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  • richardmitnick 8:40 pm on October 25, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Reviving a Legacy Technology-for Spacecraft Exploration", Department of Energy (US), Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs), Silicon-germanium, ,   

    From Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab (US) : “Reviving a Legacy Technology-for Spacecraft Exploration” 

    The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab

    From Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab (US)

    10.25.21
    Jeremy Rehm
    240-592-3997
    Jeremy.Rehm@jhuapl.edu

    More than 20 years ago, production of a material technology that enabled our deepest space missions halted, and the expertise to make it was lost. But a team led by Johns Hopkins APL has paved a way for this hardy technology to be used once again.

    Technology rarely makes a comeback after it’s gone or (more often) replaced. But sometimes — because it’s retro, it shows new promise or people just won’t let it go — the tech of the past can breathe life anew.

    That’s what’s happening with a material called silicon-germanium. Thanks in part to recent work by a team led by the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory (APL) in Laurel, Maryland, this legacy material is making a comeback with a new twist in NASA’s next-generation nuclear power source for spacecraft.

    3
    Creator: Craig Weiman
    Copyright: Copyright 2021 JHU/APL. All rights reserved

    Its resurgence will enable NASA missions to travel farther and longer than current capabilities allow, meeting the demands of a science community with ambitious ideas.

    2
    Originally developed in the 1970s for the U.S. Air Force using a nuclear power source and silicon-germanium unicouples, Multi-Hundred-Watt RTGs were used on the Voyager 1 and Voyager 2 spacecraft and are still powering them today. Credit: The National Aeronautics and Space Agency (US)/ Department of Energy (US).

    For around 30 years, silicon-germanium, or SiGe, was a key material made for NASA’s radioisotope thermal generators (RTGs), a technology that APL helped develop and that earned NASA and the Department of Energy a Lifetime Achievement Award during the 2021 Nuclear Science Week opening ceremony in Washington, DC, last week. RTGs take heat from the natural decay of plutonium oxide and generate electricity by passing the heat through devices called unicouples. From the 1970s, those unicouples were made of either SiGe or lead-telluride/TAGS (PbTe) alloys. They enabled the exploration of the outer solar system and have powered more than a dozen NASA spacecraft, including the history-making Voyagers 1 and 2, Cassini, New Horizons and the Viking Mars landers.

    But by the late 1990s, after a short restart of the RTG program for the development of NASA’s Galileo and Cassini spacecraft, RTG production halted. NASA’s flight program needs were met, the manufacturing costs were deemed too expensive and no contractual agreements were created to sustain production.

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration(US) Galileo 1989-2003

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration(US)/European Space Agency [Agence spatiale européenne][Europäische Weltraumorganisation](EU)/ASI Italian Space Agency [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana](IT) Cassini Spacecraft.

    “The only reason we flew one on New Horizons [in 2006] was because we used one of the Cassini spares,” said Paul Ostdiek, a program manager at APL.

    National Aeronautics Space Agency(USA) New Horizons(US) spacecraft

    “Without that RTG, there would have been no exploration of Pluto and the Kuiper Belt.”
    Kuiper Belt. Minor Planet Center.

    In the early 2000s, unicouples of PbTe and related materials found new life when NASA started developing its multi-mission RTG (MMRTG), which has powered NASA’s Mars Rovers and is expected to power NASA’s APL-led Dragonfly mission to Saturn’s moon Titan.

    NASA The Dragonfly mission to Titan.

    With a maximum lifespan of 17 years, however, MMRTGs aren’t enough for deep-space missions like New Horizons that require decades of spaceflight. And compared with SiGe unicouples, they can’t operate at as high of a temperature, which affects power production efficiency, and they degrade faster.

    It wasn’t until 2018, when NASA moved ahead with developing a Next-Generation RTG for use by 2030, that SiGe entered discussions again. Companies preferred SiGe for unicouple material in the Next-Gen RTG, but because nobody had built or worked with it in over 20 years (and those who had had either retired or died), they were considering newer and riskier materials.

    But in spring 2020, after becoming familiar with research happening in Rama Venkatasubramanian’s thermoelectric labs in APL’s Research and Exploratory Development Department, NASA tasked Venkatasubramanian’s team, among others, with probing the risks and challenges of developing SiGe materials again as well as turning them into devices. They were to mitigate any hazards and develop a unicouple as close to the original design and functionality of those in the 1990s as possible.

    The team didn’t disappoint. In just three months, Venkatasubramanian’s APL team and partners from The University of Virginia (US), Clemson University (US) and Alfred University (US) recreated SiGe and other materials with modern fabrication techniques. They produced functioning unicouples that worked as well as (and potentially better than) those from the past.

    “I think what Rama and his team were able to lead and pull off through spring 2020 and into the summer — during the [COVID-19] pandemic, no less — was just amazing,” Ostdiek said.

    The team went on to show that it could create operative SiGe unicouples with the modern, cost-effective techniques in the labs with various partner institutions. “That partnership helped prove that this technique can be portable and replicable for industry adoption,” Venkatasubramanian said.

    The results demonstrated the possibility of resurrecting SiGe technology. And after further investigation, NASA decided to include SiGe unicouples in the Next-Gen RTG design.

    “APL’s quick work helped NASA understand the risks industry might face when reestablishing this capability and demonstrated that they were manageable,” said June Zakrajsek, the Radioisotope Power System program manager at NASA Glenn Research Center (US)

    “APL’s contributions to the Next-Gen Project’s top risk have been invaluable,” added Next-Gen Project Manager Rob Overy, also of NASA Glenn.

    Power to Explore

    Beyond reestablishing the capability, the team is excited by the new possibilities for the future.

    “We think SiGe is a long-range platform technology that we are developing for the Next-Gen RTG,” Venkatasubramanian said. “Our approach will likely not only meet the current goals of a 2030 mission, but could lay the foundation for a long-term, higher-performing RTG converter technology for future missions.”

    Among the most conspicuous of future candidate missions is the Interstellar Probe, a conceptual mission led by APL researchers and engineers. The idea would push modern technology to the very edge, propelling a spacecraft out of the solar system faster than any spacecraft before it and returning data for at least 50 years.

    “Basically, silicon-germanium RTG technology is an absolute necessity for the Interstellar Probe,” Venkatasubramanian said.

    Down the road, the APL team also believes the technology could fit into a modular device architecture like that of MMRTGs, and it could easily make its way into the commercial sector in high-temperature power generation to complement high-temperature energy storage.

    “Time will tell,” Venkatasubramanian said. “Our goal for now in the next two to three years is to understand the risks NASA faces, and help transition this technology into future use — both by NASA and other markets.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    JHUAPL campus

    Founded on March 10, 1942—just three months after the United States entered World War II— The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Lab (US) -was created as part of a federal government effort to mobilize scientific resources to address wartime challenges.

    The Applied Physics Lab was assigned the task of finding a more effective way for ships to defend themselves against enemy air attacks. The Laboratory designed, built, and tested a radar proximity fuze (known as the VT fuze) that significantly increased the effectiveness of anti-aircraft shells in the Pacific—and, later, ground artillery during the invasion of Europe. The product of the Laboratory’s intense development effort was later judged to be, along with the atomic bomb and radar, one of the three most valuable technology developments of the war.

    On the basis of that successful collaboration, the government, The Johns Hopkins University, and APL made a commitment to continue their strategic relationship. The Laboratory rapidly became a major contributor to advances in guided missiles and submarine technologies. Today, more than seven decades later, the Laboratory’s numerous and diverse achievements continue to strengthen our nation.

    The Applied Physics Lab continues to relentlessly pursue the mission it has followed since its first day: to make critical contributions to critical challenges for our nation.

    Johns Hopkins University campus

    Johns Hopkins University opened in 1876, with the inauguration of its first president, Daniel Coit Gilman. “What are we aiming at?” Gilman asked in his installation address. “The encouragement of research … and the advancement of individual scholars, who by their excellence will advance the sciences they pursue, and the society where they dwell.”

    The mission laid out by Gilman remains the university’s mission today, summed up in a simple but powerful restatement of Gilman’s own words: “Knowledge for the world.”

    What Gilman created was a research university, dedicated to advancing both students’ knowledge and the state of human knowledge through research and scholarship. Gilman believed that teaching and research are interdependent, that success in one depends on success in the other. A modern university, he believed, must do both well. The realization of Gilman’s philosophy at Johns Hopkins, and at other institutions that later attracted Johns Hopkins-trained scholars, revolutionized higher education in America, leading to the research university system as it exists today.

    The Johns Hopkins University (US) is a private research university in Baltimore, Maryland. Founded in 1876, the university was named for its first benefactor, the American entrepreneur and philanthropist Johns Hopkins. His $7 million bequest (approximately $147.5 million in today’s currency)—of which half financed the establishment of the Johns Hopkins Hospital—was the largest philanthropic gift in the history of the United States up to that time. Daniel Coit Gilman, who was inaugurated as the institution’s first president on February 22, 1876, led the university to revolutionize higher education in the U.S. by integrating teaching and research. Adopting the concept of a graduate school from Germany’s historic Ruprecht Karl University of Heidelberg, [Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg] (DE), Johns Hopkins University is considered the first research university in the United States. Over the course of several decades, the university has led all U.S. universities in annual research and development expenditures. In fiscal year 2016, Johns Hopkins spent nearly $2.5 billion on research. The university has graduate campuses in Italy, China, and Washington, D.C., in addition to its main campus in Baltimore.

    Johns Hopkins is organized into 10 divisions on campuses in Maryland and Washington, D.C., with international centers in Italy and China. The two undergraduate divisions, the Zanvyl Krieger School of Arts and Sciences and the Whiting School of Engineering, are located on the Homewood campus in Baltimore’s Charles Village neighborhood. The medical school, nursing school, and Bloomberg School of Public Health, and Johns Hopkins Children’s Center are located on the Medical Institutions campus in East Baltimore. The university also consists of the Peabody Institute, Applied Physics Laboratory, Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies, School of Education, Carey Business School, and various other facilities.

    Johns Hopkins was a founding member of the American Association of Universities (US). As of October 2019, 39 Nobel laureates and 1 Fields Medalist have been affiliated with Johns Hopkins. Founded in 1883, the Blue Jays men’s lacrosse team has captured 44 national titles and plays in the Big Ten Conference as an affiliate member as of 2014.

    Research

    The opportunity to participate in important research is one of the distinguishing characteristics of Hopkins’ undergraduate education. About 80 percent of undergraduates perform independent research, often alongside top researchers. In FY 2013, Johns Hopkins received $2.2 billion in federal research grants—more than any other U.S. university for the 35th consecutive year. Johns Hopkins has had seventy-seven members of the Institute of Medicine, forty-three Howard Hughes Medical Institute Investigators, seventeen members of the National Academy of Engineering, and sixty-two members of the National Academy of Sciences. As of October 2019, 39 Nobel Prize winners have been affiliated with the university as alumni, faculty members or researchers, with the most recent winners being Gregg Semenza and William G. Kaelin.

    Between 1999 and 2009, Johns Hopkins was among the most cited institutions in the world. It attracted nearly 1,222,166 citations and produced 54,022 papers under its name, ranking No. 3 globally [after Harvard University (US) and the Max Planck Society (DE) in the number of total citations published in Thomson Reuters-indexed journals over 22 fields in America.

    In FY 2000, Johns Hopkins received $95.4 million in research grants from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (US), making it the leading recipient of NASA research and development funding. In FY 2002, Hopkins became the first university to cross the $1 billion threshold on either list, recording $1.14 billion in total research and $1.023 billion in federally sponsored research. In FY 2008, Johns Hopkins University performed $1.68 billion in science, medical and engineering research, making it the leading U.S. academic institution in total R&D spending for the 30th year in a row, according to a National Science Foundation (US) ranking. These totals include grants and expenditures of JHU’s Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland.

    The Johns Hopkins University also offers the “Center for Talented Youth” program—a nonprofit organization dedicated to identifying and developing the talents of the most promising K-12 grade students worldwide. As part of the Johns Hopkins University, the “Center for Talented Youth” or CTY helps fulfill the university’s mission of preparing students to make significant future contributions to the world. The Johns Hopkins Digital Media Center (DMC) is a multimedia lab space as well as an equipment, technology and knowledge resource for students interested in exploring creative uses of emerging media and use of technology.

    In 2013, the Bloomberg Distinguished Professorships program was established by a $250 million gift from Michael Bloomberg. This program enables the university to recruit fifty researchers from around the world to joint appointments throughout the nine divisions and research centers. Each professor must be a leader in interdisciplinary research and be active in undergraduate education. Directed by Vice Provost for Research Denis Wirtz, there are currently thirty two Bloomberg Distinguished Professors at the university, including three Nobel Laureates, eight fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science (US), ten members of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and thirteen members of the National Academies.

     
  • richardmitnick 8:25 am on October 8, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "DOE Announces $20 Million to Produce Clean Hydrogen From Nuclear Power", Department of Energy (US)   

    From Department of Energy (US) : “DOE Announces $20 Million to Produce Clean Hydrogen From Nuclear Power” 

    From Department of Energy (US)

    2
    DOE’s H2@Scale vision for clean hydrogen.

    Arizona Project Will Advance DOE’s Hydrogen Shot of $1 per 1 Kilogram of Clean Hydrogen in One Decade.

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced $20 million in funding to demonstrate technology that will produce clean hydrogen energy from nuclear power. This innovative approach will allow clean hydrogen to serve as a source for zero-carbon electricity and represent an important economic product for nuclear plants beyond electricity. The project, based in Arizona, will make progress on DOE’s H2@Scale vision for clean hydrogen across multiple sectors and help meet the Department’s Hydrogen Shot goal of $1 per 1 kilogram in one decade. This announcement is part of a week-long celebration of Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Day that culminates on October 8.

    “Developing and deploying clean hydrogen can be a crucial part of the path to achieving a net-zero carbon future and combatting climate change,” said Deputy Secretary of Energy David M. Turk. “Using nuclear power to create hydrogen energy is an illustration of DOE’s commitment to funding a full range of innovative pathways to create affordable, clean hydrogen, to meet DOE’s Hydrogen Shot goal, and to advance our transition to a carbon-free future.”

    The project, led by PNW Hydrogen LLC, will receive $12 million from the DOE’s Hydrogen and Fuel Cell Technologies Office (HFTO) and $8 million from DOE’s Office of Nuclear Energy (NE) for a total award of $20 million. The project will produce clean hydrogen from nuclear power at the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station in Phoenix, Arizona. Six tonnes of stored hydrogen will be used to produce approximately 200 MWh electricity during times of high demand, and may be also used to make chemicals and other fuels. The project will provide insights about integrating nuclear energy with hydrogen production technologies and inform future clean hydrogen production deployments at scale.

    “Arizona continues to lead the nation in clean hydrogen energy innovation, and today’s Department of Energy investment will help fuel continued progress,” said U.S. Senator Kyrsten Sinema (AZ). “I am committed to supporting state-of-the-art investments to secure our energy future, including by passing the bipartisan Infrastructure Investment and Jobs Act which provides $9.5 billion for national clean hydrogen hubs, hydrogen manufacturing and recycling programs, and programs to lower the cost of clean hydrogen. I look forward to working with the Department and Arizonans to encourage such investments going forward.”

    PNW Hydrogen, LLC will be the primary recipient of the DOE award and will collaborate with multiple stakeholders in research, academia, industry and state-level government including DOE’s Idaho National Laboratory (US), DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (US), DOE’s National Renewable Energy Laboratory, OxEon, Electric Power Research Institute, The Arizona State University US), The University of California-Irvine (US), Siemens, Xcel Energy, Energy Harbor and the LA Department of Water and Power.

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Department of Energy (US) is a cabinet-level department of the United States Government concerned with the United States’ policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation’s nuclear weapons program; nuclear reactor production for the United States Navy; energy conservation; energy-related research; radioactive waste disposal; and domestic energy production. It also directs research in genomics. the Human Genome Project originated in a DOE initiative. DOE sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other U.S. federal agency, the majority of which is conducted through its system of National Laboratories. The agency is led by the United States Secretary of Energy, and its headquarters are located in Southwest Washington, D.C., on Independence Avenue in the James V. Forrestal Building, named for James Forrestal, as well as in Germantown, Maryland.

    Formation and consolidation

    In 1942, during World War II, the United States started the Manhattan Project, a project to develop the atomic bomb, under the eye of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After the war in 1946, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was created to control the future of the project. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 also created the framework for the first National Laboratories. Among other nuclear projects, the AEC produced fabricated uranium fuel cores at locations such as Fernald Feed Materials Production Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1974, the AEC gave way to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which was tasked with regulating the nuclear power industry and the Energy Research and Development Administration, which was tasked to manage the nuclear weapon; naval reactor; and energy development programs.

    The 1973 oil crisis called attention to the need to consolidate energy policy. On August 4, 1977, President Jimmy Carter signed into law The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Pub.L. 95–91, 91 Stat. 565, enacted August 4, 1977), which created the Department of Energy(US). The new agency, which began operations on October 1, 1977, consolidated the Federal Energy Administration; the Energy Research and Development Administration; the Federal Power Commission; and programs of various other agencies. Former Secretary of Defense James Schlesinger, who served under Presidents Nixon and Ford during the Vietnam War, was appointed as the first secretary.

    President Carter created the Department of Energy with the goal of promoting energy conservation and developing alternative sources of energy. He wanted to not be dependent on foreign oil and reduce the use of fossil fuels. With international energy’s future uncertain for America, Carter acted quickly to have the department come into action the first year of his presidency. This was an extremely important issue of the time as the oil crisis was causing shortages and inflation. With the Three-Mile Island disaster, Carter was able to intervene with the help of the department. Carter made switches within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in this case to fix the management and procedures. This was possible as nuclear energy and weapons are responsibility of the Department of Energy.

    Recent

    On March 28, 2017, a supervisor in the Office of International Climate and Clean Energy asked staff to avoid the phrases “climate change,” “emissions reduction,” or “Paris Agreement” in written memos, briefings or other written communication. A DOE spokesperson denied that phrases had been banned.

    In a May 2019 press release concerning natural gas exports from a Texas facility, the DOE used the term ‘freedom gas’ to refer to natural gas. The phrase originated from a speech made by Secretary Rick Perry in Brussels earlier that month. Washington Governor Jay Inslee decried the term “a joke”.

    Facilities

    The Department of Energy operates a system of national laboratories and technical facilities for research and development, as follows:

    Ames Laboratory
    Argonne National Laboratory
    Brookhaven National Laboratory
    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
    Idaho National Laboratory
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
    Los Alamos National Laboratory
    National Energy Technology Laboratory
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
    Sandia National Laboratories
    Savannah River National Laboratory
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Other major DOE facilities include:
    Albany Research Center
    Bannister Federal Complex
    Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory – focuses on the design and development of nuclear power for the U.S. Navy
    Kansas City Plant
    Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory – operates for Naval Reactors Program Research under the DOE (not a National Laboratory)
    National Petroleum Technology Office
    Nevada Test Site
    New Brunswick Laboratory
    Office of Fossil Energy
    Office of River Protection
    Pantex
    Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory
    Y-12 National Security Complex
    Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository
    Other:

    Pahute Mesa Airstrip – Nye County, Nevada, in supporting Nevada National Security Site

     
  • richardmitnick 1:19 pm on October 1, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "DOE Announces up to $400 Million for Basic Research to Advance the Frontiers of Science", Department of Energy (US)   

    From Department of Energy (US) : “DOE Announces up to $400 Million for Basic Research to Advance the Frontiers of Science” 

    From Department of Energy (US)

    October 1, 2021

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today announced up to $400 million in funding for a range of research opportunities to support DOE’s clean energy, economic, and national security goals. The funding will advance the priorities of DOE’s Office of Science and its major programs, including DOE Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (US), DOE Office of Basic Energy Sciences (BES)(US), DOE Biological and Environmental Research (BER), DOE Fusion Energy Sciences (US), DOE Office of High Energy Physics (HEP), DOE Office of Nuclear Physics, Isotope R&D and Production and Accelerator R&D and Production. This funding opportunity will help achieve the Biden Administration’s plan to employ science and innovation to tackle our greatest challenges.

    “From developing new materials for batteries to building the scientific foundation for fusion energy, DOE’s Office of Science is providing the funding and resources to help experts and innovators tackle climate change by improving our understanding of the world and accelerating the development of new solutions,” said Secretary of Energy Jennifer M. Granholm. “This comprehensive investment will power new scientific breakthroughs and position America as a leader in scientific innovation.”

    The DOE Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA), informally known as the “Open Call,” is issued annually at the beginning of each Fiscal Year (FY). It provides a vehicle for the Office of Science to solicit applications for research support in areas not covered by more specific, topical FOAs that are issued by the office over the course of the Fiscal Year. The FOA, titled “FY 2022 Continuation of Solicitation for the Office of Science Financial Assistance Program,” can be found on the Office of Science funding opportunities page.

    “The future of America depends on science and technology like never before,” said Director of the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy Dr. Eric Lander. “President Biden understands that addressing the opportunities and challenges we face – to our health, our planet, our economic prosperity, and our national security – will require harnessing the full power of science and technology.”

    DOE’s Office of Science is the nation’s largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences, the steward of 10 of the Nation’s national laboratories, funds research at hundreds of universities nationwide, and the lead federal entity supporting fundamental research for clean energy and security.

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Department of Energy (US) is a cabinet-level department of the United States Government concerned with the United States’ policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation’s nuclear weapons program; nuclear reactor production for the United States Navy; energy conservation; energy-related research; radioactive waste disposal; and domestic energy production. It also directs research in genomics. the Human Genome Project originated in a DOE initiative. DOE sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other U.S. federal agency, the majority of which is conducted through its system of National Laboratories. The agency is led by the United States Secretary of Energy, and its headquarters are located in Southwest Washington, D.C., on Independence Avenue in the James V. Forrestal Building, named for James Forrestal, as well as in Germantown, Maryland.

    Formation and consolidation

    In 1942, during World War II, the United States started the Manhattan Project, a project to develop the atomic bomb, under the eye of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After the war in 1946, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was created to control the future of the project. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 also created the framework for the first National Laboratories. Among other nuclear projects, the AEC produced fabricated uranium fuel cores at locations such as Fernald Feed Materials Production Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1974, the AEC gave way to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which was tasked with regulating the nuclear power industry and the Energy Research and Development Administration, which was tasked to manage the nuclear weapon; naval reactor; and energy development programs.

    The 1973 oil crisis called attention to the need to consolidate energy policy. On August 4, 1977, President Jimmy Carter signed into law The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Pub.L. 95–91, 91 Stat. 565, enacted August 4, 1977), which created the Department of Energy(US). The new agency, which began operations on October 1, 1977, consolidated the Federal Energy Administration; the Energy Research and Development Administration; the Federal Power Commission; and programs of various other agencies. Former Secretary of Defense James Schlesinger, who served under Presidents Nixon and Ford during the Vietnam War, was appointed as the first secretary.

    President Carter created the Department of Energy with the goal of promoting energy conservation and developing alternative sources of energy. He wanted to not be dependent on foreign oil and reduce the use of fossil fuels. With international energy’s future uncertain for America, Carter acted quickly to have the department come into action the first year of his presidency. This was an extremely important issue of the time as the oil crisis was causing shortages and inflation. With the Three-Mile Island disaster, Carter was able to intervene with the help of the department. Carter made switches within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in this case to fix the management and procedures. This was possible as nuclear energy and weapons are responsibility of the Department of Energy.

    Recent

    On March 28, 2017, a supervisor in the Office of International Climate and Clean Energy asked staff to avoid the phrases “climate change,” “emissions reduction,” or “Paris Agreement” in written memos, briefings or other written communication. A DOE spokesperson denied that phrases had been banned.

    In a May 2019 press release concerning natural gas exports from a Texas facility, the DOE used the term ‘freedom gas’ to refer to natural gas. The phrase originated from a speech made by Secretary Rick Perry in Brussels earlier that month. Washington Governor Jay Inslee decried the term “a joke”.

    Facilities

    The Department of Energy operates a system of national laboratories and technical facilities for research and development, as follows:

    Ames Laboratory
    Argonne National Laboratory
    Brookhaven National Laboratory
    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
    Idaho National Laboratory
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
    Los Alamos National Laboratory
    National Energy Technology Laboratory
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
    Sandia National Laboratories
    Savannah River National Laboratory
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Other major DOE facilities include:
    Albany Research Center
    Bannister Federal Complex
    Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory – focuses on the design and development of nuclear power for the U.S. Navy
    Kansas City Plant
    Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory – operates for Naval Reactors Program Research under the DOE (not a National Laboratory)
    National Petroleum Technology Office
    Nevada Test Site
    New Brunswick Laboratory
    Office of Fossil Energy
    Office of River Protection
    Pantex
    Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory
    Y-12 National Security Complex
    Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository
    Other:

    Pahute Mesa Airstrip – Nye County, Nevada, in supporting Nevada National Security Site

     
  • richardmitnick 3:18 pm on August 31, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Wind Turbines-the Bigger the Better", , , Department of Energy (US)   

    From Department of Energy (US) : “Wind Turbines-the Bigger the Better” 

    From Department of Energy (US)

    August 30, 2021

    Since the early 2000s, wind turbines have grown in size—in both height and blade lengths—and generate more energy. What’s driving this growth? Let’s take a closer look.

    1
    Average turbine hub height, rotor diameter, and nameplate capacity for land-based wind projects from the Land-Based Wind Market Report: 2021 Edition.

    A wind turbine’s hub height is the distance from the ground to the middle of the turbine’s rotor. The hub height for utility-scale land-based wind turbines has increased 59% since 1998–1999, to about 90 meters (295 feet) in 2020. That’s about as tall as the Statue of Liberty! The average hub height for offshore turbines in the United States is projected to grow even taller—from 100 meters (330 feet) in 2016 to about 150 meters (500 feet), or about the height of the Washington Monument, in 2035.

    2
    Illustration of increasing turbine heights and blades lengths over time.

    Turbine towers are becoming taller to capture more energy, since winds generally increase as altitudes increase. The change in wind speed with altitude is called wind shear. At higher heights above the ground, wind can flow more freely, with less friction from obstacles on the earth’s surface such as trees and other vegetation, buildings, and mountains. Most wind turbine towers taller than 100 meters tend to be concentrated in the Midwest and Northeast, two regions with higher-than-average wind shear.

    3
    Location of tall-tower turbine installations from the Land-Based Wind Market Report: 2021 Edition.

    3

    Rotor Diameter

    A turbine’s rotor diameter, or the width of the circle swept by the rotating blades (the dotted circles in the second illustration), has also grown over the years. Back in 2010, no turbines in the United States employed rotors that were 115 meters (380 feet) in diameter or larger. In 2020, 91% of newly installed turbines featured such rotors. The average rotor diameter in 2020 was about 125 meters (410 feet)—longer than a football field.

    Larger rotor diameters allow wind turbines to sweep more area, capture more wind, and produce more electricity. A turbine with longer blades will be able to capture more of the available wind than shorter blades—even in areas with relatively less wind. Being able to harvest more wind at lower wind speeds can increase the number of areas available for wind development nationwide. Due to this trend, rotor swept areas have grown 570% since 1998–1999.

    Nameplate Capacity

    In addition to getting taller and bigger, wind turbines have also increased in maximum power rating, or capacity, since the early 2000s. The average capacity of newly installed U.S. wind turbines in 2020 was 2.75 megawatts (MW), up 8% since 2019 and 284% since 1998–1999. In 2020, there was a sharp increase for turbines installed in the 2.75–3.5 MW range. More wind energy per turbine means that fewer turbines are needed to generate a desired capacity across a wind plant—ultimately leading to lower costs.

    Transportation and Installation Challenges

    If bigger is better, why aren’t even larger turbines used currently? Although turbine heights and rotor diameters are increasing, there are a few limitations. Transporting and installing large turbine blades for land-based wind is not easy, since they cannot be folded or bent once constructed. This limits the routes trucks can take and the radius of their turns. Turbine tower diameters are also difficult to manage, since they may not fit under bridges or highway overpasses. DOE is addressing these challenges through its research projects. For instance, DOE is designing turbines with more slender and flexible blades that can navigate through curves in roads and rail lines that conventional blades cannot. DOE is also supporting efforts to develop tall turbine towers that can be produced on site, thus eliminating tower transportation issues.

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Department of Energy (US) is a cabinet-level department of the United States Government concerned with the United States’ policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation’s nuclear weapons program; nuclear reactor production for the United States Navy; energy conservation; energy-related research; radioactive waste disposal; and domestic energy production. It also directs research in genomics. the Human Genome Project originated in a DOE initiative. DOE sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other U.S. federal agency, the majority of which is conducted through its system of National Laboratories. The agency is led by the United States Secretary of Energy, and its headquarters are located in Southwest Washington, D.C., on Independence Avenue in the James V. Forrestal Building, named for James Forrestal, as well as in Germantown, Maryland.

    Formation and consolidation

    In 1942, during World War II, the United States started the Manhattan Project, a project to develop the atomic bomb, under the eye of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After the war in 1946, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was created to control the future of the project. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 also created the framework for the first National Laboratories. Among other nuclear projects, the AEC produced fabricated uranium fuel cores at locations such as Fernald Feed Materials Production Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1974, the AEC gave way to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which was tasked with regulating the nuclear power industry and the Energy Research and Development Administration, which was tasked to manage the nuclear weapon; naval reactor; and energy development programs.

    The 1973 oil crisis called attention to the need to consolidate energy policy. On August 4, 1977, President Jimmy Carter signed into law The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Pub.L. 95–91, 91 Stat. 565, enacted August 4, 1977), which created the Department of Energy(US). The new agency, which began operations on October 1, 1977, consolidated the Federal Energy Administration; the Energy Research and Development Administration; the Federal Power Commission; and programs of various other agencies. Former Secretary of Defense James Schlesinger, who served under Presidents Nixon and Ford during the Vietnam War, was appointed as the first secretary.

    President Carter created the Department of Energy with the goal of promoting energy conservation and developing alternative sources of energy. He wanted to not be dependent on foreign oil and reduce the use of fossil fuels. With international energy’s future uncertain for America, Carter acted quickly to have the department come into action the first year of his presidency. This was an extremely important issue of the time as the oil crisis was causing shortages and inflation. With the Three-Mile Island disaster, Carter was able to intervene with the help of the department. Carter made switches within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in this case to fix the management and procedures. This was possible as nuclear energy and weapons are responsibility of the Department of Energy.

    Recent

    On March 28, 2017, a supervisor in the Office of International Climate and Clean Energy asked staff to avoid the phrases “climate change,” “emissions reduction,” or “Paris Agreement” in written memos, briefings or other written communication. A DOE spokesperson denied that phrases had been banned.

    In a May 2019 press release concerning natural gas exports from a Texas facility, the DOE used the term ‘freedom gas’ to refer to natural gas. The phrase originated from a speech made by Secretary Rick Perry in Brussels earlier that month. Washington Governor Jay Inslee decried the term “a joke”.

    Facilities

    The Department of Energy operates a system of national laboratories and technical facilities for research and development, as follows:

    Ames Laboratory
    Argonne National Laboratory
    Brookhaven National Laboratory
    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
    Idaho National Laboratory
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
    Los Alamos National Laboratory
    National Energy Technology Laboratory
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
    Sandia National Laboratories
    Savannah River National Laboratory
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Other major DOE facilities include:
    Albany Research Center
    Bannister Federal Complex
    Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory – focuses on the design and development of nuclear power for the U.S. Navy
    Kansas City Plant
    Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory – operates for Naval Reactors Program Research under the DOE (not a National Laboratory)
    National Petroleum Technology Office
    Nevada Test Site
    New Brunswick Laboratory
    Office of Fossil Energy
    Office of River Protection
    Pantex
    Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory
    Y-12 National Security Complex
    Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository
    Other:

    Pahute Mesa Airstrip – Nye County, Nevada, in supporting Nevada National Security Site

     
  • richardmitnick 3:50 pm on August 13, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "DOE Announces Nearly $83 Million to Increase Building Energy Efficiency and Cut Consumers' Energy Bills", 44 Projects Will Drive Innovations in Building Materials; Lighting; and Heating and Cooling Systems., Department of Energy (US)   

    From Department of Energy (US) : “DOE Announces Nearly $83 Million to Increase Building Energy Efficiency and Cut Consumers’ Energy Bills” 

    From Department of Energy (US)

    August 13, 2021

    44 Projects Will Drive Innovations in Building Materials; Lighting; and Heating and Cooling Systems.

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) today awarded $82.6 million in funding to 44 projects that will lower Americans’ energy bills and help meet President Biden’s goal of net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 by investing in new energy efficient building technologies, construction practices, and the U.S. buildings-sector workforce.

    “Americans spend about $100 billion every year on wasted energy from buildings, heating and cooling units, and more – increasing energy bills and needless emissions that dirty our air and worsen the climate crisis,” said Secretary of Energy Jennifer M. Granholm. “By pursuing advancements that make both existing and newly constructed buildings more energy efficient, we can save consumers money and reduce the climate impacts of the places we live and work.”

    Currently, residential and commercial buildings account for more than one-third of the climate-altering carbon pollution America releases each year, and consume 40% of the nation’s energy and 75% of its electricity. Pursuing energy efficiency innovations is one of the most cost-effective means to keep the growth of energy consumption from spiraling upwards as society’s energy needs grow.

    The 44 projects across 20 states will improve building energy efficiency through innovations in thermal energy storage, building envelopes, lighting, heating, ventilation, air conditioning, refrigeration, and water heating – as well as by bolstering America’s energy efficiency workforce with trainings, educational programs, and other technical support.

    “Technology serves as the third economic wave in our state’s economic growth and today’s funding to North Dakota State University will be used to advance innovative ways to store energy,” said U.S. Senator John Hoeven (ND). “Investments in research to develop cost-effective, more efficient technologies is key to meeting our growing energy needs while leveraging existing resources and with improved environmental stewardship.”

    “I am grateful for the Energy Department’s consistent investment in North Dakota and its energy efforts,” said U.S. Senator Kevin Cramer (ND). “Today’s award will help NDSU advance its research of efficient energy storage and sustainability.”

    “As the strain of extreme heat and wildfires continue threatening to overwhelm California’s electric grid, the funding and support of these pivotal projects are crucial to improving the efficiency of our energy grid and reduce demand,” U.S. Senator Alex Padilla (CA) said. “This is one of the many steps we need to take in order to combat the worsening impacts of climate change. Through these various research projects, we are one step closer to being able to conserve more energy and save billions of dollars in yearly energy costs.”

    “Just yesterday, I had the opportunity to bring Secretary Granholm to Central Virginia to demonstrate how our region is leading the way in building new clean energy technologies, constructing energy-efficient buildings, and creating good-paying clean energy jobs,” said U.S. Representative Abigail Spanberger (VA-07). “Today’s announcement is an exciting moment for Project Haystack and the Commonwealth as a whole. I look forward to following this project’s progress very closely, and I would like to thank the U.S. Department of Energy for their continued confidence in Virginia’s clean energy future.”

    “If we are going to address the climate crisis we must take steps to reduce emissions in every sector of our economy,” said U.S. Representative Teresa Leger Fernández (NM-03). “This investment will help New Mexico deploy energy-efficient building technologies and advance our ever-growing clean energy workforce.”

    “Georgia’s Fifth Congressional District is home to innovators working toward environmental justice for everyone,” said U.S. Representative Nikema Williams (GA-05). “The Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance is one of those innovators and today’s award will allow them to help consumers make the informed decisions they need to create a greener planet. I thank Secretary Granholm and the Department of Energy for recognizing this work.”

    Among the 44 projects are:

    North Dakota State University (US) (Fargo, North Dakota) will develop a novel absorption material that will efficiently store thermal energy.
    Baryon Inc. (Wilmington, Delaware) will develop an innovative air-conditioning system based on a new method of evaporative cooling combined with dehumidification that can consume 50 to 85% less energy than traditional air conditioning systems.
    Emerson Commercial and Residential Solutions (Sidney, Ohio) will design, fabricate, and validate a highly efficient refrigerated display case for use in supermarkets.
    New Jersey Institute of Technology (US) (Newark, New Jersey) will design, prototype, install, test, and evaluate a high-performance residential wall retrofit that can achieve estimated heating and cooling energy savings of 30% or more.
    The Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (Atlanta, Georgia) will develop training resources on electrified building systems such as electric heat pumps, heat pump water heaters, electric vehicle charging systems, and battery storage systems. These resources will help members of the workforce learn how to educate consumers on the benefits of these technologies.

    Visit here for more information and the full list of selected projects.

    The following 23 projects were selected under Topic Area 1: Building Technology Research, Development, and Field Validation:

    Advancing Innovative Manufacturing and End-of-Life Processing of Efficient Building Energy Technologies

    University of Maryland (US) (College Park, Maryland) will develop an adhesive-based hybrid manufacturing method for next-generation air-to-refrigerant heat exchangers. These heat exchangers will be 50% cheaper and use 36% less energy in manufacturing, making them ideal for use in affordable heat pumps.

    Thermal Storage Research, Development, and Field Validation

    Massachusetts Institute of Technology (US) (Cambridge, Massachusetts) will develop a thermal energy storage device that uses a hydrogel/salt composite to achieve high energy densities, low costs, and the potential for scalable fabrication. This device can be integrated with HVAC, water heating, or other applications to provide energy savings and building load flexibility.
    North Dakota State University (US)(Fargo, North Dakota) will develop a novel thermochemical absorption material for energy storage by embedding a framework of nanocellulose with hygroscopic salt. This material will serve as the basis for economical and highly efficient thermal energy storage systems and could potentially be used in other applications such as adsorption cooling.
    University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (US) (Champaign, Illinois) will develop and optimize a polymer hydrogel that incorporates stable nucleation sites for low-cost salt hydrates, for use in phase-change thermal energy storage systems. If successful, this project will provide a comprehensive framework to manufacture thermal energy storage technology at scale.
    University of Maryland (College Park, Maryland) will develop an integrated heat pump and thermal energy storage system that can provide thermal energy storage for both heating and cooling and provide ideal performance throughout the year, independent of outdoor conditions. This system has the potential to achieve more than 50% demand reduction during on-peak hours in commercial buildings.

    Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning Research, Development, and Field Validation

    Baryon Inc. (Wilmington, Delaware) will develop a novel air-conditioning system based on a new method of evaporative cooling combined with dehumidification through a new type of ionic membrane. Due to its unique arrangement, the proposed system can consume 50% to 85% less energy than traditional air conditioning systems, generate water for its own operation, and remain highly effective in humid climates.
    Palo Alto Research Center Inc. (Palo Alto, California) will engineer, construct, and demonstrate a packaged 5-ton HVAC system using a liquid desiccant that returns to a liquid phase at ambient temperature, and is capable of shifting load to reduce grid demand.

    Refrigeration and Water Heating Research, Development, and Field Validation

    Emerson Commercial and Residential Solutions (Sidney, Ohio) will design, fabricate, and validate a highly efficient refrigerated display case for use in supermarkets. The display case will also integrate with HVAC systems to serve as a flexible grid resource.
    Ultrasonic Technology Solutions (Knoxville, Tennessee) will develop a vibrational defrosting system to remove ice from the evaporator in a refrigerator. By replacing current refrigerator defrosting technology that uses heat, this system will reduce energy use and allow the refrigerator to maintain a more consistent temperature.
    University of Maryland (College Park, Maryland) will develop an isothermal compressor that can reduce the energy consumption of refrigerators by an average of 40%.

    Integrated HVAC, Refrigeration, and Water Heating Research, Development, and Field Validation

    Electric Power Research Institute (Palo Alto, California) will combine a thermoelectric heat pump with a direct expansion air-to-air heat pump, creating a system with improved efficiency and heating capacity in cold outdoor temperatures at low cost. The project will develop and demonstrate the heat pump and measure its energy savings.

    Lighting Technology Research, Development, and Field Validation

    Eaton Corporation (Menomonee Falls, Wisconsin) will validate a new design methodology that applies automated luminaire design and additive manufacturing to optimize light-emitting diode (LED) lighting for the built environment. This methodology will allow manufacturers to reduce part counts and produce custom LED optics while avoiding some of the expenses and long lead times of traditional manufacturing.
    OSRAM Opto Semiconductors (Portland, Oregon) will develop cadmium-free quantum dot color converters that are robust enough to endure the typical operating conditions of solid-state lighting devices. These converters will allow a wider color range in solid-state lighting, improving occupant well-being.
    DOE’s Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (US) (Richland, Washington) will update state-of-the-art software tools for lighting design, informed by laboratory and field work, to include the capabilities of solid-state lighting technology and their interactions with occupants’ environments.
    Palo Alto Research Center Inc. (Palo Alto, California) will develop a manufacturing process to place LEDs on a thin sheet at high-precision, via roll-to-roll printing building lighting platform composed of thin, bendable sheets of solid-state light-emitting diodes (LEDs) that are more efficient, affordable, and lightweight than current organic LED lighting sheets. These lighting sheets will also feature distributed electronics throughout the lighting system to optimize energy efficiency and function.
    Pennsylvania State University (US)(University Park, Pennsylvania) will develop a framework for measuring lighting application efficiency (LAE), the relationship between electrical power consumed by lighting hardware and the amount of generated light that is useful to building occupants.
    Pennsylvania State University (University Park, Pennsylvania) will develop OLEDs on substrates that enable luminance equal to existing devices with lower current density, enabling improvements in efficiency and OLED lifetime.
    Regents of the University of Michigan (US) (Ann Arbor, Michigan) will produce longer-lived white organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs) by developing techniques to extend the lifetime of the shortest-lived component of white OLED assemblies–blue OLEDs–to 50,000 hours of operation or more.
    Thomas Jefferson University (US) (Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) will strive to demonstrate that the light emitted by solid-state lighting can improve the health and well-being of hospital workers and patients over the light of conventional fluorescent lights.
    University of California-Santa Barbara (US) (Santa Barbara, California) will develop light-emitting diodes with improved energy efficiency, to address long-standing challenges hindering highly efficient, color-mixed solid-state lighting.

    Energy and Demand Data, Modeling, and Analytics

    Fraunhofer USA, Center for Manufacturing Innovation (Brookline, Massachusetts) will use appliance, thermostat, and weather-station data to train a machine learning model to automatically forecast device loads and perform model-predictive control-based load management.
    Project Haystack (Glen Allen, Virginia) will create a validation and accreditation framework to standardize metadata templates across grid-interactive efficient buildings and energy management information system platforms.

    Comprehensive Electric Load Optimization

    Otherlab Inc. (San Francisco, California) will demonstrate the effectiveness of battery-integrated appliances to shift electrical loads on utility grids in response to demand.

    The following 21 projects were selected under Topic Area 2, Advanced Building Construction:

    Mass Produced Highly Efficient Manufactured Homes and Portable Classrooms

    Systems Building Research Alliance (New York, New York) will collaborate with home manufacturers, product suppliers, and customers to develop cost-effective solutions for net-zero-energy manufactured homes.

    Building Envelope Research, Development, and Field Validation

    Alpen High-Performance Products Inc. (Louisville, Colorado) will demonstrate the ability to fabricate dynamic glazing with insulation performance greater than R-6 in a decentralized fashion, allowing it to access economies of scale that can reduce its price.
    InventWood, LLC (College Park, Maryland) will engineer new vacuum insulation panels (VIPs) with a novel structure composed of low-cost nanoporous wood chips. These VIPs can potentially deliver an overall panel insulation of R15, minimize edge losses, and increase service life while costing less than $1 per square foot for an inch-thick panel.
    Liatris Inc. (Bethesda, Maryland) will develop nanocomposite R-10 insulation board using high-volume, low-cost processes, resulting in a total cost per R superior to current insulation products. Liatris plans to collaborate with a manufacturing partner to utilize this isolation in off-site manufacturing of passive homes, improving home performance in cold climates and reducing flammability and embodied emissions.
    New Jersey Institute of Technology (Newark, New Jersey) will design, prototype, install, test, and evaluate a high-performance residential wall retrofit that can achieve estimated heating and cooling energy savings of 30% or more. The retrofit includes a two-component barrier system that resists temperature differentials, air, and water; a re-engineered window surround; and a high-performance storm window that supplements rather than replaces conventional windows.
    DOE’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (US) (Oak Ridge, Tennessee) will use state-of-the-art simulation tools and machine learning to develop novel insulation materials that exceed R-10/in. without vacuum at a competitive cost per R.
    Tynt Technologies (Boulder, Colorado) will develop market-ready dynamic windows manufactured with reversible metal electrodeposition. This process is much cheaper than current dynamic window manufacturing methods and has the potential to reduce the sale price of dynamic windows by more than 50%.
    University of Colorado-Boulder (US) (Boulder, Colorado) will develop thin-film monolithic mesoporous metamaterials that can be applied to new ultrahigh-efficiency glazing solutions. These materials can be used to construct windows with insulating capabilities equal to or greater than conventional walls, allowing buildings to take advantage of daylighting without compromising thermal efficiency.

    Advanced Workforce for Advanced Technology:

    The Architectural Solar Association (Boulder, Colorado) will develop a continuing education program for the design, construction, and economics of integrating solar energy generating equipment into a building’s structure. The program will connect solar and building industry stakeholders to promote architectural solar innovation and deployment.
    The Association of Energy Services Professionals (Phoenix, Arizona) will develop and deliver a series of online courses on grid-interactive, demand-flexible energy technologies for energy efficiency and demand management professionals.
    Frontier Energy Inc. (San Ramon, California) will create a self-sustaining, replicable program to provide ongoing education on quality HVAC services. The program will provide several different curricula to train students on HVAC installation, maintenance techniques, and the benefits of energy-efficient HVAC products and services.
    International Center for Appropriate and Sustainable Technology (Denver, Colorado) will develop and validate a new curriculum to train HVAC technicians in the design, installation, and maintenance of cold climate air source heat pumps in existing residential and small commercial buildings.
    Momentum Innovation Group LLC (Jersey City, New Jersey) will create a Workforce Development Platform to allow individuals entering the building workforce to access training content and job opportunities. The Workforce Development Platform will be scalable nationwide, integrate classroom and hands-on training, and allow potential employers to easily connect with students.
    New Buildings Institute Inc. (Portland, Oregon) will develop educational resources to help design and construction professionals design and install building electrification technology. The resources will specifically target electrified space and water heating systems, and the project team will engage with partners at the local and national level to tailor their resources to the needs of building professionals.
    The New Mexico Energy, Minerals and Natural Resources Department (Santa Fe, New Mexico) will develop, deliver, and evaluate continuing education and training on New Mexico’s updated energy efficiency codes and policies. This training will allow the state’s energy workforce to adapt to the new policies and better take advantage of the increasing demand for energy-efficient building technologies.
    Northeast Energy Efficiency Partnerships (Lexington, Massachusetts) will collaborate with several partner organizations to produce on-demand training tools for the building workforce and issue a new “Total Energy Pathways” certification to workers through the Building Performance Institute.
    Northeastern University (US) (Boston, Massachusetts) will develop a 14-hour curriculum that teaches entry-level building operators about the operation of grid-interactive efficient buildings. The curriculum will include a hands-on building operation demonstrator that integrates building energy simulation with real-world building automation system hardware and interfaces to simulate the effects of automated systems on building energy dynamics.
    Pennsylvania State University (University Park, Pennsylvania) will create a multi-institution consortium to develop building engineering curricula, including fundamental skills in programming and data science and training in the use of modeling technologies such as EnergyPlus and Modelica.
    Slipstream Group Inc. (Madison, Wisconsin) will develop an advanced-level college curriculum on smart building technologies for architectural engineering and other building technology-related programs. The course will use hands-on tools including building energy modeling and simulation and an integrated building energy and control testbed with a small-scale automation system to teach smart building system design, control, integration, and interactions with distributed energy resources and the grid.
    The Southeast Energy Efficiency Alliance (Atlanta, Georgia) will develop training resources on electrified building systems such as electric heat pumps, heat pump water heaters, electric vehicle charging systems, and battery storage systems. These resources will help members of the workforce learn how to educate consumers on the benefits of these technologies.
    Washington State University (US) (Pullman, Washington) will develop a curriculum on the design and construction of high-performing, energy-efficient residential buildings. The curriculum will provide students with an interdisciplinary grounding in building science, and address skill gaps in efficient building construction identified by DOE.

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Department of Energy (US) is a cabinet-level department of the United States Government concerned with the United States’ policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation’s nuclear weapons program; nuclear reactor production for the United States Navy; energy conservation; energy-related research; radioactive waste disposal; and domestic energy production. It also directs research in genomics. the Human Genome Project originated in a DOE initiative. DOE sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other U.S. federal agency, the majority of which is conducted through its system of National Laboratories. The agency is led by the United States Secretary of Energy, and its headquarters are located in Southwest Washington, D.C., on Independence Avenue in the James V. Forrestal Building, named for James Forrestal, as well as in Germantown, Maryland.

    Formation and consolidation

    In 1942, during World War II, the United States started the Manhattan Project, a project to develop the atomic bomb, under the eye of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After the war in 1946, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was created to control the future of the project. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 also created the framework for the first National Laboratories. Among other nuclear projects, the AEC produced fabricated uranium fuel cores at locations such as Fernald Feed Materials Production Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1974, the AEC gave way to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which was tasked with regulating the nuclear power industry and the Energy Research and Development Administration, which was tasked to manage the nuclear weapon; naval reactor; and energy development programs.

    The 1973 oil crisis called attention to the need to consolidate energy policy. On August 4, 1977, President Jimmy Carter signed into law The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Pub.L. 95–91, 91 Stat. 565, enacted August 4, 1977), which created the Department of Energy(US). The new agency, which began operations on October 1, 1977, consolidated the Federal Energy Administration; the Energy Research and Development Administration; the Federal Power Commission; and programs of various other agencies. Former Secretary of Defense James Schlesinger, who served under Presidents Nixon and Ford during the Vietnam War, was appointed as the first secretary.

    President Carter created the Department of Energy with the goal of promoting energy conservation and developing alternative sources of energy. He wanted to not be dependent on foreign oil and reduce the use of fossil fuels. With international energy’s future uncertain for America, Carter acted quickly to have the department come into action the first year of his presidency. This was an extremely important issue of the time as the oil crisis was causing shortages and inflation. With the Three-Mile Island disaster, Carter was able to intervene with the help of the department. Carter made switches within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in this case to fix the management and procedures. This was possible as nuclear energy and weapons are responsibility of the Department of Energy.

    Recent

    On March 28, 2017, a supervisor in the Office of International Climate and Clean Energy asked staff to avoid the phrases “climate change,” “emissions reduction,” or “Paris Agreement” in written memos, briefings or other written communication. A DOE spokesperson denied that phrases had been banned.

    In a May 2019 press release concerning natural gas exports from a Texas facility, the DOE used the term ‘freedom gas’ to refer to natural gas. The phrase originated from a speech made by Secretary Rick Perry in Brussels earlier that month. Washington Governor Jay Inslee decried the term “a joke”.

    Facilities

    The Department of Energy operates a system of national laboratories and technical facilities for research and development, as follows:

    Ames Laboratory
    Argonne National Laboratory
    Brookhaven National Laboratory
    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
    Idaho National Laboratory
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
    Los Alamos National Laboratory
    National Energy Technology Laboratory
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
    Sandia National Laboratories
    Savannah River National Laboratory
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Other major DOE facilities include:
    Albany Research Center
    Bannister Federal Complex
    Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory – focuses on the design and development of nuclear power for the U.S. Navy
    Kansas City Plant
    Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory – operates for Naval Reactors Program Research under the DOE (not a National Laboratory)
    National Petroleum Technology Office
    Nevada Test Site
    New Brunswick Laboratory
    Office of Fossil Energy
    Office of River Protection
    Pantex
    Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory
    Y-12 National Security Complex
    Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository
    Other:

    Pahute Mesa Airstrip – Nye County, Nevada, in supporting Nevada National Security Site

     
  • richardmitnick 2:53 pm on August 11, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "DOE Awards $45 Million to Advance Solar Manufacturing and Grid Technologies", $45 million for projects that will help seamlessly integrate clean energy sources onto the grid., Advancing the domestic manufacturing of solar energy and electric grid technologies., Creating a public-private consortium on grid integration technology., Department of Energy (US), GridBright Inc. and The University of Pittsburgh (US) will develop sensor hardware and system designs that will help utilities understand how much renewable energy is being generated., Renewable energy is America’s largest source of new electricity generation with hundreds of gigawatts of solar and wind expected to come online in the next 15 years., The Biden Administration’s goal of a decarbonized power sector by 2035, The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (US); The University of Washington (US); and the Electric Power Research Institute will co-lead an industry-wide consortium on grid-forming inverters.   

    From Department of Energy (US) : “DOE Awards $45 Million to Advance Solar Manufacturing and Grid Technologies” 

    From Department of Energy (US)

    Funding Creates New Industry-Wide Consortium to Strengthen Grid Infrastructure, Supports American-Made Products That Accelerate Clean Electricity

    The Department of Energy (US) today announced $45 million for projects that will help seamlessly integrate clean energy sources onto the grid, supporting the Biden Administration’s goal of a decarbonized power sector by 2035. As solar and other renewable energy are rapidly deployed throughout the country, these projects are developing new technologies and capabilities to bolster the resilience of the U.S. electric grid. The funding, which also creates a new $25 million consortium, will advance the domestic manufacturing of solar energy and electric grid technologies.

    “To flip the switch on climate change, we need a grid that’s chock full of renewable energy that’s also cheap and accessible,” said Secretary of Energy Jennifer M. Granholm. “The universities, small businesses, and national lab behind these projects are building the critical components of America’s future grid, making it more resilient on our way to a 100% clean power system.”

    Renewable energy is America’s largest source of new electricity generation with hundreds of gigawatts of solar and wind expected to come online in the next 15 years. Maintaining a reliable, high-renewable grid requires technologies and industry standards that can seamlessly coordinate renewable resources and restart the grid if it goes down. When the power goes out today, a grid operator must first turn on a spinning turbine—often times from a coal or gas-fired power plant—that sends a signal for other power sources to match. Grid-forming inverters will allow renewable sources to create that signal, eliminating the need for a turbine.

    The selected projects will:

    Create a public-private consortium on grid integration technology (Award amount: $25 million) – The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (US), The University of Washington (US), and the Electric Power Research Institute will co-lead an industry-wide consortium to advance research on grid-forming inverters — an emerging technology that allows solar and other inverter-based energy sources to restart the grid without a spinning turbine, typically a oil or coal-fired power plant. This consortium will include national labs, universities and minority-serving institutions, equipment manufacturers, utilities, and bulk power system operators.
    Provide utilities better data about rooftop solar power generation (Award amount: $6 million) – Two projects led by GridBright, Inc. (Alamo, California) and The University of Pittsburgh (US) (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania) will develop sensor hardware and system designs that will help utilities understand how much renewable energy is being generated by residential and commercial solar photovoltaics (PV), strengthening reliability of the electricity grid.
    Advance the commercialization of American-made solar innovations (Award amount: $14 million) – Nine solar hardware and manufacturing projects will receive DOE funding to accelerate the commercialization of innovative technologies that can lower the cost of solar technologies and help to integrate solar electricity into the nation’s energy grid. Among the projects include a new solar heat system to dry out sewage and convert it to fertilizer, which would help decarbonize the agricultural, wastewater, and industrial sectors and a project to develop a low-cost device to help prevent solar system electrical fires.

    “Investments in clean and renewable energy infrastructure are a big reason why Washington state continues to lead in innovation and technological development. I am so glad to see this important funding go towards projects that will promote energy security, meet domestic demands, and create good-paying manufacturing jobs. This is an important step towards ensuring Washington state leads in solar energy and grid reliability,” said U.S. Senator Patty Murray (WA).

    “Adding more renewable energy to the grid is key to fighting climate change, but it has its challenges. I am pleased that the Department of Energy is investing in researching and demonstrating innovative technologies that will help communities deploy more solar energy and create a more reliable grid. These awards are a testament to all of the innovative work being done by universities and companies all over the Pittsburgh area. We have been leaders in innovation for centuries and as that tradition continues, I will work to ensure that DOE and our institutions have the resources they need to keep innovating,” said U.S. Congressman Mike Doyle (PA-18).

    “The Department of Energy’s investment in innovative local projects is the spark Northwest Washington needs to be a leader in solar manufacturing. I will continue to champion bold, FDR-like investment in the development of clean technologies to create well-paying jobs, bolster grid resiliency and competitiveness, and fight climate change,” said U.S. Congressman Rick Larsen (WA-2).

    “Congratulations to Golden’s own Alliance for Sustainable Energy (NREL). The Alliance is bringing us closer to a cleaner future through its work in advancing energy efficiency and renewable energy initiatives and improving grid reliability for the nation,” said U.S. Congressman Ed Perlmutter (CO-07).

    “Investing in clean energy technologies like solar not only helps us combat climate change, it strengthens our energy and manufacturing sectors, creating good jobs while building the economy of the future. I’m so thrilled that Louisville’s own Bert Thin Films is leading the way in this industry, working to reduce costs and expand access to an inexhaustible clean energy source. I congratulate Thad and Ruvini on earning this highly sought-after Department of Energy funding to continue their great work here in Louisville,” said U.S. Congressman John Yarmuth (KY-3).

    “Congratulations to Gridbright for being awarded this funding to advance their solar manufacturing and grid reliability projects. These initiatives are crucial for meeting the needs of the 21st century here in Contra Costa and across the country,” said U.S. Congressman Mark Desaulnier (CA-11).

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Department of Energy (US) is a cabinet-level department of the United States Government concerned with the United States’ policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation’s nuclear weapons program; nuclear reactor production for the United States Navy; energy conservation; energy-related research; radioactive waste disposal; and domestic energy production. It also directs research in genomics. the Human Genome Project originated in a DOE initiative. DOE sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other U.S. federal agency, the majority of which is conducted through its system of National Laboratories. The agency is led by the United States Secretary of Energy, and its headquarters are located in Southwest Washington, D.C., on Independence Avenue in the James V. Forrestal Building, named for James Forrestal, as well as in Germantown, Maryland.

    Formation and consolidation

    In 1942, during World War II, the United States started the Manhattan Project, a project to develop the atomic bomb, under the eye of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After the war in 1946, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was created to control the future of the project. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 also created the framework for the first National Laboratories. Among other nuclear projects, the AEC produced fabricated uranium fuel cores at locations such as Fernald Feed Materials Production Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1974, the AEC gave way to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which was tasked with regulating the nuclear power industry and the Energy Research and Development Administration, which was tasked to manage the nuclear weapon; naval reactor; and energy development programs.

    The 1973 oil crisis called attention to the need to consolidate energy policy. On August 4, 1977, President Jimmy Carter signed into law The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Pub.L. 95–91, 91 Stat. 565, enacted August 4, 1977), which created the Department of Energy(US). The new agency, which began operations on October 1, 1977, consolidated the Federal Energy Administration; the Energy Research and Development Administration; the Federal Power Commission; and programs of various other agencies. Former Secretary of Defense James Schlesinger, who served under Presidents Nixon and Ford during the Vietnam War, was appointed as the first secretary.

    President Carter created the Department of Energy with the goal of promoting energy conservation and developing alternative sources of energy. He wanted to not be dependent on foreign oil and reduce the use of fossil fuels. With international energy’s future uncertain for America, Carter acted quickly to have the department come into action the first year of his presidency. This was an extremely important issue of the time as the oil crisis was causing shortages and inflation. With the Three-Mile Island disaster, Carter was able to intervene with the help of the department. Carter made switches within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in this case to fix the management and procedures. This was possible as nuclear energy and weapons are responsibility of the Department of Energy.

    Recent

    On March 28, 2017, a supervisor in the Office of International Climate and Clean Energy asked staff to avoid the phrases “climate change,” “emissions reduction,” or “Paris Agreement” in written memos, briefings or other written communication. A DOE spokesperson denied that phrases had been banned.

    In a May 2019 press release concerning natural gas exports from a Texas facility, the DOE used the term ‘freedom gas’ to refer to natural gas. The phrase originated from a speech made by Secretary Rick Perry in Brussels earlier that month. Washington Governor Jay Inslee decried the term “a joke”.

    Facilities

    The Department of Energy operates a system of national laboratories and technical facilities for research and development, as follows:

    Ames Laboratory
    Argonne National Laboratory
    Brookhaven National Laboratory
    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
    Idaho National Laboratory
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
    Los Alamos National Laboratory
    National Energy Technology Laboratory
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
    Sandia National Laboratories
    Savannah River National Laboratory
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Other major DOE facilities include:
    Albany Research Center
    Bannister Federal Complex
    Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory – focuses on the design and development of nuclear power for the U.S. Navy
    Kansas City Plant
    Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory – operates for Naval Reactors Program Research under the DOE (not a National Laboratory)
    National Petroleum Technology Office
    Nevada Test Site
    New Brunswick Laboratory
    Office of Fossil Energy
    Office of River Protection
    Pantex
    Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory
    Y-12 National Security Complex
    Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository
    Other:

    Pahute Mesa Airstrip – Nye County, Nevada, in supporting Nevada National Security Site

     
  • richardmitnick 12:23 pm on August 5, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Department of Energy Announces $15.1 Million for Integrated Computational and Data Infrastructure for Science Research", Department of Energy (US)   

    From Department of Energy (US) : “Department of Energy Announces $15.1 Million for Integrated Computational and Data Infrastructure for Science Research” 

    From Department of Energy (US)

    5-Aug-2021

    Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) announced $15.1 million for three collaborative research projects, at five universities, to advance the development of a flexible multi-tiered data and computational infrastructure to support a diverse collection of on-demand scientific data processing tasks and computationally intensive simulations. The projects will accelerate research in the fields of environmental and materials science and enhance simulation capabilities.

    Modern science depends on a geographically distributed devices such as specialized instruments, sensors, detectors, computers, storage systems, and visualization systems that are interconnected via high performance networks. Science workflow systems, like those supported by these projects, automatically combines a unique group of these distributed devices and orchestrates how they are used to create a unique on-demand scientific tool for discovery. Computational scientists create instruments to execute and visualize detailed simulations while experimental scientists create instruments to observe and analyze physical events, like simulations of the expanding universe and detailed understanding of subatomic particles.

    “Collaborations between scientific disciplines, like those created through this program, pave the way for the future of scientific discovery by combining diverse knowledge, skills and tools in new ways to approach a variety of critical problems.” said Barbara Helland, DOE Associate Director of Science for Advanced Scientific Computing Research (US). “These projects can revolutionize the scientific productivity of our facilities while working towards solving some of America’s big problems.”

    Projects selected in today’s announcement cover a range of topics at the frontiers of the DOE Office of Science’s mission. The projects are:

    A collaborative team of scientists from The University of Texas-Austin (US), the University of Notre Dame (US), Louisiana State University (US), and DOE Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (US) will address mitigation strategies for gulf coastal flooding events due to extreme weather with artificial intelligence and machine learning (AI/ML) techniques that combine experimental data with computer simulations.
    A collaborative team of scientists from the University of Connecticut (US) and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will couple experimental data with simulations using AI/ML techniques to design, manufacture, and test new materials with uniquely designed properties for potential applications in batteries, sensors, and energy storage.
    A collaborative team of scientists from the University of Southern California (US), DOE Argonne National Laboratory (US), and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory will develop AI/ML based methods to simulate and experimentally verify the performance of large, distributed computing infrastructures.

    The projects were selected by competitive peer review under a DOE Funding Opportunity Announcement and are managed by the Office of Advanced Scientific Computing Research (US) within the DOE Office of Science.

    Total funding is $15.1 million for projects lasting up to 3 years in duration, with $5.76 million in Fiscal Year 2021 dollars and outyear funding contingent on congressional appropriations. The list of projects and more information can be found here.

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Department of Energy (US) is a cabinet-level department of the United States Government concerned with the United States’ policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation’s nuclear weapons program; nuclear reactor production for the United States Navy; energy conservation; energy-related research; radioactive waste disposal; and domestic energy production. It also directs research in genomics. the Human Genome Project originated in a DOE initiative. DOE sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other U.S. federal agency, the majority of which is conducted through its system of National Laboratories. The agency is led by the United States Secretary of Energy, and its headquarters are located in Southwest Washington, D.C., on Independence Avenue in the James V. Forrestal Building, named for James Forrestal, as well as in Germantown, Maryland.

    Formation and consolidation

    In 1942, during World War II, the United States started the Manhattan Project, a project to develop the atomic bomb, under the eye of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After the war in 1946, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was created to control the future of the project. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 also created the framework for the first National Laboratories. Among other nuclear projects, the AEC produced fabricated uranium fuel cores at locations such as Fernald Feed Materials Production Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1974, the AEC gave way to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which was tasked with regulating the nuclear power industry and the Energy Research and Development Administration, which was tasked to manage the nuclear weapon; naval reactor; and energy development programs.

    The 1973 oil crisis called attention to the need to consolidate energy policy. On August 4, 1977, President Jimmy Carter signed into law The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Pub.L. 95–91, 91 Stat. 565, enacted August 4, 1977), which created the Department of Energy(US). The new agency, which began operations on October 1, 1977, consolidated the Federal Energy Administration; the Energy Research and Development Administration; the Federal Power Commission; and programs of various other agencies. Former Secretary of Defense James Schlesinger, who served under Presidents Nixon and Ford during the Vietnam War, was appointed as the first secretary.

    President Carter created the Department of Energy with the goal of promoting energy conservation and developing alternative sources of energy. He wanted to not be dependent on foreign oil and reduce the use of fossil fuels. With international energy’s future uncertain for America, Carter acted quickly to have the department come into action the first year of his presidency. This was an extremely important issue of the time as the oil crisis was causing shortages and inflation. With the Three-Mile Island disaster, Carter was able to intervene with the help of the department. Carter made switches within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in this case to fix the management and procedures. This was possible as nuclear energy and weapons are responsibility of the Department of Energy.

    Recent

    On March 28, 2017, a supervisor in the Office of International Climate and Clean Energy asked staff to avoid the phrases “climate change,” “emissions reduction,” or “Paris Agreement” in written memos, briefings or other written communication. A DOE spokesperson denied that phrases had been banned.

    In a May 2019 press release concerning natural gas exports from a Texas facility, the DOE used the term ‘freedom gas’ to refer to natural gas. The phrase originated from a speech made by Secretary Rick Perry in Brussels earlier that month. Washington Governor Jay Inslee decried the term “a joke”.

    Facilities

    The Department of Energy operates a system of national laboratories and technical facilities for research and development, as follows:

    Ames Laboratory
    Argonne National Laboratory
    Brookhaven National Laboratory
    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
    Idaho National Laboratory
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
    Los Alamos National Laboratory
    National Energy Technology Laboratory
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
    Sandia National Laboratories
    Savannah River National Laboratory
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Other major DOE facilities include:
    Albany Research Center
    Bannister Federal Complex
    Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory – focuses on the design and development of nuclear power for the U.S. Navy
    Kansas City Plant
    Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory – operates for Naval Reactors Program Research under the DOE (not a National Laboratory)
    National Petroleum Technology Office
    Nevada Test Site
    New Brunswick Laboratory
    Office of Fossil Energy
    Office of River Protection
    Pantex
    Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory
    Y-12 National Security Complex
    Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository
    Other:

    Pahute Mesa Airstrip – Nye County, Nevada, in supporting Nevada National Security Site

     
  • richardmitnick 11:47 am on August 3, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Small Businesses Selected To Help Advance Wind Energy as a Distributed Energy Resource", Department of Energy (US),   

    From Department of Energy (US) : “Small Businesses Selected To Help Advance Wind Energy as a Distributed Energy Resource” 

    From Department of Energy (US)

    August 3, 2021

    Electricity is the center of the U.S. economy and American homes. To help meet the nation’s needs, eight small businesses will develop wind technology as a cost-effective, reliable, and compatible distributed energy resource under the 2021 round of the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE’s) Competitiveness Improvement Project (CIP).

    Individuals, businesses, and communities can use distributed wind—or wind turbines that generate electricity close to where it will be consumed—to reduce electricity costs, provide back-up power and grid-support services, and complement solar energy.

    “Distributed energy resources—including wind—will help decarbonize the energy sector and enable local communities to participate in the energy transition,” said Acting Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Kelly Speakes-Backman. “Our Competitiveness Improvement Project awards are advancing wind as a distributed energy resource to support the Biden Administration’s goal of reaching net-zero emissions by 2050.”

    The 2021 CIP selectees are expected to share about $2.2 million in DOE funding and leverage about $1.3 million of industry cost share. They are:

    Accelerate Wind Inc. (St. Louis, Missouri) will develop a modular 5-kilowatt (kW) horizontal axis wind turbine with integrated solar, which is designed to be deployed on the edges of commercial buildings. The project will take the concept from a preliminary design stage to a test-ready, preproduction prototype.
    Bergey Windpower (Norman, Oklahoma) will implement several design and manufacturing changes to the Excel 15 wind turbine generator, lowering its cost by 26% and leading to an 8% reduction in total wind turbine manufacturing cost.
    Intergrid LLC (Temple, New Hampshire) will develop and implement improved simulation and testing capabilities to allow faster and lower-cost certification of upgrades to the Intergrid IG-25, a 25-kW programmable inverter.
    Pecos Wind Power (Somerville, Massachusetts) will develop the first full-scale prototype of an 85-kW wind turbine designed for low-wind-speed sites. Pecos will also install this turbine at the Renewable Concepts factory in Neodesha, Kansas, for initial prototype testing and evaluation.
    Siva Powers America Inc. (Ransomville, New York) will develop new, lighter-weight 14.4-meter blades for its existing 250-kW turbine. This will extend the rotor diameter to 35 meters and boost energy production, reduce electricity costs, and increase access to lower wind-speed sites.
    Sonsight Wind (Grayson, Georgia) will test a new 3.5-kW wind turbine prototype designed for residential, small commercial-scale, and remote hybrid energy system applications.
    Windurance LLC (Coraopolis, Pennsylvania) will design, test, and obtain third-party certification of an advanced, programmable control system for wind turbines. The controller operates the turbine’s mechanical and electrical systems and is designed for 85-kW to over 150-kW wind turbine models.
    Xflow Energy Company (Seattle, Washington) will conduct prototype testing of a 25-kW vertical axis wind turbine designed for isolated microgrids and remote communities. The project builds on previous CIP and DOE Small Business Innovation Research awards and will bring this new, low-cost turbine closer to commercial viability.

    These projects, and those launched under prior CIP rounds, will deliver a range of certified, next-generation wind turbines that provide competitive electricity costs, grid-support capabilities, and compatibility with other distributed energy resources for hybrid systems.

    “To combat climate change and protect our planet, we must make strategic moves to decarbonize our power sector and transition towards a clean energy economy,” said U.S. Representative Annie Kuster (NH-02). “Today’s announcement and significant investment in Integrid LLC further demonstrates that New Hampshire companies can lead the way in charting our clean energy future by bolstering advanced manufacturing and creating jobs in the Granite State. As a member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee, I have long championed smart energy policies that can deliver 21st century solutions, and I’ll continue working across the aisle in Congress to support New Hampshire’s clean energy economy.”

    “I am thrilled that the XFlow Energy Company here in the Ninth District is receiving a Competitive Improvement Project award from the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy,” said U.S. Representative Adam Smith (WA-09). “This funding will help XFlow advance their work manufacturing wind turbines for isolated microgrids and remote communities. Investments in innovative manufacturing for wind and solar are critical to help reduce the cost of renewable energy, ensure it is accessible to all communities, and grow jobs in the renewables sector here in the U.S.”

    “I am very proud the Department of Energy’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy has selected Bergey Windpower of Norman, Oklahoma to receive significant funding through the Competitive Improvement Project,” said U.S. Representative Tom Cole (OK-4). “By implementing several design and production changes to the Excel 15 wind turbine generator, manufacturing costs will be significantly reduced and safety and performance will be improved. Indeed, by supporting manufacturers of small and medium-sized wind turbines, these awards will be critical in developing and progressing renewable wind technology.

    “With support from DOE’s Competitiveness Improvement Project, small wind turbine manufacturers have significantly reduced the costs of their products while improving their reliability through robust certification processes,” said Ian Baring-Gould, distributed wind program lead for the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, which manages CIP on behalf of DOE. “Consumers are using more electricity for things like air conditioners and transportation. By providing energy services alone or in combination with solar and storage, wind turbines can support expanding distributed energy markets and increase the nation’s ability to address local energy needs.”

    Finalizing these selections will bring the total to 52 subcontracts to 25 companies since CIP began in 2012. The awards total $12.84 million in DOE funding and leverage an additional $6.67 million in private-sector investment.

    For more information about CIP, visit NREL’s website or download the DOE factsheet.

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Department of Energy (US) is a cabinet-level department of the United States Government concerned with the United States’ policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation’s nuclear weapons program; nuclear reactor production for the United States Navy; energy conservation; energy-related research; radioactive waste disposal; and domestic energy production. It also directs research in genomics. the Human Genome Project originated in a DOE initiative. DOE sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other U.S. federal agency, the majority of which is conducted through its system of National Laboratories. The agency is led by the United States Secretary of Energy, and its headquarters are located in Southwest Washington, D.C., on Independence Avenue in the James V. Forrestal Building, named for James Forrestal, as well as in Germantown, Maryland.

    Formation and consolidation

    In 1942, during World War II, the United States started the Manhattan Project, a project to develop the atomic bomb, under the eye of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After the war in 1946, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was created to control the future of the project. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 also created the framework for the first National Laboratories. Among other nuclear projects, the AEC produced fabricated uranium fuel cores at locations such as Fernald Feed Materials Production Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1974, the AEC gave way to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which was tasked with regulating the nuclear power industry and the Energy Research and Development Administration, which was tasked to manage the nuclear weapon; naval reactor; and energy development programs.

    The 1973 oil crisis called attention to the need to consolidate energy policy. On August 4, 1977, President Jimmy Carter signed into law The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Pub.L. 95–91, 91 Stat. 565, enacted August 4, 1977), which created the Department of Energy(US). The new agency, which began operations on October 1, 1977, consolidated the Federal Energy Administration; the Energy Research and Development Administration; the Federal Power Commission; and programs of various other agencies. Former Secretary of Defense James Schlesinger, who served under Presidents Nixon and Ford during the Vietnam War, was appointed as the first secretary.

    President Carter created the Department of Energy with the goal of promoting energy conservation and developing alternative sources of energy. He wanted to not be dependent on foreign oil and reduce the use of fossil fuels. With international energy’s future uncertain for America, Carter acted quickly to have the department come into action the first year of his presidency. This was an extremely important issue of the time as the oil crisis was causing shortages and inflation. With the Three-Mile Island disaster, Carter was able to intervene with the help of the department. Carter made switches within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in this case to fix the management and procedures. This was possible as nuclear energy and weapons are responsibility of the Department of Energy.

    Recent

    On March 28, 2017, a supervisor in the Office of International Climate and Clean Energy asked staff to avoid the phrases “climate change,” “emissions reduction,” or “Paris Agreement” in written memos, briefings or other written communication. A DOE spokesperson denied that phrases had been banned.

    In a May 2019 press release concerning natural gas exports from a Texas facility, the DOE used the term ‘freedom gas’ to refer to natural gas. The phrase originated from a speech made by Secretary Rick Perry in Brussels earlier that month. Washington Governor Jay Inslee decried the term “a joke”.

    Facilities

    The Department of Energy operates a system of national laboratories and technical facilities for research and development, as follows:

    Ames Laboratory
    Argonne National Laboratory
    Brookhaven National Laboratory
    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
    Idaho National Laboratory
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
    Los Alamos National Laboratory
    National Energy Technology Laboratory
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
    Sandia National Laboratories
    Savannah River National Laboratory
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Other major DOE facilities include:
    Albany Research Center
    Bannister Federal Complex
    Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory – focuses on the design and development of nuclear power for the U.S. Navy
    Kansas City Plant
    Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory – operates for Naval Reactors Program Research under the DOE (not a National Laboratory)
    National Petroleum Technology Office
    Nevada Test Site
    New Brunswick Laboratory
    Office of Fossil Energy
    Office of River Protection
    Pantex
    Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory
    Y-12 National Security Complex
    Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository
    Other:

    Pahute Mesa Airstrip – Nye County, Nevada, in supporting Nevada National Security Site

     
  • richardmitnick 9:03 pm on August 2, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Department of Energy to Provide $100 Million for High Energy Physics Research", , , Department of Energy (US), , High Energy Physics plays a role in many major innovations of the 21st century., , ,   

    From Department of Energy (US) : “Department of Energy to Provide $100 Million for High Energy Physics Research” 

    From Department of Energy (US)

    August 2, 2021

    Research Aims to Advance Understanding of the Universe

    Today, the Department of Energy (US)’s Office of Science (US) announced a plan to provide $100 million over the next four years for university-based research on a range of High Energy Physics topics through a new funding opportunity announcement (FOA). The objective of this funding is to advance knowledge of how the universe works at its most fundamental level.

    “High Energy Physics plays a role in many major innovations of the 21st century. America must keep its competitive edge, which is why we’re investing in the scientists and engineers advancing basic physical science today to drive the new breakthroughs of tomorrow,” said Dr. Steve Binkley, Acting Director of DOE’s Office of Science. “The Department of Energy is proud to be the nation’s largest funder of physical sciences, leading to life-changing and lifesaving technologies and solutions.”

    High Energy Physics (HEP) is a cornerstone of America’s scientific efforts to uncover foundational physics from tiny particle to massive universal scales. [Blogger’s editorial note: Why did the U.S. Congress not realize this when in 1993 they cancelled the Superconducting Super Collider being built in Waxahachie, Texas, because it showed “no immediate economic gain” and because California and surrounding states pulled their support for the Texas project hoping to move it to California. This allowed for the shift in HEP superiority to move to European Organization for Nuclear Research [Organisation européenne pour la recherche nucléaire] [Europäische Organisation für Kernforschung](CH) [CERN] in Europe where with the Large Hadron Collider the Higgs boson was finally confirmed. It would have been found by the SSC. The U.S is not out of the HEP arena. Superconducting magnets for the LHC are built by DOE’s Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (US), Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (US) and Brookhaven National Laboratory (US). Also, there are 600 scientists on the ATLAS (CH) project at Brookhaven and 1000 scientists on CMS (CH) at Fermilab.] HEP also plays a major role in nurturing and inspiring top scientific talent and building and sustaining the nation’s scientific workforce. DOE anticipates that the selected projects will involve scientists at U.S. institutions of higher learning across the nation and include both experimental and theoretical research into such topics as the Higgs boson, neutrinos, Dark Matter, Dark Energy, and the search for new fundamental particles and forces.

    Funding will support research and experiments that explore the frontiers of high energy physics, which require some of the world’s most advanced instruments. The Muon g-2 experiment at DOE’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory is searching for signs of physics beyond the standard model, scientists’ current best theory to describe the most basic building blocks of the universe.

    The nature of Dark Energy and its role in the expansion of the universe are being explored with the DESI experiment at NSF NOIRLab NOAO Kitt Peak National Observatory (US).

    The LBNL LZ Dark Matter Experiment (US) experiment one mile below the Black Hills of South Dakota is searching for Dark Matter, which accounts for five times as much of the universe as ordinary matter.

    Studies of the Higgs boson and searches for new particles and forces are being performed at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider.

    Other projects are aimed at further developments in particle physics theory, advanced particle accelerators, and new detector technologies, which scientists will use in continued explorations of the subatomic world.

    Total funding will be approximately $100 million for awards lasting up to four years in duration. The awards will be selected by competitive peer review.

    See the full article here.

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Department of Energy (US) is a cabinet-level department of the United States Government concerned with the United States’ policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation’s nuclear weapons program; nuclear reactor production for the United States Navy; energy conservation; energy-related research; radioactive waste disposal; and domestic energy production. It also directs research in genomics. the Human Genome Project originated in a DOE initiative. DOE sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other U.S. federal agency, the majority of which is conducted through its system of National Laboratories. The agency is led by the United States Secretary of Energy, and its headquarters are located in Southwest Washington, D.C., on Independence Avenue in the James V. Forrestal Building, named for James Forrestal, as well as in Germantown, Maryland.

    Formation and consolidation

    In 1942, during World War II, the United States started the Manhattan Project, a project to develop the atomic bomb, under the eye of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After the war in 1946, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was created to control the future of the project. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 also created the framework for the first National Laboratories. Among other nuclear projects, the AEC produced fabricated uranium fuel cores at locations such as Fernald Feed Materials Production Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1974, the AEC gave way to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which was tasked with regulating the nuclear power industry and the Energy Research and Development Administration, which was tasked to manage the nuclear weapon; naval reactor; and energy development programs.

    The 1973 oil crisis called attention to the need to consolidate energy policy. On August 4, 1977, President Jimmy Carter signed into law The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Pub.L. 95–91, 91 Stat. 565, enacted August 4, 1977), which created the Department of Energy(US). The new agency, which began operations on October 1, 1977, consolidated the Federal Energy Administration; the Energy Research and Development Administration; the Federal Power Commission; and programs of various other agencies. Former Secretary of Defense James Schlesinger, who served under Presidents Nixon and Ford during the Vietnam War, was appointed as the first secretary.

    President Carter created the Department of Energy with the goal of promoting energy conservation and developing alternative sources of energy. He wanted to not be dependent on foreign oil and reduce the use of fossil fuels. With international energy’s future uncertain for America, Carter acted quickly to have the department come into action the first year of his presidency. This was an extremely important issue of the time as the oil crisis was causing shortages and inflation. With the Three-Mile Island disaster, Carter was able to intervene with the help of the department. Carter made switches within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in this case to fix the management and procedures. This was possible as nuclear energy and weapons are responsibility of the Department of Energy.

    Recent

    On March 28, 2017, a supervisor in the Office of International Climate and Clean Energy asked staff to avoid the phrases “climate change,” “emissions reduction,” or “Paris Agreement” in written memos, briefings or other written communication. A DOE spokesperson denied that phrases had been banned.

    In a May 2019 press release concerning natural gas exports from a Texas facility, the DOE used the term ‘freedom gas’ to refer to natural gas. The phrase originated from a speech made by Secretary Rick Perry in Brussels earlier that month. Washington Governor Jay Inslee decried the term “a joke”.

    Facilities

    The Department of Energy operates a system of national laboratories and technical facilities for research and development, as follows:

    Ames Laboratory
    Argonne National Laboratory
    Brookhaven National Laboratory
    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
    Idaho National Laboratory
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
    Los Alamos National Laboratory
    National Energy Technology Laboratory
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
    Sandia National Laboratories
    Savannah River National Laboratory
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Other major DOE facilities include:
    Albany Research Center
    Bannister Federal Complex
    Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory – focuses on the design and development of nuclear power for the U.S. Navy
    Kansas City Plant
    Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory – operates for Naval Reactors Program Research under the DOE (not a National Laboratory)
    National Petroleum Technology Office
    Nevada Test Site
    New Brunswick Laboratory
    Office of Fossil Energy
    Office of River Protection
    Pantex
    Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory
    Y-12 National Security Complex
    Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository
    Other:

    Pahute Mesa Airstrip – Nye County, Nevada, in supporting Nevada National Security Site

     
  • richardmitnick 7:34 pm on July 27, 2021 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Department of Energy Invests $5 Million in Desalination Technology to Deliver Freshwater to Communities Across America", , , Department of Energy (US)   

    From Department of Energy (US) : “Department of Energy Invests $5 Million in Desalination Technology to Deliver Freshwater to Communities Across America” 

    From Department of Energy (US)

    July 27, 2021

    Today, the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and National Alliance for Water Innovation (NAWI) announced $5 million in federal funding to develop desalination technologies that will help bring freshwater supplies to communities across the nation.

    “These water innovation projects allow for incredible development to improve energy efficiency in desalination processes” said Acting Assistant Secretary for Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Kelly Speakes-Backman. “By building a circular economy of water that is more energy efficient and powered by renewable electricity, we’re not only staying on our path towards continuous industry decarbonization, we’re also pushing our water and wastewater infrastructure one step further in the future, and carving out a cleaner, greener energy economy for generations to come.”

    Water sources for many communities contain high levels of salt and contaminants, a problem that can be intensified by changing precipitation patterns due to the climate crisis and regional population increase. Desalination can help diversify the range of accessible water resources. This will help the US meet net-zero carbon emissions by 2050 while also helping all Americans access new supplies of freshwater.

    The funding will support early-stage applied research on state-of-the-art, next generation technology desalination systems collaborative teams of industry, labs, and universities that treat non-traditional water sources.

    The projects selected specifically address challenges of managing concentrated brine waste streams that are a by-product of the desalination process.

    The projects selected are:

    Stanford University (US) (Lead), DOE’s SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (US), Aqua membranes, Inc., and Cascade Technologies, Inc: This innovation can improve energy efficiency and reduce the risk of mineral scaling on membrane surfaces.
    Vanderbilt University (US) (Lead), Colorado State University (US), Black & Veatch: This team will investigate a new brine crystallization process that will improve energy efficiency and reduce the total cost of crystallization.
    DOE’s Idaho National Laboratory (US) (Lead), Massachusetts Institute of Technology (US), Trevi Systems, and USG Corporation: This project pioneers the use of dimethyl ether (DME)-Driven Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) desalination potentially reducing ZLD costs 50% relative to state-of-the-art crystallizers.
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (Lead), DOE’s National Energy Technology Laboratory (US), Veolia Water Technologies, OLI Systems, Inc.: This team will create a software program to better predict kinetic induction times which may improve capability of brine concentrators to operate at the edge of scale formation.
    The University of Connecticut (US) (Lead), DOE’s Sandia National Laboratories (US), and Modelon, Inc.: This team will develop a new software toolset for the design and optimization of brine treatment processes.
    Yale University (US) (Lead), DOE’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory (US), Electric Power Research Institute, and Saltworks Technologies: This team aims to develop new and improved antiscalants to prevent equipment scaling and improve the efficiency of brine concentrators.

    NAWI is an Energy Innovation Hub funded by the Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy’s (EERE) Advanced Manufacturing Office to address the barriers and needs surrounding the cost and energy for the desalination of water.

    This announcement is part of DOE’s 2021 Future of Manufacturing campaign. For more information on DOE’s commitment to creating a resilient American manufacturing future that supports economy-wide decarbonization, and to join the conversation, visit the AMO website.

    EERE’s mission is to accelerate the research, development, demonstration, and deployment of technologies and solutions to equitably transition America to net-zero greenhouse gas emissions economy-wide by no later than 2050, and ensure the clean energy economy benefits all Americans, creating good paying jobs for the American people—especially workers and communities impacted by the energy transition and those historically underserved by the energy system and overburdened by pollution.

    See the full article here.

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    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    The Department of Energy (US) is a cabinet-level department of the United States Government concerned with the United States’ policies regarding energy and safety in handling nuclear material. Its responsibilities include the nation’s nuclear weapons program; nuclear reactor production for the United States Navy; energy conservation; energy-related research; radioactive waste disposal; and domestic energy production. It also directs research in genomics. the Human Genome Project originated in a DOE initiative. DOE sponsors more research in the physical sciences than any other U.S. federal agency, the majority of which is conducted through its system of National Laboratories. The agency is led by the United States Secretary of Energy, and its headquarters are located in Southwest Washington, D.C., on Independence Avenue in the James V. Forrestal Building, named for James Forrestal, as well as in Germantown, Maryland.

    Formation and consolidation

    In 1942, during World War II, the United States started the Manhattan Project, a project to develop the atomic bomb, under the eye of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. After the war in 1946, the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) was created to control the future of the project. The Atomic Energy Act of 1946 also created the framework for the first National Laboratories. Among other nuclear projects, the AEC produced fabricated uranium fuel cores at locations such as Fernald Feed Materials Production Center in Cincinnati, Ohio. In 1974, the AEC gave way to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission, which was tasked with regulating the nuclear power industry and the Energy Research and Development Administration, which was tasked to manage the nuclear weapon; naval reactor; and energy development programs.

    The 1973 oil crisis called attention to the need to consolidate energy policy. On August 4, 1977, President Jimmy Carter signed into law The Department of Energy Organization Act of 1977 (Pub.L. 95–91, 91 Stat. 565, enacted August 4, 1977), which created the Department of Energy(US). The new agency, which began operations on October 1, 1977, consolidated the Federal Energy Administration; the Energy Research and Development Administration; the Federal Power Commission; and programs of various other agencies. Former Secretary of Defense James Schlesinger, who served under Presidents Nixon and Ford during the Vietnam War, was appointed as the first secretary.

    President Carter created the Department of Energy with the goal of promoting energy conservation and developing alternative sources of energy. He wanted to not be dependent on foreign oil and reduce the use of fossil fuels. With international energy’s future uncertain for America, Carter acted quickly to have the department come into action the first year of his presidency. This was an extremely important issue of the time as the oil crisis was causing shortages and inflation. With the Three-Mile Island disaster, Carter was able to intervene with the help of the department. Carter made switches within the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in this case to fix the management and procedures. This was possible as nuclear energy and weapons are responsibility of the Department of Energy.

    Recent

    On March 28, 2017, a supervisor in the Office of International Climate and Clean Energy asked staff to avoid the phrases “climate change,” “emissions reduction,” or “Paris Agreement” in written memos, briefings or other written communication. A DOE spokesperson denied that phrases had been banned.

    In a May 2019 press release concerning natural gas exports from a Texas facility, the DOE used the term ‘freedom gas’ to refer to natural gas. The phrase originated from a speech made by Secretary Rick Perry in Brussels earlier that month. Washington Governor Jay Inslee decried the term “a joke”.

    Facilities

    The Department of Energy operates a system of national laboratories and technical facilities for research and development, as follows:

    Ames Laboratory
    Argonne National Laboratory
    Brookhaven National Laboratory
    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory
    Idaho National Laboratory
    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory
    Los Alamos National Laboratory
    National Energy Technology Laboratory
    National Renewable Energy Laboratory
    Oak Ridge National Laboratory
    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory
    Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory
    Sandia National Laboratories
    Savannah River National Laboratory
    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
    Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility

    Other major DOE facilities include:
    Albany Research Center
    Bannister Federal Complex
    Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory – focuses on the design and development of nuclear power for the U.S. Navy
    Kansas City Plant
    Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory – operates for Naval Reactors Program Research under the DOE (not a National Laboratory)
    National Petroleum Technology Office
    Nevada Test Site
    New Brunswick Laboratory
    Office of Fossil Energy
    Office of River Protection
    Pantex
    Radiological and Environmental Sciences Laboratory
    Y-12 National Security Complex
    Yucca Mountain nuclear waste repository
    Other:

    Pahute Mesa Airstrip – Nye County, Nevada, in supporting Nevada National Security Site

     
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