Tagged: Curtin University Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • richardmitnick 10:39 am on July 8, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Curtin University, , The thickness of the tiny rectangular-shaped nanocrystals called nanoplatelets could be controlled with atomic precision., Tiny ‘greener’ nanocrystals that can be manipulated to produce high-quality pictures and lighting in electronic devices such as televisions.   

    From Curtin University: “Tiny nanocrystals create ‘brighter’ future for TV viewers, study finds” 

    From Curtin University

    8 July 2019

    Lucien Wilkinson
    Media Consultant
    Supporting Humanities and Science and Engineering
    Tel: +61 8 9266 9185
    Mob: +61 401 103 683
    lucien.wilkinson@curtin.edu.au

    Yasmine Phillips
    Media Relations Manager, Public Relations
    Tel: +61 8 9266 9085
    Mob: +61 401 103 877
    yasmine.phillips@curtin.edu.au

    Curtin University researchers have discovered tiny ‘greener’ nanocrystals that can be manipulated to produce high-quality pictures and lighting in electronic devices such as televisions.

    The research, published in the Journal of Physical Chemistry Letters, found that the thickness of the tiny rectangular-shaped nanocrystals, called nanoplatelets, could be controlled with atomic precision, and can be used to improve the brightness and colour performance displayed on an LCD screen.

    Lead researcher ARC DECRA Fellow Dr Guohua Jia, from Curtin’s School of Molecular and Life Sciences and the Curtin Institute for Functional Molecules and Interfaces, said manufacturers were constantly searching for products with unprecedented picture quality given the high demand and competition in the electronics industry.

    “A popular choice by consumers are quantum dot light emitting diodes (QLED) televisions, which use quantum dots to produce better brightness and a wider colour spectrum. The dots act like an activation layer when applied on a blue LED backlight, producing a more saturated and wider colour gamut,” Dr Jia said.

    “Our research explored whether we could improve the picture and lighting quality in similar electronic devices by creating a new form of nanocrystal. We were able to create these by using a wet-chemical, ‘bottom-up’ method, in which chemicals in their ionic phase react in a solvent in the presence of organic ligands such as amine.

    “Due to their unique shape and thickness, the nanocrystals produce colour that is much more pure. If they are used in electronic devices, they can greatly improve the lighting and picture quality by generating more vivid colours.”

    Dr Jia explained that the rectangular-shaped nanocrystals were non-toxic and ‘greener’ in comparison to other nanocrystals commonly used in similar devices and do not contain heavy-metal compounds.

    “The method that we invented can produce the nanocrystals in a large scale. This is valuable for industrial applications, as it can greatly improve the production of nanocrystals that can be used in electronic devices such as QLED televisions,” Dr Jia said.

    “The collaboration between several research groups around the world including Professor Chunsen Li from Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) and Dr Amit Sitt from Tel Aviv University in Israel, each with its unique capabilities and knowledge base, allowed us to tackle this unique problem both experimentally and theoretically, and may open the way for the development of new and exciting materials and technologies.

    “This research also underpinned a Patent Cooperation Treaty (PCT) application, and our team is looking for commercial and development partners to progress the commercialisation of this important research outcome.”

    The research was co-authored by researchers from the WA School of Mines: Minerals, Energy and Chemical Engineering at Curtin University, Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS), The University of Western Australia and Tel Aviv University, in Israel.

    The research was funded by an Australian Research Council Discovery Early Career Researcher Award (ARC DECRA).

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Curtin University (formerly known as Curtin University of Technology and Western Australian Institute of Technology) is an Australian public research university based in Bentley and Perth, Western Australia. The university is named after the 14th Prime Minister of Australia, John Curtin, and is the largest university in Western Australia, with over 58,000 students (as of 2016).

    Curtin was conferred university status after legislation was passed by the Parliament of Western Australia in 1986. Since then, the university has been expanding its presence and has campuses in Singapore, Malaysia, Dubai and Mauritius. It has ties with 90 exchange universities in 20 countries. The University comprises five main faculties with over 95 specialists centres. The University formerly had a Sydney campus between 2005 & 2016. On 17 September 2015, Curtin University Council made a decision to close its Sydney campus by early 2017.

    Curtin University is a member of Australian Technology Network (ATN), and is active in research in a range of academic and practical fields, including Resources and Energy (e.g., petroleum gas), Information and Communication, Health, Ageing and Well-being (Public Health), Communities and Changing Environments, Growth and Prosperity and Creative Writing.

    It is the only Western Australian university to produce a PhD recipient of the AINSE gold medal, which is the highest recognition for PhD-level research excellence in Australia and New Zealand.

    Curtin has become active in research and partnerships overseas, particularly in mainland China. It is involved in a number of business, management, and research projects, particularly in supercomputing, where the university participates in a tri-continental array with nodes in Perth, Beijing, and Edinburgh. Western Australia has become an important exporter of minerals, petroleum and natural gas. The Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao visited the Woodside-funded hydrocarbon research facility during his visit to Australia in 2005.
    Contents

     
  • richardmitnick 8:16 am on March 22, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ARC-Australian Research Council, , Curtin University,   

    From Curtin University: “New ARC-funded research uses new tool to examine world’s oldest rocks” 

    From Curtin University

    19 March 2019

    Yasmine Phillips
    Media Relations Manager, Public Relations
    Tel: +61 8 9266 9085
    Mob: +61 401 103 877
    yasmine.phillips@curtin.edu.au

    Curtin University researchers will develop a new fingerprinting tool capable of delving deeper into the Earth’s rock layers, in what promises to be an important development for Australia’s mining and petroleum sectors.

    The research will enhance industry’s understanding of the Earth’s sedimentary rocks by investigating case studies at the Yilgarn Craton, Australia’s premier gold and nickel province spanning from Meekatharra to WA’s South-West including Kalgoorlie, as well as the Canning Basin, located in the Kimberley, and the Northern Carnarvon Basin.

    The project secured $352,000 from the Australian Research Council’s Linkage Project scheme as part of the latest funding announcement made by the Federal Minister for Education, the Hon. Dan Tehan, today.

    Curtin University Acting Deputy Vice-Chancellor Research Professor Garry Allison said the research had potentially important implications for the mining and petroleum sectors.

    “Western Australia’s mineral and petroleum exports are major contributors to the Australian economy, but in recent years the number of significant discoveries has fallen and those that have been identified tend to be at greater depths,” Professor Allison said.

    “This new research will develop a new fingerprinting tool capable of shedding more light on some of the world’s oldest rocks with the aim of helping Australian mining and petroleum explorers to uncover major new mineral and hydrocarbon deposits.”

    The state-wide isotope-based research project will be led by Associate Professor Chris Kirkland and Professor Chris Elders, both from the School of Earth and Planetary Sciences at Curtin University.

    Curtin University researchers will work with Northern Star Resources and the Geological Survey of Western Australia, within the Department of Mines, Industry Regulation and Safety, on the project.

    As part of the latest round of ARC grants announced today, Curtin University researchers will also work on an international project, led by The University of Western Australia, that will test and review the success of teaching Einstein’s theories of space, time, matter, light and gravity. That project was awarded $898,560 in ARC funding.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Curtin University (formerly known as Curtin University of Technology and Western Australian Institute of Technology) is an Australian public research university based in Bentley and Perth, Western Australia. The university is named after the 14th Prime Minister of Australia, John Curtin, and is the largest university in Western Australia, with over 58,000 students (as of 2016).

    Curtin was conferred university status after legislation was passed by the Parliament of Western Australia in 1986. Since then, the university has been expanding its presence and has campuses in Singapore, Malaysia, Dubai and Mauritius. It has ties with 90 exchange universities in 20 countries. The University comprises five main faculties with over 95 specialists centres. The University formerly had a Sydney campus between 2005 & 2016. On 17 September 2015, Curtin University Council made a decision to close its Sydney campus by early 2017.

    Curtin University is a member of Australian Technology Network (ATN), and is active in research in a range of academic and practical fields, including Resources and Energy (e.g., petroleum gas), Information and Communication, Health, Ageing and Well-being (Public Health), Communities and Changing Environments, Growth and Prosperity and Creative Writing.

    It is the only Western Australian university to produce a PhD recipient of the AINSE gold medal, which is the highest recognition for PhD-level research excellence in Australia and New Zealand.

    Curtin has become active in research and partnerships overseas, particularly in mainland China. It is involved in a number of business, management, and research projects, particularly in supercomputing, where the university participates in a tri-continental array with nodes in Perth, Beijing, and Edinburgh. Western Australia has become an important exporter of minerals, petroleum and natural gas. The Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao visited the Woodside-funded hydrocarbon research facility during his visit to Australia in 2005.
    Contents

     
  • richardmitnick 11:20 am on March 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Autism Open Day aims to create ‘a better future’ for people on the spectrum", , Curtin Autism Research Group, Curtin University, Telethon Kids Institute   

    From Curtin University: “Autism Open Day aims to create ‘a better future’ for people on the spectrum” 

    From Curtin University

    18 March 2019

    Lauren Sydoruk
    Media Consultant
    Tel: +61 8 9266 4241
    Mob: +61 401 103 373
    lauren.sydoruk@curtin.edu.au

    Yasmine Phillips
    Media Relations Manager, Public Relations
    Tel: +61 8 9266 9085
    Mob: +61 401 103 877
    yasmine.phillips@curtin.edu.au

    Researchers from Curtin University and the Telethon Kids Institute will explore the strengths and skills that can help build a better future for people living on the spectrum at this year’s Autism Open Day.

    1

    Adults and children with autism, their families and the wider community are invited to attend the free annual event, which will include presentations from autistic adults and information on current research and programs aiming to support people with autism.

    Autism Open Day will mark the start of Curtin’s Research Rumble, a series of events that promote the innovative research projects being undertaken at Curtin University, from March 24 to 27.

    Curtin Autism Research Group (CARG) Director Professor Sonya Girdler, from the School of Occupational Therapy, Social Work and Speech Pathology at Curtin University, said only 42 per cent of Australian adults with autism participate in employment, compared to 53 per cent with other disabilities and 83 per cent without disabilities.

    “People with autism possess unique skills and qualities that include being punctual, having high attention to detail and a high tolerance for repetitive tasks, and these skills can be beneficial to many employers, especially in the technology and software development industries,” Professor Girdler said.

    “It is essential to prepare and mentor young adults with autism throughout their education to ensure they are ready to tackle the workforce. Employers can play an important role in supporting autistic people in work environments, making small changes to the workplace and tailoring job descriptions to match an autistic individual’s skill set and strengths.

    “Australia has historically performed poorly in creating employment opportunities for autistic individuals compared to other nations, but the combined work of researchers, employers, the autistic and the wider community is working to improve that and create a brighter future for people on the spectrum.”

    Professor Girdler explained that Autism Open Day offered a great opportunity for people with autism and their families to exchange knowledge and experiences in a safe environment.

    “Members of the public attending this year’s Autism Open Day will have access to a range of important information about pathway planning for school leavers with autism, quality of life tips for adults with autism, medication use amongst adults with autism, the transition to school, and peer-mentoring programs for university students with autism,” Professor Girdler said.

    Autism Open Day will be held in the Technology Park Function Centre, 2 Brodie Hall Drive, Bentley, on Sunday, 24 March, from 10am to 3pm. Further information can be found online here.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Curtin University (formerly known as Curtin University of Technology and Western Australian Institute of Technology) is an Australian public research university based in Bentley and Perth, Western Australia. The university is named after the 14th Prime Minister of Australia, John Curtin, and is the largest university in Western Australia, with over 58,000 students (as of 2016).

    Curtin was conferred university status after legislation was passed by the Parliament of Western Australia in 1986. Since then, the university has been expanding its presence and has campuses in Singapore, Malaysia, Dubai and Mauritius. It has ties with 90 exchange universities in 20 countries. The University comprises five main faculties with over 95 specialists centres. The University formerly had a Sydney campus between 2005 & 2016. On 17 September 2015, Curtin University Council made a decision to close its Sydney campus by early 2017.

    Curtin University is a member of Australian Technology Network (ATN), and is active in research in a range of academic and practical fields, including Resources and Energy (e.g., petroleum gas), Information and Communication, Health, Ageing and Well-being (Public Health), Communities and Changing Environments, Growth and Prosperity and Creative Writing.

    It is the only Western Australian university to produce a PhD recipient of the AINSE gold medal, which is the highest recognition for PhD-level research excellence in Australia and New Zealand.

    Curtin has become active in research and partnerships overseas, particularly in mainland China. It is involved in a number of business, management, and research projects, particularly in supercomputing, where the university participates in a tri-continental array with nodes in Perth, Beijing, and Edinburgh. Western Australia has become an important exporter of minerals, petroleum and natural gas. The Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao visited the Woodside-funded hydrocarbon research facility during his visit to Australia in 2005.
    Contents

     
  • richardmitnick 12:38 pm on January 29, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: AuScope, Curtin University, John de Laeter Research Centre at the University’s Bentley Campus, National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy, SHRIMP-Sensitive High-Resolution Ion Microprobe   

    From Curtin University: “Curtin home to new equipment that unlocks the secrets of the Universe” 

    From Curtin University

    29 January 2019

    Yasmine Phillips
    Media Relations Manager, Public Relations
    Tel: +61 8 9266 9085
    Mob: +61 401 103 877
    yasmine.phillips@curtin.edu.au

    Lucien Wilkinson
    Media Consultant
    Supporting Humanities and Science and Engineering
    Tel: +61 8 9266 9185
    Mob: +61 401 103 683
    lucien.wilkinson@curtin.edu.au

    Curtin University will be home to new equipment vital for gaining a better understanding of the Earth and its place in the Universe after AuScope received $5 million in Federal Government funding.

    AuScope supports the purchase, upgrade and maintenance of geochemical research infrastructure at Curtin and a new replacement Sensitive High-Resolution Ion Microprobe (SHRIMP) age-dating instrument will be installed at the John de Laeter Research Centre at the University’s Bentley Campus.

    Funded through the National Collaborative Research Infrastructure Strategy, the new SHRIMP will enable continued research and innovation at the world-leading zircon geochronology facility at the centre.

    Curtin University Vice-Chancellor Professor Deborah Terry congratulated the John de Laeter Research Centre team for presenting a strong case for funding to upgrade the existing 25-year-old SHRIMP.

    “A quarter of a century ago, Professor John de Laeter led a proposal to commission a new SHRIMP ion microprobe at Curtin, which would subsequently bring about new understandings of the Australian continent, the Earth’s tectonic plates and the age of the Solar System, among other breakthroughs,” Professor Terry said.

    “This new SHRIMP instrument will enable the continuation of the important research that has been demonstrated over many years as having tremendous benefit to government, industry and academia.

    “The funding allows our researchers to remain working at the forefront of a science that shapes our collective understanding of the Earth and its place in the Universe.”

    John de Laeter Research Centre Director Professor Brent McInnes said the SHRIMP instrument had played a huge role in the advancement of geoscience research in Australia and around the globe, enabling new scientific discoveries and reshaping the geological map of Australia.

    “The new funding will allow industry, government and academic researchers to undertake new Earth and planetary research, such as those related to deep drilling projects and asteroid sample return missions,” Professor McInnes said.

    The John de Laeter Research Centre has strong links with the Geological Survey of Western Australia and Geoscience Australia, and provides geochronology and isotope geoscience data critical to their missions of mapping and understanding the Australian continent and its resources.

    AuScope’s SHRIMP instrument forms part of the Earth Composition and Evolution infrastructure located at Curtin University, The University of Melbourne and Macquarie University.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Curtin University (formerly known as Curtin University of Technology and Western Australian Institute of Technology) is an Australian public research university based in Bentley and Perth, Western Australia. The university is named after the 14th Prime Minister of Australia, John Curtin, and is the largest university in Western Australia, with over 58,000 students (as of 2016).

    Curtin was conferred university status after legislation was passed by the Parliament of Western Australia in 1986. Since then, the university has been expanding its presence and has campuses in Singapore, Malaysia, Dubai and Mauritius. It has ties with 90 exchange universities in 20 countries. The University comprises five main faculties with over 95 specialists centres. The University formerly had a Sydney campus between 2005 & 2016. On 17 September 2015, Curtin University Council made a decision to close its Sydney campus by early 2017.

    Curtin University is a member of Australian Technology Network (ATN), and is active in research in a range of academic and practical fields, including Resources and Energy (e.g., petroleum gas), Information and Communication, Health, Ageing and Well-being (Public Health), Communities and Changing Environments, Growth and Prosperity and Creative Writing.

    It is the only Western Australian university to produce a PhD recipient of the AINSE gold medal, which is the highest recognition for PhD-level research excellence in Australia and New Zealand.

    Curtin has become active in research and partnerships overseas, particularly in mainland China. It is involved in a number of business, management, and research projects, particularly in supercomputing, where the university participates in a tri-continental array with nodes in Perth, Beijing, and Edinburgh. Western Australia has become an important exporter of minerals, petroleum and natural gas. The Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao visited the Woodside-funded hydrocarbon research facility during his visit to Australia in 2005.
    Contents

     
  • richardmitnick 9:42 pm on October 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Curtin University, , Reidite-an ultra-rare mineral from what may be the largest-known meteorite impact crater in Australia, Woodleigh impact crater near Shark Bay in Western Australia   

    From Curtin University: “Curtin scientists unearth rare mineral from buried WA impact crater” 

    From Curtin University

    16 October 2018

    Lucien Wilkinson
    Media Consultant
    Supporting Humanities and Science and Engineering
    Tel: +61 8 9266 9185
    Mob: +61 401 103 683
    lucien.wilkinson@curtin.edu.au

    Yasmine Phillips
    Media Relations Manager, Public Relations
    Tel: +61 8 9266 9085
    Mob: +61 401 103 877
    yasmine.phillips@curtin.edu.au

    Curtin University researchers studying core samples taken near Shark Bay have discovered an ultra-rare mineral from what may be the largest-known meteorite impact crater in Australia.

    1
    Honours student Morgan Cox, from Curtin’s School of Earth and Planetary Sciences.

    The mineral, named reidite, only forms in rocks that experience the incredible pressure created when rocks from space slam into the Earth’s crust. Reidite starts as the common mineral zircon and transforms to reidite during the pressure of impact, making it incredibly rare and only the sixth-known crater on Earth where the mineral has been found.

    Published in leading journal Geology, the new research examined drill core from the buried Woodleigh impact crater, near Shark Bay, and found that some zircon grains in the core had partially transformed to reidite.

    The chance find of reidite gave the team new insights into how the Earth responds to the dramatic changes created by meteorite impact, a process that violently lifts deep-seated rocks to the surface in seconds.

    Lead author Honours student Morgan Cox, from Curtin’s School of Earth and Planetary Sciences, said given the Woodleigh impact crater is buried below younger sedimentary rocks, its size is not known and remains hotly debated.

    “Previous research estimated the size of the impact crater between 60km and more than 120km in diameter,” Ms Cox said.

    “However, our discovery of reidite near the base of the core suggests a larger crater. The research team is now using numerical modelling to refine the size of Woodleigh and if we establish its diameter is greater than 100km, it would be the largest-known impact crater in Australia.”

    The researchers also found additional clues in the same zircon grains, some of which had deformation twins, which is another feature that only forms in zircon grains shocked by impact.

    The team analysed the microscopic interaction of reidite and twins, which provided critical evidence for how and when these features formed during the violent upheaval.

    Research supervisor Dr Aaron Cavosie, also from Curtin’s School of Earth and Planetary Sciences, said the drill core sampled the middle of the impact crater, a region called the central uplift.

    “Central uplifts are desirable targets for learning about impact conditions,” Dr Cavosie said.

    “They bring profoundly damaged rocks closer to the surface, and in some instances, are associated with exploration targets.

    “Finding reidite at Woodleigh was quite a surprise as it is much rarer than diamonds or gold, though unfortunately not as valuable.”

    The research team also includes Professor Phil Bland and Dr Katarina Miljković, both from Curtin’s School of Earth and Planetary Sciences, and Dr Michael Wingate from the Geological Survey of Western Australia.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Curtin University (formerly known as Curtin University of Technology and Western Australian Institute of Technology) is an Australian public research university based in Bentley and Perth, Western Australia. The university is named after the 14th Prime Minister of Australia, John Curtin, and is the largest university in Western Australia, with over 58,000 students (as of 2016).

    Curtin was conferred university status after legislation was passed by the Parliament of Western Australia in 1986. Since then, the university has been expanding its presence and has campuses in Singapore, Malaysia, Dubai and Mauritius. It has ties with 90 exchange universities in 20 countries. The University comprises five main faculties with over 95 specialists centres. The University formerly had a Sydney campus between 2005 & 2016. On 17 September 2015, Curtin University Council made a decision to close its Sydney campus by early 2017.

    Curtin University is a member of Australian Technology Network (ATN), and is active in research in a range of academic and practical fields, including Resources and Energy (e.g., petroleum gas), Information and Communication, Health, Ageing and Well-being (Public Health), Communities and Changing Environments, Growth and Prosperity and Creative Writing.

    It is the only Western Australian university to produce a PhD recipient of the AINSE gold medal, which is the highest recognition for PhD-level research excellence in Australia and New Zealand.

    Curtin has become active in research and partnerships overseas, particularly in mainland China. It is involved in a number of business, management, and research projects, particularly in supercomputing, where the university participates in a tri-continental array with nodes in Perth, Beijing, and Edinburgh. Western Australia has become an important exporter of minerals, petroleum and natural gas. The Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao visited the Woodside-funded hydrocarbon research facility during his visit to Australia in 2005.
    Contents

     
  • richardmitnick 11:22 am on September 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Curtin University, Future of Work Institute   

    From Curtin University: “New Curtin research hub to shape Australia’s jobs of the future” 

    Curtin University

    3 September 2018

    Lauren Sydoruk
    Media Consultant
    Tel: +61 8 9266 4241
    Mob: +61 401 103 373
    lauren.sydoruk@curtin.edu.au

    Yasmine Phillips
    Media Relations Manager, Public Relations
    Tel: +61 8 9266 9085
    Mob: +61 401 103 877
    yasmine.phillips@curtin.edu.au

    A new team led by global experts will be tasked with shaping the jobs and industries of the future as part of a collaborative research hub based at Curtin University.

    1
    No image caption or credit.

    The Future of Work Institute includes about 40 researchers and professionals with expertise in the changing nature of work and employment.

    The Institute will provide research, knowledge and advice for businesses, government and communities seeking to understand the challenges and capitalise on the opportunities presented by technological and social change, digital innovation and automation.

    Curtin University Vice-Chancellor Professor Deborah Terry welcomed the team to the University and acknowledged the Australian Research Council, the Western Australian Government, and industry partners for supporting the Future of Work Institute.

    “I would like to formally welcome the new researchers to Curtin University and look forward to seeing the important work of the new Institute, which will complement the priority given by the Federal and State Governments to support and create the jobs and industries of the future,” Professor Terry said.

    Curtin University Faculty of Business and Law Pro-Vice Chancellor Professor Nigel de Bussy said the Institute will be led by Professor Mark Griffin, a leading expert in leadership, work performance, safety, and data analysis.

    “The Future of Work Institute will draw on Curtin’s immense expertise across management, engineering, computing, technology, economics and education, and help position Australia and WA as leaders in innovation, employment, work practices and skills development,” Professor de Bussy said.

    The research team includes ARC Laureate Fellow Professor Sharon Parker, Director of the Curtin-based Centre for Transformative Work Design and a world-renowned scholar in the field of work design and employee productivity, and Professor Marylène Gagné, a leading researcher in the study of work motivation.

    Other researchers include Associate Professor Karina Jorritsma, whose research focuses on new ways for research and industry to interact, which aligns with Curtin’s goal of balancing demand-driven and researcher-driven research. Associate Professor Patrick Dunlop will be joining the team in 2019. His research focuses on personnel recruitment, selection, and socialisation.

    Future of Work Institute Director Professor Mark Griffin said the new team members are delighted to join Curtin and are already creating new collaborations with other Curtin researchers.

    “The digital revolution is re-configuring work rapidly and on a very large scale. Changing skill requirements and employment patterns means there is an urgent need to understand and improve the nature of work for everyone,” Professor Griffin said.

    “Digital disruption, automation, artificial intelligence, social change and globalisation are changing the way people work. Understanding the trends, influences and consequences of these changes is critical to Australia’s economic and social future.

    “The Future of Work Institute will collaborate with industry, government, not-for-profit, and volunteer organisations to design new ways of working that will maximise human potential. The Institute seeks to understand and help meet future challenges facing society as we transition to new ways of working.”

    Professor John Phillimore, Executive Director of the John Curtin Institute of Public Policy, will lead a public policy research program at the Future of Work Institute, which has already secured State Government support.

    The public policy program will aim to ensure Australia remains competitive and generates high-value and high-wage jobs, with a particular focus on STEM-based industries in WA, while also providing input into efforts to diversify the State’s economy.

    The Future of Work Institute will include senior and early career researchers, postgraduate students, and professionals dedicated to building Australia’s capability to embrace opportunities in the changing world of work.

    Curtin and other parties including industry and the Australian Research Council will invest approximately $20 million over the next five years in the Institute. The Western Australian Government has also provided a one-off grant of $150,000 towards its establishment.

    The Institute will be centred at the Curtin Graduate School of Business, located at 78 Murray Street, Perth. Further information can be found online here.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Curtin University (formerly known as Curtin University of Technology and Western Australian Institute of Technology) is an Australian public research university based in Bentley and Perth, Western Australia. The university is named after the 14th Prime Minister of Australia, John Curtin, and is the largest university in Western Australia, with over 58,000 students (as of 2016).

    Curtin was conferred university status after legislation was passed by the Parliament of Western Australia in 1986. Since then, the university has been expanding its presence and has campuses in Singapore, Malaysia, Dubai and Mauritius. It has ties with 90 exchange universities in 20 countries. The University comprises five main faculties with over 95 specialists centres. The University formerly had a Sydney campus between 2005 & 2016. On 17 September 2015, Curtin University Council made a decision to close its Sydney campus by early 2017.

    Curtin University is a member of Australian Technology Network (ATN), and is active in research in a range of academic and practical fields, including Resources and Energy (e.g., petroleum gas), Information and Communication, Health, Ageing and Well-being (Public Health), Communities and Changing Environments, Growth and Prosperity and Creative Writing.

    It is the only Western Australian university to produce a PhD recipient of the AINSE gold medal, which is the highest recognition for PhD-level research excellence in Australia and New Zealand.

    Curtin has become active in research and partnerships overseas, particularly in mainland China. It is involved in a number of business, management, and research projects, particularly in supercomputing, where the university participates in a tri-continental array with nodes in Perth, Beijing, and Edinburgh. Western Australia has become an important exporter of minerals, petroleum and natural gas. The Chinese Premier Wen Jiabao visited the Woodside-funded hydrocarbon research facility during his visit to Australia in 2005.
    Contents

     
  • richardmitnick 9:44 am on April 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , , Curtin University,   

    From ICRAR via Curtin University: “Outback radio telescope listens in on interstellar visitor” 

    ICRAR Logo
    International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research

    Curtin University

    10 April 2018

    Lucien Wilkinson
    Media Consultant
    Tel: +61 8 9266 9185
    Mob: +61 401 103 683
    lucien.wilkinson@curtin.edu.au

    Hailey Ross
    Media Relations Manager, Public Relations
    Tel: +61 8 9266 3357
    Mob: +61 478 310 708
    hailey.ross@curtin.edu.au

    A telescope in outback Western Australia has been used to listen to a mysterious cigar-shaped object that entered our Solar System late last year.

    The unusual object – known as ‘Oumuamua – came from another solar system, prompting speculation it could be an alien spacecraft.

    1
    This artist’s concept depicts ‘Oumuamua, which recently swung by the Sun during a quick pass through our solar system. Though initially believed to be a comet from another star system, further study revealed the object was actually an interstellar asteroid, which astronomers previously thought were much more rare. ESO/M. Kommesser.

    So astronomers went back through observations from the Murchison Widefield Array (MWA) telescope to check for radio transmissions coming from the object between the frequencies of 72 and 102MHz – similar to the frequency range in which FM radio is broadcast.

    SKA Murchison Widefield Array, Boolardy station in outback Western Australia, at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO)

    While they did not find any signs of intelligent life, the research helped expand the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence (SETI) from distant stars to objects closer to home.

    When ‘Oumuamua was first discovered, astronomers thought it was a comet or an asteroid from within the Solar System. But after studying its orbit and discovering its long, cylindrical shape, they realised ‘Oumuamua was neither and had come from interstellar space.

    Telescopes around the world trained their gaze on the mysterious visitor in an effort to learn as much as possible before it headed back out of the Solar System, becoming too faint to observe in detail.

    John Curtin Distinguished Professor Steven Tingay, from the Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), said the MWA team did not initially set out to find ‘Oumuamua.

    “We didn’t set out to observe this object with the MWA but because we can see such a large fraction of the sky at once, when something like this happens, we’re able to go back through the data and analyse it after the fact,” Professor Tingay said.

    “If advanced civilizations do exist elsewhere in our galaxy, we can speculate that they might develop the capability to launch spacecraft over interstellar distances and that these spacecraft may use radio waves to communicate.

    “Whilst the possibility of this is extremely low, possibly even zero, as scientists it’s important that we avoid complacency and examine observations and evidence without bias.”

    The MWA is located in Western Australia’s remote Murchison region, one of the most radio quiet areas on the planet and far from human activity and radio interference caused by technology.

    It is made up of thousands of antennas attached to hundreds of “tiles” that dot the ancient landscape, relentlessly observing the heavens day after day, night after night.

    Professor Tingay said the research team was able to look back through all of the MWA’s observations from November, December and early January, when ‘Oumuamua was between 95 million and 590 million kilometres from Earth.

    “We found nothing, but as the first object of its class to be discovered, `Oumuamua has given us an interesting opportunity to expand the search for extra-terrestrial intelligence from traditional targets such as stars and galaxies to objects that are much closer to Earth.

    “This also allows for searches for transmitters that are many orders of magnitude less powerful than those that would be detectable from a planet orbiting even the most nearby stars.”

    ‘Oumuamua was first discovered by the Pan-STARRS project at the University of Hawaii in October.

    Pann-STARS telescope, U Hawaii, Mauna Kea, Hawaii, USA, 4,207 m (13,802 ft) above sea level

    Its name loosely means “a messenger that reaches out from the distant past” in Hawaiian, and is the first known interstellar object to pass through our Solar System.

    Combining observations from a host of telescopes, scientists have determined that `Oumuamua is most likely a cometary fragment that has lost much of its surface water because it was bombarded by cosmic rays on its long journey through interstellar space.

    Researchers have now suggested there could be more than 46 million similar interstellar objects crossing the Solar System every year.

    While most of these objects are too far away to study with current technologies, future telescopes such as the Square Kilometre Array (SKA) will enable scientists to understand more about these interstellar interlopers.

    “So once the SKA is online, we’ll be able to look at large numbers of objects and partially balance out the low probability of a positive detection,” Professor Tingay said.

    ***This media release was issued by ICRAR***

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Curtin is ranked in the top one per cent of universities worldwide in the prestigious Academic Ranking of World Universities 2017.

    We are WA’s most preferred university and are globally recognised for our strong connections with industry, high-impact research and wide range of innovative courses. We are also WA’s largest and most multicultural university, welcoming more than 52,000 students, around a third of whom come from a country other than Australia.

    ICRAR is an equal joint venture between Curtin University and The University of Western Australia with funding support from the State Government of Western Australia. The Centre’s headquarters are located at UWA, with research nodes at both UWA and the Curtin Institute for Radio Astronomy (CIRA).
    ICRAR has strong support from the government of Australia and is working closely with industry and the astronomy community, including CSIRO and the Australian Telescope National Facility, <a
    ICRAR is:

    Playing a key role in the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project, the world's biggest ground-based telescope array.

    Attracting some of the world’s leading researchers in radio astronomy, who will also contribute to national and international scientific and technical programs for SKA and ASKAP.
    Creating a collaborative environment for scientists and engineers to engage and work with industry to produce studies, prototypes and systems linked to the overall scientific success of the SKA, MWA and ASKAP.

    Murchison Widefield Array,SKA Murchison Widefield Array, Boolardy station in outback Western Australia, at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO)

    A Small part of the Murchison Widefield Array

    Enhancing Australia’s position in the international SKA program by contributing to the development process for the SKA in scientific, technological and operational areas.
    Promoting scientific, technical, commercial and educational opportunities through public outreach, educational material, training students and collaborative developments with national and international educational organisations.
    Establishing and maintaining a pool of emerging and top-level scientists and technologists in the disciplines related to radio astronomy through appointments and training.
    Making world-class contributions to SKA science, with emphasis on the signature science themes associated with surveys for neutral hydrogen and variable (transient) radio sources.
    Making world-class contributions to SKA capability with respect to developments in the areas of Data Intensive Science and support for the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:55 pm on September 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Curtin University, , , TTGs, Uniformitarianism   

    From Curtin: “New research ‘rocks’ long-held geological theory” 

    Curtin University

    28 February 2017 [Just appeared in social media, better late than never]

    Tamara Hunter
    Media Consultant (Monday to Wednesday)
    Supporting Humanities and Science & Engineering
    Tel: +61 8 9266 3353
    Mob: +61 401 103 683
    tamara.hunter@curtin.edu.au

    Hailey Ross
    Media Relations Manager, Public Relations
    Tel: +61 8 9266 3357
    Mob: +61 478 310 708
    hailey.ross@curtin.edu.au

    New research into ancient rocks in Western Australia contradicts the commonly held belief that Earth’s first stable continents were formed in a plate tectonic setting.

    The Curtin University-led paper, Earth’s first stable continents did not form by subduction, was published today in Nature.

    Dr Tim Johnson, from The Institute for Geoscience Research (TIGeR) and the Department of Applied Geology at the Curtin WA School of Mines, explained that the geodynamic environment in which Earth’s first stable continents formed remained controversial.

    “Uniformitarianism is the precept in geology that the processes we can observe happening today are those that have operated throughout Earth’s history,” Dr Johnson said.

    “Many geologists have subscribed to the uniformitarian view that the first continental crust formed in subduction zones via modern-style plate tectonics.

    The tectonic plates of the world were mapped in 1996, USGS.

    “Some, however, believe that alternative (non-uniformitarian) processes were involved – our research supports the latter.”

    Dr Johnson said examples of truly ancient continental crust – rocks formed around 3.5-4 billion years ago, in the early stages of the Archaean Eon – could still be found today, in places like Australia, South Africa, India, North America and Europe.

    “Most exposed areas of Archaean crust include a specific type of granitic rocks known as TTGs,” [Tonalite-Trondhjemite-Granodiorite] Dr Johnson said.

    “These rocks were formed by partial melting of a low magnesium basaltic source, and have a trace element signature that resemble crust produced in modern subduction settings.

    “My previous research came to a similar conclusion, that plate tectonic processes are not required for the formation of the earliest continents, and that other mechanisms are plausible. We wanted to explore the hypothesis further, leading to our current findings.”

    Samples were selected from the low magnesium basalts of the Coucal Formation at the base of the Pilbara Supergroup in the East Pilbara Terrane, Western Australia. These rocks, amongst the oldest basaltic lavas on Earth, have previously been shown to contain a trace element composition consistent with source rocks for TTGs .

    “Through phase equilibria modelling of the Coucal basalts, we confirmed their suitability as TTG parents, suggesting they were produced by melting in a high geothermal gradient environment. By contrast, many researchers maintain that TTGs were formed in subduction zones, which are characterised by very low geothermal gradients,” Dr Johnson said.

    “Additionally, the trace element signature of the Coucal basalts indicates that they were derived from an earlier generation of mafic rocks, suggesting this signature was inherited from an ancestral lineage.

    “This leads us to believe that a protracted, multistage process, in combination with high geothermal gradients, was required for the production and stabilisation of the first continents. These results are not consistent with formation of TTGs in subduction zones, but rather favour their production near the base of thick basaltic plateaux in the early Archaean.”

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Curtin is ranked in the top one per cent of universities worldwide in the prestigious Academic Ranking of World Universities 2017.

    We are WA’s most preferred university and are globally recognised for our strong connections with industry, high-impact research and wide range of innovative courses. We are also WA’s largest and most multicultural university, welcoming more than 52,000 students, around a third of whom come from a country other than Australia.

     
  • richardmitnick 5:59 am on November 23, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Curtin University, , Meteorite recovered in WA with the help of stargazers and science app   

    From CSIRO via ABC: “Meteorite recovered in WA with the help of stargazers and science app” 

    CSIRO bloc

    Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation

    1
    ABC

    11.21.16
    Colin Cosier

    2
    The pristine meteorite sample recovered from Morawa, protected by a non-reactive Teflon bag. Supplied: Curtin University

    A meteorite estimated to be older than Earth has been recovered from a West Australian farm with the help of some enthusiastic stargazers and a phone app.

    The 1.15-kilogram meteor landed near Morawa on Halloween, discovered days later by members of Curtin University’s Desert Fireball Network (DFN).

    DFN founder Phil Bland said the fireball was located with the help of four skyward-pointing outback cameras and reports made to the Fireballs in the Sky citizen science app.

    He said retrieving the meteorite so quickly meant it is in good condition and scientifically valuable.

    “Our team was able to track the fall line and calculate its landing spot to within 200 metres of where it was subsequently found,” Professor Bland said.

    “It [the meteorite] is a type called a chondrite, which is a type of meteorite which has not been cooked up enough to melt.

    “So it can give us some information about that period of early solar system history.”

    “We’re hopeful, because we managed to get it in a very pristine way, that we can find some quite soluble elements or minerals in there, or volatile minerals that can tell us about water and organics in the solar system.

    “Meteorites tell us pretty much everything we want to know about the solar system … but unless we know where they came from, there’s a really big piece of that puzzle left.”

    3
    Curtin University’s Desert Fireball Network camera used a 30-second exposure to pick up the fireball. Supplied: Curtin University

    Prof Bland said of the 50,000 meteorites that have been discovered, the origins of only 20 to 30 are known.

    Meteorites decelerate to a free-fall velocity by the time they hit the earth, travelling at the same speed as a rock thrown from a tall building.

    Before falling through the atmosphere, the meteorite is predicted to have been 50-100 times bigger than its current size.

    Martin Towner from the Department of Applied Geology described the rock as a pristine, unweathered and a fresh sample.

    He said there was no visible impact on the ground where it was found, about 300 kilometres north-east of Perth.

    DFN’s Ben Hartig said they were at the correct field when they first looked, but called it a day before they found the meteor.

    The next morning they looked in another paddock, before it was finally discovered in the original field.

    “It was right at the end of the field, so we pretty much all thought we’d finished off that field and we then we see this black rock,” Mr Hartig said.

    Founder of WA’s Stargazers Club, Carol Redford, was one of those who uploaded her location to the app when she saw the meteorite streak through the sky.

    “I immediately grabbed my smart phone and headed outside,” said Ms Redford, who is also known as Galaxy Girl.

    4
    Desert Fireball Network search team with recovered meteorite. Supplied: Curtin University

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: