From Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy and CfA : “The far side of the Milky Way”


Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy

CfA

October 12, 2017
Contact
Dr. Alberto Sanna
Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, Bonn
Phone:+49 228 525-304
asanna@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de

Prof. Dr. Karl M. Menten
Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, Bonn
Phone:+49 228 525-297
Fax:+49 228 525-435
kmenten@mpifr-bonn.mpg.de

Dr. Norbert Junkes
Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy, Bonn
Phone:+49 228 525-399
njunkes@mpifr.de

Astronomers achieve record measurement for an improved picture of our home galaxy.

Astronomers from the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn, Germany, and the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, using the Very Long Baseline Array, have directly measured a distance of more than 66,000 light-years to a star-forming region. This region, known as G007.47+00.05, is on the opposite side of our Milky Way Galaxy from the Sun. The researchers’ achievement reaches deep into the Milky Way’s terra incognita and nearly doubles the previous record for distance measurement within our Galaxy.

NRAO VLBA


NRAO/VLBA


Milky Way NASA/JPL-Caltech /ESO R. Hurt

Distance measurements are crucial for an understanding of the structure of the Milky Way. Most of our Galaxy’s material, consisting principally of stars, gas, and dust, lies within a flattened disk, in which our Solar System is embedded. Because we cannot see our Galaxy face-on, its structure, including the shape of its spiral arms, can only be mapped by measuring distances to objects elsewhere in the Galaxy.

The astronomers used a technique called trigonometric parallax, first applied by Friedrich Wilhelm Bessel in 1838 to measure the distance to the star 61 Cygni in the constellation of the Swan. This technique measures the apparent shift in the sky position of a celestial object as seen from opposite sides of the Earth’s orbit around the Sun. This effect can be demonstrated by holding a finger in front of one’s nose and alternately closing each eye — the finger appears to jump from side to side.

Measuring the angle of an object’s apparent shift in position this way allows astronomers to use simple trigonometry to directly calculate the distance to that object. The smaller the measured angle, the greater the distance is. In the framework of the Bar and Spiral Structure Legacy (BeSSeL) Survey, it is now possible to measure parallaxes a thousand times more accurate than Friedrich Bessel. The Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA), a continent-wide radio telescope system, with ten dish antennas distributed across North America, Hawaii, and the Caribbean, can measure the minuscule angles associated with great distances. In this case, the measurement was roughly equal to the angular size of a baseball on the Moon.

“Using the VLBA, we now can accurately map the whole extent of our Galaxy,” says Alberto Sanna, of the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Germany (MPIfR).

The new VLBA observations, made in 2014 and 2015, measured a distance of more than 66,000 light-years to the star-forming region G007.47+00.05 on the opposite side of the Milky Way from the Sun, well past the Galaxy’s center in a distance of 27,000 light-years. The previous record for a parallax measurement was about 36,000 light-years.

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Highly complex observations: The calculation of distances is principally simple, but requires highly accurate measurements of the angle of apparent shifts in an object’s position – only the VLBA has the capability to deliver such measurements.
© Bill Saxton, NRAO/AUI/NSF; Robert Hurt, NASA.

“Most of the stars and gas in our Galaxy are within this newly-measured distance from the Sun. With the VLBA, we now have the capability to measure enough distances to accurately trace the Galaxy’s spiral arms and learn their true shapes,” Sanna explains.

The VLBA observations measured the distance to a region where new stars are being formed.

Such regions include areas where molecules of water and methanol act as natural amplifiers of radio signals — masers, the radio-wave equivalent of lasers for light waves. This effect makes the radio signals bright and readily observable with radio telescopes.

The Milky Way has hundreds of such star-forming regions that include masers. “So we have plenty of ‘mileposts’ to use for our mapping project. But this one is special: Looking all the way through the Milky Way, past its center, way out into the other side”, says the MPIfR’s Karl Menten.

The astronomers’ goal is to finally reveal what our own Galaxy looks like if we could leave it, travel outward perhaps a million light-years, and view it face-on, rather than along the plane of its disk. This task will require many more observations and much painstaking work, but, the scientists say, the tools for the job now are in hand. How long will it take?

“Within the next 10 years, we should have a fairly complete picture,” predicts Mark Reid of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics.

Science paper:
Mapping Spiral Structure on the far side of the Milky Way, Science

See the full article here .

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MPIFR/Effelsberg Radio Telescope, Germany

The Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy (German: Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie) is located in Bonn, Germany. It is one of 80 institutes in the Max Planck Society (German: Max-Planck-Gesellschaft).

By combining the already existing radio astronomy faculty of the University of Bonn led by Otto Hachenberg with the new Max Planck institute the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy was formed. In 1972 the 100-m radio telescope in Effelsberg was opened. The institute building was enlarged in 1983 and 2002.

The institute was founded in 1966 by the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft as the “Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie” (MPIfR).

The foundation of the institute was closely linked to plans in the German astronomical community to construct a competitive large radio telescope in (then) West Germany. In 1964, Professors Friedrich Becker, Wolfgang Priester and Otto Hachenberg of the Astronomische Institute der Universität Bonn submitted a proposal to the Stiftung Volkswagenwerk for the construction of a large fully steerable radio telescope.

In the same year the Stiftung Volkswagenwerk approved the funding of the telescope project but with the condition that an organization should be found, which would guarantee the operations. It was clear that the operation of such a large instrument was well beyond the possibilities of a single university institute.

Already in 1965 the Max-Planck-Gesellschaft (MPG) decided in principle to found the Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie. Eventually, after a series of discussions, the institute was officially founded in 1966.

The Max Planck Society for the Advancement of Science (German: Max-Planck-Gesellschaft zur Förderung der Wissenschaften e. V.; abbreviated MPG) is a formally independent non-governmental and non-profit association of German research institutes founded in 1911 as the Kaiser Wilhelm Society and renamed the Max Planck Society in 1948 in honor of its former president, theoretical physicist Max Planck. The society is funded by the federal and state governments of Germany as well as other sources.

According to its primary goal, the Max Planck Society supports fundamental research in the natural, life and social sciences, the arts and humanities in its 83 (as of January 2014)[2] Max Planck Institutes. The society has a total staff of approximately 17,000 permanent employees, including 5,470 scientists, plus around 4,600 non-tenured scientists and guests. Society budget for 2015 was about €1.7 billion.

The Max Planck Institutes focus on excellence in research. The Max Planck Society has a world-leading reputation as a science and technology research organization, with 33 Nobel Prizes awarded to their scientists, and is generally regarded as the foremost basic research organization in Europe and the world. In 2013, the Nature Publishing Index placed the Max Planck institutes fifth worldwide in terms of research published in Nature journals (after Harvard, MIT, Stanford and the US NIH). In terms of total research volume (unweighted by citations or impact), the Max Planck Society is only outranked by the Chinese Academy of Sciences, the Russian Academy of Sciences and Harvard University. The Thomson Reuters-Science Watch website placed the Max Planck Society as the second leading research organization worldwide following Harvard University, in terms of the impact of the produced research over science fields.