From Manu Garcia- a friend from IAC: “A failed galaxy”


From Manu Garcia- a friend from IAC.

The universe around us.
Astronomy, everything you wanted to know about our local universe and never dared to ask.

06/26/2021

1
If you look closely at the dim and fuzzy center of this image, you will find a ghostly galaxy, UDG4 that doesn’t sound all that creepy, captured with ESO’s VLT Reconnaissance Telescope (VST).

UDG stands for ultra-diffuse galaxy: objects as big as the Milky Way but with 100 – 1000 times fewer stars. These galaxies are extremely faint and lack star-forming gas, making them look almost like a fluffy cosmic cloud or blob in space. Their origins remain uncertain, but astronomers speculate that they could be “failed” galaxies that lost their gas supply early in life. This UDG4 image was taken as part of a study by a much larger program, the VST Early-type Galaxy Survey (VEGAS), which aims to investigate very faint structures in galaxy clusters: large groups of many galaxies held together by gravity. The study, led by Enrichetta Iodice of the INAF Italian National Institute for Astrophysics [Istituto Nazionale di Astrofisica] (IT) in Italy, has found several UDGs in the Hydra Cluster, but more observations are needed to elucidate their true nature. Given their flimsy appearance, UDGs can be difficult to spot. However, the VST, equipped with its OmegaCAM camera, provides exquisite sensitivity to light, allowing astronomers to study such elusive objects.

The acronym UDG comes from ultra-diffuse galaxy (in English, Ultra-Diffuse Galaxy) and it is about objects as big as the Milky Way but with between 100 and 1000 times fewer stars. These galaxies are extremely faint and lack star-forming gas, which makes them look almost like a fluffy cosmic cloud or blob in space. Their origins remain uncertain, but the astronomical community speculates that they could be “failed” galaxies that lost their gas supply early in life.

See the full article here .

five-ways-keep-your-child-safe-school-shootings

Please help promote STEM in your local schools.

Stem Education Coalition

The Instituto de Astrofísica de Canarias(IAC) is an international research centre in Spain which comprises:

These centres, with all the facilities they bring together, make up the European Northern Observatory (EU).

The IAC is constituted administratively as a Public Consortium, created by statute in 1982, with involvement from the Spanish Government, the Government of the Canary Islands, the University of La Laguna [Universidad de La Laguna](ES) and Spanish National Research Council [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas] (ES) (CSIC).

The International Scientific Committee (CCI) manages participation in the observatories by institutions from other countries. A Time Allocation Committee (CAT) allocates the observing time reserved for Spain at the telescopes in the IAC’s observatories.

The exceptional quality of the sky over the Canaries for astronomical observations is protected by law. The IAC’s Sky Quality Protection Office (OTPC) regulates the application of the law and its Sky Quality Group continuously monitors the parameters that define observing quality at the IAC Observatories.

The IAC’s research programme includes astrophysical research and technological development projects.

The IAC is also involved in researcher training, university teaching and outreach activities.

The IAC has devoted much energy to developing technology for the design and construction of a large 10.4 metre diameter telescope, the ( Gran Telescopio CANARIAS, GTC), which is sited at the Observatorio del Roque de los Muchachos.