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  • richardmitnick 3:46 pm on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Basic Research, Early days, , , ,   

    From FNAL: “Early Tevatron design days” 

    FNAL II photo

    FNAL Art Image
    FNAL Art Image by Angela Gonzales

    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    May 24, 2017
    Tom Nicol

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    Fermilab technicians assemble a magnet spool piece for the Tevatron. Photo: Fermilab

    When I started at the lab in December 1977, work on the dipole magnets for the Tevatron was well under way in what was then called the Energy Doubler Department in the Technical Services Section.

    My first project was to work on the quadrupole magnets and spools, which hadn’t really been started yet. The spool is a special unit that attaches to each quadrupole and the adjacent dipole. It contains what we used to call “the stuff that wouldn’t fit anywhere else” – correction magnets and their power leads, quench stoppers to dump the energy from all the magnets, beam position monitors, relief valves, things like that.

    At the time, we were located in the Village in the old director’s complex, which now houses the daycare center. We had a large open area where the engineers, designers and drafters worked and a small conference room where we kept up-to-date models of some of the things we were working on.

    2
    A team tests a magnet spool piece. Photo: Fermilab

    For several weeks we worked feverishly on the design of the quadrupole and spool combination — we in the design room and the model makers in the model shop on their full-scale models. We would work all week, then have a meeting with the lab director, Bob Wilson. Dr. Wilson would come out to see how we were doing, but more importantly to see what our designs looked like.

    It turns out he was very interested in that and very fussy that things — even those buried in the tunnel — looked just so.

    After every one of those meetings we’d walk back into the design room and tell everyone to tear up what we’d been working on and start over. The same would hold for the model makers. This went on for several weeks until Dr. Wilson was happy. We began to really dread going into those meetings, but in the end they served us very well.

    FNAL Tevatron

    FNAL/Tevatron map


    FNAL/Tevatron DZero detector


    FNAL/Tevatron CDF detector

    See the full article here .

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    Fermilab Campus

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. Fermilab is America’s premier laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Thousands of scientists from universities and laboratories around the world
    collaborate at Fermilab on experiments at the frontiers of discovery.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:55 pm on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Basic Research, Charm mesons and baryons, , , , ,   

    From FNAL: ” Fermilab measures lifetimes and properties of charm mesons and baryons” 

    FNAL II photo

    FNAL Art Image
    FNAL Art Image by Angela Gonzales

    Fermilab is an enduring source of strength for the US contribution to scientific research world wide.

    properties of charm mesons and baryons

    May 24, 2017
    Troy Rummler

    1

    Heavy quarks produced in high-energy collisions decay within a tiny fraction of a second, traveling less than a few centimeters from the collision point. To study properties of these particles, Fermilab began using microstrip detectors in the late 1970s. These detectors are made of thin slices of silicon and placed close to the interaction point in order to take advantage of the microstrip’s tremendous position resolution. Over time, Fermilab developed this technology, improving our understanding of silicon’s capabilities and adapting the technology to other detectors, including those at CDF and DZero.

    FNAL Tevatron

    FNAL/Tevatron map


    FNAL/Tevatron DZero detector


    FNAL/Tevatron CDF detector

    See the full article here .

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    Fermilab Campus

    Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab), located just outside Batavia, Illinois, near Chicago, is a US Department of Energy national laboratory specializing in high-energy particle physics. Fermilab is America’s premier laboratory for particle physics and accelerator research, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy. Thousands of scientists from universities and laboratories around the world
    collaborate at Fermilab on experiments at the frontiers of discovery.

     
  • richardmitnick 1:22 pm on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Basic Research, ,   

    From U Wisconsin IceCube: “IceCube sets new best limits for dark matter searches in neutrino detectors” 

    icecube
    U Wisconsin IceCube South Pole Neutrino Observatory

    24 May 2017
    Sílvia Bravo

    Studies aimed at understanding the nature and origin of dark matter include experiments in astronomy, astrophysics and particle physics. Astronomical observations point to the existence of dark matter in large amounts and in many cosmic environments, including the Milky Way. However, at the same time, the international quest to detect a dark matter interaction has so far been unsuccessful.

    IceCube has proven to be a champion detector for indirect searches of dark matter using neutrinos. As the amount of data grows and a better understanding of the detector allows making evermore precise measurements, the IceCube Collaboration continues exploring a vast range of dark matter energies and decay channels. In the most recent study, the collaboration sets the best limits on a neutrino signal from dark matter particles with masses between 10 and 100 GeV. These results have recently been submitted to the European Physical Journal C.

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    Comparison of upper limits on , i.e., the velocity averaged product of the dark matter self-annihilation cross section and the relative velocity of the dark matter particles, versus WIMP mass, for dark matter self-annihilating through taus to neutrinos. The ‘natural scale’ refers to the value that is needed for WIMPs to be a thermal relic. Credit: IceCube Collaboration.

    Searches for dark matter usually focus on a generic candidate, called a weakly interacting massive particle, or WIMP. Physicists expect WIMPs to interact with other matter particles or to self-annihilate, producing a cascade of known particles, which for many channels and energies include neutrinos that can be detected on Earth. If this is the case, a neutrino detector on Earth is expected to detect an excess of neutrinos related to the distribution of dark matter in our galaxy. A similar signal is expected for photons.

    “The enormous size of IceCube allows the rare detection of high-energy neutrinos, but it is also essential for the detection of neutrinos at lower energies as it serves to identify incoming muons produced in cosmic ray air showers, which is a major challenge in searching for a signal from the Southern Hemisphere,” explains Morten Medici, a PhD student at the Niels Bohr Institute in Denmark and corresponding author of this study.

    See the full article here .

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    ICECUBE neutrino detector
    IceCube is a particle detector at the South Pole that records the interactions of a nearly massless sub-atomic particle called the neutrino. IceCube searches for neutrinos from the most violent astrophysical sources: events like exploding stars, gamma ray bursts, and cataclysmic phenomena involving black holes and neutron stars. The IceCube telescope is a powerful tool to search for dark matter, and could reveal the new physical processes associated with the enigmatic origin of the highest energy particles in nature. In addition, exploring the background of neutrinos produced in the atmosphere, IceCube studies the neutrinos themselves; their energies far exceed those produced by accelerator beams. IceCube is the world’s largest neutrino detector, encompassing a cubic kilometer of ice.

     
  • richardmitnick 12:45 pm on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Basic Research, , , Enter the ‘Synestia’   

    From Centauri Dreams: “Enter the ‘Synestia’” 

    Centauri Dreams

    May 24, 2017
    Paul Gilster

    What happens when giant objects collide? We know the result will be catastrophic, as when we consider the possibility that the Moon was formed by a collision between the Earth and a Mars-sized object in the early days of the Solar System. But Sarah Stewart (UC-Davis) and Simon Lock (a graduate student at Harvard University) have produced a different possible outcome. Perhaps an impact between two infant planets would produce a single, disk-shaped object like a squashed doughnut, made up of vaporized rock and having no solid surface.

    Call it a ‘synestia,’ a coinage invoking the Greek goddess Hestia (goddess of the hearth, family, and domestic life, although the authors evidently drew on Hestia’s mythological connections to architecture). Stewart and Lock got interested in the possibility of such structures by asking about the effects of angular momentum, which would be conserved in any collision. Thus two giant bodies smashing into each other should result in the angular momentum of each being added together. Given enough energy (and there should be plenty), the hypothesized structure should form, an indented disk much larger than either planet.

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    Image: The structure of a planet, a planet with a disk and a synestia, all of the same mass. Credit: Simon Lock and Sarah Stewart

    The paper [ AGU Journal of Geophysical Resarch ] on this work notes that “…the structure of post-impact bodies influences the physical processes that control accretion, core formation and internal evolution. Synestias also lead to new mechanisms for satellite formation.” Moreover, Stewart and Lock believe that rocky planets are vaporized multiple times during their formation. Thus synestias should be a common outcome in young systems.

    See the full article here .

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    Tracking Research into Deep Space Exploration

    Alpha Centauri and other nearby stars seem impossible destinations not just for manned missions but even for robotic probes like Cassini or Galileo. Nonetheless, serious work on propulsion, communications, long-life electronics and spacecraft autonomy continues at NASA, ESA and many other venues, some in academia, some in private industry. The goal of reaching the stars is a distant one and the work remains low-key, but fascinating ideas continue to emerge. This site will track current research. I’ll also throw in the occasional musing about the literary and cultural implications of interstellar flight. Ultimately, the challenge may be as much philosophical as technological: to reassert the value of the long haul in a time of jittery short-term thinking.

     
  • richardmitnick 12:27 pm on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Basic Research, , Galaxy IC 342, NASA/DLR SOFIA   

    From SOFIA: “Understanding Star Formation in the Nucleus of Galaxy IC 342” 

    NASA SOFIA Banner

    NASA SOFIA

    SOFIA (Stratospheric Observatory For Infrared Astronomy)

    May 23, 2017
    Nicholas A. Veronico
    NVeronico@sofia.usra.edu
    SOFIA Science Center
    NASA Ames Research Center
    Moffett Field, California

    1
    A BIMA-SONG radio map of the IC 342 central molecular zone; dots indicate locations of SOFIA/GREAT observations.
    Credits: Röllig et al.

    An international team of researchers used NASA’s Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, SOFIA, to make maps of the ring of molecular clouds that encircles the nucleus of galaxy IC 342. The maps determined the proportion of hot gas surrounding young stars as well as cooler gas available for future star formation. The SOFIA maps indicate that most of the gas in the central zone of IC 342, like the gas in a similar region of our Milky Way Galaxy, is heated by already-formed stars, and relatively little is in dormant clouds of raw material.

    At a distance of about 13 million light years, galaxy IC 342 is considered relatively nearby. It is about the same size and type as our Milky Way Galaxy, and oriented face-on so we can see its entire disk in an undistorted perspective. Like our galaxy, IC 342 has a ring of dense molecular gas clouds surrounding its nucleus in which star formation is occurring. However, IC 342 is located behind dense interstellar dust clouds in the plane of the Milky Way, making it difficult to study by optical telescopes.

    The team of researchers from Germany and the Netherlands, led by Markus Röllig of the University of Cologne, Germany, used the German Receiver for Astronomy at Terahertz frequencies, GREAT, onboard SOFIA to scan the center of IC 342 at far-infrared wavelengths to penetrate the intervening dust clouds. Röllig’s group mapped the strengths of two far-infrared spectral lines – one line, at a wavelength of 158 microns, is emitted by ionized carbon, and the other, at 205 microns, is emitted by ionized nitrogen.

    The 158-micron line is produced both by cold interstellar gas that is the raw material for new stars, and also by hot gas illuminated by stars that have already finished forming. The 205-micron spectral line is only emitted by the hot gas around already-formed young stars. Comparison of the strengths of the two spectral lines allows researchers to determine of the amount of warm gas versus cool gas in the clouds.

    Röllig’s team found that most of the ionized gas in IC 342’s central molecular zone (CMZ) is in clouds heated by fully formed stars rather than in cooler gas found farther out in the zone, like the situation in the Milky Way’s CMZ. The team’s research was published in Astronomy and Astrophysics, volume 591.

    “SOFIA and its powerful GREAT instrument allowed us to map star formation in the center of IC 342 in unprecedented detail,” said Markus Röllig of the University of Cologne, Germany, “These measurements are not possible from ground-based telescopes or existing space telescopes.”

    Researchers previously used SOFIA’s GREAT spectrometer for a corresponding study of the Milky Way’s CMZ. That research, published in 2015 by principal investigator W.D. Langer, et. al, appeared in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics 576, A1; an overview of that study can be found here.

    For more information about SOFIA, visit:

    http://www.nasa.gov/sofiahttp://www.dlr.de/en/sofia

    For information about SOFIA’s science mission and scientific instruments, visit:

    http://www.sofia.usra.eduhttp://www.dsi.uni-stuttgart.de/index.en.html

    See the full article here .

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    SOFIA is a joint project of NASA and the German Aerospace Center (DLR). The aircraft is based at and the program is managed from NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center’s facility in Palmdale, California. NASA’s Ames Research Center, manages the SOFIA science and mission operations in cooperation with the Universities Space Research Association (USRA) headquartered in Columbia, Maryland, and the German SOFIA Institute (DSI) at the University of Stuttgart.

    NASA image

    DLR Bloc

     
  • richardmitnick 12:15 pm on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Basic Research, , HD 192163,   

    From Chandra- “Crescent Nebula: Live Fast, Blow Hard and Die Young” From 2003, But Worth It 

    NASA Chandra Banner

    NASA Chandra Telescope

    NASA Chandra

    October 14, 2003 [From before I was doing this. But worth it.]

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    Credit: X-ray: NASA/UIUC/Y. Chu & R. Gruendl et al. Optical: SDSU/MLO/Y. Chu et al.

    Massive stars lead short, spectacular lives. This composite X-ray (blue)/optical (red and green) image reveals dramatic details of a portion of the Crescent Nebula, a giant gaseous shell created by powerful winds blowing from the massive star HD 192163 (a.k.a. WR 136, the star is out of the field of view to the lower right).

    After only 4.5 million years (one-thousandth the age of the Sun), HD 192163 began its headlong rush toward a supernova catastrophe. First it expanded enormously to become a red giant and ejected its outer layers at about 20,000 miles per hour. Two hundred thousand years later – a blink of the eye in the life of a normal star – the intense radiation from the exposed hot, inner layer of the star began pushing gas away at speeds in excess of 3 million miles per hour!

    When this high speed “stellar wind” rammed into the slower red giant wind, a dense shell was formed. In the image, a portion of the shell is shown in red. The force of the collision created two shock waves: one that moved outward from the dense shell to create the green filamentary structure, and one that moved inward to produce a bubble of million degree Celsius X-ray emitting gas (blue). The brightest X-ray emission is near the densest part of the compressed shell of gas, indicating that the hot gas is evaporating matter from the shell. The massive star HD 192183 that has produced the nebula appears as the bright dot at the center of the full-field image.

    HD 192163 will likely explode as a supernova in about a hundred thousand years. This image enables astronomers to determine the mass, energy, and composition of the gaseous shell around this pre-supernova star. An understanding of such environments provides important data for interpreting observations of supernovas and their remnants.

    SDSU MLO Mount Laguna Observatory telescope approximately 75 kilometers (47 mi) east of downtown San Diego California (USA)

    See the full article here .

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    NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., manages the Chandra program for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory controls Chandra’s science and flight operations from Cambridge, Mass.

     
  • richardmitnick 11:30 am on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Basic Research, , Inflating Sh2-308,   

    From Hubble: “Inflating Sh2-308” 

    NASA Hubble Banner

    NASA/ESA Hubble Telescope

    NASA/ESA Hubble Telescope

    Undated
    No writer credit

    1

    The NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope still has a few tricks up its sleeve in its task of exploring the Universe. For one, it is able to image two adjacent parts of the sky simultaneously. It does this using two different cameras — one camera can be trained on the target object itself, and the other on a nearby patch of sky so that new and potentially interesting regions of the cosmos can be observed at the same time (these latter observations are known as parallel fields).

    This image shows part of a bubble-like cloud of gas — a nebula named Sh2-308 — surrounding a massive and violent star named EZ Canis Majoris. It uses observations from Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys, and is the parallel field associated with another view of the nebula produced by Hubble’s Wide Field Camera 3.

    NASA/ESA Hubble ACS

    NASA/ESA Hubble WFC3

    EZ Canis Majoris is something known as a Wolf-Rayet star, and is one of the brightest known stars of its kind. Its outer shell of hydrogen gas has been used up, revealing inner layers of heavier elements that burn at ferocious temperatures. The intense radiation pouring out from EZ Canis Majoris forms thick stellar winds that whip up nearby material, sculpting and blowing it outwards.

    These processes have moulded the surrounding gas into a vast bubble. A bubble nebula produced by a Wolf-Rayet star is made of ionised hydrogen (HII), which is often found in interstellar space. In this case, it is the outer hydrogen layers of EZ Canis Majoris — the bubble — that are being inflated by the deluge of radiation — the air — coming from the central star. The fringes of these bubbles are nebulous and wispy, as can be seen in this image.

    Credit:

    NASA/ESA Hubble

    See the full article here .

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    The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and the European Space Agency. NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center manages the telescope. The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), is a free-standing science center, located on the campus of The Johns Hopkins University and operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy (AURA) for NASA, conducts Hubble science operations.

    ESA50 Logo large

    AURA Icon

    NASA image

     
  • richardmitnick 10:39 am on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Basic Research, , Synopsis: Capillary Effect in Grains Explained   

    From Physics: “Synopsis: Capillary Effect in Grains Explained” 

    Physics LogoAbout Physics

    Physics Logo 2

    Physics

    May 23, 2017
    Michael Schirber

    Numerical simulations show that a previously observed capillary-like action in vibrating grain systems is due to convective motion of the grains.

    1
    F. Fan et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. (2017)

    When a narrow tube is inserted into a bed of vibrating grains, the granular material rises up inside the tube, much like a liquid climbs through a thin straw. For liquids, this capillary, or wicking, action results from attractive interactions between the liquid molecules and the tube walls. But that explanation does not apply to grains—they do not stick to walls with enough force to defy gravity. New computer simulations show that the effect instead relies on friction-induced convective motion in the vibrating grains.

    Fengxian Fan, from the University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, and colleagues simulated a rectangular container partly filled with spherical grains (0.6 mm diameter). In the center of the container, a cylindrical tube (8 mm diameter) descended into the grains. When the tube was vibrated up and down, the simulated grains rose up the tube to a height of around 50 mm. But the effect disappeared when the team made the container walls frictionless. Wall friction causes a well-known convective motion in shaken grain systems (called the Brazil nut effect) in which grains at the walls are pushed downward, while grains in the center move up. The team showed that when the inserted tube vibrates, the resulting grain convection produces a pressure in the bottom of the tube that pushes material upwards. This understanding might help in the design and development of a grain pump that could transport grains along pipes for industrial processes.

    This research is published in Physical Review Letters.

    See the full article here .

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    Physicists are drowning in a flood of research papers in their own fields and coping with an even larger deluge in other areas of physics. How can an active researcher stay informed about the most important developments in physics? Physics highlights a selection of papers from the Physical Review journals. In consultation with expert scientists, the editors choose these papers for their importance and/or intrinsic interest. To highlight these papers, Physics features three kinds of articles: Viewpoints are commentaries written by active researchers, who are asked to explain the results to physicists in other subfields. Focus stories are written by professional science writers in a journalistic style and are intended to be accessible to students and non-experts. Synopses are brief editor-written summaries. Physics provides a much-needed guide to the best in physics, and we welcome your comments (physics@aps.org).

     
  • richardmitnick 10:17 am on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Basic Research, , Critical Thinking—Attained through Physics   

    From Cornell: “Critical Thinking—Attained through Physics” 

    Cornell Bloc

    Cornell University

    5.23.17
    Jackie Swift

    1
    Beatrice Jin

    Science is about experimentation, creativity, even play. The greatest breakthroughs have come from those who pushed the known limits to ask why, how, and ultimately what if. If this is how the best science is done, then why don’t we start giving students autonomy to explore and create in the lab early in their university training? If we do, Natasha G. Holmes, Physics, says that perhaps they’ll get a taste of what it means to be a scientist early enough that they’ll choose science as a career path.

    Holmes studies the teaching and learning of physics, especially in lab courses, but her work is applicable more broadly across many disciplines. “In the lab students have their hands on the equipment,” she says. “I’m looking at what they are getting or not getting out of that experience and also digging into what the lab space is actually good for. As a loftier, long-term goal, how can we provide students with transferable skills that will make them critical thinkers and good citizens?”

    A Tool for Assessing Critical Thinking Skills in Physics

    To shed light on those questions, Holmes is working on a project funded by the National Science Foundation to design a tool that can assess critical thinking. “This will be a closed response standardized test that allows any instructor to measure whether their students can think critically about a physics experiment,” Holmes says.

    Holmes and her coresearcher, Carl Wieman of Stanford University, began designing the assessment by gathering initial data from respondents at multiple universities. They asked them a series of open-ended questions about an introductory level mass-on-a-spring physics experiment conducted by a hypothetical group of people. Respondents answered questions about the hypothetical group’s methods and the data that the group collected. For instance, they were asked if they thought the data collected was reasonable, how well they felt the hypothetical group designed the experiment, and how well the group evaluated the model.

    “We were looking for the most common answers an introductory physics student would give,” Holmes explains. “But we also wanted to collect as many responses as we could from advanced physics majors, professors, and grad students to see the full spectrum of possible answers.” The researchers distilled the open-ended answers down into a multiple-choice test that can be given to students before they take a lab course and again afterward, to see how well they have learned the concepts.

    See the full article here .

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    Stem Education Coalition
    Once called “the first American university” by educational historian Frederick Rudolph, Cornell University represents a distinctive mix of eminent scholarship and democratic ideals. Adding practical subjects to the classics and admitting qualified students regardless of nationality, race, social circumstance, gender, or religion was quite a departure when Cornell was founded in 1865.

    Today’s Cornell reflects this heritage of egalitarian excellence. It is home to the nation’s first colleges devoted to hotel administration, industrial and labor relations, and veterinary medicine. Both a private university and the land-grant institution of New York State, Cornell University is the most educationally diverse member of the Ivy League.

    On the Ithaca campus alone nearly 20,000 students representing every state and 120 countries choose from among 4,000 courses in 11 undergraduate, graduate, and professional schools. Many undergraduates participate in a wide range of interdisciplinary programs, play meaningful roles in original research, and study in Cornell programs in Washington, New York City, and the world over.

     
  • richardmitnick 10:04 am on May 24, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , Basic Research, Binary star composed of two brown dwarfs discovered by microlensing, ,   

    From phys.org: “Binary star composed of two brown dwarfs discovered by microlensing” 

    physdotorg
    phys.org

    May 23, 2017
    Tomasz Nowakowski

    1
    Light curve of the microlensing event OGLE-2016-BLG-1469. The upper panel shows the enlarged view of the anomaly around the peak. The two lower panels show the residual from the binary-lens models with (orbit+parallax) and without (standard) considering higher-order effects. Credit: Han et al., 2017.

    Using gravitational microlensing, astronomers have recently found a binary star composed of two brown dwarfs.

    Now, a team of astronomers led by Cheongho Han of the Chungbuk National University in Cheongju, South Korea, reports the detection of a new brown-dwarf binary system from the analysis of the microlensing event OGLE-2016-BLG-1469. The discovery is the result of a joint effort of over 50 scientists working in three microlensing research groups. The team consists of researchers from the Korea Microlensing Telescope Network (KMTNet), the Optical Gravitational Lensing Experiment (OGLE) and the Microlensing Observations in Astrophysics (MOA).

    For their observations of OGLE-2016-BLG-1469, MOA researchers employed the 1.8m telescope at the Mt. John University Observatory in New Zealand, while OGLE scientists used the 1.3m telescope located at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile. When it comes to KMTNet, the astronomers utilized three identical 1.6m telescopes located at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile, the South African Astronomical Observatory in South Africa, and the Siding Spring Observatory in Australia.

    Mt John University Observatory 1.8m MOA telescope NZ

    1.3 meter OGLE Warsaw Telescope at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile

    SAAO 1.9 meter Telescope, at the SAAO observation station 15Kms from the small Karoo town of Sutherland in the Northern Cape, a 4-hour drive from Cape Town.

    Gravitational microlensing, S. Liebes, Physical Review B, 133 (1964): 835

    AAO 1.2m UK Schmidt Telescope at Siding Spring Observatory, near Coonabarabran, New South Wales, Australia

    The newly discovered system is the third brown-dwarf binary detected with this technique. The finding was presented in a paper published May 16 on the arXiv pre-print server.

    See the full article here .

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    About Phys.org in 100 Words

    Phys.org™ (formerly Physorg.com) is a leading web-based science, research and technology news service which covers a full range of topics. These include physics, earth science, medicine, nanotechnology, electronics, space, biology, chemistry, computer sciences, engineering, mathematics and other sciences and technologies. Launched in 2004, Phys.org’s readership has grown steadily to include 1.75 million scientists, researchers, and engineers every month. Phys.org publishes approximately 100 quality articles every day, offering some of the most comprehensive coverage of sci-tech developments world-wide. Quancast 2009 includes Phys.org in its list of the Global Top 2,000 Websites. Phys.org community members enjoy access to many personalized features such as social networking, a personal home page set-up, RSS/XML feeds, article comments and ranking, the ability to save favorite articles, a daily newsletter, and other options.

     
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