From The Louisiana State University (US): “Discovery of Extreme Superflares On Recurrent Nova V2487 Oph”

From The Louisiana State University (US)

The Louisiana State University (US) College of Science

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The Louisiana State University Department of Physics and Astronomy

1.18.22

Prof. Bradley E. Schaefer
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Louisiana State University
schaefer@lsu.edu

Mimi LaValle
Department of Physics and Astronomy
Louisiana State University
mlavall@lsu.edu
225-439-5633

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Figure 1. Depiction of a close-up of the V2487 Oph system. This is an accurate depiction, although the exact placement and details of the starspots can only be representative. The ordinary star (in the upper right) is somewhat similar to our Sun, having a similar mass, a similar surface temperature (around 6000° K), and just twice the size. The polar regions in one hemisphere are illuminated by the intense light from the white dwarf and accretion disk, while the equatorial regions are in a shadow cast by the disk itself. This star has been spun up to the orbital period of 1.24 days, and with the fast rotation inevitably comes starspots and the associated loops of magnetic field lines. The two stars are in such a close orbit that gas from the ordinary star falls off continuously, forming a narrow stream that then merges into a large flat and circular accretion disk, a swirl of gas slowly relaxing onto the white dwarf star at its center. This white dwarf appears as a very small white dot, lost in the middle of the accretion disk.
Photo credit: Prof. Robert Hynes, Louisiana State University, with his BinSim program.

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Figure 2. V2487 Oph with the magnetic field lines. The magnetic field lines are illustrated with the green curves. The configuration is not known for the magnetic fields for V2487 Oph, yet the picture shows a plausible case. The magnetic field lines will be anchored to gas, likely with the ‘footprints’ on the surface of the star near the starspots, and also anchored to gas in the accretion disk, or maybe even to the likely high-fields on the white dwarf itself. As the starspots roil the nearby gas, and as the footprints in the accretion disk gas gets wrapped up, the field lines will twist and be amplified. The field lines will be ‘stretched’ and wrapped, ultimately reaching a break point. In the illustration, we see many field lines twisting together, and this is where the magnetic reconnection will occur.
Photo credit: Prof. Robert Hynes, Louisiana State University, with his BinSim program forming the base picture as in Figure 1.

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Figure 3. Superflare in the V2487 Oph system. When the magentic field lines (depicted as green curves) get all twisted to their breaking point, then their huge amount of magnetic energy gets released. This energy will mostly be radiated as light, resulting in optical flux visible as a brightening of the entire system. This energy release is depicted by the magenta rays radiating out of the site of the magnetic reconnection. This basic mechanism is very familiar to astronomers as being the cause of solar flares (including the Carrington Event), flares on ordinary flare stars, and superflares on other (much weaker) Superflare stars.
Photo credit: Prof. Robert Hynes, Louisiana State University, with his BinSim program forming the base picture as in Figure 1.

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Figure 4. Superflare light curves for V2487 Oph. A light curve is just a graph showing the brightness as a function of time. For each of the six light curve for six individual Superflares, the vertical axis is the brightness as measured in flux (counts per second) from the Kepler spacecraft, while the horizontal axis is the time from the peak of the Superflare (in units of minutes). As we scan from left to right, we see that the Superflares all start suddenly, have a fast rise to a peak, then a fast fall in brightness, followed by a fairly long fading tail. As with all stellar magnetic reconnection events, the initial impulsive spike in brightness is from the immediate energy release, with the tail showing the light of the cooling gas heated up by the initial spike.
Photo credit: Light curves from Schaefer, Pagnotta, & Zoppelt (2022).

Startlingly, the Recurrent Nova V2487 Oph has been discovered to have extreme superflares, with the bursts more frequent and 100,000 times more powerful than any other known superflare star, in terms of energy per year. The energy in just one flare is up to 20 million times that of the infamous Carrington Event of 1859.

“The startling discovery of extreme superflares from a Recurrent Nova is exciting because it presents astronomers with a profound astrophysics challenge, and because of the implications for life elsewhere in our galaxy,” said Schaefer.

This discovery is being announced for the first time, in association with The American Astronomical Society (US), by three astronomers, Professor Bradley E. Schaefer, Louisiana State University, and Professor Ashley Pagnotta and Seth Zoppelt, undergraduate student, both with The College of Charleston (US).

The authors discovered the superflares on V2487 Oph using data from the Kepler satellite, obtained via a proposal from Pagnotta and Schaefer, and confirmed their existence using the public-domain light curves of the Zwicky Transient Facility.

NASA Kepler Space Telescope (US) launched in 2009 and retired on October 30 2018.

Zwicky Transient Facility (ZTF) instrument installed on the 1.2m diameter Samuel Oschin Telescope at Palomar Observatory in California. Credit: Caltech Optical Observatories.

Caltech Palomar Samuel Oschin 48 inch Telescope, located in San Diego County, California, U.S.A., altitude 1,712 m (5,617 ft). Credit: Caltech.

“These flares occur about once per day, and they seem to have been occurring nearly continuously from at least 2016 to the present,” said Pagnotta. “They start with a sharp spike up in brightness, taking only about one minute to rise to peak, and then fade back down to their previous level. The typical duration of one flare is around one hour, and at the peak of the flares, the star can brighten by up to a factor of 2.8 (up to 1.1 magnitudes).”

Superflares are massive explosions that occur on stars of all types, including 1.6 percent of stars that are similar to our Sun, with deep implications for life on planets around other stars as well as on far-future colonization of space. Superflares will variously sterilize life on exoplanet surfaces, fry all electronic technology, and strip the entire atmosphere off any exoplanet.

Superflares were discovered and named in 1989 by Schaefer. “The recognition was that apparently-ordinary stars suffered stellar flares, solar flares on other stars, with many orders-of-magnitude times the energy of the most energetic solar flares,” said Schaefer. “These superflares occurred on ordinary stars of all types, hot and cold, young and old, and with high and low mass.” Some of the superflare stars are among the closest known twins of our own Sun.

A great advance came in 2012, when the Kepler satellite provided long-term continuous brightness measures of a fraction of a million stars. Currently, superflares are known for ordinary stars of all classes, including main-sequence stars from B to M, brown dwarf, white dwarfs, subgiant stars, giant stars, Mira stars, and even three supergiant stars. All of the known Superflare stars are ‘normal’ or ‘ordinary’, with V2487 Oph being the first case of superflares on any type of exotic star.

The extreme superflares were discovered on the star V2487 Oph, named as the 2487th cataloged variable star in the constellation Ophiucus, the ‘Serpent-Bearer’. This star is a Recurrent Nova, the rarest class of variable stars, and is only the tenth known Recurrent Nova in our Milky Way galaxy. This nova most recently erupted on June 15, 1988, peaking at 9.5 magnitudes, barely visible in binoculars, and then faded fast over the next few weeks.

“The recurrence of a prior nova event was discovered in 2009 as part of an intentional search of archival records from 1890 to 1998 by Pagnotta, 2012 LSU PhD alumna, when she found a record of an eruption on an old sky photograph, now archived at Harvard Observatory, dated 1900 June 20,” noted Schaefer. “Accounting for the number of missed eruptions from 1900 to 1998, the nova events likely recur with a timescale of around 20 years. With the last eruption in 1998, V2487 Oph is expected to erupt again any year now.”

The superflares on V2487 Oph, are very energetic and the most powerful known. The estimate of the total energy for the average superflare is 2×1038 ergs, while the most energetic event, which occurred on May 6, 2016, had a total energy of 2×1039 ergs.

“A mind-boggling comparison is that one of the daily superflares on V2487 Oph would be enough to power all of Earth’s humanity at its current rate for 24X the age of the Universe,” said Schaefer. “For a relevant comparison, the all-time most-energetic solar flare from our own Sun, the infamous Carrington Event of September 1, 1859, had a total energy of roughly 1032 ergs. The Carrington Event is known to be a small version of a superflare, caused by the energy released by magnetic reconnection of the field lines attached to sunspots, but the energy is more than 100X too low for the event to be called a ‘superflare’. With an energy scale of ‘MegaCarringtons’ (i.e., one million times the energy of the Carrington Event), V2487 Oph is producing superflares at the 20-MegaCarrington level.”

The superflares on V2487 Oph are by far the most extreme known for any superflare star. The typical superflares on stars like our Sun have energies of 100 to 10,000 Carringtons, while the largest previously known event, the once-per-century superflare on S For, only reached two MegaCarringtons. So V2487 Oph has the most extreme energy on a flare-by-flare basis. Other superflare stars all have their most energetic events being very rare, so their yearly energy budgets are relatively small. V2487 Oph not only has a very high energy-per-flare, but also a very high flare rate. These combine to give V2487 Oph a total yearly energy budget that is greater than 100,000 times larger than any other known superflare star. The total energy budget is estimated as 1041 ergs (as much energy as a billion Carrington Events) every year.

All other known superflare stars are ‘ordinary’, while V2487 Oph has its extreme energy presumably related somehow to its very rare status as a Recurrent Nova. While the magnetic-reconnection origin of the superflares can be demonstrated, this does not mean that the configuration of the magnetic field lines is known. A plausible idea is that the companion star has starspots generating field lines that get caught up in the accretion process, with overflowing gas carrying the field lines into the accretion disk, where it will rapidly get amplified and twisted until breakage. Thus, the extreme nature of the V2487 Oph superflares may be due to its rare condition with the high rate of mass transfer. Still, this does not explain the utter lack of any superflares for any other such similar binary, despite a tremendous amount of observation time of such stars over the last many decades. Especially, the ‘sister recurrent nova’ U Scorpii certainly has no superflares. So we are left with the mystery of what additional rare property sets V2487 Oph apart, allowing for the extreme superflares. Indeed, the microphysics of the magnetic reconnection is still an unsolved problem, despite much theoretical effort for solar flares.

Now suddenly, V2487 Oph presents a profound challenge for astrophysics theory, as an explanation is needed for how it is possible for the system to generate such huge magnetic fields over such large volumes, only to have the reconnection destroy all the field lines, and to do this once a day. In all, the startling discovery of extreme superflares on V2487 Oph makes for a set of daunting challenges for astrophysics theory.

Superflares have deep implications for the possibility of life on exoplanets going around any Superflare star. Superflares would destroy life by direct damage and sterilization from the Superflare radiation, and also by stripping away the atmosphere of all planets in orbit.

“To take a recent and well-studied case, a superflare was seen coming from Proxima Centauri, the star closest to our Sun, with this star having a planet with roughly one Earth-mass and residing within the ‘habitable zone’,” said Schaefer. “That is, this Earth-like planet is the best possible case for finding life, and it is also the best case for sending out survey and colony ships in the future. But the superflares by themselves would quickly kill all life as we know it, and indeed, the superflares would ‘speedily’ strip the planet of all atmosphere. Thus, in this case of an Earth-like planet around the closest star, superflares preclude the formation of life on any planet in the system, and it makes the best and closest planet inhospitable for human colonization.”

Science paper:
MNRAS

See the full article here.

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The Louisiana State University (US) (officially Louisiana State University and Agricultural and Mechanical College) is a public research university in Baton Rouge, Louisiana. The university was founded in 1853 in what is now known as Pineville, Louisiana, under the name Louisiana State Seminary of Learning & Military Academy. The current Louisiana State University main campus was dedicated in 1926, consists of more than 250 buildings constructed in the style of Italian Renaissance architect Andrea Palladio, and the main campus historic district occupies a 650-acre (2.6 km²) plateau on the banks of the Mississippi River.

Louisiana State University is the flagship school of the state of Louisiana, as well as the flagship institution of the Louisiana State University System, and is the most comprehensive university in Louisiana. In 2017, the university enrolled over 25,000 undergraduate and over 5,000 graduate students in 14 schools and colleges. Several of Louisiana State University’s graduate schools, such as the E. J. Ourso College of Business and the Paul M. Hebert Law Center, have received national recognition in their respective fields of study. It is classified among “R1: Doctoral Universities – Very high research activity”. Designated as a land-grant, sea-grant, and space-grant institution, Louisiana State University is also noted for its extensive research facilities, operating some 800 sponsored research projects funded by agencies such as the National Institutes of Health (US), the National Science Foundation (US), the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (US). Louisiana State University is one of eight universities in the United States with dental, law, veterinary, medical, and Master of Business Administration programs. The Louisiana State University School of Veterinary Medicine is one of only 30 veterinary schools in the country and the only one in Louisiana.

Louisiana State University’s athletics department fields teams in 21 varsity sports (9 men’s, 12 women’s), and is a member of the NCAA (National Collegiate Athletic Association) and the SEC (Southeastern Conference). The university is represented by its mascot, Mike the Tiger.

History

19th century

Louisiana State University Agricultural & Mechanical College had its origin in several land grants made by the United States government in 1806, 1811, and 1827 for use as a seminary of learning. It was founded as a military academy and is still today steeped in military tradition, giving rise to the school’s nickname “The Ole War Skule”. In 1853, the Louisiana General Assembly established the Seminary of Learning of the State of Louisiana near Pineville in Rapides Parish in Central Louisiana. Modeled initially after Virginia Military Institute, the institution opened with five professors and nineteen cadets on January 2, 1860, with Colonel William Tecumseh Sherman as superintendent. The original location of the Old Louisiana State University Site is listed on the National Register of Historic Places. On January 26, 1861, after only a year at the helm, Sherman resigned his position because Louisiana became the sixth state to secede from the Union. The school closed on June 30, 1861, with the start of the American Civil War.

During the war, the university reopened briefly in April 1863 but was closed once again with the invasion of the Red River Valley by the Union Army. The losses sustained by the institution during the Union occupation were heavy, and after 1863 the seminary remained closed for the remainder of the Civil War. Following the surrender of the Confederates at Appomattox Court House on April 9, 1865, General Sherman donated two cannons to the institution. These cannons had been captured from Confederate forces after the close of the war and had been used during the initial firing upon Fort Sumter in April 1861. The cannons are still displayed in front of Louisiana State University’s Military Science/Aerospace Studies Building.

The seminary officially reopened its doors on October 2, 1865, only to be burned October 15, 1869. On November 1, 1869, the institution resumed its exercises in Baton Rouge, where it has since remained. In 1870, the name of the institution was officially changed to Louisiana State University.

Louisiana State University Agricultural & Mechanical College was established by an act of the legislature, approved April 7, 1874, to carry out the United States Morrill Act of 1862, granting lands for this purpose. It temporarily opened in New Orleans, June 1, 1874, where it remained until it merged with Louisiana State University in 1877. This prompted the final name change for the university to the Louisiana State University and Agricultural & Mechanical College.

20th century

In 1905, Louisiana State University admitted its first female student, R. O. Davis. She was admitted into a program to pursue a master’s degree. The following year, 1906, Louisiana State University admitted sixteen female students to its freshman class as part of an experimental program. Before this, Louisiana State University’s student body was all-male. In 1907, Louisiana State University’s first female graduate, Martha McC. Read, was awarded a Bachelor of Arts degree. After this two year experimental program, the university fully opened its doors to female applicants in 1908, and thus coeducation was born at Louisiana State University.

On April 30, 1926, the present Louisiana State University campus was formally dedicated, following the school’s history at the federal garrison grounds (now the site of the state capitol) where it had been since 1886. Before this, Louisiana State University used the quarters of the Institute for the Deaf, Mute, and Blind. Land for the present campus was purchased in 1918, construction started in 1922, and the move began in 1925; however, the move was not completed until 1932. The campus was originally designed for 3000 students but was cut back due to budget problems. After years of enrollment fluctuation, student numbers began a steady increase, new programs were added, curricula and faculty expanded, and a true state university emerged.

In 1928, Louisiana State University was a small-time country school that generated little interest or attention in the state. Labeled a “third-rate” institution by the Association of State Universities, the school had only 1800 students, 168 faculty members, and an annual operating budget of $800,000. In 1930, Huey Pierce Long Jr., the governor, began a massive building program to expand the physical plant and add departments.

By 1936, Louisiana State University had the finest facilities in the South, a top-notch faculty of 394 professors, a new medical school, more than 6,000 students, and a winning football team. In only eight years, it had risen in size from 88th in the nation to 20th, and it was the 11th largest state university in the nation. Long financed these improvements by arranging for the state to purchase acreage from the old Louisiana State University campus, which adjoined the grounds of the new State Capitol building in downtown Baton Rouge. To the consternation of his critics, Long essentially diverted $9 million for Louisiana State University’s expansion and increased the annual operating budget to $2.8 million.

Louisiana State University was hit by scandal in 1939 when James Monroe Smith, appointed by Huey Long as president of Louisiana State University, was charged with embezzling a half-million dollars. In the ensuing investigation, at least twenty state officials were indicted. Two committed suicide as the scandal enveloped Governor Richard W. Leche, who received a 10-year federal prison sentence as a result of a kickback scheme. Paul M. Hebert, Dean of Louisiana State University’s law school at the time, then assumed interim presidency in Smith’s place.

During World War II, Louisiana State University was one of 131 colleges and universities nationally that took part in the V-12 Navy College Training Program which offered students a path to a Navy commission.

Although some African-Americans students tried to enroll in Louisiana State University in 1946, the university did not admit African-Americans until the 1950s. In 1953 A. P. Tureaud Jr. enrolled under court order, but his enrollment was canceled when a higher court overturned the ruling. His case was ultimately decided by the U.S. Supreme Court. Tureaud returned to Louisiana State University in 1956. A classroom building on the Louisiana State University campus is named for his father, the late A. P. Tureaud Sr., a noted Civil Rights leader. The federal courts mandated full integration for Louisiana State University in 1964. The first African-American graduate of the LSU Louisiana State University Law School was New Orleans’s first African-American mayor, the late Ernest N. “Dutch” Morial.

In 1969, mandatory ROTC for freshmen and sophomores was abolished; however, Louisiana State University continues to maintain Air Force and Army ROTC. In 1978, Louisiana State University was named a sea-grant college, the 13th university in the nation to be so designated. In 1992, the Louisiana State University Board of Supervisors approved the creation of the Louisiana State University Honors College.

21st century

In the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina, Louisiana State University accepted an additional 2,300 displaced students from the greater New Orleans area, such as Tulane University (US), The Loyola University New Orleans (US), The Xavier University of Louisiana (US), and The University of New Orleans (US). In addition to accepting displaced students, university officials also took on the challenge of housing and managing many hurricane victims, converting the Pete Maravich Assembly Center into a fully functional field hospital. Around 3,000 Louisiana State University students volunteered during the months after Katrina, assisting with the administration of medical treatment to some 5,000 evacuees and screening another 45,000 for various diseases.

In 2013, F. King Alexander was named President of Louisiana State University.

In fall 2020, Louisiana State University broke its record for the most diverse and largest freshman class in history. Of the record 6,690 freshmen, more than 30% identified as students of color, African-Americans made up the most at 16.8%. Additionally, Louisiana State University reached its all-time highest enrollment at 34,290 undergraduate and graduate students.

An November 2020 investigative report in USA Today accused Louisiana State University of mishandling sexual misconduct claims against the football players. Louisiana State University hired Husch Blackwell LLP to review policies in response to the report, which released a 262-page report in March 2021 confirming the USA Today story, adding the problems within Louisiana State University went far beyond the allegations detailed in the investigation, with many of the problems being widespread across the university. In the fallout of the report, former Louisiana State University Tigers football coach Les Miles and former Louisiana State University president F. King Alexander were forced to resign from their jobs at The University of Kansas (US) and The Oregon State University (US), respectively. In April 2021, seven women filed a federal class-action lawsuit against Louisiana State University and its leadership based on their inability to report their incidents to the university’s Title IX office. The seven women are six former students (three of which were a part of the women’s tennis team at Louisiana State University and two who were student employees in the football recruiting office) and one current student. In June 2021, football coach Ed Orgeron was added as a defendant to the Title IX lawsuit under the notion Orgeron was aware and failed to report the rape allegation of former running back Derrius Guice.

Dr. William F. Tate IV was named the new president of the school on May 6, 2021, effective in July. He will be the first African-American president in Louisiana State University’s history.

Colleges and schools

College of Agriculture
College of Art & Design
College of Humanities & Social Sciences
College of Science
E. J. Ourso College of Business
College of Music & Dramatic Arts
College of Human Sciences & Education
College of Engineering
Paul M. Hebert Law Center

University College
Roger Hadfield Ogden Honors College
Graduate School
Manship School of Mass Communication
School of Veterinary Medicine
College of the Coast & Environment
School of Social Work
Continuing Education

Rankings

Louisiana State University is ranked 153rd in the national universities category and 72nd among public universities by the 2020 U.S. News & World Report ranking of U.S. colleges. Louisiana State University is also ranked as the 192nd best overall university in the nation by Forbes Magazine in 2019. Additionally, U.S. News & World Report ranked Louisiana State University as the 16th most popular university in the nation. Louisiana State University was listed for academic censure by The National Association of University Professors for its alleged mistreatment of faculty on June 16, 2012.

Louisiana State University was ranked 11th most LGBTQ-unfriendly campus by The Princeton Review in its 2020 rankings of American campuses by student survey. It was also featured as one of The Foundation for Individual Rights in Education’s 2016 “10 Worst Colleges for Free Speech” due to its firing of a professor.

Programs that have received recognition within Louisiana State University include the following:

The E. J. Ourso College of Business has two professional programs ranked by U.S. News & World Report: in 2015, The Public Administration Institute ranked 73rd nationally according to the magazine, and the Flores MBA program was ranked 65th nationally. Additionally,
Louisiana State University students have won the International Student High Achievement Award, an accolade given to students who score the highest possible score on the Certified Internal Auditor (CIA) exam, seventeen times during the last twenty-one years.
In 2007, the Flores MBA Program was ranked seventh in the nation “for attracting corporate MBA recruiters who recruit regionally” by The Wall Street Journal.
The Louisiana State University College of Engineering undergraduate program was ranked 91st by U.S. News & World Report while the graduate program was ranked 94th.
The Paul M. Hebert Law Center is ranked as the 75th best law school in the nation by the 2010 U.S. News Rankings of Best Law Schools. Louisiana State University law graduates have the highest first-time bar passage rate in Louisiana.
In 2009, Entrepreneur Magazine ranked Louisiana State University among the top 12 Entrepreneurial Colleges and Universities in the nation.
The university’s Robert S. Reich School of Landscape Architecture was ranked No. 1 nationally in undergraduate and No. 2 in graduate programs by DesignIntelligence in its 2011 and 2012 editions of “America’s Best Architecture & Design Schools”. The journal has ranked the school in the top five since 2004.
The Louisiana State University College of Education graduate program was ranked 86th in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.
The Louisiana State University French program, comprising the Department of French Studies and the Center for French and Francophone Studies, is recognized by the Cultural Services office of the French Ambassador to the United States as a centre d’excellence, an honor given to only 15 university French programs in the United States, and is ranked as one of the top 20 undergraduate French programs in the nation.
The Louisiana State University graduate program in fine arts is ranked 62nd in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.
The Louisiana State University graduate program in library and information studies is ranked 27th in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.
The Louisiana State University School of Social Work is ranked 79th in the nation by the 2015 U.S. News & World Report.[80]
The Louisiana State University College of Science is the top producer of African American Ph.D. graduates and women graduates in chemistry in the United States.

Media

The Daily Reveille, the university’s student newspaper, has been keeping students informed for more than a century. It publishes five days a week during the fall and spring semesters and twice a week during the summer semester. The paper has a circulation of 11,000 or more. The Daily Reveille, which is funded by advertising and student fees, employs more than 80 students each semester in jobs ranging from writing and editing to design and illustration. The Daily Reveille was recognized for its outstanding coverage in the 2002–2003 school year with a Pacemaker Award from The Associated Collegiate Press and The Newspaper Association of America Foundation, the highest award granted to student publications in the United States. Princeton Review named The Daily Reveille as the 12th best college newspaper in the nation in its 2008 edition of The Best 361 Colleges. The Daily Reveille won the Editor & Publisher award, or EPpy, in 2008 for best college newspaper Web site. The Society of Professional Journalists named The Reveille “Best All-Around Daily Student Newspaper” in its 2012 Mark of Excellence awards.

KLSU is an FCC-licensed non-commercial educational (NCE) college radio station, public broadcasting with 5,000 watts of power at 91.1 on the FM dial. Radio on the Media

The Daily Reveille, the university’s student newspaper, has been keeping students informed for more than a century. It publishes five days a week during the fall and spring semesters and twice a week during the summer semester. The paper has a circulation of 11,000 or more. The Daily Reveille, which is funded by advertising and student fees, employs more than 80 students each semester in jobs ranging from writing and editing to design and illustration. The Daily Reveille was recognized for its outstanding coverage in the 2002–2003 school year with a Pacemaker Award from the Associated Collegiate Press and the Newspaper Association of America Foundation, the highest award granted to student publications in the United States. Princeton Review named The Daily Reveille as the 12th best college newspaper in the nation in its 2008 edition of The Best 361 Colleges. The Daily Reveille won the Editor & Publisher award, or EPpy, in 2008 for best college newspaper Web site.[93] The Society of Professional Journalists named The Reveille “Best All-Around Daily Student Newspaper” in its 2012 Mark of Excellence awards.

KLSU is an FCC-licensed non-commercial educational (NCE) college radio station, public broadcasting with 5,000 watts of power at 91.1 on the FM dial. Radio on the Louisiana State University campus began in 1915 when Dr. David Guthrie, a physics professor, patched together a radio transmitter from spare parts. Call letters KFGC were assigned in the early 1920s. In 1924 the station covered the first football game played in Tiger Stadium and thus provided the first broadcast of a football game in the South. In the 1950s, it switched to FM and became the first educational station in the country to broadcast a college opera. And in the 1990s, it was the first college station to stream audio on the Net. The station is on the air 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, with a format of college alternative music and specialty programming. All programming and operations are managed by the student staff.

Broadcasting on campus cable channel 75, Tiger TV shares its production equipment and facilities with the Manship School of Mass Communication and is one of the most modern student television stations in the country.

Broadcasting on campus cable channel 75, Tiger TV shares its production equipment and facilities with the Manship School of Mass Communication and is one of the most modern student television stations in the country.

Publications

LSU Press is a nonprofit book publisher dedicated to the publication of scholarly, general interest, and regional books. It publishes approximately 80 titles per year and continues to garner national and international accolades, including four Pulitzer Prizes. John Kennedy Toole’s A Confederacy of Dunces is among its best-known publications.
Southern Review is a literary journal published by Louisiana State University. It was co-founded in 1935 by three-time Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Robert Penn Warren, who served as U.S. Poet Laureate and wrote the classic novel All the King’s Men, and renowned literary critic of the New Criticism school, Cleanth Brooks. It publishes fiction, poetry, and essays, with an emphasis on southern culture and history.
Legacy is a student-run magazine that publishes a variety of feature-length stories. In both 2001 and 2005, it was named the best student magazine in the nation by The Society of Professional Journalists.
Louisiana State University RESEARCH Magazine informs readers about university research programs.
Apollo’s Lyre is a poetry and fiction magazine published each semester by the Honors College.
Louisiana State University Alumni Magazine is a quarterly which focuses on Alumni success and current University news sent out to alumni everywhere.
Gumbo is the university’s yearbook, which may be purchased.
Louisiana State University Today magazine keeps faculty and staff updated with university news.
New Delta Review is a literary quarterly funded by Louisiana State University that publishes a wide range of fiction, poetry, and interviews from new, up-and-coming, and established writers.