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  • richardmitnick 10:47 am on March 28, 2020 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: AMD, “Today’s news provides a prime example of how government and industry can work together for the benefit of the entire nation.”, Ensuring the National Nuclear Security Administration — LLNL Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory —keeping the nation’s nuclear stockpile safe., , HPE Cray Shasta El Capitan supercomputer at LLNL, HPE/Cray,   

    From Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory: “LLNL and HPE to partner with AMD on El Capitan, projected as world’s fastest supercomputer” 

    From Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory

    3.5.20

    Jeremy Thomas
    thomas244@llnl.gov
    925-422-5539

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE) and Advanced Micro Devices Inc. (AMD) today announced the selection of AMD as the node supplier for El Capitan, projected to be the world’s most powerful supercomputer when it is fully deployed in 2023.

    HPE Cray Shasta El Capitan supercomputer at LLNL

    With its advanced computing and graphics processing units (CPUs/GPUs), El Capitan’s peak performance is expected to exceed 2 exaFLOPS, ensuring the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) laboratories — LLNL, Sandia National Laboratories and Los Alamos National Laboratory — can meet their primary mission of keeping the nation’s nuclear stockpile safe, secure and reliable. (An exaFLOP is one quintillion floating point operations per second.)

    Funded by the Advanced Simulation and Computing (ASC) program at the Department of Energy’s (DOE) NNSA, El Capitan will perform complex and increasingly predictive modeling and simulation for NNSA’s vital Life Extension Programs (LEPs), which address weapons aging and emergent threat issues in the absence of underground nuclear testing.

    “This unprecedented computing capability, powered by advanced CPU and GPU technology from AMD, will sustain America’s position on the global stage in high-performance computing and provide an observable example of the commitment of the country to maintaining an unparalleled nuclear deterrent,” said LLNL Director Bill Goldstein. “Today’s news provides a prime example of how government and industry can work together for the benefit of the entire nation.”

    El Capitan will be powered by next-generation AMD EPYC processors, code-named “Genoa” and featuring the “Zen 4” processor core, next-generation AMD Radeon Instinct GPUs based on a new compute-optimized architecture for workloads including HPC and AI, and the AMD Radeon Open Compute platform (ROCm) heterogenous computing software. The nodes will support simulations used by the NNSA labs to address the demands of the LEPs, whose computational requirements are growing due to the ramping up of stockpile modernization efforts and in response to rapidly evolving threats from America’s adversaries.

    Providing enormous computation capability for the energy used, the GPUs will provide the majority of the peak floating-point performance of El Capitan. This enables LLNL scientists to run high-resolution 3D models quicker, as well as increase the fidelity and repeatability of calculations, thus making those simulations truer to life.

    “We have been pursuing a balanced investment effort at NNSA in advancing our codes, our platforms and our facilities in an integrated and focused way,” said Michel McCoy, Weapon Simulation and Computing Program Director at LLNL. “And our teams and industrial partners will deliver this capability as planned to the nation. Naturally, this has required an intimate, sustained partnership with our industry technology partners and between the tri-labs to be successful.”

    Anticipated to be one of the most capable supercomputers in the world, El Capitan will have a significantly greater per-node capability than any current systems, LLNL researchers said. El Capitan’s graphics processors will be amenable to AI and machine learning-assisted data analysis, further propelling LLNL’s sizable investment in AI-driven scientific workloads. These workloads will supplement scientific models that researchers hope will be faster, more accurate and intrinsically capable of quantifying uncertainty in their predictions, and will be increasingly used for stockpile stewardship applications. The use of AMD’s GPUs also is anticipated to dramatically increase El Capitan’s energy efficiency as compared to systems using today’s graphical processors.

    “El Capitan will drive unprecedented advancements in HPC and AI, powered by the next-generation AMD EPYC CPUs and Radeon Instinct GPUs,” said Forrest Norrod, senior vice president and general manager, Datacenter and Embedded Systems Group, AMD. “Building on our strong foundation in high-performance computing and adding transformative coherency capabilities, AMD is enabling the NNSA Tri-Lab community — LLNL, Los Alamos and Sandia national laboratories — to achieve their mission-critical objectives and contribute new AI advancements to the industry. We are extremely proud to continue our exascale work with HPE and NNSA and look forward to the delivery of the most powerful supercomputer in the world, expected in early 2023.”

    El Capitan also will integrate many advanced features that are not yet widely deployed, including HPE’s advanced Cray Slingshot interconnect network, which will enable large calculations across many nodes, an essential requirement for the NNSA laboratories’ simulation workloads. In addition to the capabilities that Cray Slingshot provides, HPE and LLNL are partnering to actively explore new HPE optics technologies that integrate electrical-to-optical interfaces that could deliver higher data transmission at faster speeds with improved power efficiency and reliability. El Capitan also will feature the new Cray Shasta software platform, which will have a new container-based architecture to enable administrators and developers to be more productive, and to orchestrate LLNL’s complex new converged HPC and AI workflows at scale.

    “As an industry and as a nation, we have achieved a major milestone in computing. HPE is honored to support DOE, NNSA and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in a critical strategic mission to advance the United States’ position in security and defense,” said Peter Ungaro, senior vice president and general manager, HPC and Mission Critical Systems (MCS), at HPE. “The computing power and capabilities of this system represent a new era of innovation that will unlock solutions to society’s most complex issues and answer questions we never thought were possible.”

    The exascale ecosystem being developed through the sustained efforts of DOE’s Exascale Computing Initiative will further ensure El Capitan has formidable capabilities from day one. Through funding from NNSA’s ASC program, in collaboration with the DOE Office of Science’s Advanced Scientific Computing Research program, ongoing investments in hardware and software technology will assure highly functional hardware and tools to meet DOE’s needs in the next decade. The El Capitan system also will benefit from a partnership with Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which is taking delivery of a similar system from HPE about one year earlier than El Capitan.

    El Capitan would not have been possible without the investments made by DOE’s Exascale PathForward program, which provided funding for American companies including HPE/Cray and AMD to accelerate the technologies necessary to maximize energy efficiency and performance of exascale supercomputers.

    Besides supporting the nuclear stockpile, El Capitan will perform secondary national security missions, including nuclear nonproliferation and counterterrorism. NNSA laboratories are building machine learning and AI into computational techniques and analysis that will benefit NNSA’s primary missions and unclassified projects such as climate modeling and cancer research for DOE.

    See the full article here .


    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition


    Operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC, for the Department of Energy’s National Nuclear Security Administration
    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is an American federal research facility in Livermore, California, United States, founded by the University of California, Berkeley in 1952. A Federally Funded Research and Development Center (FFRDC), it is primarily funded by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and managed and operated by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (LLNS), a partnership of the University of California, Bechtel, BWX Technologies, AECOM, and Battelle Memorial Institute in affiliation with the Texas A&M University System. In 2012, the laboratory had the synthetic chemical element livermorium named after it.
    LLNL is self-described as “a premier research and development institution for science and technology applied to national security.” Its principal responsibility is ensuring the safety, security and reliability of the nation’s nuclear weapons through the application of advanced science, engineering and technology. The Laboratory also applies its special expertise and multidisciplinary capabilities to preventing the proliferation and use of weapons of mass destruction, bolstering homeland security and solving other nationally important problems, including energy and environmental security, basic science and economic competitiveness.

    The Laboratory is located on a one-square-mile (2.6 km2) site at the eastern edge of Livermore. It also operates a 7,000 acres (28 km2) remote experimental test site, called Site 300, situated about 15 miles (24 km) southeast of the main lab site. LLNL has an annual budget of about $1.5 billion and a staff of roughly 5,800 employees.

    LLNL was established in 1952 as the University of California Radiation Laboratory at Livermore, an offshoot of the existing UC Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley. It was intended to spur innovation and provide competition to the nuclear weapon design laboratory at Los Alamos in New Mexico, home of the Manhattan Project that developed the first atomic weapons. Edward Teller and Ernest Lawrence,[2] director of the Radiation Laboratory at Berkeley, are regarded as the co-founders of the Livermore facility.

    The new laboratory was sited at a former naval air station of World War II. It was already home to several UC Radiation Laboratory projects that were too large for its location in the Berkeley Hills above the UC campus, including one of the first experiments in the magnetic approach to confined thermonuclear reactions (i.e. fusion). About half an hour southeast of Berkeley, the Livermore site provided much greater security for classified projects than an urban university campus.

    Lawrence tapped 32-year-old Herbert York, a former graduate student of his, to run Livermore. Under York, the Lab had four main programs: Project Sherwood (the magnetic-fusion program), Project Whitney (the weapons-design program), diagnostic weapon experiments (both for the Los Alamos and Livermore laboratories), and a basic physics program. York and the new lab embraced the Lawrence “big science” approach, tackling challenging projects with physicists, chemists, engineers, and computational scientists working together in multidisciplinary teams. Lawrence died in August 1958 and shortly after, the university’s board of regents named both laboratories for him, as the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory.

    Historically, the Berkeley and Livermore laboratories have had very close relationships on research projects, business operations, and staff. The Livermore Lab was established initially as a branch of the Berkeley laboratory. The Livermore lab was not officially severed administratively from the Berkeley lab until 1971. To this day, in official planning documents and records, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is designated as Site 100, Lawrence Livermore National Lab as Site 200, and LLNL’s remote test location as Site 300.[3]

    The laboratory was renamed Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLL) in 1971. On October 1, 2007 LLNS assumed management of LLNL from the University of California, which had exclusively managed and operated the Laboratory since its inception 55 years before. The laboratory was honored in 2012 by having the synthetic chemical element livermorium named after it. The LLNS takeover of the laboratory has been controversial. In May 2013, an Alameda County jury awarded over $2.7 million to five former laboratory employees who were among 430 employees LLNS laid off during 2008.[4] The jury found that LLNS breached a contractual obligation to terminate the employees only for “reasonable cause.”[5] The five plaintiffs also have pending age discrimination claims against LLNS, which will be heard by a different jury in a separate trial.[6] There are 125 co-plaintiffs awaiting trial on similar claims against LLNS.[7] The May 2008 layoff was the first layoff at the laboratory in nearly 40 years.[6]

    On March 14, 2011, the City of Livermore officially expanded the city’s boundaries to annex LLNL and move it within the city limits. The unanimous vote by the Livermore city council expanded Livermore’s southeastern boundaries to cover 15 land parcels covering 1,057 acres (4.28 km2) that comprise the LLNL site. The site was formerly an unincorporated area of Alameda County. The LLNL campus continues to be owned by the federal government.

    LLNL/NIF


    DOE Seal
    NNSA

     
  • richardmitnick 1:31 pm on August 8, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: ALLOT-See.Control.Secure, AMD, , , Lenovo’s ThinkSystem SR635 and SR655,   

    From insideHPC: “Lenovo Launches Single Socket Servers with AMD EPYC 7002 Series” 

    From insideHPC

    2

    Today Lenovo introduced the Lenovo ThinkSystem SR635 and SR655 server platforms, two of the industry’s most powerful single-socket servers.

    3
    Lenovo ThinkSystem SR635 & SR655 Servers with AMD’s EPYC ‘Rome’ CPUs

    5

    As businesses are tasked with doing more with less, the new Lenovo solutions provide the performance of a dual-socket server at the cost of a single-socket. These new additions to Lenovo’s expansive server portfolio are powered by next-generation AMD EPYC 7002 Series processors and were designed specifically to handle customers’ evolving, data-intensive workloads such as video security, software-defined storage and network intelligence, as well as support for virtualized and edge environments. The result is a solution that packs power along with efficiency for customers who place a premium on balancing throughput and security with easy scalability.

    “Lenovo’s integration of next generation I/O and processing technology gives Allot the ability to manage more network bandwidth at higher speeds, allowing us to pull actionable insights from increasingly heavy traffic without any degradation in performance,” said Mark Shteiman, AVP of Product Management with Allot.

    2

    “The communication service providers and enterprises we support need to see and react to their network needs in real time. We evaluated Lenovo’s ThinkSystem SR635 and SR655 server platform prototypes and were immediately impressed.”

    Organizations are juggling business priorities with tight budgets. Lenovo’s new ThinkSystem SR635 and SR655 server platforms not only allow customers to run more workloads on fewer servers, but also offer up to 73 percent savings on potential software licensing, empowering users to accelerate emerging workloads more efficiently. Additionally, customers can realize a reduction in total cost of ownership (TCO) by up to 46 percent. Further supporting these advances in workload efficiency and TCO savings are the ThinkSystem SR635 and SR655 servers’ world records for energy efficiency. The net result of all these enhancements is better price for performance.

    The Lenovo ThinkSystem SR635 and SR655 provide more throughput, lower latency and higher core density, as well as the largest NVMe drive capacity of any single-socket on the market. Beyond that, the new 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processor based systems also provide a solid opportunity for the enablement of additional hyperconverged infrastructure solutions. This gives Lenovo the ability to offer customers VX and other certified nodes and appliances for simple deployment, management, and scalability.

    Unleashing Smarter Networks with Data Intelligence

    Many customers have been eagerly anticipating these systems due to their ability to handle data-intensive workloads, including Allot, a leading global provider of innovative network intelligence and security solutions for communications service providers (CSPs) and enterprises. They require solutions that can turn network, application, usage and security data into actionable intelligence that make their customers’ networks smarter and their users more secure. The market dictates that those solutions be able to match their ever-evolving needs and help them to address new pain points that surface as IT demands continue to change.

    ‘Lenovo’s integration of next generation I/O and processing technology gives Allot the ability to manage more network bandwidth at higher speeds, allowing us to pull actionable insights from increasingly heavy traffic without any degradation in performance,” said Mark Shteiman, AVP of Product Management with Allot. “The communication service providers and enterprises we support need to see and react to their network needs in real time. We evaluated Lenovo’s ThinkSystem SR635 and SR655 server platform prototypes and were immediately impressed.”

    The new Lenovo ThinkSystem SR635 and SR655 solutions are now available through Lenovo sales representatives and channel partners across the globe.

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Founded on December 28, 2006, insideHPC is a blog that distills news and events in the world of HPC and presents them in bite-sized nuggets of helpfulness as a resource for supercomputing professionals. As one reader said, we’re sifting through all the news so you don’t have to!

    If you would like to contact me with suggestions, comments, corrections, errors or new company announcements, please send me an email at rich@insidehpc.com. Or you can send me mail at:

    insideHPC
    2825 NW Upshur
    Suite G
    Portland, OR 97239

    Phone: (503) 877-5048

     
  • richardmitnick 1:02 pm on August 8, 2019 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: AMD, , Army Research Lab (ARL), , ERDC-U.S. Army Engineering and Research Development Center, ,   

    From insideHPC: “AMD to Power Two Cray CS500 Systems at Army Research Centers” 

    From insideHPC

    August 8, 2019

    Today Cray announced that the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) has selected two Cray CS500 systems for its High Performance Computing Modernization Program (HPCMP) annual technology procurement known as TI-18.

    3

    The Army Research Lab (ARL) and the U.S. Army Engineering and Research Development Center (ERDC) will each deploy a Cray CS500 to help serve the U.S. through accelerated research in science and technology.

    2
    Cray CS500

    The two contracts are valued at more than $46M and the CS500 systems are expected to be delivered to ARL and ERDC in the fourth quarter of 2019.

    “We’re proud to continue to support the DOD and its advanced use of high-performance computing in providing ARL and ERDC new systems for their research programs,” said Peter Ungaro, CEO at Cray. “We’re looking forward to continued collaboration with the DOD in leveraging the capabilities of these new systems to achieve their important mission objectives.”

    Cray has a long history of delivering high-performance computing technologies to ARL and ERDC and continues to play a vital role in helping the organizations deliver on their missions to ensure the U.S. remains a leader in science. Both organizations’ CS500 systems will be equipped with 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processors and NVIDIA Tensor Core GPUs, and will provide access to high-performance capabilities and resources that make it possible for researchers, scientists and engineers across the Department of Defense to better understand insights and enable new discoveries across diverse research disciplines to address the Department’s most challenging problems.

    “We are truly proud to partner with Cray to create the world’s most powerful supercomputing platforms. To be selected to help accelerate scientific research and discovery is a testament to our commitment to datacenter innovation,” said Forrest Norrod, senior vice president and general manager, Datacenter and Embedded Solutions Business Group, AMD. “By leveraging breakthrough CPU performance and robust feature set of the 2nd Gen AMD EPYC processors with Cray CS500 supercomputers, the DOD has a tremendous opportunity to grow its computing capabilities and deliver on its missions.”

    See the full article here .

    five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

    Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

    Stem Education Coalition

    Founded on December 28, 2006, insideHPC is a blog that distills news and events in the world of HPC and presents them in bite-sized nuggets of helpfulness as a resource for supercomputing professionals. As one reader said, we’re sifting through all the news so you don’t have to!

    If you would like to contact me with suggestions, comments, corrections, errors or new company announcements, please send me an email at rich@insidehpc.com. Or you can send me mail at:

    insideHPC
    2825 NW Upshur
    Suite G
    Portland, OR 97239

    Phone: (503) 877-5048

     
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