From NAOJ: ” Galactic Merger (II. The Case of Oblique Impact)”

NAOJ

NAOJ

7.13.16
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The Milky Way Galaxy in which we live and the neighboring Andromeda Galaxy are currently being drawn together through their mutual gravity. It is thought that they will collide in approximately another 4 billion years.

NAOJ Milky Way merger with Andromeda
NAOJ Milky Way merger with Andromeda

This kind of collision between galaxies has actually been observed many times in the Universe. So what happens when galaxies collide? This video is a visualization of simulations performed with a supercomputer for the case of two spiral galaxies colliding obliquely.

Formation of Giant Star Clusters Resulting from a Galactic Collision

It’s called a galactic “collision,” but the individual stars within the galaxies don’t collide; they pass each other within the galaxies. But the gas filling the galaxies is compressed into strips where the galaxies collide, and clumps of thick gas form in these regions. Stars form explosively within these gas clouds, and these stars collect to create giant star clusters. Then the two galaxies move past each other, dragging along the star clusters formed by the collision.

But before long, the two galaxies are pulled back towards each other by their mutual gravity and collide again. And finally they become a single large galaxy. Around the galaxy formed by this merger there are large star clusters which were formed in the first collision. From this simulation we learned that galactic mergers form a far larger mass of star clusters than previously thought.

http://www.nao.ac.jp/en/gallery/weekly/2016/20160712-4d2u.html

(YouTube)

See the full article here .

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The National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) is an astronomical research organisation comprising several facilities in Japan, as well as an observatory in Hawaii. It was established in 1988 as an amalgamation of three existing research organizations – the Tokyo Astronomical Observatory of the University of Tokyo, International Latitude Observatory of Mizusawa, and a part of Research Institute of Atmospherics of Nagoya University.

In the 2004 reform of national research organizations, NAOJ became a division of the National Institutes of Natural Sciences.

NAOJ Subaru Telescope

NAOJ Subaru Telescope interior
Subaru

ESO/NRAO/NAOJ ALMA Array
ESO/NRAO/NAOJ ALMA Array
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Solar Flare Telescope

Nobeyama Radio Telescope - Copy
Nobeyama Radio Observatory

Nobeyama Solar Radio Telescope Array
Nobeyama Radio Observatory: Solar

Misuzawa Station Japan
Mizusawa VERA Observatory

NAOJ Okayama Astrophysical Observatory Telescope
Okayama Astrophysical Observatory

The National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (NAOJ) is an astronomical research organisation comprising several facilities in Japan, as well as an observatory in Hawaii. It was established in 1988 as an amalgamation of three existing research organizations – the Tokyo Astronomical Observatory of the University of Tokyo, International Latitude Observatory of Mizusawa, and a part of Research Institute of Atmospherics of Nagoya University.

In the 2004 reform of national research organizations, NAOJ became a division of the National Institutes of Natural Sciences.