From CERN: “LINAC4 ready to go up in energy”

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4.6.16
Jennifer Toes

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The DTL section of the LINAC4 (Image: CERN)

The LINAC4 linear accelerator has recently achieved beam commissioning of 50MeV and is now almost ready for the next step of increasing the beam energy even further up to 100MeV. This project is part of the LHC Injectors Upgrade (LIU) required for the needs of the High Luminosity LHC (HL-LHC).

LINAC4 aims to replace the ageing LINAC2 linear accelerator, going from the present 50 MeV proton beam injection into the Proton Synchrotron Booster (PSB), the first ring in the CERN accelerator chain, to a modern H- ion beam injection at 160 MeV, more the three times the Linac2 energy.

“CERN is one of the few laboratories in the world that has not yet implemented H- injection” said Alessandra Lombardi, who is responsible for the beam commissioning of the LINAC4. Injecting H- at a higher energy results in a smaller emittance in the PSB.

Following the successful commissioning of the three newly designed Drift Tube Linac (DTL) tanks in November 2015, the team began its preparations for the installation of two key accelerating sectors: the Cell Coupled Drift Tube Linac (CCDTL) and PI-Mode Structures (PIMS).

Built in Russia by a collaboration of CERN with two Russian laboratories, VNIITF in Snezinsk and BINP in Novossibirsk, the CCDTL is the next structure to be conditioned and commissioned with beam in the LINAC4.

“The CERN CCDTL is composed of 7 modules of 3 tanklets each and it brings the energy of the beam from 50 to 100MeV” said Lombardi.

The main advantage of CCDTLs over standard DTLs is that their quadrupoles are external and therefore more accessible. The accessibility of these magnets makes the construction and alignment process much more straight forward.

The PIMS was constructed as part of a CERN-Poland (NCBJ Swierk) collaboration with contributions from FZ Jülich (Germany). The PIMS was assembled and tuned at CERN will bring up the beam energy from 100MeV to its final goal of 160MeV. It is composed of 12 modules for a total length of about 25m.

Currently, the installation and conditioning of all CCDTL tanks and of the first PIMS is being carried out before beam commissioning begins on April 11th 2016. The commissioning of the remaining PIMS tanks expected to follow in October will allow reaching the final beam energy.

Scheduled to become operational by 2020, the LINAC4 is a crucial step towards the increase in the LHC luminosity that will allow CERN to remain at the pinnacle of high energy physics research.

See the full article here.

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