From astrobites: “Which Are The Brightest Gravitational Wave Sources In Our Galaxy?”

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From astrobites

May 7, 2018
Matthew Green

Title: LISA verification binaries with updated distances from Gaia Data Release 2
Authors: T. Kupfer, V. Korol, S. Shah, G. Nelemans, T. R. Marsh, G. Ramsay, P. J. Groot, D. T. H Steeghs, E. M. Rossi
First Author’s Institution: Division of Physics, Mathematics and Astronomy, Caltech, Pasadena, USA.

Status: Submitted to MNRAS, open access

A couple of weeks ago, the Gaia satellite released data that it has been collecting since its launch in 2013.

ESA/GAIA satellite

Among these data were “parallax” measurements (a property we can use to measure how far away something is) for over a billion stars — a revolution for many fields of astronomy. A couple of astrobites last week talked about some results from this data. In today’s paper, the authors used the data from Gaia to look at a group of gravitational-wave-emitting binary stars, and see how visible they will be to the planned LISA mission.

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Figure 1: The LISA space mission will consist of 3 satellites connected by laser beams, which they will use to monitor for changes to the distance between them. Source: NASA.

See the full article here .

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