From BNL: “Electron Orbitals May Hold Key to Unifying Concept of High-Temperature Superconductivity”

Brookhaven Lab

July 6, 2017
Karen McNulty Walsh,
kmcnulty@bnl.gov
(631) 344-8350

Peter Genzer
genzer@bnl.gov
(631) 344-3174

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Iron-based superconductivity occurs in materials such as iron selenide (FeSe) that contain crystal planes made up of a square array of iron (Fe) atoms, depicted here. In these iron layers, each Fe atom has two active electron “clouds,” or orbitals—dxz (red) and dyz (blue)—each containing one electron. By directly visualizing the electron states in the iron planes of FeSe, the researchers revealed that that electrons in the dxz orbitals (red) do not form Cooper pairs or contribute to the superconductivity, but instead form an incoherent metallic state along the horizontal (x) axis. In contrast, all electrons in the dyz orbitals (blue) form strong Cooper pairs with neighboring atoms to generate superconductivity. Searching for other materials with this exotic “orbital-selective” pairing may lead to the discovery of new superconductors. No image credit.

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The custom-built Spectroscopic Imaging Scanning Tunneling Microscope used for these experiments stands one meter high, with cryogenic circuitry at the top for cooling samples to temperatures just above absolute zero (nearly -273 degrees Celsius). Inside, a needle with single atom on the end scans across the crystal surface in steps as small as 2 trillionths of a meter, measuring the electron tunneling current at each location. These measurements reveal the quantum wavefunctions of electrons in the material with exquisite precision. No image credit.

A team of scientists has found evidence for a new type of electron pairing that may broaden the search for new high-temperature superconductors. The findings, described in the journal Science, provide the basis for a unifying description of how radically different “parent” materials—insulating copper-based compounds and metallic iron-based compounds—can develop the ability to carry electrical current with no resistance at strikingly high temperatures.

According to the scientists, the materials’ dissimilar electronic characteristics actually hold the key to commonality.

See the full article here .

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