From CSIRO-Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (AU) : “Fuelling a clean and bright future- CSIRO and partners launch $68M Hydrogen Industry Mission”

CSIRO bloc

From CSIRO-Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (AU)

26 May 2021

Mr Nick Kachel
Communication Advisor
+61 2 4960 6206

A new Hydrogen Industry Mission launched today by CSIRO, Australia’s national science agency, will help support the world’s transition to clean energy, create new jobs and boost the economy.

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CSIRO’s Larry Marshall, Vicky Au and Patrick Hartley pick up a hydrogen vehicle for testing new technologies.

Hydrogen, when mixed with oxygen, can be used as an emissions-free fuel source to generate electricity, power or heat.

But it is expensive to turn into a fuel.

The research mission will help drive down the cost of hydrogen production to under $2 per kilogram, making the fuel more affordable and helping to position Australia to lead the world in exporting hydrogen by 2030.

Over the next five years, more than 100 projects worth $68M have been planned by partners including: Department of Industry, Science, Energy and Resources (DISER), Australian Renewable Energy Agency (ARENA) , Fortescue Metals Group, Swinburne University, the Victorian Government, the Future Fuels CRC, National Energy Resources Australia (NERA), and the Australian Hydrogen Council, along with collaborators Toyota and Hyundai.

CSIRO Chief Executive Dr Larry Marshall said the unique mission-based partnership was the key to creating a new industry for the future energy needs of Australia and the world.

“Australia can become a renewable energy leader through the production, use and export of hydrogen, but it will only become a reality if we breakthrough the $2/kg barrier. That needs Australia’s world class science working with CSIRO’s commercialisation expertise turning breakthrough science into real-world solutions,” Dr Marshall said.

“Taking a Team Australia approach is essential to creating the 8,000 jobs and $11 billion a year in GDP that hydrogen can contribute to Australia’s economy as we build back better from the impacts of COVID-19.”

CEO of the Australian Hydrogen Council Dr Fiona Simon said the Mission came at a critical time for the emerging Australian hydrogen industry.

“We need a coordinated series of investments in industrial-scale research and demonstration activities, along with the supporting research and infrastructure that can bring the technologies that are available and emerging to the industry that needs to deploy them,” Dr Simon said.

“Focussed efforts like the Hydrogen Industry Mission will help realise these goals, and the Hydrogen Council is delighted to be part of it.”

The Mission will focus on delivering four key programs of work, some of which have already begun:

Hydrogen Knowledge Centre to capture and promote hydrogen projects and industry developments across Australia.
The first module, HyResource, was launched in September with NERA, the Future Fuels CRC and The Australian Hydrogen Council.

Feasibility and strategy studies to deliver trusted advice to government, industry and the community.
This builds on recent hydrogen cost modelling and barrier analysis provided as part of developing the National Hydrogen Strategy.

Demonstration projects that validate hydrogen value chains and de-risk enabling technologies.
Development is underway at a new facility in Clayton, Victoria, with Swinburne University of Technology (AU) and the Victorian Government.

Enabling science and technology through investment in breakthrough science, including a $20m partnership with Fortescue which focuses on the development and commercialisation of new hydrogen technologies.

CSIRO Hydrogen Industry Mission Lead Dr Patrick Hartley said CSIRO was uniquely placed to drive this collaboration.

“The goal of this Mission is to support the vision of a clean and competitive hydrogen industry for Australia by delivering research, development and demonstration partnerships which help make Australia’s hydrogen markets a reality,” Dr Hartley said.

“CSIRO’s unique position at the nexus of research, government, and industry gives us the ability to bring together stakeholders, and our track record of partnering and leveraging research funds means that we are able to grow this new phase of the industry without the need for everyone to do it alone.”

See the full article here .


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CSIRO campus

CSIRO -Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (AU) , is Australia’s national science agency and one of the largest and most diverse research agencies in the world.

CSIRO works with leading organisations around the world. From its headquarters in Canberra, CSIRO maintains more than 50 sites across Australia and in France, Chile and the United States, employing about 5,500 people.

Federally funded scientific research began in Australia 104 years ago. The Advisory Council of Science and Industry was established in 1916 but was hampered by insufficient available finance. In 1926 the research effort was reinvigorated by establishment of the Council for Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR), which strengthened national science leadership and increased research funding. CSIR grew rapidly and achieved significant early successes. In 1949 further legislated changes included renaming the organisation as CSIRO.

Notable developments by CSIRO have included the invention of atomic absorption spectroscopy; essential components of Wi-Fi technology; development of the first commercially successful polymer banknote; the invention of the insect repellent in Aerogard and the introduction of a series of biological controls into Australia, such as the introduction of myxomatosis and rabbit calicivirus for the control of rabbit populations.

Research and focus areas

Research Business Units

As at 2019, CSIRO’s research areas are identified as “Impact science” and organised into the following Business Units:

Agriculture and Food
Health and Biosecurity
Data 61
Energy
Land and Water
Manufacturing
Mineral Resources
Oceans and Atmosphere

National Facilities

CSIRO manages national research facilities and scientific infrastructure on behalf of the nation to assist with the delivery of research. The national facilities and specialized laboratories are available to both international and Australian users from industry and research. As at 2019, the following National Facilities are listed:

Australian Animal Health Laboratory (AAHL)
Australia Telescope National Facility – radio telescopes included in the Facility include the Australia Telescope Compact Array, the Parkes Observatory, Mopra Observatory and the Australian Square Kilometre Array Pathfinder.

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CSIRO Pawsey Supercomputing Centre AU)

Others not shown

SKA

SKA- Square Kilometer Array

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