From Universe Today: “What Exactly Should We See When a Star Splashes into a Black Hole Event Horizon?”

universe-today

Universe Today

1 June , 2017
Evan Gough

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This artist’s impression shows the surroundings of the supermassive black hole at the heart of the active galaxy NGC 3783. Credit: ESO/M. Kornmesser

At the center of our Milky Way galaxy dwells a behemoth.

Sag A* NASA Chandra X-Ray Observatory 23 July 2014, the supermassive black hole at the center of the Milky Way

An object so massive that nothing can escape its gravitational pull, not even light. In fact, we think most galaxies have one of them. They are, of course, supermassive black holes.

Supermassive black holes are stars that have collapsed into a singularity. Einstein’s General Theory of Relativity predicted their existence. And these black holes are surrounded by what’s known as an event horizon, which is kind of like the point of no return for anything getting too close to the black hole. But nobody has actually proven the existence of the event horizon yet.

Some theorists think that something else might lie at the center of galaxies, a supermassive object event stranger than a supermassive black hole. Theorists think these objects have somehow avoided a black hole’s fate, and have not collapsed into a singularity. They would have no event horizon, and would have a solid surface instead.

“Our whole point here is to turn this idea of an event horizon into an experimental science, and find out if event horizons really do exist or not,” – Pawan Kumar Professor of Astrophysics, University of Texas at Austin.

A team of researchers at the University of Texas at Austin and Harvard University have tackled the problem. Wenbin Lu, Pawan Kumar, and Ramesh Narayan wanted to shed some light onto the event horizon problem.

They wondered about the solid surface object, and what would happen when an object like a star collided with it. They published their results in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society.

The trio predicted that in the 3.5 year time-frame captured by the Pan-STAARS survey, 10 of these collisions would occur and should be represented in the data.

Pan-STARRS1 located on Haleakala, Maui, HI, USA

The team found none of the flare-ups they expected to see if the hard-surface theory is true.

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Artist’s conception of the event horizon of a black hole. Credit: Victor de Schwanberg/Science Photo Library

They’re hoping to improve their test with the upcoming Large Synoptic Survey Telescope (LSST) being built in Chile.


LSST Camera, built at SLAC



LSST telescope, currently under construction at Cerro Pachón Chile, a 2,682-meter-high mountain in Coquimbo Region, in northern Chile, alongside the existing Gemini South and Southern Astrophysical Research Telescopes.

The LSST is a wide field telescope that will capture images of the night sky every 20 seconds over a ten-year span. Every few nights, the LSST will give us an image of the entire available night sky. This will make the study of transient objects much easier and effective.

See the full article here .

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