From Science Node: “Cracking the CRISPR clock”

Science Node bloc
Science Node

05 Jul, 2017
Jan Zverina

SDSC Dell Comet supercomputer

Capturing the motion of gyrating proteins at time intervals up to one thousand times greater than previous efforts, a team led by University of California, San Diego (UCSD) researchers has identified the myriad structural changes that activate and drive CRISPR-Cas9, the innovative gene-splicing technology that’s transforming the field of genetic engineering.

By shedding light on the biophysical details governing the mechanics of CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) activity, the study provides a fundamental framework for designing a more efficient and accurate genome-splicing technology that doesn’t yield ‘off-target’ DNA breaks currently frustrating the potential of the CRISPR-Cas9- system, particularly for clinical uses.


Shake and bake. Gaussian accelerated molecular dynamics simulations and state-of-the-art supercomputing resources reveal the conformational change of the HNH domain (green) from its inactive to active state. Courtesy Giulia Palermo, McCammon Lab, UC San Diego.

“Although the CRISPR-Cas9 system is rapidly revolutionizing life sciences toward a facile genome editing technology, structural and mechanistic details underlying its function have remained unknown,” says Giulia Palermo, a postdoctoral scholar with the UC San Diego Department of Pharmacology and lead author of the study [PNAS].

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