From National Astronomical Observatories of China (CN) and phys.org: “LAMOST-Kepler/K2 Survey Announces the First Light Result”

From National Astronomical Observatories of China (CN)

at

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CN)

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From phys.org

An international team led by Prof. Jian-Ning Fu and Dr. Weikai Zong, from Beijing Normal University, published the first light result of medium-resolution spectroscopic observations, which is undertaken by the LAMOST-Kepler/K2 Survey.

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Phase II of the LAMOST-Kepler/K2 Survey.

This result demonstrates that the medium-resolution spectrographs, equipped on LAMOST, perform to the designed expectation. The article is published this November online in the Astrophysical Journal Supplement Series.

NASA/Kepler Telescope, and K2 March 7, 2009 until November 15, 2018.

The LAMOST-Kepler/K2 Survey [science paper above] was launched based on the success of the LAMOST-Kepler project [RAA], a low-resolution spectroscopic survey that consecutive performed since 2011.

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From LAMOST-Kepler project. Targets of scientific interest in the field of view (FOV) of the Keplermission. The black dots refer to the centers of the 14 LK-fields that cover the KeplerFOV. The following color coding is used: green for standard targets, blue for KASC targets, and orange for planet targets. The LK-fields observed in 2011–2014 are indicated by the circles drawn with a full line going from thick to thin and from gray to black, respectively.

Different from LAMOST-Kepler project, the LAMOST-Kepler/K2 Survey aims to collect time-series spectroscopies with medium-resolution on about 55,000 stars distributed on Kepler and K2 campaigns, with higher priority given to the targets with available Kepler photometry. Each of those input targets will be visited about 60 times during the period from September 2018 to June 2023. This project is allocated with one sixth of the entire time within the LAMOST medium-resolution observations.

From May 2018 to June 2019, a total of thirteen LAMOST-Kepler/K2 Survey footprints have been visited by LAMOST, and obtained about 370,000 high-quality spectra of 28,000 stars. The internal uncertainties for the effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity and radial velocity are 80 K,0.08 dex, 0.05 dex and 1km/s when the signal to noise ratio equals to 20, respectively, which suggests that the performance of LAMOST medium-resolution spectrographs meet the designed expectation. The external comparisons with GAIA and APOGEE show that LAMOST stellar atmospheric parameters have a good linear relationship, which indicates the quality of LAMOST medium-resolution spectra is reliable.

The result demonstrated that the medium-resolution spectrographs on LAMOST performed to the designed expectation.

The LAMOST-Kepler/K2 Survey was launched based on the success of the LAMOST-Kepler project, a low-resolution spectroscopic survey that consecutively performed since 2011.

Different from LAMOST-Kepler project, the LAMOST-Kepler/K2 Survey aims to collect time-series spectroscopies with medium resolution on about 55,000 stars distributed on Kepler and K2 campaigns, with higher priority given to the targets with available Kepler photometry.

Each of those input targets will be visited about 60 times during the period from September 2018 to June 2023. This project is allocated with one-sixth of the entire time within the LAMOST medium-resolution observations.

From May 2018 to June 2019, a total of 13 LAMOST-Kepler/K2 Survey footprints have been visited by LAMOST, and obtained about 370,000 high-quality spectra of 28,000 stars.

The internal uncertainties for the effective temperature, surface gravity, metallicity and radial velocity were 80 K,0.08 dex, 0.05 dex and 1km/s when the signal to noise ratio equals to 20, respectively, which suggested that the performance of LAMOST medium-resolution spectrographs meet the designed expectation.

The external comparisons with GAIA and APOGEE showed that LAMOST stellar atmospheric parameters had a good linear relationship, which indicated the quality of LAMOST medium-resolution spectra is reliable.

ESA (EU)/GAIA satellite .

SDSS Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment – Apogee

SDSS Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, near Sunspot NM, USA, Altitude2,788 meters (9,147 ft).

Apache Point Observatory, near Sunspot, New Mexico Altitude 2,788 meters (9,147 ft).

The LAMOST-Kepler/K2 Survey is the first project dedicated to obtaining time series of spectra by using the LAMOST medium-resolution spectrographs, pointing toward the Kepler/K2 fields. These spectra will be very important for many scientific goals, including the discovery of new binaries or even the brown dwarfs, the study of oscillation dynamics for large-amplitude pulsators and the investigation of the variability of stellar activity.

See the full article here .

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The National Astronomical Observatories of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NAOC) (CN) was officially founded in April 2001 through the merger of four observatories, three observing stations and one research center, all under the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS).

NAOC is headquartered in Beijing and has four subordinate units across the country: the Yunnan Observatory (YNAO), the Nanjing Institute of Astronomical Optics and Technology (NIAOT), the Xinjiang Astronomical Observatory (XAO) and the Changchun Observatory.

The headquarters of NAOC, located in Beijing and formerly known as the Beijing Astronomical Observatory, is simply referred to as NAOC. Established in 1958 and aiming at the forefront of astronomical science, NAOC conducts cutting-edge astronomical studies, operates major national facilities and develops state-of the-art technological innovations. Applying astronomical methods and knowledge to fulfill national interests and needs is also an integral part of the mission of NAOC. NAOC hosts the Center for Astronomical Mega-Science of Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAMS), which is a new initiative to establish a mechanism for reaching consensus in the construction of major facilities, operations and technology developments among the CAS core observatories (NAOC; the Purple Mountain Observatory, PMO; and the Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, SHAO). CAMS will strive for the sharing of financial, personnel resources and technical expertise among the three core observatories of CAS.

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