter telescope at La Silla, Chile, we see this iconic region of the sky in a uniquely beautiful and revealing way.

    ESO VLT Interferometer
    ESO/VLT

    ESO 2.2 meter telescope
    MPG 2.2m diameter telescope at LaSilla

    In visible wavelengths, the nebula shines mainly due to reflected starlight and hot gas filling the giant cavity, covering the surfaces of the pillars and other dusty structures.

    In far-infrared, Herschel detects this cold dust and the pillars reappear, this time glowing in their own light.
    Intricate tendrils of dust and gas are seen to shine, giving astronomers clues about how it interacts with strong ultraviolet light from the hot stars seen by XMM-Newton.
    In 2001, Very Large Telescope near-infrared images had shown only a small minority of the EGGs were likely to contain stars being born. However, Herschel’s image makes it possible to search for young stars over a much wider region and thus come to a much fuller understanding of the creative and destructive forces inside the Eagle Nebula.

    5
    Pillars of Creation in near-infrared

    6
    Herschel far-infrared view

    Earlier mid-infrared images from ESA’s Infrared Space Observatory and NASA’s Spitzer, and the new XMM-Newton data, have led astronomers to suspect that one of the massive, hot stars in NGC6611 may have exploded in a supernova 6000 years ago, emitting a shockwave that destroyed the pillars.

    ESA Infrared Space Observatory
    ESA/ISO

    NASA Spitzer Telescope
    NASA/Spitzer

    However, because of the distance of the Eagle Nebula, we won’t see this happen for several hundred years yet.

    7
    ISO mid-infrared view of Pillars of Creation

    Powerful ground-based telescopes continue to provide astonishing views of our Universe, but images in far-infrared, mid-infrared and X-ray wavelengths are impossible to obtain owing to the absorbing effects of Earth’s atmosphere.

    Space-based observatories such as ESA’s Herschel and XMM-Newton help to peel back that veil and see the full beauty of the Universe across the electromagnetic spectrum.

    With regions like the Eagle Nebula, combining all of these observations helps astronomers to understand the complex yet amazing lifecycle of stars

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    The European Space Agency (ESA), established in 1975, is an intergovernmental organization dedicated to the exploration of space, currently with 19 member states. Headquartered in Paris, ESA has a staff of more than 2,000. ESA’s space flight program includes human spaceflight, mainly through the participation in the International Space Station program, the launch and operations of unmanned exploration missions to other planets and the Moon, Earth observation, science, telecommunication as well as maintaining a major spaceport, the Guiana Space Centre at Kourou, French Guiana, and designing launch vehicles. ESA science missions are based at ESTEC in Noordwijk, Netherlands, Earth Observation missions at ESRIN in Frascati, Italy, ESA Mission Control (ESOC) is in Darmstadt, Germany, the European Astronaut Centre (EAC) that trains astronauts for future missions is situated in Cologne, Germany, and the European Space Astronomy Centre is located in Villanueva de la Cañada, Spain.

    ESA50 Logo large

     
    • richardmitnick 8:06 pm on January 3, 2015 Permalink | Reply

      A lesson for other bloggers. This was presented by a secondary source with the implication that it was new. But a little digging at ESA (five minutes) showed that it was from 2012. So much for secondary sources.

      Make sure that you have the right information before you post.

      Like

  • richardmitnick 9:13 pm on November 24, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , ESO - European Southern Observatory   

    From ALMA via ESO: “Seeing into the Heart of Mira A and its Partner” 

    ALMA Array
    ALMA

    NRAO Small

    ESO 50

    NAOJ


    European Southern Observatory

    Studying red giant stars tells astronomers about the future of the Sun — and about how previous generations of stars spread the elements needed for life across the Universe. One of the most famous red giants in the sky is called Mira A, part of the binary system Mira which lies about 400 light-years from Earth. In this image ALMA reveals Mira’s secret life.

    Mira A is an old star, already starting to throw out the products of its life’s work into space for recycling. Mira A’s companion, known as Mira B, orbits it at twice the distance from the Sun to Neptune.

    m
    ESO/S. Ramstedt (Uppsala University, Sweden) & W. Vlemmings (Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden)

    Mira A is known to have a slow wind which gently moulds the surrounding material. ALMA has now confirmed that Mira’s companion is a very different kind of star, with a very different wind. Mira B is a hot, dense white dwarf with a fierce and fast stellar wind.

    New observations show how the winds from the two stars have created a fascinating, beautiful and complex nebula. The remarkable heart-shaped bubble at the centre is created by Mira B’s energetic wind inside Mira A’s more relaxed outflow. The heart, which formed some time in the last 400 years or so, and the rest of the gas surrounding the pair show that they have long been building this strange and beautiful environment together.

    By looking at stars like Mira A and Mira B scientists hope to discover how our galaxy’s double stars differ from single stars in how they give back what they have created to the Milky Way’s stellar ecosystem. Despite their distance from one another, Mira A and its companion have had a strong effect on one another and demonstrate how double stars can influence their environments and leave clues for scientists to decipher.

    Other old and dying stars also have bizarre surroundings, as astronomers have seen using both ALMA and other telescopes. But it’s not always clear whether the stars are single, like the Sun, or double, like Mira. Mira A, its mysterious partner and their heart-shaped bubble are all part of this story.

    The new observations of Mira A and its partner are presented in this paper.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    Visit ESO in Social Media-

    Facebook

    Twitter

    YouTube

    ESO Main

    ESO, European Southern Observatory, builds and operates a suite of the world’s most advanced ground-based astronomical telescopes.

     
  • richardmitnick 2:45 pm on October 28, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , ESO - European Southern Observatory   

    From ESO: “Poland to Join the European Southern Observatory” 


    European Southern Observatory

    28 October 2014
    Richard Hook
    ESO Public Information Officer
    Garching bei München, Germany
    Tel: +49 89 3200 6655
    Cell: +49 151 1537 3591
    Email: rhook@eso.org

    Today Professor Lena Kolarska-Bobińska, the Polish Minister of Science and Higher Education, signed an agreement that will lead to the country joining the European Southern Observatory (ESO) — the world’s most productive ground-based observatory. ESO is looking forward to welcoming Poland as a Member State, following subsequent ratification of the accession agreement.

    table

    Poland’s accession agreement was signed today in Warsaw, Poland, by Minister Kolarska-Bobińska and ESO’s Director General Tim de Zeeuw, in the presence of other senior officials from Poland and ESO. Since this agreement means accession to an international treaty, it must now be submitted to the Polish Parliament for ratification [1]. The signing of the agreement followed its unanimous approval by the ESO Council during an extraordinary meeting on 8 October 2014.

    “We’re very excited to have our membership of ESO on the horizon,” says Minister Kolarska-Bobińska. “This will open up many future opportunities for us, and drive Polish industry, science and technology forward. This will be the beginning of a fantastic partnership for European astronomy and will also strengthen our links with Chile, with whom we are already cooperating intensively, for instance, in the mining industry — another field where Chile’s natural conditions are outstanding.”

    The connection between ESO and Poland extends beyond their respective astronomical communities. For example, the most recent ESO Industry Day was hosted in Warsaw in January 2013. This event gave ESO the chance to inform Polish industry about ESO’s current facilities and its future plans, including the construction of the European Extremely Large Telescope (E-ELT).

    “We are looking forward to having Poland as a member of our organisation,” says ESO’s Director General, Tim de Zeeuw. “Poland will bring a strong astronomical community, which will strengthen the expertise across the ESO Member States, for example in the time-series astronomy. Poland will gain access to some of the best telescopes and observatories in the world, including the Very Large Telescope on Paranal, ALMA at Chajnantor and, in the coming decade, also the European Extremely Large Telescope on Armazones which will be a tremendous step forward. Poland can now be part of the E-ELT construction effort.”

    Poland, the homeland of Nicolaus Copernicus, the astronomer who proposed that the Sun and not the Earth is at the centre of the Solar System, has a rich tradition in astronomy extending to the present. “Polish astronomers have contributed greatly to astronomical research in recent years, and with our accession to ESO this will only continue to grow,” says Minister Kolarska-Bobińska.
    Notes

    [1] After ratification of Poland’s membership of ESO, the ESO Member States will be Austria, Belgium, Brazil (pending ratification), the Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Finland, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the United Kingdom.

    See the full article here.

    Visit ESO in Social Media-

    Facebook

    Twitter

    YouTube

    ESO Main

    ESO, European Southern Observatory, builds and operates a suite of the world’s most advanced ground-based astronomical telescopes.

    ScienceSprings relies on technology from

    MAINGEAR computers

    Lenovo
    Lenovo

    Dell
    Dell

     
  • richardmitnick 4:25 am on September 2, 2014 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , ESO - European Southern Observatory   

    From ESO: “Unravelling the Mystery of Massive Star Birth ” 2010 


    European Southern Observatory

    14 July 2010
    Contacts
    Stefan Kraus
    University of Michigan
    USA
    Tel: +1 734 615 7374
    Email: stefankr@umich.edu

    Richard Hook
    ESO
    Garching bei München, Germany
    Tel: +49 89 3200 6655
    Email: rhook@eso.org

    Henri Boffin
    ESO, La Silla Paranal and E-ELT Press Officer
    Garching bei München, Germany
    Tel: +49 89 3200 6222
    Cell: +49 174 515 43 24
    Email: hboffin@eso.org

    All Stars are Born the Same Way

    Astronomers have obtained the first image of a dusty disc closely encircling a massive baby star, providing direct evidence that massive stars form in the same way as their smaller brethren. This discovery, made thanks to a combination of ESO’s telescopes, is described in an article in this week’s issue of Nature.

    star

    “Our observations show a disc surrounding an embryonic young, massive star, which is now fully formed,” says Stefan Kraus, who led the study. “One can say that the baby is about to hatch!”

    The team of astronomers looked at an object known by the cryptic name of IRAS 13481-6124. About twenty times the mass of our Sun and five times its radius, the young central star, which is still surrounded by its pre-natal cocoon, is located in the constellation of Centaurus, about 10 000 light-years away.

    From archival images obtained by the NASA Spitzer Space Telescope as well as from observations done with the APEX 12-metre submillimetre telescope, astronomers discovered the presence of a jet.

    NASA Spitzer Telescope
    NASA/Spitzer

    ESO APEX
    ESO/APEX

    “Such jets are commonly observed around young low-mass stars and generally indicate the presence of a disc,” says Kraus.

    Circumstellar discs are an essential ingredient in the formation process of low-mass stars such as our Sun. However, it is not known whether such discs are also present during the formation of stars more massive than about ten solar masses, where the strong light emitted might prevent mass falling onto the star. For instance, it has been proposed that massive stars might form when smaller stars merge.

    In order to discover and understand the properties of this disc, astronomers employed ESO’s Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI). By combining light from three of the VLTI’s 1.8-metre Auxiliary Telescopes with the AMBER instrument, this facility allows astronomers to see details equivalent to those a telescope with a mirror of 85 metres in diameter would see. The resulting resolution is about 2.4 milliarcseconds, which is equivalent to picking out the head of a screw on the International Space Station, or more than ten times the resolution possible with current visible-light telescopes in space.

    ESO VLT Interferometer
    ESO VLT Interior
    ESO VLT

    With this unique capability, complemented by observations done with another of ESO’s telescopes, the 3.58-metre New Technology Telescope at La Silla, Kraus and colleagues were able to detect a disc around IRAS 13481-6124.

    ESO NTT
    ESO NTT Interior
    ESO/NTT

    ESO LaSilla Long View
    ESO/LaSilla

    “This is the first time we could image the inner regions of the disc around a massive young star”, says Kraus. “Our observations show that formation works the same for all stars, regardless of mass.”

    The astronomers conclude that the system is about 60 000 years old, and that the star has reached its final mass. Because of the intense light of the star — 30 000 times more luminous than our Sun — the disc will soon start to evaporate. The flared disc extends to about 130 times the Earth–Sun distance — or 130 astronomical units (AU) — and has a mass similar to that of the star, roughly twenty times the Sun. In addition, the inner parts of the disc are shown to be devoid of dust.

    “Further observations with the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA), currently being constructed in Chile, could provide much information on these inner parts, and allow us to better understand how baby massive stars became heavy,” concludes Kraus.

    ALMA Array
    ALMA

    More information

    This research was presented in a paper to appear in this week issue of Nature (A hot compact dust disk around a massive young stellar object, by S. Kraus et al.).

    The team is composed of Stefan Kraus (University of Michigan, USA), Karl-Heinz Hofmann, Karl M. Menten, Dieter Schertl, Gerd Weigelt, Friedrich Wyrowski, and Anthony Meilland (Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Bonn, Germany),Karine Perraut (Laboratoire d’Astrophysique de Grenoble, France), Romain Petrov and Sylvie Robbe-Dubois (Université de Nice Sophia-Antipolis/CNRS/Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur, France), Peter Schilke (Universität zu Köln, Germany), and Leonardo Testi (ESO).

    See the full article here.

    Visit ESO in Social Media-

    Facebook

    Twitter

    YouTube

    ESO Main

    ESO, European Southern Observatory, builds and operates a suite of the world’s most advanced ground-based astronomical telescopes.

    ScienceSprings relies on technology from

    MAINGEAR computers

    Lenovo
    Lenovo

    Dell
    Dell

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 460 other followers

%d bloggers like this: