From IAC Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias] (ES) via Manu Garcia- a friend from IAC: “Study reveals unexpected effect of black holes beyond their own galaxy”

Instituto de Astrofísica de Andalucía

From IAC Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias] (ES)

via


Manu Garcia- a friend from IAC.

The universe around us.
Astronomy, everything you wanted to know about our local universe and never dared to ask.

1
Artistic composition of a supermassive black hole regulating the evolution of its environment.
Credit: Gabriel Pérez Díaz, SMM (IAC) and Dylan Nelson (Illustris-TNG)

At the heart of every sufficiently massive galaxy there is a black hole whose gravitational field, although very intense, affects only a small region around the galactic center. Despite the fact that these astronomical objects are billions of times smaller than the host galaxies, the current conception of the Universe is only understood if the evolution of galaxies is regulated by the activity of black holes since, without them, it is not possible to explain the observed properties of galaxies.

Theoretical predictions suggest that growing black holes generate enough energy to heat and expel gas in galaxies over great distances. Observing and describing the mechanism by which this energy interacts with galaxies, modulating their evolution is therefore a fundamental question in current Astrophysics.

Science paper:
Nature

See the full article here .

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Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

Stem Education Coalition

IAC Institute of Astrophysics of the Canary Islands [Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias] (ES) operates two astronomical observatories in the Canary Islands:

Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on La Palma
Teide Observatory on Tenerife.

The seeing statistics at ORM make it the second-best location for optical and infrared astronomy in the Northern Hemisphere, after Mauna Kea Observatory Hawaii (US).

The site also has some of the most extensive astronomical facilities in the Northern Hemisphere; its fleet of telescopes includes the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio Canarias, the world’s largest single-aperture optical telescope as of July 2009, the William Herschel Telescope (second largest in Europe), and the adaptive optics corrected Swedish 1-m Solar Telescope.

The observatory was established in 1985, after 15 years of international work and cooperation of several countries with the Spanish island hosting many telescopes from Britain, The Netherlands, Spain, and other countries. The island provided better seeing conditions for the telescopes that had been moved to Herstmonceux by the Royal Greenwich Observatory, including the 98 inch aperture Isaac Newton Telescope (the largest reflector in Europe at that time). When it was moved to the island it was upgraded to a 100-inch (2.54 meter), and many even larger telescopes from various nations would be hosted there.

Teide Observatory [Observatorio del Teide], IAU code 954, is an astronomical observatory on Mount Teide at 2,390 metres (7,840 ft), located on Tenerife, Spain. It has been operated by the Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias since its inauguration in 1964. It became one of the first major international observatories, attracting telescopes from different countries around the world because of the good astronomical seeing conditions. Later the emphasis for optical telescopes shifted more towards Roque de los Muchachos Observatory on La Palma.