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  • richardmitnick 4:00 pm on December 28, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Bose-Einstein-condensates, Can Bose-Einstein condensates simulate cosmic inflation?, ,   

    From physicsworld.com: “Can Bose-Einstein condensates simulate cosmic inflation?” 

    physicsworld
    physicsworld.com

    Dec 28, 2017
    Tim Wogan

    1
    Rolling downhill: illustration of a coherent quantum phase transition

    Cosmological inflation, first proposed by Alan Guth in 1979, describes a hypothetical period when the early Universe expanded faster than the speed of light.

    4
    Alan Guth, Highland Park High School and M.I.T., who first proposed cosmic inflation

    HPHS Owls

    Lambda-Cold Dark Matter, Accelerated Expansion of the Universe, Big Bang-Inflation (timeline of the universe) Date 2010 Credit: Alex MittelmannColdcreation

    5
    Alan Guth’s notes. http://www.bestchinanews.com/Explore/4730.html

    The model, which answers fundamental questions about the formation of the Universe we know today, has become central to modern cosmology, but many details remain uncertain. Now atomic physicists in the US have developed a laboratory analogue by shaking a Bose-Einstein condensate (BEC). The team’s initial results suggest that the Universe may have remained quantum coherent throughout inflation and beyond. The researchers hope their condensate model may provide further insights into inflation in a more accessible system, however not everyone agrees on its usefulness.

    Dynamical instability occurs in all sorts of physical systems that are out of equilibrium. A ball perched at the top of a hill, for example, may stay put for short time. But the tiniest perturbation will send the ball falling towards a lower-energy state at the bottom of the hill. Guth realized that a very short, very rapid period of expansion could occur if the Universe got stuck out of equilibrium around 10-35 s after the Big Bang, causing it to expand by a factor of around 1026 in a tiny fraction of a second. The details of the inflationary model have been revised many times, and numerous questions remain. “This is where I can contribute, even though I’m not a cosmologist,” says Cheng Chin of the University of Chicago in Illinois: “We have only one Universe, so it becomes very hard to say whether our theories really capture the whole physics as we can’t repeat the experiment.”

    Shake it up

    Chin and colleagues created their model system by cooling 30,000 atoms in an optical trap into a BEC, in which all the atoms occupy a single quantum state. Initially, this BEC was sitting still in the centre of the trap. The researchers then began to shake the condensate by moving the trapping potential from side to side with increasing amplitude. This raised the energy of the state in which the condensate was stationary relative to the trapping potential. When the shaking amplitude was increased past a critical value, the energy of this “stationary” state became higher than the energy of two other states with the condensate oscillating in opposite directions inside the trap. The condensate therefore underwent a dynamical phase transition, splitting into two parts that each entered one of these two momentum states.

    Between 20-30 ms after the phase transition, the researchers saw a clear interference pattern in the density of the condensate. This shows, says Chin, that the condensate had undergone a quantum coherent separation, with each atom entering a superposition of both momentum states. After this, the clear interference pattern died out. This later period corresponds, says Chin, to the period of cosmological relaxation in which, after inflation had finished, different parts of the Universe relaxed to their new ground states. More detailed analysis of the condensate in this phase showed that, although its quantum dynamics were more complicated – with higher harmonics of the oscillation frequencies becoming more prominent – the researchers’ observations could not be described classically.

    Chin says that cosmologists may find this observation interesting. Although “in principle, everything is quantum mechanical,” he explains, the practical impossibility of performing a full quantum simulation of the Universe as its complexity grows leads cosmologists to fall back on classical models. “The value of our research is to try and point out that we shouldn’t give up [on quantum simulation] that early,” he says. “Even in inflation and the subsequent relaxation process, we have one concrete example to show that quantum mechanics and coherence still play a very essential role.”

    Inflated claims?

    James Anglin of the University of Kaiserslautern in Germany is impressed by the research. “Understanding what happens to small initial quantum fluctuations after a big instability has saturated is an important and basic question in physics, and it really is an especially relevant question for cosmology,” he explains. “The big difference, of course, is that the cosmic inflation scenario includes gravity as curved spacetime in general relativity, such that space expands enormously while the inflaton field [the field thought to drive inflation] finds its true ground state. A malicious critic might say that this experiment is a perfect analogue for cosmological inflation, except for the inflation part.”

    “This is indeed nice work,” he concludes: “The language is simply a little bit inflated!” The research is described in Nature Physics.

    See the full article here .

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  • richardmitnick 5:00 pm on June 13, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: A different kind of dark matter could help to resolve an old celestial conundrum, , , Bose-Einstein-condensates, , , , Dark matter superfluid, Dark matter vortices, , Kent Ford, , ,   

    From Quanta: “Dark Matter Recipe Calls for One Part Superfluid” 

    Quanta Magazine
    Quanta Magazine

    June 13, 2017
    Jennifer Ouellette

    A different kind of dark matter could help to resolve an old celestial conundrum.

    1
    Markos Kay for Quanta Magazine

    For years, dark matter has been behaving badly. The term was first invoked nearly 80 years ago by the astronomer Fritz Zwicky, who realized that some unseen gravitational force was needed to stop individual galaxies from escaping giant galaxy clusters. Later, Vera Rubin and Kent Ford used unseen dark matter to explain why galaxies themselves don’t fly apart.

    Yet even though we use the term “dark matter” to describe these two situations, it’s not clear that the same kind of stuff is at work. The simplest and most popular model holds that dark matter is made of weakly interacting particles that move about slowly under the force of gravity. This so-called “cold” dark matter accurately describes large-scale structures like galaxy clusters. However, it doesn’t do a great job at predicting the rotation curves of individual galaxies. Dark matter seems to act differently at this scale.

    In the latest effort to resolve this conundrum, two physicists have proposed that dark matter is capable of changing phases at different size scales. Justin Khoury, a physicist at the University of Pennsylvania, and his former postdoc Lasha Berezhiani, who is now at Princeton University, say that in the cold, dense environment of the galactic halo, dark matter condenses into a superfluid — an exotic quantum state of matter that has zero viscosity. If dark matter forms a superfluid at the galactic scale, it could give rise to a new force that would account for the observations that don’t fit the cold dark matter model. Yet at the scale of galaxy clusters, the special conditions required for a superfluid state to form don’t exist; here, dark matter behaves like conventional cold dark matter.

    “It’s a neat idea,” said Tim Tait, a particle physicist at the University of California, Irvine. “You get to have two different kinds of dark matter described by one thing.” And that neat idea may soon be testable. Although other physicists have toyed with similar ideas, Khoury and Berezhiani are nearing the point where they can extract testable predictions that would allow astronomers to explore whether our galaxy is swimming in a superfluid sea.

    Impossible Superfluids

    Here on Earth, superfluids aren’t exactly commonplace. But physicists have been cooking them up in their labs since 1938. Cool down particles to sufficiently low temperatures and their quantum nature will start to emerge. Their matter waves will spread out and overlap with one other, eventually coordinating themselves to behave as if they were one big “superatom.” They will become coherent, much like the light particles in a laser all have the same energy and vibrate as one. These days even undergraduates create so-called Bose-Einstein condensates (BECs) in the lab, many of which can be classified as superfluids.

    Superfluids don’t exist in the everyday world — it’s too warm for the necessary quantum effects to hold sway. Because of that, “probably ten years ago, people would have balked at this idea and just said ‘this is impossible,’” said Tait. But recently, more physicists have warmed to the possibility of superfluid phases forming naturally in the extreme conditions of space. Superfluids may exist inside neutron stars, and some researchers have speculated that space-time itself may be a superfluid. So why shouldn’t dark matter have a superfluid phase, too?

    To make a superfluid out of a collection of particles, you need to do two things: Pack the particles together at very high densities and cool them down to extremely low temperatures. In the lab, physicists (or undergraduates) confine the particles in an electromagnetic trap, then zap them with lasers to remove the kinetic energy and lower the temperature to just above absolute zero.

    2
    Lucy Reading-Ikkanda/Quanta Magazine

    The dark matter particles that would make Khoury and Berezhiani’s idea work are emphatically not WIMP-like. WIMPs should be pretty massive as fundamental particles go — about as massive as 100 protons, give or take. For Khoury’s scenario to work, the dark matter particle would have to be a billion times less massive. Consequently, there should be billions of times as many of them zipping through the universe — enough to account for the observed effects of dark matter and to achieve the dense packing required for a superfluid to form. In addition, ordinary WIMPs don’t interact with one another. Dark matter superfluid particles would require strongly interacting particles.

    The closest candidate is the axion, a hypothetical ultralight particle with a mass that could be 10,000 trillion trillion times as small as the mass of the electron. According to Chanda Prescod-Weinstein, a theoretical physicist at the University of Washington, axions could theoretically condense into something like a Bose-Einstein condensate.

    But the standard axion doesn’t quite fit Khoury and Berezhiani’s needs. In their model, particles would need to experience a strong, repulsive interaction with one another. Typical axion models have interactions that are both weak and attractive. That said, “I think everyone thinks that dark matter probably does interact with itself at some level,” said Tait. It’s just a matter of determining whether that interaction is weak or strong.

    Cosmic Superfluid Searches

    The next step for Khoury and Berezhiani is to figure out how to test their model — to find a telltale signature that could distinguish this superfluid concept from ordinary cold dark matter. One possibility: dark matter vortices. In the lab, rotating superfluids give rise to swirling vortices that keep going without ever losing energy. Superfluid dark matter halos in a galaxy should rotate sufficiently fast to also produce arrays of vortices. If the vortices were massive enough, it would be possible to detect them directly.

    Inside galaxies, the role of the electromagnetic trap would be played by the galaxy’s gravitational pull, which could squeeze dark matter together enough to satisfy the density requirement. The temperature requirement is easier: Space, after all, is naturally cold.

    Outside of the “halos” found in the immediate vicinity of galaxies, the pull of gravity is weaker, and dark matter wouldn’t be packed together tightly enough to go into its superfluid state. It would act as dark matter ordinarily does, explaining what astronomers see at larger scales.

    But what’s so special about having dark matter be a superfluid? How can this special state change the way that dark matter appears to behave? A number of researchers over the years have played with similar ideas. But Khoury’s approach is unique because it shows how the superfluid could give rise to an extra force.

    In physics, if you disturb a field, you’ll often create a wave. Shake some electrons — for instance, in an antenna — and you’ll disturb an electric field and get radio waves. Wiggle the gravitational field with two colliding black holes and you’ll create gravitational waves. Likewise, if you poke a superfluid, you’ll produce phonons — sound waves in the superfluid itself. These phonons give rise to an extra force in addition to gravity, one that’s analogous to the electrostatic force between charged particles. “It’s nice because you have an additional force on top of gravity, but it really is intrinsically linked to dark matter,” said Khoury. “It’s a property of the dark matter medium that gives rise to this force.” The extra force would be enough to explain the puzzling behavior of dark matter inside galactic halos.

    A Different Dark Matter Particle

    Dark matter hunters have been at work for a long time. Their efforts have focused on so-called weakly interacting massive particles, or WIMPs. WIMPs have been popular because not only would the particles account for the majority of astrophysical observations, they pop out naturally from hypothesized extensions of the Standard Model of particle physics.

    Yet no one has ever seen a WIMP, and those hypothesized extensions of the Standard Model haven’t shown up in experiments either, much to physicists’ disappointment.

    The Standard Model of elementary particles (more schematic depiction), with the three generations of matter, gauge bosons in the fourth column, and the Higgs boson in the fifth.

    With each new null result, the prospects dim even more, and physicists are increasingly considering other dark matter candidates. “At what point do we decide that we’ve been barking up the wrong tree?” said Stacy McGaugh, an astronomer at Case Western Reserve University.

    Unfortunately, this is unlikely to be the case: Khoury’s most recent computer simulations suggest that vortices in the dark matter superfluid would be “pretty flimsy,” he said, and unlikely to offer researchers clear-cut evidence that they exist. He speculates it might be possible to exploit the phenomenon of gravitational lensing to see if there are any scattering effects, similar to how a crystal will scatter X-ray light that passes through it.

    Gravitational Lensing NASA/ESA

    Astronomers could also search for indirect evidence that dark matter behaves like a superfluid. Here, they’d look to galactic mergers.

    The rate that galaxies collide with one another is influenced by something called dynamical friction. Imagine a massive body passing through a sea of particles. Many of the small particles will get pulled along by the massive body. And since the total momentum of the system can’t change, the massive body must slow down a bit to compensate.

    That’s what happens when two galaxies start to merge. If they get sufficiently close, their dark matter halos will start to pass through each other, and the rearrangement of the independently moving particles will give rise to dynamical friction, pulling the halos even closer. The effect helps galaxies to merge, and works to increase the rate of galactic mergers across the universe.

    But if the dark matter halo is in a superfluid phase, the particles move in sync. There would be no friction pulling the galaxies together, so it would be more difficult for them to merge. This should leave behind a telltale pattern: rippling interference patterns in how matter is distributed in the galaxies.

    Perfectly Reasonable Miracles

    While McGaugh is mostly positive about the notion of superfluid dark matter, he confesses to a niggling worry that in trying so hard to combine the best of both worlds, physicists might be creating what he terms a “Tycho Brahe solution.” The 16th-century Danish astronomer invented a hybrid cosmology in which the Earth was at the center of the universe but all the other planets orbited the sun. It attempted to split the difference between the ancient Ptolemaic system and the Copernican cosmology that would eventually replace it. “I worry a little that these kinds of efforts are in that vein, that maybe we’re missing something more fundamental,” said McGaugh. “But I still think we have to explore these ideas.”

    Tait admires this new superfluid model intellectually, but he would like to see the theory fleshed out more at the microscopic level, to a point where “we can really calculate everything and show why it all works out the way it’s supposed to. At some level, what we’re doing now is invoking a few miracles” in order to get everything to fit into place, he said. “Maybe they’re perfectly reasonable miracles, but I’m not fully convinced yet.”

    One potential sticking point is that Khoury and Berezhiani’s concept requires a very specific kind of particle that acts like a superfluid in just the right regime, because the kind of extra force produced in their model depends upon the specific properties of the superfluid. They are on the hunt for an existing superfluid — one created in the lab — with those desired properties. “If you could find such a system in nature, it would be amazing,” said Khoury, since this would essentially provide a useful analog for further exploration. “You could in principle simulate the properties of galaxies using cold atoms in the lab to mimic how superfluid dark matter behaves.”

    While researchers have been playing with superfluids for many decades, particle physicists are only just beginning to appreciate the usefulness of some of the ideas coming from subjects like condensed matter physics. Combining tools from those disciplines and applying it to gravitational physics might just resolve the longstanding dispute on dark matter — and who knows what other breakthroughs might await?

    “Do I need superfluid models? Physics isn’t really about what I need,” said Prescod-Weinstein. “It’s about what the universe may be doing. It may be naturally forming Bose-Einstein condensates, just like masers naturally form in the Orion nebula. Do I need lasers in space? No, but they’re pretty cool.”

    See the full article here .

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    Formerly known as Simons Science News, Quanta Magazine is an editorially independent online publication launched by the Simons Foundation to enhance public understanding of science. Why Quanta? Albert Einstein called photons “quanta of light.” Our goal is to “illuminate science.” At Quanta Magazine, scientific accuracy is every bit as important as telling a good story. All of our articles are meticulously researched, reported, edited, copy-edited and fact-checked.

     
  • richardmitnick 11:04 am on January 31, 2016 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Bose-Einstein-condensates, , Quantum randomness,   

    From TUW: “Solving Hard Quantum Problems: Everything is Connected” 

    Techniche Universitat Wein (Vienna)

    Techniche Universitat Wein (Vienna)

    2016-01-26
    Florian Aigner

    Further Information:
    Dr. Kaspar Sakmann
    Institute for Atomic and Subatomic Physics
    TU Wien
    Stadionallee 2, 1020 Vienna, Austria
    T: +43-1-58801-141889
    kaspar.sakmann@ati.ac.at

    Bose-Einstein-condensates making waves a many-particle phenomenon

    Quantum systems are extremely hard to analyse if they consist of more than just a few parts. It is not difficult to calculate a single hydrogen atom, but in order to describe an atom cloud of several thousand atoms, it is usually necessary to use rough approximations. The reason for this is that quantum particles are connected to each other and cannot be described separately. Kaspar Sakmann (TU Wien, Vienna) and Mark Kasevich (Stanford, USA) have now shown in an article published in Nature Physics that this problem can be overcome. They succeeded in calculating effects in ultra-cold atom clouds which can only be explained in terms of the quantum correlations between many atoms. Such atom clouds are known as Bose-Einstein condensates and are an active field of research.

    Quantum Correlations

    Quantum physics is a game of luck and randomness. Initially, the atoms in a cold atom cloud do not have a predetermined position. Much like a die whirling through the air, where the number is yet to be determined, the atoms are located at all possible positions at the same time. Only when they are measured, their positions are fixed. “We shine light on the atom cloud, which is then absorbed by the atoms”, says Kaspar Sakmann. “The atoms are photographed, and this is what determines their position. The result is completely random.”

    There is, however, an important difference between quantum randomness and a game of dice: if different dice are thrown at the same time, they can be seen as independent from each other. Whether or not we roll a six with die number one does not influence the result of die number seven. The atoms in the atom cloud on the other hand are quantum physically connected. It does not make sense to analyse them individually, they are one big quantum object. Therefore, the result of every position measurement of any atom depends on the positions of all the other atoms in a mathematically complicated way.

    “It is not hard to determine the probability that a particle will be found at a specific position”, says Kaspar Sakmann. “The probability is highest in the centre of the cloud and gradually diminishes towards the outer fringes.” In a classically random system, this would be all the information that is needed. If we know that in a dice roll, any number has the probability of one sixth, then we can also determine the probability of rolling three ones with three dice. Even if we roll five ones consecutively, the probability remains the same the next time. With quantum particles, it is more complicated than that.

    “We solve this problem step by step”, says Sakmann. “First we calculate the probability of the first particle being measured on a certain position. The probability distribution of the second particle depends on where the first particle has been found. The position of the third particle depends on the first two, and so on.” In order to be able to describe the position of the very last particle, all the other positions have to be known. This kind of quantum entanglement makes the problem mathematically extremely challenging.

    Only Correlations Can Explain the Experimental Data

    But these correlations between many particles are extremely important – for example for calculating the behaviour of colliding Bose-Einstein-condensates. “The experiment shows that such collisions can lead to a special kind of quantum waves. On certain positions we find many particles, on an adjacent position we do not find any”, says Kaspar Sakmann. “If we consider the atoms separately, this cannot be explained. Only if we take the full quantum distribution into account, with all its higher correlations, these waves can be reproduced by our calculations.”

    Also other phenomena have been calculated with the same method, for instance Bose-Einstein-condensates which are stirred with a laser beam, so that little vortices emerge – another typical quantum many-particle-effect. “Our results show how important theses correlations are and that it is possible to include them in quantum calculations, in spite of all mathematical difficulties”, says Sakmann. With certain modifications, the approach can be expected to be useful for many other quantum systems as well.

    Original paper: http://www.nature.com/nphys/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nphys3631.htmlhttp://www.nature.com/nphys/journal/vaop/ncurrent/full/nphys3631.html

    See the full article here .

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    Techniche Universitat Wein (Vienna) campus

    Our mission is “technology for people”. Through our research we “develop scientific excellence”,
    through our teaching we “enhance comprehensive competence”.

    TU Wien (TUW) is located in the heart of Europe, in a cosmopolitan city of great cultural diversity. For nearly 200 years, TU Wien has been a place of research, teaching and learning in the service of progress. TU Wien is among the most successful technical universities in Europe and is Austria’s largest scientific-technical research and educational institution.

     
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