Tagged: CSIRO Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • richardmitnick 2:31 pm on November 8, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "New digital Ag research station to help future proof our farms", Boorowa Agriculture Research Station, CSIRO   

    From CSIRO: “New digital Ag research station to help future proof our farms” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation -CSIRO

    09 Nov 2019
    Kate Langford
    Communication Manager – Agriculture & Food
    Phone +61262183459
    Mobile +61472845877

    Drones, remote monitoring and advanced data analytics will provide scientists unprecedented accuracy in studying crops and farming systems at the new Boorowa Agriculture Research Station, opened by Australia’s national science agency CSIRO today.

    1
    At Boorowa, research will be conducted into new varieties of wheat, canola, legumes and pastures that can withstand warmer and drier conditions, such as those predicted for the future.

    2
    Purpose built workshops and storage facilities at Boorowa Agricultural Research Station

    The digitally-enabled farm in southwestern NSW is equipped with 100 temperature and humidity probes, 72 soil moisture probes, and six weather stations to monitor experiments in crop science, agronomy and farming systems across its 290 hectares.

    It took four years to design and build, and is an $11.5 million investment in the future of Australian farming.

    Director of CSIRO Agriculture and Food Dr Michiel van Lookeren Campagne said it was more important than ever to advance innovative science to build resilient agriculture systems and increase food production.

    “Our agriculture industries are facing major challenges, especially with the current drought,” Dr van Lookeren Campagne said.

    “Here at Boorowa, we’ll be trialling new varieties of wheat, canola, legumes and pastures that can withstand warmer and drier conditions, such as those predicted for the future.

    “We’ll also continue to research the best farming practices to manage our fragile soils and get the most from every drop of water.”

    “The better we can understand how plants grow and produce in a real farming environment – not just the lab – the more we can help Australian agriculture meet its $100 billion target.”

    The new research station replaces CSIRO’s Ginninderra Experimental Station, which was established just outside Canberra in 1958.

    “It was at Ginninderra that we field-tested a range of high yielding and disease resistant wheat varieties such as Lawson, Paterson, Gordon, Tennant, Brennan and Dennis. We also refined our high-fibre BARLEYmax and ultra-low gluten Kebari® barley,” Dr van Lookeren Campagne said.

    “With this new state-of-the-art facility at Boorowa, it’s exciting to imagine what we can achieve.”

    The research station was developed with support from the Grains Research and Development Corporation and the Science and Industry Endowment Fund .

    B-roll footage for media is available for download.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 3:58 pm on November 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CSIRO, The devastating Ug99 strain of the wheat stem rust fungus   

    From CSIRO: “Cereal killer’s deadly touch could lead to new wheat threat” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation -CSIRO

    08 Nov 2019

    Kate Langford
    Communication Manager – Agriculture & Food
    Phone +61262183459
    Mobile +61472845877

    Scientists have uncovered the origins of the world’s deadliest strain of cereal rust disease which threatens global food security.

    1
    Wheat stem rust. Credit: Dr Zacharias Pretorius ©Dr Zacharias Pretorius

    Researchers from Australia’s national science agency, CSIRO, together with partners in the US and South Africa have solved a 20-year-old mystery with findings published today in Nature Communications.

    Their works shows that the devastating Ug99 strain of the wheat stem rust fungus (named for its discovery and naming in Uganda in 1999) was created when different rust strains simply fused to create a new hybrid strain.

    This process is called somatic hybridisation and enables the fungi to merge their cells together and exchange genetic material without going through the complex sexual reproduction cycle.

    The study found half of Ug99’s genetic material came from a strain that has been in southern Africa for more than 100 years and also occurs in Australia.

    The discovery shows that other crop-destroying rust strains could hybridise in other parts of the world, and scientists found evidence of this in their study.

    It also means Ug99 could once again exchange genetic material with different pathogen strains to create a whole new enemy.

    While it was proposed that rust strains could hybridise based on laboratory studies in the 1960s, this new research provides the first clear molecular evidence that this process generates new strains in nature.

    Rusts are a common fungal disease of plants. Globally they destroy over $1 billion worth of crops each year. Australian crops have largely been protected for the past 60 years by the breeding of rust-resistant crop varieties.

    Group Leader at CSIRO Dr Melania Figueroa said Ug99 is considered one of the most threatening of all rusts as it has managed to overcome many of the stem rust resistance genes used in wheat varieties and has evolved many variants.

    “While outbreaks of Ug99 have so far been restricted to Africa and the Middle East, it has been estimated that a nationwide outbreak here could cost Australia up to $500 million in lost production and fungicide use in the first year,” Dr Figueroa said.

    “There is some good news, however, as the more you know your enemy, the more equipped you are to fight against it.

    “Knowing how these pathogens come about means we can better predict how they are likely to change in the future and better determine which resistance genes can be bred into wheat varieties to give long-lasting protection.”

    Earlier this year, CSIRO worked with the University of Minnesota and the 2Blades Foundation to achieve good results in wheat resistance by stacking five resistance genes into the one wheat plant to combat wheat stem rust.

    This latest research is the result of a collaboration between scientists from CSIRO, the University of Minnesota, University of the Free State, and Australian National University.

    The breakthrough came as Dr Figueroa’s group was sequencing Ug99 (then at the University of Minnesota) and at the same time a CSIRO team led by Dr Peter Dodds was sequencing Pgt 21 in Australia.

    Pgt21 is a rust strain that was first seen in South Africa in the 1920s and believed to have been carried to Australia in the 1950s by wind currents. When the two groups compared results, they found the two pathogens share an almost identical nucleus and therefore half of their DNA.

    “This discovery will make it possible to develop better methods to screen for varieties with strong resistance to disease,” Dr Figueroa said.

    “There was an element of serendipity at play in this work. We never expected that Ug99 and an Australian isolate might be related but only through a multi-continental collaboration was it possible to make the connections needed to achieve this discovery.”

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:36 pm on October 31, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Australian innovation adds new sheen to old masters", , , CSIRO   

    From CSIRO: “Australian innovation adds new sheen to old masters” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation -CSIRO

    31 Oct 2019

    Ali Green
    Communication Advisor
    Phone +61 3 9545 8098
    Mobile +61 406 146 523

    1

    The new varnish resin is the result of a collaboration between Australia’s oldest and most visited gallery, the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) and CSIRO. The product has now been commercialised by Melbourne chemical manufacturer Boron Molecular, a former CSIRO spin-out.

    The synthetic resin, called MS3, is the latest generation of a synthetic varnish that was designed specifically for conservation and cultural heritage applications. After extensive testing at the NGV, the resin will now be trialled by conservators working in several of the world’s major art institutions.

    Michael Gallagher, the Sherman Fairchild Chairman of Paintings Conservation at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, welcomed the collaborative project, which brought together specialists from the diverse fields of painting conservation and polymer chemistry to address an important need in the paintings conservation profession.

    “Thoughtful, fully informed research is essential to addressing the practical challenges of responsibly conserving paintings for the future,” Mr Gallagher said.

    “The addition of a stable, affordable, and aesthetically appropriate varnish is potentially a major contribution.”

    CSIRO’s Leader of Materials for Energy and the Environment, Dr Deborah Lau, said using the emerging technology of ‘flow chemistry’ allowed the team to develop the resin in a safer, cleaner, more efficient way than traditional chemical manufacturing. This in turn delivered improved colour, chemical stability, and consistency between batches.

    “Flow chemistry is a cutting-edge technology that allowed us to develop a bespoke fine-art resin with minimal discolouration or cracking over time,” Dr Lau said.

    “The resin provides a protective coating together with enhancing the visual aesthetic, and can be removed without causing any damage to the underlying paint layers. This means the resin can be re-applied to artworks and protect them for generations to come.

    “For a niche market like fine art preservation and restoration, lowering the costs of production meant creating an opportunity for an Australian small business like Boron Molecular to step in and scale-up the resin for commercialisation.”

    Carl Villis, Senior Conservator of Paintings at the NGV, said that MS3 has been warmly received by the international paintings conservation profession because an earlier and much loved version of synthetic resin, known as MS2A, had gone out of production in 2015. With the new collaboration, CSIRO and the NGV saw an opportunity to further improve what was already the best product out there.

    “MS3 is clearer and more consistent in its appearance than the earlier resin as a direct result of the flow chemistry process employed by CSIRO’s scientists,” Mr Villis said.

    “We approached CSIRO to see if they could develop a resin for us, and we were so encouraged by the results we were seeing that we sent samples to galleries around the world for them to trial.

    “The feedback so far has been very positive, and we have had the opportunity to use the varnish in recent important conservation treatments of works in our own collection, notably Rembrandt’s Two Old Men Disputing and van Dyck’s portrait, Philip Herbert, the 4th Earl of Pembroke.”

    Director of Business Development at Boron Molecular, Dr Oliver Hutt, said that working with CSIRO on cutting-edge technology like flow chemistry has allowed Boron to broaden the scope of their business and upscale their innovative products to compete in the global marketplace.

    “Using flow helps us get our products to market more rapidly, both here and overseas,” Dr Hutt said.

    “The revolutionary process also means more control and higher quality material as the chemical process is refined compared to traditional large-scale production methods. This control translates to less material waste and better environmental outcomes.”

    The resin was developed at CSIRO’s world-class flow chemistry facility in Melbourne, FloWorks, which was officially opened by Australia’s Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Finkel, last week.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 12:46 pm on October 30, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Students tackle Australia's challenges with science", CSIRO, Making STEM careers more visible and relatable., STEM professionals and parliamentarians head to classrooms around the country today   

    From CSIRO: “Students tackle Australia’s challenges with science” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation -CSIRO

    30 Oct 2019
    Jessica Hildyard

    School students are being recruited to help solve some of Australia’s greatest challenges, as STEM professionals and parliamentarians head to classrooms around the country today.

    Students at more than 300 schools from across the country will hear directly from professionals who tackle national challenges, ranging from climate change to our ageing population to food security, as part of their work in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics).

    The annual event is part of the STEM in Schools program, run by Australia’s national science agency, CSIRO, to make STEM careers more visible and relatable.

    1
    Rama Rao and Pamela Taylor at Sirius College, Melbourne, during STEM in Schools in 2017.

    2
    Regina Coeli Primary School Sydney during 2017 STEM in Schools event.

    3
    CSIRO Education Advisor Peter Poon teacher Mieke Roodenburg with students from Redlands Junior School at the 2017 STEM in Schools event. ©Daniel Boud

    CSIRO’s Chief Scientist Dr Cathy Foley said Australia’s future prosperity will need a workforce with high STEM literacy.

    “Science creates new industries, new jobs and shapes the minds and aspirations of our future leaders,” Dr Foley said.

    “We can’t think about science as something which is locked away in a lab; it connects and drives everything we touch and do.

    “It’s also pretty exciting when your work can have an enormous impact and make a difference in people’s lives and around the world, which is what I love about working in science and at CSIRO.”

    Minister for Industry, Science and Technology, the Hon Karen Andrews MP, said studying STEM subjects could lead to a career in anything from astronomy and space science to biology and even politics.

    “The skills I have acquired as an engineer have served me well, from the floor of power stations I worked in, to the floor of the House of Representatives,” Minister Andrews said.

    “STEM skills can be the launch-pad of many careers and will also be essential in many others, so we need to inspire all students to take up and stick with STEM subjects.”

    CSIRO’s Director of Education and Outreach Mary Mulcahy said as the national science agency, CSIRO has a proud history of delivering innovative learning opportunities to inspire the STEM leaders of the future.

    “Connecting students to real life STEM experiences is an important part of helping students see their path from the classroom to solving national challenges with their work,” Ms Mulcahy said.

    “STEM professionals can make subjects come to life by sharing their work and their excitement about what they do.

    “We are calling for more STEM professionals and teachers to join our STEM Professionals in Schools program.”

    For more information about the STEM Professionals in Schools program visit http://www.csiro.au/STEM-Professionals-in-Schools

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:24 am on October 21, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Businesses to benefit from Australia’s first flow chemistry lab", CSIRO, FloWorks Centre for Industrial Flow Chemistry   

    From Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation CSIRO: “Businesses to benefit from Australia’s first flow chemistry lab” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation -CSIRO

    21 Oct 2019
    Ali Green
    Communication Advisor
    Phone +61 3 9545 8098
    Mobile +61 406 146 523

    Small businesses will have more opportunities to enter and innovate industries like hydrogen energy, pharmaceuticals, and agriculture with the opening of Australia’s first flow chemistry facility in Melbourne today.

    1
    Flow chemistry uses far less solvents and energy and discards far less waste material into the environment than traditional batch chemistry. ©Nick Pitsas

    2
    Catalytic Static Mixers could hold the key for a technological breakthrough in hydrogen energy. ©Nick Pitsas

    3
    Catalytic Static Mixers could hold the key for a technological breakthrough in hydrogen energy. ©Nick Pitsas

    Australia’s national science agency, CSIRO, officially opened its FloWorks Centre for Industrial Flow Chemistry in the presence of Australia’s Chief Scientist Dr Alan Finkel and representatives from a number of small and medium business partners.

    Located in the heart of the Australian Manufacturing and Materials Precinct in Clayton, Victoria, FloWorks provides cutting edge research into flow chemistry capability, making it more accessible to the chemical manufacturing industry and solving challenges associated with developing Australia’s future industries and jobs.

    Flow chemistry is a form of chemical manufacturing that is cleaner, smarter and more efficient. The benefits of using the flow process include reduced reaction times and plant space, which equate to less energy cost, more efficient processes, reduced waste and a much safer environment.

    The smaller set-up used in flow chemistry reduces barriers to entry for small and medium businesses in what would otherwise be capital-intensive industries.

    Dr Christian Hornung, a senior research scientist with CSIRO and Director of the new centre, said FloWorks provides a world-leading research facility and innovation centre for chemistry.

    “FloWorks develops scalable and safe chemical processes using an emerging technology called continuous flow chemistry,” Dr Horning said.

    “The Centre provides a collaborative space at the cutting-edge of modern chemistry, where we can work with Australian businesses to improve their processes, cut costs and reduce waste.

    “Our world-class researchers at FloWorks can work with partners to update their current chemical processes, including from laboratory discovery to continuous flow production scale; from inefficient batch procedures to continuous processes; and offer in-house training for industrial collaborators on our state-of-the-art flow chemistry equipment.”

    Australia’s Chief Scientist, Dr Alan Finkel, said the FloWorks Centre will allow Australian-based researchers to use its capabilities to support emerging renewable hydrogen technology development.

    “One of our greatest challenges is to move to a decarbonised economy, and hydrogen has the potential to play an important role in this transition,” Dr Finkel said.

    “Maximising the efficiency in both production and use of hydrogen is crucially important. Improvements depend largely on the efficiency of the catalysis. Flow chemistry could be used to improve efficiency, and FloWorks has developed its own catalysis processes in pursuit of this goal.”

    Since 2009, CSIRO has worked with small businesses through to multi-nationals using flow chemistry to manufacture innovative new materials like RAFT and other high-performance polymers, Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs), pharmaceuticals and various fine chemicals and specialty materials.

    Dr Oliver Hutt is Director of Business Development at Boron Molecular, which was created more than 20 years ago to commercialise CSIRO science, and now uses flow chemistry at their Melbourne plant to manufacture fine chemicals for Australian and international clients.

    “CSIRO helped us integrate flow chemistry into our operations. We use our unit to develop a number of processes or convert them from batch to flow,” Dr Hutt said.

    “Examples of the types of technologies we’ve commercialised using flow chemistry include poly-aniline (PANI), a high-performance electroactive polymer used in coating applications, and a suite of Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs), next generation high-surface area, porous materials used for applications like gas storage and water treatment,” he said.

    FloWorks is open to businesses of all sizes interested in working with CSIRO’s world-class experts to create value using flow chemistry.

    This research is supported by the Science and Industry Endowment Fund.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:33 pm on March 7, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "Indigenous STEM Awards winners passionate about innovation through culture", CSIRO, Winners List   

    From Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation -CSIRO: “Indigenous STEM Awards winners passionate about innovation through culture” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation -CSIRO

    07 Mar 2019

    Emma Sugget
    Communication Advisor
    Phone +61738335512
    Mobile +61459876247
    emma.sugget@csiro.au

    Ali Green
    Communication Advisor
    Phone +61 3 9545 8098
    Mobile +61 406 146 523
    Ali.Green@csiro.au

    A partnership between the BHP Foundation and CSIRO, the Indigenous STEM Awards recognise the achievements of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander STEM professionals and students as well as schools, teachers and mentors working in Indigenous STEM Education.

    Associate Lecturer at Macquarie University and designer of Torres Strait Virtual Reality, Rhett Loban, received the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander STEM Professional Career Achievement Award.

    Torres Strait Virtual Reality is a virtual reality game to highlight the unique traditions and history of the Torres Strait Islander people.

    The game illustrates environmental knowledge, astronomy, stories and cultural practices specific to the Torres Strait Islands.

    Rhett, a Torres Strait Islander, is passionate about using new technology and ways of learning in schools and universities.

    “There isn’t a lot of digital media out there in terms of Indigenous content, particularly for Torres Strait Islander content,” he said.

    “Through participation and recognition of Indigenous peoples working in STEM, everyone can benefit and learn from each other to power innovation.

    “I really enjoy using new and digital media within education. At Macquarie University we are setting up a virtual reality lab and looking how we might use virtual reality in schools and universities.”

    Taylah Griffin , winner of the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Tertiary Student STEM Achievement Award is a proud Gangulu woman who grew up in Gordonvale in Far North Queensland.

    She recently graduated with a Bachelor of Electrical and Aerospace Engineering (Honours) at the Queensland University of Technology (QUT) and works for Boeing Defence Australia as a Graduate Systems Engineer.

    “My love for both my culture, and for STEM, are my motivations,” she said.

    “I’m the first Indigenous person to graduate with Honours in Electrical and Aerospace Engineering, and the first Indigenous female to graduate with any engineering degree at QUT.”

    “The future job market will be led by STEM and currently, less than one per cent of Indigenous students are studying STEM at university.

    “If we don’t put a spotlight on Indigenous excellence and promote STEM to young Indigenous Australians, then the gap will continue to grow.”

    Areyonga School won the School Award for their bilingual two-way science program.

    The school works closely with a community of Elders who share their incredibly valuable traditional ecological knowledge with staff and students.

    Each of the winners will have a presentation in their home communities throughout March and April.

    The Indigenous STEM Award program is part of the Indigenous STEM Education Project, managed by CSIRO and funded by BHP Foundation.

    The Indigenous STEM Education Project aims to increase participation of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM).

    Winners List
    The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander STEM Professional Career Achievement Award
    Rhett Loban, Macquarie University, New South Wales.

    The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander STEM Professional Early Career Award
    Tui Nolan, University of Technology Sydney, New South Wales.

    The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Tertiary Student STEM Achievement Award
    Taylah Griffin, Queensland University of Technology, Queensland.

    The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Secondary Student STEM Achievement Award
    Jordan Salmon, Clancy Catholic College, New South Wales

    Jordan Griffiths, Seaton High School, South Australia.
    School Award
    Areyonga School, Northern Territory.
    Teacher Award
    Markus Honnef, Innisfail State College, Queensland.

    STEM Champion Award
    Marcus Lacey, Gumurr Marthakal Rangers, Northern Territory.

    The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Student Science Award
    Deklan, Paralowie R-12 School, South Australia
    Sha-Kira Austin, Byron Bay High School, New South Wales.

    The Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Student Maths Award
    Stacey and Renee Edwards, Mount St Bernard College, Queensland
    Lara Riley, Newton Moore Senior High School, Western Australia

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 9:18 am on February 26, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: "SKA’s Infrastructure consortia complete their detailed design work for the SKA sites", , , , , CSIRO, , SARAO,   

    From SKA: “SKA’s Infrastructure consortia complete their detailed design work for the SKA sites” 


    From SKA

    25 February 2019

    1

    The two engineering consortia tasked with designing all the essential infrastructure for the SKA sites in Australia and South Africa have formally concluded their work, bringing to a close nearly five years of collaboration both within and between the consortia.

    Infrastructure Australia (INAU) and Infrastructure South Africa (INSA) were each led by institutions with great expertise in radio astronomy projects: Australia’s CSIRO, which designed, built and operates the SKA precursor telescope ASKAP at its Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO)…

    Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) is a radio telescope array located at Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in the Australian Mid West. ASKAP consists of 36 identical parabolic antennas, each 12 metres in diameter, working together as a single instrument with a total collecting area of approximately 4,000 square metres.

    SKA Murchison Widefield Array, Boolardy station in outback Western Australia, at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO)

    …and the South African Radio Astronomy Observatory (SARAO), which designed, built and operates the SKA precursor telescope MeerKAT. Industry partners also played key roles in both consortia*, while the European Union’s Research and Innovation programme Horizon 2020 awarded an additional €5M to conduct further work at both sites and at the SKA Global Headquarters in the UK.

    SKA Meerkat telescope, South African design


    SKA Meerkat telescope(s), 90 km outside the small Northern Cape town of Carnarvon, SA

    The consortia were responsible for designing everything required to be able to deploy and operate the SKA in its two host countries, from roads, buildings, power, to RFI shielding, water and sanitation. Both CSIRO and SARAO developed valuable expertise from delivering the two precursor telescopes, which they applied to their work designing the SKA’s site infrastructure.

    “This is the culmination of many years of development on both sites in preparation for the start of construction of the SKA,” says Gary Davis, the SKA’s Head of Operations Planning and chair of the review panel. “Both consortia have done a stellar job in collaboration with one another to design the crucial infrastructure that’ll support the SKA.”

    A major goal of the two consortia was to collaborate with each other in order to develop a common engineering approach, share knowledge and provide lessons learnt through the design and delivery of SKA precursors.

    “From the start we developed what we called the GIG, the good ideas group” says Ant Schinckel, Infrastructure Australia’s Consortium Lead. “Our engineers would continuously engage with each other to discuss issues in both countries and find common solutions that could be applied to both sites” complements Tracy Cheetham, Infrastructure South Africa’s Consortium Lead.

    “I’d like to thank both teams for their excellent work” said Martin Austin, the SKA’s Infrastructure Project Manager “The quality of the design and their approach to safety means that we can now carry this work forward with a high degree of confidence, supported by both CSIRO and SARAO and their industry partners.”

    INAU and INSA formed part of a global effort by 12 international engineering consortia, representing 500 engineers and scientists in 20 countries. Nine of the consortia focused on the SKA’s core elements, while three others were tasked with developing advanced instrumentation.

    In 2018 and 2019 the nine consortia are having their Critical Design Reviews (CDRs), during which the proposed design must meet the project’s tough engineering requirements to be approved, before a construction proposal for the SKA can be developed.

    In June and July 2018, both infrastructure consortia had successful CDRs and subsequently made the final refinements to their designs. With that work complete the consortia now formally disband, although the SKA will continue to work closely with former members in the months ahead as the overall System CDR approaches, to ensure that the infrastructure design aligns with all of the other components.

    *Infrastructure Australia consortium members included the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), Aurecon Australia and Rider Levett Bucknall.

    Infrastructure South Africa consortium members included the South African Radio Astronomy Observatory (SARAO), Aurecon South Africa and HHO Africa.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition


    SKA ASKAP Pathefinder Telescope

    SKA Meerkat telescope, 90 km outside the small Northern Cape town of Carnarvon, SA


    SKA Meerkat Telescope

    Murchison Widefield Array,SKA Murchison Widefield Array, Boolardy station in outback Western Australia, at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO)


    SKA Murchison Wide Field Array
    About SKA

    The Square Kilometre Arraywill be the world’s largest and most sensitive radio telescope. The total collecting area will be approximately one square kilometre giving 50 times the sensitivity, and 10 000 times the survey speed, of the best current-day telescopes. The SKA will be built in Southern Africa and in Australia. Thousands of receptors will extend to distances of 3 000 km from the central regions. The SKA will address fundamental unanswered questions about our Universe including how the first stars and galaxies formed after the Big Bang, how dark energy is accelerating the expansion of the Universe, the role of magnetism in the cosmos, the nature of gravity, and the search for life beyond Earth. Construction of phase one of the SKA is scheduled to start in 2016. The SKA Organisation, with its headquarters at Jodrell Bank Observatory, near Manchester, UK, was established in December 2011 as a not-for-profit company in order to formalise relationships between the international partners and centralise the leadership of the project.

    The Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project is an international effort to build the world’s largest radio telescope, led by SKA Organisation. The SKA will conduct transformational science to improve our understanding of the Universe and the laws of fundamental physics, monitoring the sky in unprecedented detail and mapping it hundreds of times faster than any current facility.

    Already supported by 10 member countries – Australia, Canada, China, India, Italy, New Zealand, South Africa, Sweden, The Netherlands and the United Kingdom – SKA Organisation has brought together some of the world’s finest scientists, engineers and policy makers and more than 100 companies and research institutions across 20 countries in the design and development of the telescope. Construction of the SKA is set to start in 2018, with early science observations in 2020.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:55 pm on November 11, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ASKAP-Australia Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder, , , , , CSIRO, , , Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia,   

    From International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research: “Aussie telescope almost doubles known number of mysterious ‘fast radio bursts’” 

    ICRAR Logo
    From International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research

    October 11, 2018
    Dr Ryan Shannon
    Swinburne University of Technology
    & OzGrav ARC Centre of Excellence
    +61 3 9214 5205
    rshannon@swin.edu.au

    Dr Jean-Pierre Macquart —
    ICRAR / Curtin University
    +61 8 9266 9248
    jean-pierre.macquart@icrar.org

    Dr Keith Bannister
    CSIRO
    +61 2 9372 4295
    keith.bannister@csiro.au

    Pete Wheeler —
    Media Contact, ICRAR
    Ph: +61 423 982 018
    pete.wheeler@icrar.org

    October 11, 2018

    Australian researchers using a CSIRO radio telescope in Western Australia have nearly doubled the known number of ‘fast radio bursts’— powerful flashes of radio waves from deep space.
    The team’s discoveries include the closest and brightest fast radio bursts ever detected. Their findings were reported today in the journal Nature.

    Fast radio bursts come from all over the sky and last for just milliseconds. Scientists don’t know what causes them but it must involve incredible energy—equivalent to the amount released by the Sun in 80 years. “We’ve found 20 fast radio bursts in a year, almost doubling the number detected worldwide since they were discovered in 2007,” said lead author Dr Ryan Shannon, from Swinburne University of Technology and the OzGrav ARC Centre of Excellence.

    “Using the new technology of the Australia Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), we’ve also proved that fast radio bursts are coming from the other side of the Universe rather than from our own galactic neighbourhood.”

    Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) is a radio telescope array located at Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in the Australian Mid West. ASKAP consists of 36 identical parabolic antennas, each 12 metres in diameter, working together as a single instrument with a total collecting area of approximately 4,000 square metres.

    1
    For each burst, the top panels show what the FRB signal looks like when averaged over all frequencies. The bottom panels show how the brightness of the burst changes with frequency. The bursts are vertical because they have been corrected for dispersion. Credit: Ryan Shannon and the CRAFT collaboration.

    Co-author Dr Jean-Pierre Macquart, from the Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), said bursts travel for billions of years and occasionally pass through clouds of gas. “Each time this happens, the different wavelengths that make up a burst are slowed by different amounts,” he said. “Eventually, the burst reaches Earth with its spread of wavelengths arriving at the telescope at slightly different times, like swimmers at a finish line. “Timing the arrival of the different wavelengths tells us how much material the burst has travelled through on its journey. “And because we’ve shown that fast radio bursts come from far away, we can use them to detect all the missing matter located in the space between galaxies—which is a really exciting discovery.”

    CSIRO’s Dr Keith Bannister, who engineered the systems that detected the bursts, said ASKAP’s phenomenal discovery rate is down to two things. “The telescope has a whopping field of view of 30 square degrees, 100 times larger than the full Moon,” he said. “And, by using the telescope’s dish antennas in a radical way, with each pointing at a different part of the sky, we observed 240 square degrees all at once—about a thousand times the area of the full Moon. “ASKAP is astoundingly good for this work.”

    Dr Shannon said we now know that fast radio bursts originate from about halfway across the Universe but we still don’t know what causes them or which galaxies they come from.
    The team’s next challenge is to pinpoint the locations of bursts on the sky. “We’ll be able to localise the bursts to better than a thousandth of a degree,” Dr Shannon said.
    “That’s about the width of a human hair seen ten metres away, and good enough to tie each burst to a particular galaxy.”

    ASKAP is located at CSIRO’s Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia, and is a precursor for the future Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope.

    SKA Murchison Widefield Array, Boolardy station in outback Western Australia, at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO)

    The SKA could observe large numbers of fast radio bursts, giving astronomers a way to study the early Universe in detail.

    CSIRO acknowledges the Wajarri Yamaji as the traditional owners of the MRO site.

    A fast radio burst leaves a distant galaxy, travelling to Earth over billions of years and occasionally passing through clouds of gas in its path. Each time a cloud of gas is encountered, the different wavelengths that make up a burst are slowed by different amounts. Timing the arrival of the different wavelengths at a radio telescope tells us how much material the burst has travelled through on its way to Earth and allows astronomers to to detect “missing” matter located in the space between galaxies. Credit: CSIRO/ICRAR/OzGrav/Swinburne University of Technology

    Dr Ryan Shannon (Swinburne/OzGrav), Dr Jean-Pierre Macquart (Curtin/ICRAR) and Dr Keith Bannister (CSIRO) describe their discovery of 20 new fast radio bursts (FRBs) and how the Phased Array Feed (PAF) receiver technology in CSIRO’s Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope enabled this breakthrough science. Credit: CSIRO.

    More Information:
    ASKAP

    The Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP) is the world’s fastest survey radio telescope. Designed and engineered by CSIRO, ASKAP is made up of 36 ‘dish’ antennas, spread across a 6km diameter, that work together as a single instrument called an interferometer. The key feature of ASKAP is its wide field of view, generated by its unique phased array feed (PAF) receivers. Together with specialised digital systems, the PAFs create 36 separate (simultaneous) beams on the sky which are mosaicked together into a large single image.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    ICRAR is an equal joint venture between Curtin University and The University of Western Australia with funding support from the State Government of Western Australia. The Centre’s headquarters are located at UWA, with research nodes at both UWA and the Curtin Institute for Radio Astronomy (CIRA).
    ICRAR has strong support from the government of Australia and is working closely with industry and the astronomy community, including CSIRO and the Australian Telescope National Facility, <a
    ICRAR is:

    Playing a key role in the international Square Kilometre Array (SKA) project, the world's biggest ground-based telescope array.

    Attracting some of the world’s leading researchers in radio astronomy, who will also contribute to national and international scientific and technical programs for SKA and ASKAP.
    Creating a collaborative environment for scientists and engineers to engage and work with industry to produce studies, prototypes and systems linked to the overall scientific success of the SKA, MWA and ASKAP.

    Murchison Widefield Array,SKA Murchison Widefield Array, Boolardy station in outback Western Australia, at the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO)

    A Small part of the Murchison Widefield Array

    Enhancing Australia’s position in the international SKA program by contributing to the development process for the SKA in scientific, technological and operational areas.
    Promoting scientific, technical, commercial and educational opportunities through public outreach, educational material, training students and collaborative developments with national and international educational organisations.
    Establishing and maintaining a pool of emerging and top-level scientists and technologists in the disciplines related to radio astronomy through appointments and training.
    Making world-class contributions to SKA science, with emphasis on the signature science themes associated with surveys for neutral hydrogen and variable (transient) radio sources.
    Making world-class contributions to SKA capability with respect to developments in the areas of Data Intensive Science and support for the Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory.

     
  • richardmitnick 3:58 pm on October 10, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ASKAP is located at CSIRO’s Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia, ASKAP telescopes to rule fast radio-burst hunt, , , , , CSIRO, CSIRO acknowledges the Wajarri Yamaji as the traditional owners of the MRO site, , ,   

    From Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation CSIRO: “CSIRO telescope almost doubles known number of mysterious ‘fast radio bursts'” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation CSIRO

    Australian researchers using a CSIRO radio telescope in Western Australia have nearly doubled the known number of ‘fast radio bursts’— powerful flashes of radio waves from deep space.

    1
    Antennas of CSIRO’s Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope. Credit: CSIRO/Alex Cherney

    2
    An artist’s impression of CSIRO’s Australian SKA Pathfinder (ASKAP) radio telescope observing ‘fast radio bursts’ in ‘fly’s-eye mode’. Each antenna points in a slightly different direction, giving maximum sky coverage. ©OzGrav, Swinburne University of Technology

    3
    (L-R) Lead author Dr Ryan Shannon (Swinburne/OzGrav), with co-authors Dr Keith Bannister (CSIRO) and Dr Jean-Pierre Macquart (Curtin/ICRAR). ©Inspireworks

    4
    Dishes of CSIRO’s Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder in ‘fly’s-eye mode’ ©Kim Steel

    The team’s discoveries include the closest and brightest fast radio bursts ever detected.

    Their findings were reported today in the journal Nature .

    Fast radio bursts come from all over the sky and last for just milliseconds.

    Scientists don’t know what causes them but it must involve incredible energy—equivalent to the amount released by the Sun in 80 years.

    “We’ve found 20 fast radio bursts in a year, almost doubling the number detected worldwide since they were discovered in 2007,” lead author Dr Ryan Shannon, from Swinburne University of Technology and the OzGrav ARC Centre of Excellence said.

    “Using the new technology of the Australia Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder (ASKAP), we’ve also proved that fast radio bursts are coming from the other side of the Universe rather than from our own galactic neighbourhood.”

    Co-author Dr Jean-Pierre Macquart, from the Curtin University node of the International Centre for Radio Astronomy Research (ICRAR), said bursts travel for billions of years and occasionally pass through clouds of gas.

    “Each time this happens, the different wavelengths that make up a burst are slowed by different amounts,” he said.

    “Eventually, the burst reaches Earth with its spread of wavelengths arriving at the telescope at slightly different times, like swimmers at a finish line.

    “Timing the arrival of the different wavelengths tells us how much material the burst has travelled through on its journey.

    “And because we’ve shown that fast radio bursts come from far away, we can use them to detect all the missing matter located in the space between galaxies—which is a really exciting discovery.”

    CSIRO’s Dr Keith Bannister, who engineered the systems that detected the bursts, said ASKAP’s phenomenal discovery rate is down to two things.

    “The telescope has a whopping field of view of 30 square degrees, 100 times larger than the full Moon,” he said.

    “And, by using the telescope’s dish antennas in a radical way, with each pointing at a different part of the sky, we observed 240 square degrees all at once—about a thousand times the area of the full Moon.

    “ASKAP is astoundingly good for this work.”

    Dr Shannon said we now know that fast radio bursts originate from about halfway across the Universe but we still don’t know what causes them or which galaxies they come from.

    The team’s next challenge is to pinpoint the locations of bursts on the sky.

    “We’ll be able to localise the bursts to better than a thousandth of a degree,” Dr Shannon said.

    “That’s about the width of a human hair seen 10 metres away, and good enough to tie each burst to a particular galaxy.”

    ASKAP is located at CSIRO’s Murchison Radio-astronomy Observatory (MRO) in Western Australia, and is a precursor for the future Square Kilometre Array (SKA) telescope.

    The SKA could observe large numbers of fast radio bursts, giving astronomers a way to study the early Universe in detail.

    CSIRO acknowledges the Wajarri Yamaji as the traditional owners of the MRO site.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
  • richardmitnick 12:24 am on July 2, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , C6orf106 or "C6", , CSIRO, , Gene discovery unlocks mysteries of our immunity, , Our immune system   

    From Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation CSIRO: “Gene discovery unlocks mysteries of our immunity” 

    CSIRO bloc

    From Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation CSIRO

    7.1.18

    Ofa Fitzgibbons
    Communication Advisor
    +61 2 4960 6188
    Ofa.Fitzgibbons@csiro.au

    Australia’s national science agency CSIRO has identified a new gene that plays a critical role in regulating the body’s immune response to infection and disease.

    1
    The C6orf106 or “C6” gene. No image credit.

    The discovery could lead to the development of new treatments for influenza, arthritis and even cancer.

    The gene, called C6orf106 or “C6”, controls the production of proteins involved in infectious diseases, cancer and diabetes. The gene has existed for 500 million years, but its potential is only now understood.

    “Our immune system produces proteins called cytokines that help fortify the immune system and work to prevent viruses and other pathogens from replicating and causing disease,” CSIRO researcher Dr Cameron Stewart said.

    “C6 regulates this process by switching off the production of certain cytokines to stop our immune response from spiralling out of control.

    “The cytokines regulated by C6 are implicated in a variety of diseases including cancer, diabetes and inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis.”

    The discovery helps improve our understanding of our immune system, and it is hoped that this understanding will enable scientists to develop new, more targeted therapies.

    Dr Rebecca Ambrose was part of the CSIRO team that discovered the gene, and co-authored the recent paper announcing the discovery in the Journal of Biological Chemistry.

    “Even though the human genome was first fully sequenced in 2003, there are still thousands of genes that we know very little about,” Dr Rebecca Ambrose, a former CSIRO researcher, now based at the Hudson Institute of Medical Research said.

    “It’s exciting to consider that C6 has existed for more than 500 million years, preserved and passed down from simple organisms all the way to humans. But only now are we gaining insights into its importance.”

    Having discovered the function of C6, the researchers are awarded the privilege of naming it, and are enlisting the help of the community to do so.

    “The current name, C6orf106, reflects the gene’s location within the human genome, rather than relating to any particular function,” Dr Stewart said.

    “We think we can do better than that, and are inviting suggestions from the public.”

    A shortlist of names will be made available for final approval by a governing third party.

    The breakthrough builds on decades of work in infectious diseases, by researchers from CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    CSIRO campus

    CSIRO, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation, is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: