From NOAO: “Ultra-faint stellar systems discovered toward the Sagittarius stream”

NOAO Banner

10.8.16
No writer credit

2

1
Image Credit: K. Vivas & CTIO/NOAO/AURA/NSF

Astronomers have discovered ultra-faint stellar systems in the direction of the Sagittarius stream, the stream of stars that is being pulled out of the Sagittarius dwarf galaxy as it interacts gravitationally with our own Milky Way galaxy (Figure 1, left). Similar in size to globular clusters but more than 100 times fainter, the new stellar systems straddle the fuzzy boundary between dwarf galaxies and stellar clusters and belong to an emerging class of ultra-faint, compact stellar systems (Figure 2, right). The discoveries were made by a team using data from the Dark Energy Survey, which is being carried out with DECam on the Blanco telescope at CTIO.

Dark Energy Icon

DECam, built at FNAL
“DECam, built at FNAL

NOAO/CTIO Victor M Blanco 4m Telescope which houses the DECam at Cerro Tololo, Chile
NOAO/CTIO Victor M Blanco 4m Telescope which houses the DECam at Cerro Tololo, Chile

The team was leaded by Elmer Luque from Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, and includes NOAO astronomers Kathy Vivas, Tim Abbott, David James, Chris Smith and Alistair Walker.

Link to preprint: http://xxx.lanl.gov/pdf/1608.04033v1

See the full article here .

Please help promote STEM in your local schools.
STEM Icon

Stem Education Coalition

NOAO News
NOAO is the US national research & development center for ground-based night time astronomy. In particular, NOAO is enabling the development of the US optical-infrared (O/IR) System, an alliance of public and private observatories allied for excellence in scientific research, education and public outreach.

Our core mission is to provide public access to qualified professional researchers via peer-review to forefront scientific capabilities on telescopes operated by NOAO as well as other telescopes throughout the O/IR System. Today, these telescopes range in aperture size from 2-m to 10-m. NOAO is participating in the development of telescopes with aperture sizes of 20-m and larger as well as a unique 8-m telescope that will make a 10-year movie of the Southern sky.

In support of this mission, NOAO is engaged in programs to develop the next generation of telescopes, instruments, and software tools necessary to enable exploration and investigation through the observable Universe, from planets orbiting other stars to the most distant galaxies in the Universe.

To communicate the excitement of such world-class scientific research and technology development, NOAO has developed a nationally recognized Education and Public Outreach program. The main goals of the NOAO EPO program are to inspire young people to become explorers in science and research-based technology, and to reach out to groups and individuals who have been historically under-represented in the physics and astronomy science enterprise.

The National Optical Astronomy Observatory is proud to be a US National Node in the International Year of Astronomy, 2009.

About Our Observatories:
Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO)

Kitt Peak

Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) has its headquarters in Tucson and operates the Mayall 4-meter, the 3.5-meter WIYN , the 2.1-meter and Coudé Feed, and the 0.9-meter telescopes on Kitt Peak Mountain, about 55 miles southwest of the city.

Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO)

NOAO Cerro Tolo

The Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO) is located in northern Chile. CTIO operates the 4-meter, 1.5-meter, 0.9-meter, and Curtis Schmidt telescopes at this site.

The NOAO System Science Center (NSSC)

Gemini North
Gemini North

Gemini South telescope
Gemini South

The NOAO System Science Center (NSSC) at NOAO is the gateway for the U.S. astronomical community to the International Gemini Project: twin 8.1 meter telescopes in Hawaii and Chile that provide unprecendented coverage (northern and southern skies) and details of our universe.

NOAO is managed by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy under a Cooperative Agreement with the National Science Foundation.