Tagged: CERN Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • richardmitnick 8:02 am on May 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , CERN, , , , ,   

    From CERN: “Pioneering SESAME light source officially opened” 

    Cern New Bloc

    Cern New Particle Event

    CERN New Masthead

    CERN

    CERN PRESS RELEASE

    Pioneering SESAME light source officially opened .

    1
    SESAME | Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East

    3
    This schematic of France’s Synchrotron Soleil gives a good idea of what the completed SESAME synchrotron might look like. Image: EPSIM 3D/JF Santarelli, Synchrotron Soleil.

    The SESAME light source was today officially opened by His Majesty King Abdullah II. An intergovernmental organization, SESAME is the first regional laboratory for the Middle East and neighbouring regions The laboratory’s official opening ushers in a new era of research covering fields ranging from medicine and biology, through materials science, physics and chemistry to healthcare, the environment, agriculture and archaeology.

    Speaking at the opening ceremony, the President of the SESAME Council, Professor Sir Chris Llewellyn Smith said: “Today sees the fulfilment of many hopes and dreams. The hope that a group of initially inexperienced young people could build SESAME and make it work – they have: three weeks ago SESAME reached its full design energy. The hope that, nurtured by SESAME’s training programme, large numbers of scientists in the region would become interested in using SESAME – they have: 55 proposals to use the first two beamlines have already been submitted. And the hope that the diverse Members could work together harmoniously. As well as being a day for celebration, the opening is an occasion to look forward to the science that SESAME will produce, using photons provided by what will soon be the world’s first accelerator powered solely by renewable energy.”

    SESAME, which stands for Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East, is a particle accelerator-based facility that uses electromagnetic radiation emitted by circulating electron beams to study a range of properties of matter.

    Its initial research programme is about to get underway: three beamlines will be operational this year, and a fourth in 2019. Among the subjects likely to be studied in early experiments are pollution in the Jordan River valley with a view to improving public health in the area, as well as studies aimed at identifying new drugs for cancer therapy, and cultural heritage studies ranging from bioarcheology – the study of our ancestors – to investigations of ancient manuscripts.

    Professor Khaled Toukan the Director of SESAME, said “In building SESAME we had to overcome major financial, technological and political challenges, but – with the help and encouragement of many supporters in Jordan and around the world – the staff, the Directors and the Council did a superb job. Today we are at the end of the beginning. Many challenges lie ahead – including building up the user community, and constructing additional beamlines and supporting facilities. However, I am confident that – with the help of all of you here today, including especially Rolf Heuer, who will take over from Chris Llewellyn Smith as President of the Council tomorrow (and like Chris and his predecessor Herwig Schopper is a former Director General of CERN) – these challenges will be met.”

    The opening ceremony was an occasion for representatives of SESAME’s Members and Observers to come together to celebrate the establishment of a competitive regional facility, building regional capacity in science and technology.

    NOTES FOR EDITORS:
    1. There are some 50 synchrotron light sources in the world, including a few in developing countries. SESAME (Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) is the first light source in the Middle East, and also the region’s first true international centre of excellence.
    2. The Members of SESAME are currently Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, the Palestinian Authority and Turkey (others are being sought). Brazil, Canada, China, the European Union, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, Japan, Kuwait, Portugal, the Russian Federation, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the UK, and the USA are Observers. SESAME was set up under the auspices of UNESCO, but is now a completely independent intergovernmental organisation.
    3. SESAME will both:
    • Foster scientific and technological capacities and excellence in the Middle East and neighbouring regions (and help prevent or reverse the brain drain) by enabling world-class research in subjects ranging from biology and medical sciences through materials science, physics and chemistry to archaeology – much focussed on issues of regional importance, e.g. related to the environment, health, and agriculture, and
    • Build scientific links and foster better understanding and a culture of peace through collaboration between peoples with different creeds and political systems.
    4. At the heart of SESAME is a 2.5 GeV electron storage ring. The first electron beam was circulated on 11 January. The design energy of 2.5 GeV was reached on 27 April. A beam of 30 mA has been stored, and steps are now in train to bring the current up to the ultimate design value of 400 mA.
    5. Synchrotron light source are equipped with beamlines that focus the light on samples that scientists wish to study. Each beamline can support several experiments in series and in parallel. Two beamlines (an X-ray Absorption Fine Structure/X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy Beamline and an Infrared Beamline, which will support work in basic materials science, life sciences and environmental science, biochemistry, microanalysis, archaeology, geology, cell biology, biomedical diagnostics, environmental science, etc.) will be in operation initially. A third (Materials Science) beamline (which will support studies of disordered/amorphous material on the atomic scale and the evolution of nano-scale structures and materials in extreme conditions of pressure and temperature) will come into operation in late 2017. A Macromolecular Crystallography beamline and a protein expression/crystallization facility for structural molecular biology (aimed at elucidating the mechanisms of proteins at the atomic level and providing guidelines for developing new drugs) will come into operation in 2019. Three more beamlines are being planned which will be added when funds permit.
    6. The users of SESAME will be based in universities and research institutes in the region. They will visit the laboratory periodically to carry out experiments, generally in collaboration, where they will be exposed to the highest scientific standards. The potential user community, which is growing rapidly and already numbers over 300, has been, and is being, fostered by a series of Users’ Meetings and by training opportunities (supported by the IAEA, various governments and many of the world’s synchrotron laboratories) which are already bringing significant benefits to the region.
    7. Some $90 million have so far been invested in SESAME (including the value of the land and building provided by Jordan and of donated equipment, and all operational costs). Staff costs, provision of power, and other operational costs are provided by the Members’ annual contributions. Capital funding has been provided by the Governments of Jordan, Israel, and Turkey, the Royal Court of Jordan, and by the European Union (through CERN and directly) and Italy.
    8. SESAME is coming into operation with minimal supporting infrastructure and only two beamlines. Challenges for the future include: fully equipping the protein expression, crystallization and characterization laboratory and the end station for the Materials Science beamline; funding the three more beamlines that are planned in phase 1 of SESAME; funding construction of a conference centre, which (when SESAME is not in use during maintenance work) will be used for regional meetings on other issues (water resources, agriculture, pollution, disease,..); building a new full energy injection system in order to produce much greater integrated fluxes of synchrotron light; and last but not least further building up the user community.
    9. In common with all other accelerators, synchrotron light sources use large amounts of electrical power. Once SESAME is fully in operation, the bill for electricity (for which SESAME is currently paying $375/MWh) would be beyond the means of the SESAME Members. SESAME’s longstanding intention to build a solar power plant was recently turned in to a reality when the Government of Jordan generously agreed to provide SESAME with JD5 Million ($7.05 million) of EU funds that support deployment of renewable energy in neighbouring countries. A call for tender to build the plant was issued in April: the power that it sends to the grid will be provided to SESAME as/when needed (not just when the sun is shining). SESAME will be the first accelerator in the world powered entirely by renewable energy.

    Received via email.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Quantum Diaries
    QuantumDiaries

    Cern Courier

    CernCourier
    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New II

    LHC

    CERN LHC Map
    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel

    CERN LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries

     
  • richardmitnick 9:10 am on April 27, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , , CERN, , , , SCOAP3   

    From CERN: “CERN and the American Physical Society sign an open access agreement for SCOAP3” 

    Cern New Bloc

    Cern New Particle Event

    CERN New Masthead

    CERN

    Geneva, 27 April 2017. The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) and the American Physical Society (APS) signed an agreement today for SCOAP3 – the Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics. Under this agreement, high-energy physics articles published in three leading journals of the APS will be open access as from January 2018.

    1

    All authors worldwide will be able to publish their high-energy physics articles in Physical Review C, Physical Review D and Physical Review Letters at no direct cost. This will allow free and unrestricted exchange of scientific information within the global scientific community and beyond, for the advancement of science.

    “Open access reflects values and goals that have been enshrined in CERN’s Convention for more than sixty years, such as the widest dissemination of scientific results. We are very pleased that the APS is joining SCOAP3 and we look forward to welcoming more partners for the long-term success of this initiative”, said Fabiola Gianotti, CERN’s Director General.

    APS CEO Kate Kirby commented that, “APS has long supported the principles of open access to the benefit of the scientific enterprise. As a non-profit society publisher and the largest international publisher of high-energy physics content, APS has chosen to participate in the SCOAP3 initiative in support of this community.”

    With this new agreement between CERN and the APS, SCOAP3 will cover about 90 percent of the journal literature in the field of high-energy physics.

    Convened and managed by CERN, SCOAP3 is the largest scale global open access initiative ever built. It involves a global consortium of 3,000 libraries and research institutes from 44 countries, with the additional support of eight research funding agencies. Since its launch in 2014, it has made 15 000 articles by about 20 000 scientists from 100 countries accessible to anyone.
    The initiative is possible through funds made available from the redirection of former subscription monies. Publishers reduce subscription prices for journals participating in the initiative, and those savings are pooled by SCOAP3 partners to pay for the open access costs, for the wider benefit of the community.

    Received via email.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Quantum Diaries
    QuantumDiaries

    Cern Courier

    CernCourier
    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New II

    LHC

    CERN LHC Map
    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel

    CERN LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries

     
  • richardmitnick 3:31 pm on April 18, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , CERN, The accelerators awaken   

    From CERN: “The accelerators awaken” 

    Cern New Bloc

    Cern New Particle Event

    CERN New Masthead

    CERN

    18 Apr 2017
    Iva Maksimova Raynova

    Just like a bear after its winter sleep, CERN’s big machines are gradually awakening after the extended year-end technical stop (EYETS). The first beams for 2017 are expected to circulate in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in early May, but before that the accelerator complex and all the experiments that it serves have to be put back into operation, one after the other.

    In the first week of April, the Linear Accelerator 2 (Linac 2), the starting point of the protons used in CERN’s experiments, successfully accelerated its first proton beam and prepared it to be sent to the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB).

    CERN Super Proton Synchrotron

    On 10 April, the PSB was also restarted. As the second element in the chain, the PSB increases the energy of the beam received from Linac 2 and sends it to either the Proton Synchrotron (PS) or to the Isotope Mass Separator On-Line facility (ISOLDE).

    CERN ISOLDE

    The next step is to put the Proton Synchrotron (PS) back in operation on 17 April. This is the oldest accelerator still in service and is currently the third component in the accelerator chain. It pushes the beams to even higher energies and sends them to the Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS), the last element in the accelerator chain before the LHC. It also feeds the East Area where the Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets (CLOUD) experiment is situated, the Antiproton Decelerator, and the Neutron Time-of-Flight Facility (n_TOF).

    CERN Antiproton Decelerator

    3
    Neutron Time-of-Flight Facility (n_TOF)

    6
    4
    Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets (CLOUD)

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Quantum Diaries
    QuantumDiaries

    Cern Courier

    CernCourier
    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New II

    LHC

    CERN LHC Map
    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel

    CERN LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries

     
  • richardmitnick 2:06 pm on April 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CERN, , Retired MRI scanner gets new life studying the stars   

    From CERN: “Retired MRI scanner gets new life studying the stars” 

    Cern New Bloc

    Cern New Particle Event

    CERN New Masthead

    CERN

    4 Apr 2017
    Harriet Kim Jarlett

    1
    The ex-MRI scanner magnet has travelled all the way from Australia to be used in an experiment at CERN’s ISOLDE facility (Image: Karl Johnston/CERN)

    A team of researchers has successfully taken a magnet from a decommissioned MRI scanner used by a Brisbane, Australia, hospital for scanning patients, and recycled it for use in an experiment at CERN’s ISOLDE facility.

    CERN ISOLDE

    The ISOLDE Solenoidal Spectrometer (ISS) project will design and construct instruments to explore the nuclear reactions that occur when stars explode in supernovae.

    The decision was made to re-commission the 15-year-old magnet when it was discovered that building a new one could cost almost 1,250,000 CHF. Instead, the entire process of shipping and re-commissioning the retired MRI magnet was around 160 000 CHF (€149,500).

    “Finding a suitable MRI magnet that can go up to a strength of 4 Tesla is not easy, but we found out about this Australian magnet from our collaborators at Argonne National Laboratory and it was exactly what we needed,” explains Professor Robert Page, of the University of Liverpool, who leads the international collaboration using the magnet.

    ISOLDE is CERN’s radioactive ion beam facility, where they study the different properties of hundreds of atomic isotopes.

    Once the superconducting magnet arrived at CERN, the cryogenics team got to work cooling it with liquid helium, to see if it was still capable of producing the strong fields required by the ISS project.

    The project, will take beams of radioactive ions, produced by bombarding heavy nuclei with protons from the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB) at CERN, and fire them at a heavy hydrogen (deuterium) target inside the magnet itself. As the particles are fired at the target, neutrons are transferred to some particles to create ions with unusual numbers of protons and neutrons – these are the exotic ions studied at ISOLDE.

    But this process leaves protons without their neutron partner. The strong magnetic field from the MRI magnet causes these protons to spiral backwards and land, just nanoseconds later, on a silicon detector.

    From the position of the proton on the detector and its energy, the energy levels of the exotic ions can be determined. In this way the team hopes to understand how the forces in atomic nuclei with differing numbers of protons and neutrons give rise to their very different properties, and how elements are created by supernovae.

    The ISS project includes researchers from the University of Liverpool, STFC Daresbury Laboratory, the University of Manchester and the Katholieke Universiteit Leuven.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Quantum Diaries
    QuantumDiaries

    Cern Courier

    CernCourier
    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New II

    LHC

    CERN LHC Map
    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel

    CERN LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries

     
  • richardmitnick 1:31 pm on April 4, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CERN, , , Tim Berners-Lee wins $1 million Turing Award,   

    From MIT: “Tim Berners-Lee wins $1 million Turing Award” 

    MIT News

    MIT Widget

    MIT News

    April 4, 2017
    Adam Conner-Simons

    1
    Tim Berners-Lee was honored with the Turing Award for his work inventing the World Wide Web, the first web browser, and “the fundamental protocols and algorithms [that allowed] the web to scale.” Photo: Henry Thomas

    CSAIL researcher honored for inventing the web and developing the protocols that spurred its global use.

    MIT Professor Tim Berners-Lee, the researcher who invented the World Wide Web and is one of the world’s most influential voices for online privacy and government transparency, has won the most prestigious honor in computer science, the Association for Computing Machinery (ACM) A.M. Turing Award. Often referred to as “the Nobel Prize of computing,” the award comes with a $1 million prize provided by Google.

    In its announcement today, ACM cited Berners-Lee for “inventing the World Wide Web, the first web browser, and the fundamental protocols and algorithms allowing the web to scale.” This year marks the 50th anniversary of the award.

    A principal investigator at MIT’s Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) with a joint appointment in the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Berners-Lee conceived of the web in 1989 at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) as a way to allow scientists around the world to share information with each other on the internet. He introduced a naming scheme (URIs), a communications protocol (HTTP), and a language for creating webpages (HTML). His open-source approach to coding the first browser and server is often credited with helping catalyzing the web’s rapid growth.

    “I’m humbled to receive the namesake award of a computing pioneer who showed that what a programmer could do with a computer is limited only by the programmer themselves,” says Berners-Lee, the 3COM Founders Professor of Engineering at MIT. “It is an honor to receive an award like the Turing that has been bestowed to some of the most brilliant minds in the world.”

    Berners-Lee is founder and director of the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C), which sets technical standards for web development, as well as the World Wide Web Foundation, which aims to establish the open web as a public good and a basic right. He also holds a professorship at Oxford University.

    As director of CSAIL’s Decentralized Information Group, Berners-Lee has developed data systems and privacy-minded protocols such as “HTTP with Accountability” (HTTPA), which monitors the transmission of private data and enables people to examine how their information is being used. He also leads Solid (“social linked data”), a project to re-decentralize the web that allows people to control their own data and make it available only to desired applications.

    “Tim Berners-Lee’s career — as brilliant and bold as they come — exemplifies MIT’s passion for using technology to make a better world,” says MIT President L. Rafael Reif. “Today we celebrate the transcendent impact Tim has had on all of our lives, and congratulate him on this wonderful and richly deserved award.”

    While Berners-Lee was initially drawn to programming through his interest in math, there was also a familial connection: His parents met while working on the Ferranti Mark 1, the world’s first commercial general-purpose computer. Years later, he wrote a program called Enquire to track connections between different ideas and projects, indirectly inspiring what later became the web.

    “Tim’s innovative and visionary work has transformed virtually every aspect our lives, from communications and entertainment to shopping and business,” says CSAIL Director Daniela Rus. “His work has had a profound impact on people across the world, and all of us at CSAIL are so very proud of him for being recognized with the highest honor in computer science.”

    Berners-Lee has received multiple accolades for his technical contributions, from being knighted by Queen Elizabeth to being named one of TIME magazine’s “100 Most Important People of the 20th Century.” He will formally receive the Turing Award during the ACM’s annual banquet June 24 in San Francisco.

    Past Turing Award recipients who have taught at MIT include Michael Stonebraker (2014), Shafi Goldwasser and Silvio Micali (2013), Barbara Liskov (2008), Ronald Rivest (2002), Butler Lampson (1992), Fernando Corbato (1990), John McCarthy (1971) and Marvin Minsky (1969).

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    MIT Seal

    The mission of MIT is to advance knowledge and educate students in science, technology, and other areas of scholarship that will best serve the nation and the world in the twenty-first century. We seek to develop in each member of the MIT community the ability and passion to work wisely, creatively, and effectively for the betterment of humankind.

    MIT Campus

     
  • richardmitnick 10:47 am on March 16, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CERN, , , , ,   

    From CERN via Accelerating News: “CESSAMag delivering impact” 

    Cern New Bloc

    Cern New Particle Event

    CERN New Masthead

    CERN

    Accelerating News

    3.16.17
    Livia Lapadatescu (CERN)

    1
    Section of the SESAME Main Accelerator Ring (Image credit: CERN)

    The main objective of the FP7-CESSAMag (CERN-EC Support for SESAME Magnets) project was to support the construction of the SESAME light source in the Middle-East. With financial contribution from the EC, CERN’s main objective was to deliver the magnetic system and its powering scheme for the SESAME main accelerator ring, as well as to support the training of SESAME staff. Completed at the end of 2016, the project fulfilled or exceeded all its objectives.

    Scientific and technical impact of CESSAMag

    Building upon SESAME studies, CESSAMag finalized the requirements and design and produced the engineering and technical drawings of the SESAME magnets and powering scheme. The first main result of CESSAMag is the production of design reports on the combined function bending magnets, on the quadrupole magnets (long and short), on the sextupole magnets with their auxiliary corrector windings and on the powering scheme. These design and engineering study reports were used as background for the technical specifications needed for tendering and can serve as reference for the construction of similar light sources.

    During the tendering process, CERN made a special effort to place orders not only with experienced European companies, but also with companies based in some of the SESAME Members (Cyprus, Israel, Pakistan, Turkey), without former experience in accelerator components (except for Israel), but demonstrating potential and motivation. This was achieved through effective knowledge transfer from CERN and generated potential commercial impact in the companies trained.

    All magnets successfully passed the acceptance tests at either ALBA-CELLS or CERN and their measured field quality and reproducibility from magnet to magnet are excellent, making them a reference for similar synchrotrons. Therefore, a key result of CESSAMag is the string of magnets forming the SESAME storage ring, composed of:

    16 combined function bending magnets (dipole + quadrupole)

    64 quadrupoles of two types: 32 long focusing and 32 short defocusing quadrupoles

    64 sextupole/correctors

    CESSAMag also contributed to the production of an improved magnet powering scheme: rather than procuring power supplies adapted to each kind of magnet, another approach was proposed by CERN, based on light source standards (PSI), which allows individual powering of quadrupoles and simplified maintenance by plug-and-play modules by standardizing interfaces. With this strategy, SESAME benefits from a powering strategy more powerful, flexible and robust than initially foreseen.

    Following the decision to procure some components from companies based in the SESAME Members and thanks to the in-kind contribution of Pakistan, offering the assembly of 50% of the sextupoles, CESSAMag managed to deliver a more powerful and complete magnetic system and reduce the financial share that SESAME was due to contribute to the project.

    Finally, CESSAMag contributed to the magnet integration and commissioning, with the goal of making SESAME fully in control of the equipment delivered by CERN.

    The first beam was circulated in the SESAME main accelerator ring on 11 January 2017 and it was stored and accumulated up to 20mA in mid-February. The next step is ramping the beam and completing the RF stations and final acceleration assessment expected before the end of summer. The inauguration ceremony of the SESAME light source will take place in mid-May with the foreseen presence of high-ranking officials from SESAME Members and Observers. The first user experiments are foreseen to start in Q3.

    Political and social impact of CESSAMag

    A significant aspect showcasing the socio-economic impact of CESSAMag is the knowledge transfer to companies from SESAME Members and training of SESAME staff. The duration of training to staff, engineers and companies from SESAME Members amounts to about 90 person-months and the CERN personnel effort in training and knowledge transfer amounts to 16 person-months.

    In the context of CESSAMag, international collaborations and agreements were established between CERN and SESAME and CERN and ALBA-CELLS; implementation agreements were formed with PAEK (Pakistan), TAEK (Turkey) and ILSF (Iran) and an informal collaboration with IAEA, which provided financial support for training and experts’ visits between CERN and SESAME. These collaborations and agreements illustrate the international and science diplomacy dimensions of the project.

    Furthermore, the European Union acknowledged the science diplomacy impact of CESSAMag and made further steps in support of SESAME. Since 2015, the EU is an Observer in the SESAME Council and the EC decided to further support the training of SESAME users and staff in the framework of the OPEN SESAME (Opening Synchrotron Light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East) H2020 “Policy and international cooperation measures for research infrastructures” project.

    See the full article here.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Quantum Diaries
    QuantumDiaries

    Cern Courier

    CernCourier
    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New II

    LHC

    CERN LHC Map
    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel

    CERN LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries

     
  • richardmitnick 12:03 pm on February 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: CERN, , Neutrino research   

    From CERN Courier: “ProtoDUNE revealed” 

    CERN Courier

    Feb 15, 2017
    Matthew Chalmers

    1
    Outer vessel

    This 11 m-high structure with thick steel walls will soon contain a prototype detector for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment (DUNE), a major international project based in the US for studying neutrinos and proton decay.

    FNAL LBNF/DUNE from FNAL to SURF, Lead, South Dakota, USA
    FNAL LBNF/DUNE from FNAL to SURF, Lead, South Dakota, USA
    FNAL DUNE Argon tank at SURF
    FNAL DUNE Argon tank at SURF

    It is being assembled in conjunction with CERN’s Neutrino Platform, which was established in 2014 to support neutrino experiments hosted in Japan and the US (CERN Courier July/August 2016 p21), and is pictured here in December as the roof of the structure was lowered into place. Another almost identical structure is under construction nearby and will house a second prototype detector for DUNE. Both are being built at CERN’s new “EHN1” test facility, which was completed last year at the north area of the laboratory’s Prévessin site.

    3
    CERN’s Neutrino Platform

    DUNE, which is due to start operations in the next decade, will address key outstanding questions about neutrinos. In addition to determining the ordering of the neutrino masses, it will search for leptonic CP violation by precisely measuring differences between the oscillations of muon-type neutrinos and antineutrinos into electron-type neutrinos and antineutrinos, respectively (CERN Courier December 2015 p19). To do so, DUNE will consist of two advanced detectors placed in an intense neutrino beam produced at Fermilab’s Long-Baseline Neutrino Facility (LBNF). One will record particle interactions near the source of the beam before the neutrinos have had time to oscillate, while a second, much larger detector will be installed deep underground at the Sanford Underground Research Laboratory in Lead, South Dakota, 1300 km away.

    SURF logo
    Sanford Underground Research Facility Interior
    Sanford Underground Research Facility Interior

    4
    Technology demonstrator

    In collaboration with CERN, the DUNE team is testing technology for DUNE’s far detector based on large liquid-argon (LAr) time-projection chambers (TPCs). Two different technologies are being considered – single-phase and double-phase LAr TPCs – and the eventual DUNE detectors will comprise four modules, each with a total LAr mass of 17 kt. The single-phase technique is well established, having been deployed in the ICARUS experiment at Gran Sasso…

    INFN Gran Sasso ICARUS
    INFN Gran Sasso ICARUS

    …while the double-phase concept offers potential advantages. Both may be used in the final DUNE far detector. Scaling LAr technology to such industrial levels presents several challenges – in particular the very large cryostats required, which has led the DUNE collaboration to use technological solutions inspired by the liquified-natural-gas (LNG) shipping industry.

    The outer structure of the cryostat (red, pictured at top) for the single-phase protoDUNE module is now complete, and an equivalent structure for the double-phase module is taking shape just a few metres away and is expected to be complete by March. In addition, a smaller technology demonstrator for the double-phase protoDUNE detector is complete and is currently being cooled down at a separate facility on the CERN site (image above). The 3 × 1 × 1 m3 module will allow the CERN and DUNE teams to perfect the double-phase concept, in which a region of gaseous argon situated above the usual liquid phase provides additional signal amplification.

    The large protoDUNE modules are planned to be ready for test beam by autumn 2018 at the EHN1 facility using dedicated beams from the Super Proton Synchrotron. Given the intensity of the future LBNF beam, for which Fermilab’s Main Injector recently passed an important milestone by generating a 700 kW, 120 GeV proton beam for a period of more than one hour, the rate and volume of data produced by the DUNE detectors will be substantial. Meanwhile, the DUNE collaboration continues to attract new members and discussions are now under way to share responsibilities for the numerous components of the project’s vast far detectors (see “DUNE collaboration meeting comes to CERN” in this month’s Faces & Places).

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition
    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New II

    LHC

    CERN LHC Map
    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel

    CERN LHC particles

     
  • richardmitnick 1:13 pm on January 14, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CERN, Percussion at CERN, STOMP   

    From Symmetry: “STOMP visits CERN” 

    Symmetry Mag
    Symmetry

    01/13/17
    Kathryn Jepsen

    1
    Maximilien Brice, CERN

    A group known for making music with everyday objects recently got their hands on some extraordinary props.

    CERN, home to the Large Hadron Collider, is known for high-speed, high-energy feats of coordination, so it’s only fitting that the touring percussion group STOMP would stop by for a visit.

    After taking a tour of the research center, STOMP performers were game to share their talent by turning three pieces of retired scientific equipment into a gigantic drum set. Check out the video below to hear the beat of an LHC dipole magnet, the Gargamelle bubble chamber and a radiofrequency cavity from the former Large Electron-Positron Collider.

    As CERN notes, these are trained professionals who were briefed on how to avoid damaging the equipment they used. Lab visitors are generally discouraged from hitting the experiments.


    Access mp4 video here .

    On Friday 6 January, the percussion group STOMP took time out from their worldwide tour to visit CERN. After seeing the Synchrocyclotron, Antiproton Decelerator and S’Cool Lab, it was time to bring out the drumsticks.

    In the Microcosm garden – home to items from CERN’s history including the Gargamelle bubble chamber and a LEP RF cavity – the cast sprang into action. With sticks whirring and hips shaking, they brought life and fantastic sound to the normally silent, sombre artefacts.

    The performance built to a crescendo at the LHC dipole magnet next to the Globe of Science and Innovation. There, the whole group leapt towards the magnet giving voice to the mighty blue tube in deep, resonating, powerful beats.

    The LHC never sounded so good. See the results for yourself in the video above.

    Disclaimer: No CERN objects were damaged in the making of this film. CERN does not normally encourage visitors to hit its historic objects and these trained percussionists were fully briefed beforehand to avoid fragile components.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Symmetry is a joint Fermilab/SLAC publication.


     
  • richardmitnick 2:21 pm on January 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: Bessy1, CERN,   

    From CERN: “Pioneering SESAME light source circulates first beam” 

    Cern New Bloc

    Cern New Particle Event

    CERN New Masthead

    CERN

    Allan, Jordan,
    12 January 2017

    SESAME PRESS RELEASE
    Pioneering SESAME light source circulates first beam

    Allan, Jordan, 12 January 2017. A beam circulated for the first time in the pioneering
    SESAME synchrotron at 18:12 (UTC+3) yesterday. The next step will be to store the
    beam.

    1
    SESAME | Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and Applications in the Middle East

    This is an important milestone on the way to research getting underway at the first
    light-source laboratory in the Middle East. SESAME was established under the
    auspices of UNESCO before becoming a fully independent intergovernmental
    organisation in its own right in 2004.

    SESAME’s Members are Bahrain, Cyprus, Egypt, Iran, Israel, Jordan, Pakistan, the Palestinian Authority and Turkey. Its mission
    is to provide a world-class research facility for the region, while fostering
    international scientific cooperation. The first call for proposals to carry out research at
    SESAME was recently issued.

    “This is a very proud moment for the entire SESAME community,” said Professor
    Khaled Toukan, SESAME Director. “SESAME is now opening for business.”

    SESAME, which stands for Synchrotron-light for Experimental Science and
    Applications in the Middle East, is a light-source; a particle accelerator-based facility
    that uses electromagnetic radiation emitted by circulating electron beams to study a
    range of properties of matter.

    Experiments at SESAME will enable research in fields
    ranging from medicine and biology, through materials science, physics and chemistry
    to healthcare, the environment, agriculture and archaeology.

    Today’s milestone follows a series of key events, including the establishment of a
    Middle East Scientific Collaboration group in the mid-1990s. This was followed by
    the donation of the BESSY1 accelerator by the BESSY laboratory in Berlin.

    2
    Gift from BESSY-1

    A refurbished and upgraded BESSY1 now serves as the injector for the new SESAME
    main ring, which is a competitive third-generation light source built by SESAME with
    support from the SESAME Members themselves, the European Commission, CERN
    and Italy.

    “This is a great day for SESAME,” said Professor Sir Chris Llewellyn-Smith,
    President of the SESAME Council. “It’s a tribute to the skill and devotion of the
    scientists and decision-makers from the region who have worked tirelessly to make
    scientific collaboration between countries in the Middle East and neighbouring
    regions a reality.”

    The first circulating beam is an important step on the way to first light, which marks
    the start of the research programme at any new synchrotron light-source facility, but
    there is much to be done before experiments can get underway.

    Beams have to be accelerated to SESAME’s operating energy of 2.5 GeV. Then the light emitted as the
    beams circulate has to be channelled along SESAME’s two day-one beam lines and
    optimised for the experiments that will take place there. This process is likely to take
    around six months, leading to first experiments in the summer of 2017.

    In the meantime, scientists wishing to carry out research at SESAME are encouraged
    to submit their proposals following the procedure described at
    http://www.sesame.org.jo/sesame/component/content/article/85-uncategorised/440-cfp.html

    Contact:
    Clarissa Formosa-Gauci c.formosa-gauci@unesco.org

    Received via email, no link available.

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Meet CERN in a variety of places:

    Cern Courier

    THE FOUR MAJOR PROJECT COLLABORATIONS

    ATLAS
    CERN ATLAS New

    ALICE
    CERN ALICE New

    CMS
    CERN CMS New

    LHCb
    CERN LHCb New II

    LHC

    CERN LHC Map
    CERN LHC Grand Tunnel

    CERN LHC particles

    Quantum Diaries

     
  • richardmitnick 3:22 pm on January 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , CERN, ,   

    From Symmetry: “CERN ramps up neutrino program” 

    Symmetry Mag
    Symmetry

    01/06/17
    Sarah Charley

    1
    Maximilien Brice, CERN

    The research center aims to test two large prototype detectors for the DUNE experiment.

    FNAL LBNF/DUNE from FNAL to SURF
    FNAL LBNF/DUNE from FNAL to SURF

    [I know that I am not a scientist and basically know nothing. But it bothers me that CERN is doing ANY work for DUNE. The U.S. Congress killed the Superconducting Super Collider in 1993 and virtually ceded HEP to Europe. I got into this blog when I found out that 30% of the people at CERN were from the U.S. and our press did not cover anything like this. I know that neutrino research virtually saved FNAL from the scrap heap. I just wish that anything being done for DUNE was being done here in the U.S. in one of our great D.O.E. labs or our great universities like MIT, Hopkins, Caltech, Illinois.]

    In the midst of the verdant French countryside is a workshop the size of an aircraft hangar bustling with activity. In a well lit new extension, technicians cut through thick slices of steel with electric saws and blast metal joints with welding torches.

    Inside this building sits its newest occupant: a two-story-tall cube with thick steel walls that resemble castle turrets. This cube will eventually hold a prototype detector for the Deep Underground Neutrino Experiment, or DUNE, the flagship research program hosted at the Department of Energy’s Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory [FNAL] to better understand the weird properties of neutrinos.

    Neutrinos are the second-most abundant fundamental particle in the visible universe, but because they rarely interact with atoms, little is known about them. The little that is known presents a daunting challenge for physicists since neutrinos are exceptionally elusive and incredibly lightweight.

    They’re so light that scientists are still working to pin down the masses of their three different types. They also continually morph from one of their three types into another—a behavior known as oscillation, one that keeps scientists on their toes.

    “We don’t know what these masses are or have a clear understanding of the flavor oscillation,” says Stefania Bordoni, a CERN researcher working on neutrino detector development. “Learning more about neutrinos could help us better understand how the early universe evolved and why the world is made of matter and not antimatter.”

    In 2015 CERN and the United States signed a new cooperation agreement that affirmed the United States’ continued participation in the Large Hadron Collider research program and CERN’s commitment to serve as the European base for the US-hosted neutrino program. Since this agreement, CERN has been chugging full-speed ahead to build and refurbish neutrino detectors.

    “Our past and continued partnerships have always shown the United States and CERN are stronger together,” says Marzio Nessi, the head of CERN’s neutrino platform. “Our big science project works only because of international collaboration.”

    The primary goal of CERN’s neutrino platform is to provide the infrastructure to test two large prototypes for DUNE’s far detectors. The final detectors will be constructed at Sanford Lab in South Dakota. Eventually they will sit 1.5 kilometers underground, recording data from neutrinos generated 1300 kilometers away at Fermilab.

    Two 8-meter-tall cubes, currently under construction at CERN, will each contain 770 metric tons of liquid argon permeated with a strong electric field. The international DUNE collaboration will construct two smaller, but still large, versions of the DUNE detector to be tested inside these cubes.

    In the first version of the DUNE detector design, particles traveling through the liquid knock out a trail of electrons from argon atoms. This chain of electrons is sucked toward the 16,000 sensors lining the inside of the container. From this data, physicists can derive the trajectory and energy of the original particle.

    In the second version, the DUNE collaboration is working on a new type of technology that introduces a thin layer of argon gas hovering above the liquid argon. The idea is that the additional gas will amplify the signal of these passing particles and give scientists a higher sensitivity to low-energy neutrinos. Scientists based at CERN are currently developing a 3-cubic-meter model, which they plan to scale up into the much larger prototype in 2017.

    In addition to these DUNE prototypes, CERN is also refurbishing a neutrino detector, called ICARUS, which was used in a previous experiment at the Italian Institute for Nuclear Physics’ Gran Sasso National Laboratory in Italy.

    INFN Gran Sasso ICARUS
    INFN Gran Sasso ICARUS

    FNAL/ICARUS
    FNAL/ICARUS

    ICARUS will be shipped to Fermilab in March 2017 and incorporated into a separate experiment.

    CERN plans to serve as a resource for neutrino programs hosted elsewhere in the world as scientists delve deeper into this enigmatic niche of particle physics.

    See the full article here .

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    STEM Icon

    Stem Education Coalition

    Symmetry is a joint Fermilab/SLAC publication.


     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: