Tagged: CSIROscope Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • richardmitnick 7:00 am on September 18, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CSIROscope, , , Picture this: snap the sea for science   

    From CSIROscope: “Picture this: snap the sea for science” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From CSIROscope

    18 September 2018
    Natalie Kikken

    1
    Contributing to water quality monitoring, from the palm of your hand

    Most people often think of water as blue, but in reality, it rarely is. Sometimes it turns brown after a storm, other times there might be floating green things in it, and sometimes there might be a rainbow sheen on the surface. All of that information is invaluable to scientists when assessing the quality of water. So when you see it, snap it, upload it using the Eye on Water Australia app and you can help scientists get a global picture of water quality.

    A simple tool for complex science

    Eye on Water enables you to take a photo of water – both fresh and sea water – and upload it to the app. This helps us monitor changes to Australian waters such as algae blooms, seasonal changes, sediment and salinity.

    Water colour can be seen from space using satellite imagery however it can be easily affected by clouds, lighting and the time of day. The information you capture will feed into a global database to monitor water quality while supporting our extensive research to calibrate in-water measurements with satellite data to understand any changes.

    How does the app work?

    The first step is to grab your mobile and download the free app. Then head to your nearest water source that’s relatively deep – the photo can’t have the bottom of the river or ocean in the shot. Ideally, find a spot where the sun is behind you then snap a photo of water. Make sure we can’t see anything else in the photo, like your feet or your finger! Once you have uploaded your image, you will be asked to compare the colour of the water in your photo to a colour chart and submit it. And that’s your job done – you can now call yourself a citizen scientist! You can even create your own profile in the app so you can keep track of your valuable contributions.

    Hit us with your best shot

    The citizen science images are used to validate satellite imagery acquired by our scientists. This means that any small changes in a water system can be accurately detected and monitored over time, such as heavy rainfall or dredging.

    Users can learn about how regular tidal or seasonal patterns can affect water colour. Recognising specific water colour traits can also educate users on the uniqueness of the waters in their area and the expected and unexpected parameters of a healthy water system.

    Starting young: students leading the water charge

    We have been introducing Eye on Water to community groups, schools and education programs to bring science to life for students. This provides them with hands-on learning tools and scientific knowledge, plus the opportunity to use other water quality methods such as Secchi disks to test water clarity and water properties like pH, salinity, temperature and conductivity. This information can also feed into the app.

    We recently visited the Broome Senior High School Bushrangers Group to conduct water quality testing, and are planning to visit more schools this year.

    Eye on Water Australia is an effective way to capture more data on our oceans which will help us better understand its current conditions, monitor changes and the effect this can have on the future. Make a splash and join us to build on our aquatic knowledge – all from the palm of your hand!

    Get snapping!

    Download the Eye on Water app

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    SKA/ASKAP radio telescope at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Mid West region of Western Australia

    So what can we expect these new radio projects to discover? We have no idea, but history tells us that they are almost certain to deliver some major surprises.

    Making these new discoveries may not be so simple. Gone are the days when astronomers could just notice something odd as they browse their tables and graphs.

    Nowadays, astronomers are more likely to be distilling their answers from carefully-posed queries to databases containing petabytes of data. Human brains are just not up to the job of making unexpected discoveries in these circumstances, and instead we will need to develop “learning machines” to help us discover the unexpected.

    With the right tools and careful insight, who knows what we might find.

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

    Advertisements
     
  • richardmitnick 3:53 am on August 24, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CSIROscope, ,   

    From CSIROscope: “How hydrogen power can help us cut emissions, boost exports, and even drive further between refills” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From CSIROscope

    24 August 2018
    Sam Bruce

    1
    Could this be the way to fill up in future?

    Hydrogen could become a significant part of Australia’s energy landscape within the coming decade, competing with both natural gas and batteries, according to our new roadmap for the industry.

    2

    Hydrogen gas is a versatile energy carrier with a wide range of potential uses. However, hydrogen is not freely available in the atmosphere as a gas. It therefore requires an energy input and a series of technologies to produce, store and then use it.

    Why would we bother? Because hydrogen has several advantages over other energy carriers, such as batteries. It is a single product that can service multiple markets and, if produced using low- or zero-emissions energy sources, it can help us significantly cut greenhouse emissions.

    2
    Potential uses for hydrogen. No image credit.

    Compared with batteries, hydrogen can release more energy per unit of mass. This means that in contrast to electric battery-powered cars, it can allow passenger vehicles to cover longer distances without refuelling. Refuelling is quicker too and is likely to stay that way.

    The benefits are potentially even greater for heavy vehicles such as buses and trucks which already carry heavy payloads, and where lengthy battery recharge times can affect the business model.

    Hydrogen can also play an important role in energy storage, which will be increasingly necessary both in remote operations such as mine sites, and as part of the electricity grid to help smooth out the contribution of renewables such as wind and solar. This could work by using the excess renewable energy (when generation is high and/or demand is low) to drive hydrogen production via electrolysis of water. The hydrogen can then be stored as compressed gas and put into a fuel cell to generate electricity when needed.

    Australia is heavily reliant on imported liquid fuels and does not currently have enough liquid fuel held in reserve. Moving towards hydrogen fuel could potentially alleviate this problem. Hydrogen can also be used to produce industrial chemicals such as ammonia and methanol, and is an important ingredient in petroleum refining.

    Further, as hydrogen burns without greenhouse emissions, it is one of the few viable green alternatives to natural gas for generating heat.

    Our roadmap predicts that the global market for hydrogen will grow in the coming decades. Among the prospective buyers of Australian hydrogen would be Japan, which is comparatively constrained in its ability to generate energy locally. Australia’s extensive natural resources, namely solar, wind, fossil fuels and available land lend favourably to the establishment of hydrogen export supply chains.

    Why embrace hydrogen now?

    Given its widespread use and benefit, interest in the “hydrogen economy” has peaked and troughed for the past few decades. Why might it be different this time around? While the main motivation is hydrogen’s ability to deliver low-carbon energy, there are a couple of other factors that distinguish today’s situation from previous years.

    Our analysis shows that the hydrogen value chain is now underpinned by a series of mature technologies that are technically ready but not yet commercially viable. This means that the narrative around hydrogen has now shifted from one of technology development to “market activation”.

    The solar panel industry provides a recent precedent for this kind of burgeoning energy industry. Large-scale solar farms are now generating attractive returns on investment, without any assistance from government. One of the main factors that enabled solar power to reach this tipping point was the increase in production economies of scale, particularly in China. Notably, China has recently emerged as a proponent for hydrogen, earmarking its use in both transport and distributed electricity generation.

    But whereas solar power could feed into a market with ready-made infrastructure (the electricity grid), the case is less straightforward for hydrogen. The technologies to help produce and distribute hydrogen will need to develop in concert with the applications themselves.

    A roadmap for hydrogen

    In light of this, the primary objective of our National Hydrogen Roadmap is to provide a blueprint for the development of a hydrogen industry in Australia. With several activities already underway, it is designed to help industry, government and researchers decide where exactly to focus their attention and investment.

    Our first step was to calculate the price points at which hydrogen can compete commercially with other technologies. We then worked backwards along the value chain to understand the key areas of investment needed for hydrogen to achieve competitiveness in each of the identified potential markets. Following this, we modelled the cumulative impact of the investment priorities that would be feasible in or around 2025.

    3

    What became evident from the report was that the opportunity for clean hydrogen to compete favourably on a cost basis with existing industrial feedstocks and energy carriers in local applications such as transport and remote area power systems is within reach. On the upstream side, some of the most material drivers of reductions in cost include the availability of cheap low emissions electricity, utilisation and size of the asset.

    The development of an export industry, meanwhile, is a potential game-changer for hydrogen and the broader energy sector. While this industry is not expected to scale up until closer to 2030, this will enable the localisation of supply chains, industrialisation and even automation of technology manufacture that will contribute to significant reductions in asset capital costs. It will also enable the development of fossil-fuel-derived hydrogen with carbon capture and storage, and place downward pressure on renewable energy costs dedicated to large scale hydrogen production via electrolysis.

    In light of global trends in industry, energy and transport, development of a hydrogen industry in Australia represents a real opportunity to create new growth areas in our economy. Blessed with unparalleled resources, a skilled workforce and established manufacturing base, Australia is extremely well placed to capitalise on this opportunity. But it won’t eventuate on its own.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    SKA/ASKAP radio telescope at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Mid West region of Western Australia

    So what can we expect these new radio projects to discover? We have no idea, but history tells us that they are almost certain to deliver some major surprises.

    Making these new discoveries may not be so simple. Gone are the days when astronomers could just notice something odd as they browse their tables and graphs.

    Nowadays, astronomers are more likely to be distilling their answers from carefully-posed queries to databases containing petabytes of data. Human brains are just not up to the job of making unexpected discoveries in these circumstances, and instead we will need to develop “learning machines” to help us discover the unexpected.

    With the right tools and careful insight, who knows what we might find.

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 8:10 am on August 16, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , CSIROscope, Samy Movassaghi,   

    From CSIROscope: Women in STEM- “The key to a STEM career? Curiosity, persistence and a knack for problem solving!” Samy Movassaghi 

    CSIRO bloc

    From CSIROscope

    16 August 2018
    Ali Green

    1
    On top of Samy’s work as a researcher, she is often sought after as a spokesperson for inspiring young people to take up a career in tech.

    It’s National Science Week and we’ve been taking a closer look at science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) careers and pathways – answering burning questions and debunking myths like: what kinds of opportunities can be found in a STEM career path? What current and future jobs rely on STEM skills? What kinds of people pursue STEM careers? Can I only become a physicist if I study physics?

    To answer some of these questions, we’re getting up close and personal with Telecommunications Engineer, 2017 Google Research Fellowship recipient and ICT Student of the Year, Samy Movassaghi to hear about some of the cool things she’s doing in her job, what sparked her interest in STEM, and the pathway that led to her becoming a STEM professional. Samy even has some tips for eager young STEM enthusiasts!

    2
    Samy developed an algorithm inspired by fireflies to help solve a communications network challenge.

    Tell us a bit about what you’re working on at the moment and how you got there.

    Samy: I work on wearable biomarker sensors, or “insideables” that can track our health. Specifically, communications between a network of intelligent, low-power, micro and nano-technology sensors which can be placed on or in the body (including in the blood stream) to monitor vitals and provide timely data for medical diagnoses and action. One potential advantage of this technology is early detection of medical conditions, resulting in major improvements to quality of life. These networks can be expanded beyond healthcare for use in sport, entertainment and many other areas with their main characteristic being to improve the user’s quality of life.

    Apparently some of this work was inspired by fireflies?

    Yeah, that’s right. I designed a self-organisation algorithm inspired by the way fireflies stimulate each other to communicate (flash their lights) which allows the coexisting networks to autonomously configure themselves when communicating. The difficulty is, these sensors, which are all battery powered, are placed on and in the body, making constant recharging and replacement impractical. A better solution would be to extend their battery life as much as possible. So, like a swarm of fireflies, my protocol allows the sensors to communicate with each other and power up and adapt their transmissions when needed, minimising the drain on their batteries.

    And what was your pathway to this job?

    Well, I did a PhD in telecommunications engineering. During this time I did a couple of internships and won a few awards like the ICT student of the year award from the Australian Computer Society (ACS) at the Digital Disruptor Awards, a Google Fellowship award that is funding me to go to Mountain View at the end of this month, being featured as part of the CSIROSeven campaign promoting STEM careers, Business Innovation in IT award from Nasscom Australia and some others!

    Wow that’s impressive! What were all these awards for?

    So they were mainly for my proposals and research work during my PhD studies, showcased across various competitions, and also the work that I had accomplished by participating in solving challenges at a number of hackathons.

    What type of personality traits or interests do you think lend themselves to a career in computers and tech?

    So this work is mainly about persistence and problem solving. For me, it’s just like wanting to solve a brain teaser or find my way through a maze – I like the challenge of finding a way to solve a problem.

    What’s the earliest step you remember taking on your education path towards a career in information technology (IT)?

    As a child I was quite lucky that my parents were very open to us exploring what we wanted to do. They would constantly buy me all these electronic starter kits, and I would put them together and then watch them work, progressing to more complex projects – and that’s how it all started. I was constantly inspired by remote controls, or anything electronic. I would pull them apart trying to understand what those circuits and components were all about and how they led to certain functionalities. I decided electronic engineering was my natural calling and so I pursued a bachelor degree to understand more around that. Later on I decided to look into the communication between circuits, which led to further research in telecommunications engineering through my Masters and PhD Studies.

    And for any young people looking to pursue a career similar to yours, what are your recommendations?

    Nowadays, even at the very early ages in primary school, I can see there are a lot of coding challenges and different competitions that really encourage students to pursue a career in STEM and get exposed to coding or building new applications for certain challenges within a specific area of demand.

    ____________________
    Over the next month there are a number of different events encouraging young people to get into ICT, one of which is the international Bebras computational thinking challenge. The Bebras challenge is designed to enhance students’ problem solving skills and prepare them for the jobs of the future. It’s a free classroom resource for teachers and runs 3-14 September. Visit the link below to take the Bebras Challenge.
    ____________________

    With how much urgency should we be promoting people to take up careers in STEM or ICT?

    With the recent advancements in the Internet of Things, machine learning, data science, and big data, a career in ICT is very promising for one’s future. As humans collect more and more data, having an IT background helps you to better understand the science behind the data and how it can be used to make decisions and improve ones’ quality of life. There are so many opportunities to marry IT knowledge with all sorts of other STEM disciplines – medical, environment and design for example.

    Do you have any final words of advice for someone thinking about pursuing a STEM career?

    In my case, I’m really happy that I chose a career in STEM because it has given me the opportunity to explore my world in another dimension. With all the advancements happening around us, my STEM background gives me a better understanding of our changing world, and makes me feel like I can make a contribution. That is very motivating and quite exciting.

    I’d recommend that students interested in a STEM career investigate the different competitions and challenges available to them. It’s a great way to sharpen and test your STEM skills set while having fun.

    ____________________

    How will your computational thinking skills prepare you for the jobs of the future?
    Take the Bebras Challenge

    ____________________

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    SKA/ASKAP radio telescope at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Mid West region of Western Australia

    So what can we expect these new radio projects to discover? We have no idea, but history tells us that they are almost certain to deliver some major surprises.

    Making these new discoveries may not be so simple. Gone are the days when astronomers could just notice something odd as they browse their tables and graphs.

    Nowadays, astronomers are more likely to be distilling their answers from carefully-posed queries to databases containing petabytes of data. Human brains are just not up to the job of making unexpected discoveries in these circumstances, and instead we will need to develop “learning machines” to help us discover the unexpected.

    With the right tools and careful insight, who knows what we might find.

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 8:35 am on August 14, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , CSIROscope, Dr. Cathy Foley, ,   

    From CSIROscope: Women in STEM- “We just appointed our new Chief Scientist and she is one ‘super woman’” Dr. Cathy Foley 

    CSIRO bloc

    From CSIROscope

    14 August 2018
    Nicholas Kachel

    1

    When Dr Cathy Foley was in primary school she found out she was dyslexic. She had terrible handwriting and spelling and was struggling in class. As one of seven kids, her brothers teased her relentlessly about her challenges with reading and writing. But she managed to turn her tribulation into determination and resilience. And those are traits that she still carries with her today. The teasing, she says, just helped push her even harder to prove them wrong.

    And then when she was just nine years old, her mother passed away. This obviously took a huge toll on Cathy but she says it helped teach her resilience and that even painful situations show you that you can move on and survive another day. In high school, Cathy had a teacher who picked up that although she was struggling in most of her subjects, she was excelling in one – science. At that stage, though, Cathy thought she’d channel this into becoming a science teacher.

    “I always thought you had to be sort of Einstein’s relative if you were going to be a physicist. But I still had that secret desire,” Cathy says.

    That teacher was one of Cathy’s first science mentors and she attributes some of her success to those formative years where she finally felt like she was doing well in a subject she enjoyed.

    It wasn’t until Cathy was at a youth camp that she realised she wanted to change the world. Her compassion for others and a sense of wanting to see more fairness in the world, changed the course of her career.

    ”At the youth camp, I found one on one interactions were frustrating for me. It was then that I decided I wanted to change the world rather than work face to face, one engagement at a time. Science and technology seemed like the way I could do this. And then CSIRO was the perfect vehicle for me to realise this vision.”

    She studied physics and education at Sydney’s Macquarie University with the intention of becoming a high school science teacher.

    “But I fell in love with research and I did my PhD in nitride semiconductors and did a smidgen of the early work that led to the white LED,” she says.

    Today Cathy’s achievements over a career spanning 33 years are pretty intimidating.

    Having decided to pursue a career in research, Cathy joined us as a post-doctoral fellow working in magnetics and was asked to join the team working on applications for the new high temperature superconductors.

    2

    Cathy is a world-renowned physicist and science leader most noted for her work developing superconducting systems including a technology called LANDTEM which uses superconductors to create three-dimensional maps of underground ore bodies. The device that Cathy helped develop has revolutionised the way mining companies detect ore underground and uncovered deposits worth billions of dollars around the world.

    Cathy has risen through the ranks here holding many senior positions is currently the Deputy Director and Science Director of our Manufacturing business unit.

    And in her latest venture, Cathy has just been appointed as our Chief Scientist. This is one of the most senior roles in the organisation and she says her priority will be putting science, STEM and women in science back in the spotlight.

    Although Cathy is now less involved in hands-on research than she used to be, she still finds her job exciting.

    “It’s pretty exciting to think that the work you do actually has an enormous impact and can make a difference. If you ask the people I work with, they all say that’s what they love about working at CSIRO. We do things that actually change the world and I think that’s a nice thing to do,” she says.

    Not only is she one of Australia’s leading scientists, has a Doctor of Philosophy in Physics, a Bachelor of Science and a Diploma of Education, but she is leading the way for women in science and encouraging the next generation of young girls to follow in her footsteps.

    “Australia’s future prosperity will be fuelled by science. Science which creates new industries, new jobs and shapes the minds and aspirations of our future leaders. We can’t keep thinking about science as something which is locked away in a lab. It connects and drives everything we touch and do.

    “In my new role, I’m looking forward to not just spreading the word, but helping shape the science agenda, raising the profile of the role of women in STEM and being a mentor to other women inspired by science.”

    Cathy credits much of her success to being supported by her family, particularly her husband, her six siblings and step-mother.

    “My step-mother helped me to not only have attention to detail, but also be organised. While my sisters and brothers have always been my mentors and greatest supporters. We all mentor each other swapping between being the mentor and mentee.”

    “And my husband Tony is a rock. Having a supportive husband and great children has been absolutely critical to my success.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    SKA/ASKAP radio telescope at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Mid West region of Western Australia

    So what can we expect these new radio projects to discover? We have no idea, but history tells us that they are almost certain to deliver some major surprises.

    Making these new discoveries may not be so simple. Gone are the days when astronomers could just notice something odd as they browse their tables and graphs.

    Nowadays, astronomers are more likely to be distilling their answers from carefully-posed queries to databases containing petabytes of data. Human brains are just not up to the job of making unexpected discoveries in these circumstances, and instead we will need to develop “learning machines” to help us discover the unexpected.

    With the right tools and careful insight, who knows what we might find.

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 9:00 am on July 25, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , CSIROscope, , ,   

    From CSIROscope: Women in STEM-“The pioneer of pulsars pops into Parkes” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From CSIROscope

    25 July 2018
    Andrew Warren,
    Lucy Thackray

    1
    Dame Jocelyn with the record of her discovery

    In 1967, as a 24-year-old PhD student at Cambridge University, Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell made one of the most significant scientific discoveries of the 20th Century when she identified and precisely analysed the first pulsar.

    Dame Jocelyn recently visited Australia, and while she was in Parkes to deliver the John Bolton lecture at the local Astrofest event, she had the chance to pop in to see our Parkes radio telescope, which you probably know as ‘The Dish’. This was the first time Dame Jocelyn had visited The Dish, which has detected more than half of the more than 2500 pulsars found since her original discovery, and when the opportunity presented itself she just ‘couldn’t resist.’ And while she was here we had the chance to catch up with her to hear her thoughts on the breakneck speed of modern science, as well as the adversity women face when pursuing a career in science.

    Puzzling pulsars

    A pulsar is a small star left behind after a normal star has died in a fiery explosion, which spins up to hundreds of times per second and sends out beams of radio waves. We now know those radio waves can be detected as a ‘pulse’ when the beam is pointed in the direction of our telescopes.

    Dame Jocelyn discovered pulsars by spotting a tiny but of ‘scruff’ in the 30 metres of chart recordings made by the telescope each day.

    “It was troubling me because it didn’t fit into any previously known category, so I was a bit puzzled by what it actually was. I started calling it ‘LGM’, which stood for Little Green Men, although I didn’t seriously believe it was little green men,” Dame Jocelyn said.

    It wasn’t until she found the second pulsar that she was able to relax a little and know that the first detection wasn’t an anomaly.

    “It wasn’t till that point I was able to stop and think aaah…this is a new branch of astronomy we’re opening up.”

    3
    Celebrating her 75th birthday at The Dish with a surprise cake

    A trailblazing pioneer

    Dame Jocelyn’s ambition when starting out was to develop a career in radio astronomy.

    “I’d already felt like a bit of a pioneering woman during my time as an undergraduate, when I was the only women in a class of fifty people doing their honours physics degree,” she said.

    And even though she’d been credited with such an important scientific discovery, she would go on to face adversity many times during her career. Perhaps the most high profile example is when the Nobel Prize in Physics was awarded to her thesis supervisor and another astronomer in 1974 for the work discovering pulsars.

    Reflecting on the incident now, Dame Jocelyn thinks “…it was far more important that there was a Nobel Prize in astrophysics, rather than what it was for, or who it went to, because it created a precedent and opened the door, because until then astrophysics hadn’t been recognised at all.”

    “There were certainly discouragements, and you sometimes had to find workarounds, but it got even harder when I married and had a child, because mothers weren’t meant to work, so I ended up working part-time for about eighteen years,” Dame Jocelyn said.

    “I knew that I needed to work… I was quite lucky that directors were prepared to give me part-time jobs, they weren’t very wonderful jobs, but they were intellectually engaging and enjoyable, and allowed me to work part-time, so that kept me sane and kept me in touch with the field.”

    “The world is getting much better at recognising women, but there’s still not parity. There’s still more room for women, and as it becomes more normal for women to do scientific things more women will come through and play a role, which will be great,” Dame Jocelyn said.

    Inspiring the next generation

    Shivani Bhandari is one of our postdoctoral astronomers who had the opportunity to hear Dame Jocelyn speak while she was in Australia.

    “It was an absolute honour to chair Dame Jocelyn’s colloquium and see her speak enthusiastically about her 50 year old discovery.” Shivani said.

    “Her struggle to pursue research in a male dominated area of study, driven by pure passion for astrophysics, is truly inspiring for female scientists, including myself.”

    4
    Our Postoctoral astronomer Shivani Bhandari with Dame Jocelyn

    Science at breakneck speed

    Dame Jocelyn also had time to reflect on the breakneck speed of modern research.

    “It’s fantastic seeing the technological change being applied to astronomy. The equipment on the Parkes telescope and others around the world is forever improving, and the pace of discovery just gets faster and faster as the equipment gets better. It leaves you a bit breathless, but it’s very exciting,” she said.

    “It’s been magnificent to see so many developments in the field since the original discovery of pulsars fifty years ago. It’s since become a major field of astronomical research, especially here at Parkes.”

    “It’s a very exciting time to be around, it’s fascinating!”

    Dame Jocelyn’s discovery

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    SKA/ASKAP radio telescope at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Mid West region of Western Australia

    So what can we expect these new radio projects to discover? We have no idea, but history tells us that they are almost certain to deliver some major surprises.

    Making these new discoveries may not be so simple. Gone are the days when astronomers could just notice something odd as they browse their tables and graphs.

    Nowadays, astronomers are more likely to be distilling their answers from carefully-posed queries to databases containing petabytes of data. Human brains are just not up to the job of making unexpected discoveries in these circumstances, and instead we will need to develop “learning machines” to help us discover the unexpected.

    With the right tools and careful insight, who knows what we might find.

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:55 am on June 26, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: CSIROscope, , STEM Professionals in Schools partnership   

    From CSIROscope: “Engineers empowering teachers” STEM 

    CSIRO bloc

    From CSIROscope

    26 June 2018
    Amy Macintyre

    1
    A STEM Professionals in Schools partnership in action.

    The STEM Professionals in Schools program partners engineers (and other experts in science, technology, and mathematics), with primary and high school teachers around Australia. Through these partnerships teachers and their students are able to learn more about modern engineering and how scientific principles taught in the classroom are applied in today’s engineering workplaces. The volunteer engineers who participate in the program are also given the opportunity to share their knowledge with the next generation of potential engineers – and have a lot of fun in the process.

    The purpose behind the program is not all fun and games however, as it strives to address the issue that in Australia there is a decline in the number of students participating in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) at school and who are considering careers in STEM. For example, the National Innovation and Science Agenda states that ‘over the next decade an estimated 75 per cent of jobs in the fastest-growing industries will need skills in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM)’. However, student participation in year 12 maths and science subjects is declining, and for science it is at the lowest rate in 20 years. As a result, two objectives of the Australian government are to engage all Australians in science, and build our scientific capability and skills.

    Sharon Allen is the Surface Engineer Manager at Origin Energy, and she has volunteered with the STEM Professionals in Schools program for more than a year. Partnering with Ashgrove State School in Brisbane, QLD, Sharon and her partnered teachers arranged for Sharon to visit the school on six occasions in 2017 to run a variety of activities based on the needs of the teacher and the age of the students.

    2
    Engineer Sharon Allen with students at the Tech Girlz Conference.

    “I worked with the school to identify areas of the curriculum that I had interest and expertise in, so that by simply sharing some of my most fundamental knowledge from my work, I’m able to give examples of how the science lessons taught in the classroom come into play to make an impact in real world situations,” said Sharon.

    “The students love to see someone from outside of the school and were very receptive to what I presented to them. By working with the teacher I could build on what they had already learned in class to extend their knowledge and understanding.”

    Some of the activities included a viscosity experiment with grade three students (measuring the time it takes for a marble to fall through liquids of different viscosities, or the same liquid at different temperatures), making models of molecules with grade five students (creating water, methane, nitrogen, and salt from the elements from the periodic table), and Sharon also gave a presentation on energy and electricity to grade six students.

    3
    A STEM Professionals in Schools partnership in action.

    “The preparation for these visits only takes up a fraction of my time, and the visits themselves can be arranged to suit my schedule, so I find the program quite flexible and easy to be a part of. More than that – it’s a welcome change of pace from my usual work. I’m fortunate in that my employer is very supportive of voluntary work and offers employees paid leave to undertake voluntary activities. For me, the sense of accomplishment in inspiring young people, particularly girls, to be interested – fascinated even! – by science has been very rewarding.”

    Despite research showing the females and males perform at a similar level of ability in maths and science subjects[1], there is a higher proportion of male graduates in STEM related fields than female graduates[2]. Gender imbalance presents a concern for the development of a more robust STEM career path and ultimately STEM related industries. Sharon said that although there seems to have been a shift in recent years in the historically male-dominated engineering fields, more change is needed to put engineering on the radar of young girls.

    “I always enjoyed maths, science and problem solving, and fortunately I had a great maths teacher who made maths fun and inspired me to work hard. Long story short, I find myself today in a job that has taken me all the way around the world and across a number of industries from the pharmaceutical sector to the energy sector, the oil and gas industry, defence and university sector,” said Sharon.

    “Engineering is a fabulous career option full of interesting challenges and problems. Women have a lot to offer in this space and I think standing in front of these girls (and boys) and telling them where engineering can take you does a lot to break down any misconceptions they might have about the job, as well as showing them what it has to offer.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    SKA/ASKAP radio telescope at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Mid West region of Western Australia

    So what can we expect these new radio projects to discover? We have no idea, but history tells us that they are almost certain to deliver some major surprises.

    Making these new discoveries may not be so simple. Gone are the days when astronomers could just notice something odd as they browse their tables and graphs.

    Nowadays, astronomers are more likely to be distilling their answers from carefully-posed queries to databases containing petabytes of data. Human brains are just not up to the job of making unexpected discoveries in these circumstances, and instead we will need to develop “learning machines” to help us discover the unexpected.

    With the right tools and careful insight, who knows what we might find.

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 8:27 pm on June 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Australia in Space, CSIROscope, Kimberley Clayfield,   

    From CSIROscope: Women in STEM: “Fostering space start-ups to get us to the stars | Kimberley Clayfield” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From CSIROscope

    12 June 2018
    Tanya Griffiths

    1
    Dr Kimberley Clayfield, our Executive Manager of Space Sciences and Technology.

    As Australia’s national science agency, we have a long and accomplished history in supporting and developing the space sector. Now, with Australia starting its journey to build a national space agency, we’d like to introduce you to some of our experts in the sector. From awards to supporting space start-ups, Dr Kimberley Clayfield has dedicated her career to space.

    When Kimberley Clayfield began reading science fiction novels as a kid, it wasn’t just the stories that drew her in. Instead, it was a sense of wonder.

    “I was fascinated by the vast unknown expanses of space. The excitement of using cutting-edge technologies to explore undiscovered aspects of the Universe has never left me,” she says.

    It’s a fascination Kimberley has managed to channel into a successful career. So successful, in fact, that in 2014 she was awarded the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics Lawrence Sperry Award, an honour bestowed by the international aerospace sector’s largest professional association. She was the first Australian recipient of the award; the list of previous winners includes a former Apollo Mission Controller, a previous NASA Chief Technologist and the first American woman in space.

    Awards aside, Kimberley’s aerospace career has been broad, spanning national space policy development, Earth observation, space situational awareness, the international Square Kilometre Array radio-telescope project, and satellite technology development programs.

    SKA Square Kilometer Array

    “CSIRO has developed advanced methodologies for using satellite data in a huge variety of ways,” she says, noting projects like a collaboration with Geoscience Australia on the Sentinel Hotspots live bushfire tracking application, or the development of Pastures from Space, which helps Australian farmers optimise their pasture productivity and improve the feed management of livestock.

    Today, as our Executive Manager of Space Sciences and Technology, Kimberley’s role combines space strategy, program management and technology development. She’s also actively involved in supporting Australia’s burgeoning space industry, and recently concluded a three-year term as Chair of Engineers Australia’s National Committee on Space Engineering.

    “It’s a really exciting time of growth across the sector” she says.

    One of those growth areas is the field of space start-ups. Five years ago there were perhaps a handful of space start-ups in Australia. Now there are dozens, including Cuberider, Fleet Space, FluroSat, Gilmour Space Technologies, Myriota, Neumann Space and Saber Astronautics.

    “Australia’s space start-ups have raised over $30m in venture capital over the past 18 months, and are continuing to grow.”

    Given that space start-ups face both business and technology development challenges, Kimberley has been involved in fostering the growth of space start-ups through increased collaboration.

    “We started with a workshop focused on building closer R&D connections between CSIRO and the emerging new space industry. This stimulated a lot of interest and we have recently followed up with another workshop aimed at fostering broader collaborations between space start-ups, SMEs and the key stakeholders across the wider Australian space sector.

    Kimberley finds time to focus on another collaboration, this time for the Defence Materials Technology Centre.

    The independent not-for-profit organisation operates collaborative innovation programs in the Australian defence and national security context. Kimberley is Program Leader of the recently established High Altitude Sensor Systems Program, currently a portfolio of four projects focused on the development of new sensor systems and related technologies for small satellites. Each project team includes partners from both the research sector and industry. While the results will assist Defence with its future space capabilities, civilian benefits will also follow.

    “All of these projects will advance the Australian space industry and the development of sovereign space capabilities for Australia,” says Kimberley.

    It is these types of projects where space technology can assist with many of the challenges we face in Australia, including climate change mitigation, environmental management, agricultural biosecurity plus societal benefits.

    Kimberley is also keen for the education sector to embrace a deeper level of involvement in space sciences.

    “We need to actively engage Australia’s young talent in space activities through STEM outreach. Fostering and nurturing the ideas and energy that the next generation can bring to the sector is key to Australia’s success,” she says.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    SKA/ASKAP radio telescope at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Mid West region of Western Australia

    So what can we expect these new radio projects to discover? We have no idea, but history tells us that they are almost certain to deliver some major surprises.

    Making these new discoveries may not be so simple. Gone are the days when astronomers could just notice something odd as they browse their tables and graphs.

    Nowadays, astronomers are more likely to be distilling their answers from carefully-posed queries to databases containing petabytes of data. Human brains are just not up to the job of making unexpected discoveries in these circumstances, and instead we will need to develop “learning machines” to help us discover the unexpected.

    With the right tools and careful insight, who knows what we might find.

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 3:57 pm on June 5, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CSIROscope, Social robots: supporting children on the autism spectrum   

    From CSIROscope: “Social robots: supporting children on the autism spectrum” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From CSIROscope

    5 June 2018
    Sian Stringer

    1
    Kaspar and Paro, two of the social robots we’re trialling to support children with autism.

    For some children on the autism spectrum, developing academic skills, as well as communication and social interaction skills can be a significant challenge.

    Children with autism may sometimes be more engaged or at ease when interacting with technology, so digital tech is often used to support their education. While it’s generally considered safe and effective, there’s still a challenge to make sure children develop skills that are useable in the real world – not just in the virtual world.

    This is where a little robot called Kaspar comes in.

    Meet Kaspar, the friendly robot

    Kaspar is a programmable, childlike robot developed by the University of Hertsfordshire in England for children with autism, and researchers from our Australian e-Health Research Centre have been trialling him in partnership with the University of New South Wales.

    Our project lead, Dr David Silvera, says that while Kaspar might look a little unnerving to an adult, he’s actually appealing to children – and his limited facial expression helps them feel more comfortable with him.

    “This is important, as we’re looking at whether he can help students develop their social and communication skills,” David says.

    David and his team have written software modules for Kaspar. A therapist then sets the little robot up to act out certain behaviours or social situations, and children practice those situations with the robot – with the goal of helping them learn how to deal with similar social situations in real life.

    Kaspar is one of four social robots David and his team have been trialling as tools in education and therapy, partnering with UNSW, Murray Bridge High School in SA, and Autism Spectrum Australia (ASPECT). The other robots include Robotis, Nao, and Paro – Paro is a furry baby seal lookalike that responds to touch and that children can find relaxing.

    What’s next for Kaspar and friends?

    We’re still evaluating our results, but so far results suggest social robots like Kaspar could be effective tools in supporting education and therapy for children on the spectrum.

    David says children who have interacted with the social robots for a while have started to see improvements in verbal communication, participation, and social interaction – and most importantly, we’re starting to see some of this transfer to children’s interactions with other people.

    We’ll keep collecting evidence and modifying the programs, so the robots are as beneficial as possible and easy for teachers and therapists to intergrate as part of their everyday classes and sessions, in the hope of making this technology as accessible as possible for schools around Australia someday.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    SKA/ASKAP radio telescope at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Mid West region of Western Australia

    So what can we expect these new radio projects to discover? We have no idea, but history tells us that they are almost certain to deliver some major surprises.

    Making these new discoveries may not be so simple. Gone are the days when astronomers could just notice something odd as they browse their tables and graphs.

    Nowadays, astronomers are more likely to be distilling their answers from carefully-posed queries to databases containing petabytes of data. Human brains are just not up to the job of making unexpected discoveries in these circumstances, and instead we will need to develop “learning machines” to help us discover the unexpected.

    With the right tools and careful insight, who knows what we might find.

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 11:56 am on June 1, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: CSIRO's Project Providence, CSIROscope, Eyes and legs in the Amazon: protecting biodiversity using data, The red robot roaming the rainforest, The robots at work   

    From CSIROscope: “Eyes and legs in the Amazon: protecting biodiversity using data” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From CSIROscope

    1 June 2018
    Ketan Joshi

    If you’ve been paying attention to the news, there’s little chance you’ve missed headlines about the latest applications of big data – there’s the blockchain, and driverless cars and artificial intelligence.

    Protecting biodiversity might not be the first thing that comes to mind, but our Data61 team is dedicated to using data science to solve pressing problems, and protecting biodiversity is a venture that grows in importance every single day.

    Our long-running project in the Amazon Rainforest, Project Providence, is entering its final phase. We’ve teamed up scientists from Brazil and Spain to deploy a remote monitoring system, and our experts have just stepped off the plane from a trip testing the deployment of the network. Providence will involve a continuous monitoring system that will act as the eyes and ears of the Amazonian forest by using a wireless network of sensors in the Amazon to monitor the activity of species including jaguars, monkeys, bats, birds, reptiles and even dolphins.

    In addition to Providence, our robotics and autonomous systems experts tagged along, testing the capability of a new, six-legged robot to navigate autonomously in the rainforest.

    1
    Some of the critters snapped in the Amazon by our robotics crew.

    Providence and its eyes – peering at biodiversity

    Phase one of Providence commenced in December 2016 – the team was granted nearly $2 million in research funding from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, the iconic American foundation established by Intel co-founder Gordon E. Moore and his wife Betty. The plan was to use our technological innovation to monitor biodiversity in the Amazon on a scale that hasn’t been seen before, and use multiple technologies including acoustics, visual and thermal imaging to do it.

    2
    One of the sensors installed in the Amazon rainforest, as part of the Providence project

    So what’s happened in the year and a half since then? Our most recent trip was to deploy and flick the on switch on our sensors. Dr Paulo Borges, the project leader for our component of the partnership, said there are ten locations, each several kilometres away from each other. We’re in the process of getting these nodes up and running, and we’re already receiving data from the network.

    With the help of local experts from the heart of the Amazon forest, the team was climbing up trees, installing solar panels with batteries, and then activating cameras and other sensors. It was a true field trip using boats and hikes to get to really remote areas. The cameras detect movement and take a photograph and lets us know if it’s significant, like an animal passing by.

    “No matter how advanced technology is, we can never underestimate the challenges around the heat, humidity, density and vastness of a rainforest, particularly the Amazon. The area is particularly challenging because it is known as a varzea region, which is exposed to 10 meters of flooding every year. It is amazing to see how the fauna and local communities adapt to these circumstances,” Paulo said.

    The red robot roaming the rainforest

    A network of sensors in the rainforest is, by nature, fixed to a single location. But during this trip to the Amazon, we wanted to check if autonomous legged robots to help solve this challenge and give us a wider view of the area. To get around that we’ve developed a range of legged, wheeled and flying robots (read about them here). One of our mechatronics engineers, Ryan Steindl, travelled with the Providence crew to the Amazon and tested out his new robot in the field.


    “We wanted to test our technology in a real, remote environment. We put it through its paces, making it walk over new terrain and seeing if it could move autonomously in that new terrain towards a targeted area,” Ryan said.

    Ryan and his bots discovered some interesting nuances of navigation in the Amazon. “The robot was able to be deployed by a single person in the field – a rarity in field robotics. We want stability in an environment where you can’t necessarily see the true foot holds the robot will use,” Ryan said. “In the forest, how does a robot distinguish the difference between a small sapling you can push over and a vine that will entangle you?”

    3
    Ryan’s six-legged Amazon bot traverses the forest

    Our next steps are to improve our ability to be sure footed in situations where we don’t necessarily know the environment we are stepping in. This will ultimately increase our speed and ability to climb over extreme terrain.

    Ryan’s red robot and Paulo’s complex sensor network are two excellent examples of how we use science, technology and engineering to solve pressing problems. In this case, the serious challenge of biodiversity in the Amazon can be partly met through collaborative efforts, and thorough, real-world testing.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    SKA/ASKAP radio telescope at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Mid West region of Western Australia

    So what can we expect these new radio projects to discover? We have no idea, but history tells us that they are almost certain to deliver some major surprises.

    Making these new discoveries may not be so simple. Gone are the days when astronomers could just notice something odd as they browse their tables and graphs.

    Nowadays, astronomers are more likely to be distilling their answers from carefully-posed queries to databases containing petabytes of data. Human brains are just not up to the job of making unexpected discoveries in these circumstances, and instead we will need to develop “learning machines” to help us discover the unexpected.

    With the right tools and careful insight, who knows what we might find.

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 9:44 am on May 23, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CSIROscope, Meet Our Robot Family,   

    From CSIROscope: “Meet Our Robot Family” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From CSIROscope

    23 May 2018
    Ketan Joshi

    1
    We’re developing robotic systems that help humans perform dangerous tasks, and expanding the Australian robotics industry. Above, Weaver. No image credit.

    The family of robots that live at our Data61 are incredibly diverse. They’ve got legs, wheels, cameras, sensors, fins, blades and magnets. They sense the world, navigate it autonomously, and they traverse places too dangerous and dirty for human work. They’re as varied as the challenges they’re designed to resolve, but the common DNA is a focus on the use of cutting-edge data science.

    This isn’t something we go at alone—our partners include: DARPA (Defence Advanced Research Projects Agency), Rockwell Collins, Boeing, Woodside, Queensland University of Technology, and many other government, universities and enterprises. We recently announced the Sixth Wave Alliance, to develop a national robotics R&D strategy and create the critical mass required to address large-scale Australian and international challenges using robotics technologies.

    This week, we’re also at the International Conference on Robotics (ICRA 2018), where we’re showcasing the best of our bots.


    Meet the family below, and read more about our robotics research here.

    Machines that see – Sensing and mapping the world

    Sucking up information from the world is a capability we fleshy humans take for granted. Data61’s robotic and autonomous devices are particularly good at sensing and mapping – two capabilities that are of high importance for modern robotics and industries like mining, exploration and environmental conservation.

    Hovermap and Zebedee – moving without GPSs

    Drones are increasingly common as consumer goods, but they’re reliant on direct access to global position satellites (GPS).

    Hovermap is a 3D mapping system that uses LIDAR (light detection and ranging) technology, combined with Data61’s proprietary Simultaneous Localisation and Mapping (SLAM) solution. Hovermap works in conjunction with a UAV (uncrewed autonomous vehicle), and can map both indoor and outdoor locations without relying on GPS.

    2
    Zebedee, our high-accuracy 3D laser mapping technology, was commercialised and is already being used around the world by 25 multinational organisations. It was recently trialled by the International Atomic Energy Agency in nuclear safeguards inspections.

    Camazotz – the bat god tech

    Camazotz, named after a Mayan bat god, is a small, portable device that is used to monitor flying foxes across Australia, helping ecologists understand and predict the spread of disease. The Wireless Ad hoc System for Positioning (WASP) uses similar tags to track vehicles and mine workers relative to reference nodes – assisting with safety and boosting productivity.

    Legged Robots

    You’ve probably seen videos of animal robots doing clever tasks and being shared with a tone of alarm. Legged robots aren’t reason for alarm – these systems are well suited to navigating environments that are too dangerous or dirty for safe human work, such as a chemical spill in a plant or the ceiling beam in a factory.

    Gizmo

    3
    Gizmo dancing

    Gizmo is Data61’s newest bot – a small, smooth hexapod designed for versatility and small spaces. One of the motivating applications for this robot is to inspect and map ceiling cavity and underfloor-type confined spaces.

    Zee

    4
    Zee

    Zee is a prototype hexapod robot equipped with a streaming camera sensor and a real-time 3D scanning LIDAR. You’ve probably seen Zee around – it’s an older machine but still an excellent demonstration of six-legged robotics.

    Weaver

    5
    Zee’s big sister, Weaver, features five joints per leg and 30 degrees of freedom. Weaver can self-stabilise through ‘exteroceptive’ sensing – enabling the robot to walk up gradients of 30°, and remain stable on inclines up to 50°.

    MaX

    6

    MaX (Multi-legged autonomous explorer) is even bigger – 2.25m tall when standing up straight. But MaX only weighs 60kg; around 5 to 20 times lighter than comparable robots. MaX is a research vehicle designed to help our scientists understand how to traverse and explore challenging indoor and outdoor environments.

    Magnapod

    7

    Magnapods are Data61’s wall-climbing, electro-magnetic inspection robots, useful in confined space inspection tasks and capable of carrying a 10 kilogram sensor payload.

    You can read more about the scientific goals of our legged robot research program here.

    Autonomous vehicles

    Creating systems that can navigate and respond without human intervention is a key component in removing the human element from tasks that are dangerous or poorly suited for human control. We’ve developed several ground vehicles normally used in industrial environments that can operate without human intervention, including the Gator, the load haul dump vehicle and the 20 tonne hot metal carrier.

    8

    Our Science Rover enabled the complicated process of satellite calibration – the autonomous vehicle collects measurements at the same time an Earth observation satellite passes overhead – the two datasets are compared, and the satellite is calibrated. Our underwater autonomous vehicle, Starbug, uses underwater sensor networks to locate itself (GPS signals cannot be used underwater), enabling smart underwater data collection for protection and tracking of ecosystems.

    Our family of robots is, as you can see, pretty diverse. It’s the broad nature of the challenges they’re addressing that gives them these shapes, from small to big, wheeled to legged.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
    stem
    Stem Education Coalition

    SKA/ASKAP radio telescope at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Mid West region of Western Australia

    So what can we expect these new radio projects to discover? We have no idea, but history tells us that they are almost certain to deliver some major surprises.

    Making these new discoveries may not be so simple. Gone are the days when astronomers could just notice something odd as they browse their tables and graphs.

    Nowadays, astronomers are more likely to be distilling their answers from carefully-posed queries to databases containing petabytes of data. Human brains are just not up to the job of making unexpected discoveries in these circumstances, and instead we will need to develop “learning machines” to help us discover the unexpected.

    With the right tools and careful insight, who knows what we might find.

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: