From University of Portsmouth: “Holes in the Universe sharpen cosmic measurements”

From University of Portsmouth

July 10, 2019

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The change in the average shape of voids caused by Doppler distortions and the effects of dark energy and curvature.

Regions of the Universe containing very few or no galaxies – known as voids – can help measure cosmic expansion with much greater precision than before, according to new research.

The study looked at the shapes of voids found in data from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) collaboration.

SDSS Telescope at Apache Point Observatory, near Sunspot NM, USA, Altitude2,788 meters (9,147 ft)

Voids come in a variety shapes, but because they have no preferred direction of alignment, a large enough sample of them can on average be used as “standard spheres” – objects which should appear perfectly symmetric in the absence of any distortions.

However, the observed shapes of these spheres are distorted by Doppler shifts in the redshifts of nearby galaxies caused by the local velocity field, and by the nature and amounts of dark matter and dark energy that make up 95% of the Universe. This distortion can be theoretically modelled, and the new work shows it can now be precisely measured.

The research was led by the University of Portsmouth, a world leader in cosmology, and is published this week in Physical Review D.

The new measurement of the distortion around voids used the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) of galaxies from SDSS, that was designed to measure dark energy and the curvature of space.

BOSS Spectrograph – SDSS-III


BOSS Supercluster Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS)

For measuring a key aspect of the cosmic expansion, the new method greatly outperforms the standard baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) technique that BOSS was designed for. The new results agree with the simplest model of a flat Universe with a cosmological constant dark energy, and tighten the constraints on alternative theories.

Lead author, Dr Seshadri Nadathur, research fellow at the University’s Institute of Cosmology and Gravitation (ICG), said: “This measurement tremendously upgrades the previous best results from BOSS – the precision is equivalent to getting data from a hypothetical survey four times as large as BOSS, completely for free. It really helps pin down the properties of dark energy.”

“These results also mean that the expected science results from facilities such as the European Space Agency’s Euclid satellite mission and the Dark Energy Spectroscopic Instrument – in which the astronomy community have invested a lot of resources – can be even better than previously thought.”

ESA/Euclid spacecraft

LBNL/DESI spectroscopic instrument on the Mayall 4-meter telescope at Kitt Peak National Observatory starting in 2018

NOAO/Mayall 4 m telescope at Kitt Peak, Arizona, USA, Altitude 2,120 m (6,960 ft)

The other authors include Portsmouth’s PhD student Paul Carter, research fellows Dr Hans Winther and Dr Julian Bautista, and former Portsmouth Professor Will Percival, who has recently taken up a new role in Canada.

See the full article here .

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The University of Portsmouth is a public university in the city of Portsmouth, Hampshire, England. The history of the university dates back to 1908, when the Park building opened as a Municipal college and public library. It was previously known as Portsmouth Polytechnic until 1992, when it was granted university status through the Further and Higher Education Act 1992. It is ranked among the Top 100 universities under 50 in the world.

The university offers a range of disciplines, from Pharmacy, International relations and politics, to Mechanical Engineering, Paleontology, Criminology, Criminal Justice, among others. The Guardian University Guide 2018 ranked its Sports Science number one in England, while Criminology, English, Social Work, Graphic Design and Fashion and Textiles courses are all in the top 10 across all universities in the UK. Furthermore, 89% of its research conducted in Physics, and 90% of its research in Allied Health Professions (e.g. Dentistry, Nursing and Pharmacy) have been rated as world-leading or internationally excellent in the most recent Research Excellence Framework (REF2014).

The University is a member of the University Alliance and The Channel Islands Universities Consortium. Alumni include Tim Peake, Grayson Perry, Simon Armitage and Ben Fogle.

Portsmouth was named the UK’s most affordable city for students in the Natwest Student Living Index 2016. On Friday 4 May 2018, the University of Portsmouth was revealed as the main shirt sponsor of Portsmouth F.C. for the 2018–19, 2019–20 and 2020–21 seasons.